i A1r

She Ventures,
And
He Wins.


A Comedy,
Acted at the
New Theatre,

In
Little Lincoln’s-Inn Fields,
By His Majeſty’s Servants.

Writen by a Young Lady.

London.
Printed for Hen. Rhodes, at the Corner of Bride-Lane,
in Fleet-ſtreet; J. Harris, at the Harrow in the Poultry;
and Sam. Briſcoe, at the Corner of Charles-ſtreet, in
Ruſſell-ſtreet, near Covent-Garden, 16961696.

☞A New Comedy, call’d, The Mock-Marriage. Written by Mr. Scot.
ii A1v
iii A2r

The Preface.

Idare not venture to ſend this Play bare-fac’d into the World, without ſaying ſomething in its Defence: I am very ſenſible of the many nice Judgments I expoſe my ſelf to, who may juſtly find an infinite Number of Faults in it, which, I profeſs ingenuouſly, I am not able to mend; for, indeed, I am altogether unacquainted with the Stage and thoſe Dramatick Rules, which others have with ſo much Art and Succeſs obſerved. It was the firſt I ever made Publick by appearing on the Stage, which, (with the Advantage it met with, of admirable Acting) is all the Recommendations I have for expoſing it, in its own naked Simplicity, without any Ornaments of Language or Wit; therefore, I believe, the beſt Apology I can make for my Self and Play, is, that ’tis the Error of a weak Woman’s Pen, one altogether unlearn’d, ignorant of any, but her Mother-Tongue, and very far from being a perfect Miſtreſs of that too; and confeſs I have but juſt Wit enough to diſcern I want it infinitely; yet theſe ReaſonsA2 ſons iv A2v ſons which ſhould have diſſuaded me, could not conquer the Inclinations I had for Scribling from my Childhood. And when our Iſland enjoyed the Bleſſing of the Incomparable Mrs Behn, even then I had much ado to keep my Muſe from ſhewing her Impertinence; but ſince her death, has claim’d a kind of Privilege; and, in ſpite of me; broke from her Confinement.

The Plot was taken from a ſmall Novel; which, I muſt needs own, had Deſign and Scope enough to have made an excellent Play, had it met with the good Fortune to have fall’n into better Hands; but, as it is, I venture to ſend it abroad, where, if it finds but a favourable Reception from my own Sex, and ſome little Incouragement from the other, I will ſtudy in my next to deſerve it: Which then, perhaps, may make me ambitious enough to be known; but, in the mean time, I humbly beg the Favour to borrow the Name of

Ariadne.

Pro-
v A3r

Prologue. Spoken by Mrs. Bowman, in Man’s Cloaths.

This is a Woman’s Treat y’are like to find;

Ladies, for Pity; Men, for Love be kind;

Elſe here I come, her Champion, to oppoſe

The two broad-ſides of dreadful Wits and Beaux:

’Tis odds indeed; but if my Sword won’t do,

I can produce another Weapon too.――

But to my Task,―― Our Author hopes indeed,

You will not think, though charming Aphra’s dead,

All Wit with her, and with Orinda’s fled.

We promis’d boldly we wou’d do her Right,

Not like the other Houſe, who, out of ſpite,

Trump’d up a Play upon us in a Night.

And it was ſcarcely thought on at the moſt,

But Hey-Boys, Preſto! conjur’d on the Poſt.

Theſe Champions bragg’d they firſt appear’d in Field,

Then bid us tamely article and yield;

So did the French, and thought themſelves ſecure;

But, to their coſt, have fairly loſt Namur.

And ſo much, Gentlemen, by way of Satyr,

Now I am come t’examine your good Nature:

Since ’tis a Lady hopes to pleaſe to Night,

I’m ſure you Beau’s will do the Ladies Right.

Clap ev’ry Scene; and do your ſelves the honour,

Loudly to boaſt the Favours you have done her.

So may the Play-Houſe, Park, and Mall befriend you,

And no more Temple-Garden Broils attend you.

Epi- vi A3v

Epilogue, Spoken by Mr. Dogget, dreſt as a Beau. Written by Mr. Motteux.

Our Poeteſs is troubled in her Mind,

Like ſome young Thing, not ſo diſcreet as kind,

Who, Without Terms, has her dear Toy reſign’d.

You all are wild to bring her to the touch;

You beg, you preſs, you ſwear, and promiſe much;

’Twere well if your performances were ſuch.

Our Authreſs now is in, at your Devotion,

Tho’ ſhe, perhaps to pleaſe you, want the Notion,

Be gen’rous once, ſhe’ll quickly mend her Motion.

For, pray take notice, ’tis her Maidenhead,

(that of her Brain I mean) and you that wed

Feel ſeldom eaſie Joys, till that is fled.

If you are kind, ſhe’s willing to go on;

But if you turn her off, the Nymph turns Nun;

And what a ſcandal wou’d be to the Nation,

Shou’d ſome for want of Trade leave their Vocation;

And, among Friars pray for Occupation?

I’m much afraid a Woman’s like a Play,

You’d have ’em new and pretty ev’ry Day,

Or, elſe, your Servant; ’Gad I cannot ſtay.

’Tis true, you wait a while in expectation

(When up the Curtain flies) of Recreation;

But you all go, when ere the Play is done;

Then down the Curtain drops, and whip you’re gone,

And thence to tell ungrateful Truths you run.

Be kinder; let our unknown Fair appeaſe ye,

Tho’ you miſlike her Play, her Face may pleaſe ye:

She vii A4r

She hides it now, yet ſhe miſlikes the Task,

But knows how much you love a Viſard Mask.

Yet ſure ſhe muſt be ſafe among You here;

We Beaux can ne’re be Criticks on the Fair:

As for you, Judges, if I rightly know ye,

You ſhou’d think that ungrateful Task below ye.

Ye Braves, that made your Campaign at the Wells,

Storming the Breach of ſome Fair Citadels,

If kind, may chance to find out where ſhe dwells.

Ladies, for your own ſakes you muſt be kind;

Leſt, while we ſcarce one writing Beauty find,

Vain Man deny your Sex the Graces of the Mind.

Take you her part, the Men of courſe ſubmit,

And ſo your Beauty ſhall ſecure her Wit.

Let all theſe Reaſons kindly draw you in,

And ſafely then She Ventures, and we Win.

Dra-
viii A4v

Dramatis Perſonæ.

Men.

Sir Charles Frankford, Brother to Charlot, in Love with Juliana.Mr. Boman.

Sir Roger Marwood, Friend to Sir Charles.Mr. Scudamore.

Lovewell, a younger Brother of ſmall-Fortune, married to Charlot.Mr. Hudſon.

Freeman, a Vintner, Husband to Urania.Mr. Freeman.

Squire Wouldbe, a proud, pragmatical Coxcomb of poor extraction, Husband to Dowdy.Mr. Doget.

Women.

Charlot, a Rich Heireſs.Mrs. Bracegirdle.

Julianaher Couſin, in Love with SirChCharles. Frankford.Mrs. Boman.

Bellaſira, in love with SirRogRoger. Marwood.Mrs. Martyn.

Urania, Wife to Freeman.Mrs. Barry.

Dowdy, wife to Squire Wouldbe, pretending to rule her Husband, yet always jealous and uneaſie.Mrs. Bowtel.

Mrs. Beldam, her Mother, a Pawn-broker.Mrs. Lee.

Doll, Urania’s Maid.Mrs. Lawſon.

Servants.

Waiters.

Chairmen.

Bayliffs.

Turnkey, &c.

1 B1r 1

She Venters, and He Wins, &c.

Act I.

Scene I.

Enter Charlot and Juliana in Mens Cloaths.

Jul.

Faith, Charlot, the Breeches become you ſo well ’tis almoſt pity you ſhould ever part with ’em.

Char.

Nor will I, till I can find one can make better uſe of them to beſtow ’em on, and then I’ll reſign my Title to ’em for ever.

Jul.

’Tis well if you find it ſo eaſie, for a Woman once veſted in Authority, tho’ ’tis by no other than her own making, does not willingly part with it: But, prithee Child, what is thy Deſign? for I am yet to learn.

Char.

Why, to ramble the Town till I can meet with the Man I can find in my heart to take for better for worſe. Theſe Cloaths will give us greater Liberty than the ſcandalous World will allow to our Petticoats, which we could not attempt this Undertaking in without hazard to our Modeſty. Beſides, ſhould I meet with the Man whoſe outſide pleaſes me, ’twill be impoſſible by any other means to diſcover his Humour; for they are ſo uſed to flatter and deceive our Sex, that there’s nothing but the Angel appears, tho’ the Devil lies lurking within, and never ſo much as ſhews his Paw till he has got his Prey faſt in his Clutches.

Jul.

Methinks you that have ſo true a Notion of that treacherous Sex, ſhould be afraid to venter for fear of being your ſelf deceived.

B Char. 2 B1v 2

Char.

No, my dear Julia, to avoid it is the ſcope of my Deſign; for, tho’ by Lazineſs and Eaſe the generality of Mankind is degenerated into a ſoft Effeminacy, unworthy of the noble Stamp was ſet upon their Soul, there ſtill remains a Race retains the Image Heaven made them in, Vertuous, and Juſt, Sincere and Brave: And ſuch a one I’ll find, if I ſearch to the Antipodes for him, or elſe lead Apes in Hell.

Jul.

But, Dear Child, will not every one think you ſtark mad for a Huſband, to take this extravagant courſe for one?

Char.

No ſure; none can think one of my Youth and Fortune can want the Tenders of Hearts enough; I’m not obliged to follow the World’s dull Maxims, nor will I wait for the formal Addreſs of ſome Ceremonious Coxcomb, with more Land than Brains, who would bargain for us as he would for his Horſe, and talks of nothing but Taxes and hard Times, to make me a good Houſewife; or elſe ſome gay young fluttering Thing, who calls himſelf a Beau, and wants my Fortune to maintain him in that Character: Such an opinionated Animal, who believes there needs no more to reach a Ladies Heart than a boon mien, fine Dreſs, the Perriwig well adjuſted, the Hand well managed in taking Snuff, to ſhew the fine Diamond-Ring, if he’s worth one; ſometimes a conceited Laugh, with the Mouth ſtretch’d from one Ear to t’other, to diſcover the white Teeth, with ſneak and cringe in an affected Tone, cries Damn me, Madam, if you are not the prettieſt Creature my Eyes ere ſaw! ’Tis impoſſible for me to live if you are ſo cruel to deny me; with a world of ſuch fooliſh ſtuff, which they talk all by rote; no, my Julia, I’ll have one who loves my Perſon as well as Gold, and pleaſe my ſelf, not the World, in my choice.

Jul.

Is there’s any ſuch thing as real Love in that falſe Sex, none ſure is ſo capable to inſpire it, as the charming Charlot, your Perſon is indeed infinitely taking, your Humour gay, and Wit refined, and Beauty enough to tempt a Hermit; yet, after all, you’ll find it a difficult buſiness to diſtinguiſh, which the moſt zealous Adorations are paid to, your Beauty, or Gold.

Char.

I warrant thee, Child, I’ll take Care of that: But come, to our Affairs in hand.

Jul.

Where’s your Brother?

Char.

He’s ſafe enough, he dined to Day at Sir Roger Marwood’s, where, ’tis twenty to one, he’ll be ingaged the Evening.

Jul.

Suppoſe he ſhould meet us in our Rambles, he’d certainly know us.

Char.

You’re ſo full of your Suppoſitions; ſuppoſe he ſhould, which there’s no great danger of, but at the Play Houſe, where we’ll firſt ſtear our Courſe; he’s too diſcreet to diſcover us, and too good humour’d to be angry, but will think it one of my mad Frolicks, without other Deſign, but a little Diverſion. But I know from whence your Fear proceeds; which, if you put any more Scruples into my Head, I’ll diſcover; therefore look to your good Behaviour.

Jul. 3 B2r 3

Jul.

ſighs.

I confeſs you have me at an Advantage, but that has now no part in my deſign, to ſerve you with that little Wit I have; there’s a Coach waits us at the Garden Gate.

Char.

Allons, my Dear; now Love be propitious.

Ex. Char.Charlot and JulJuliana.

Scene II.

Enter Freeman, and Urania with a Letter in her Hand.

Uran.

Nay, prithee Freeman, be not in ſuch a Rage at a thing ſo contemptibly ugly, that is not worth raiſing the Paſſion of a Man; you muſt truſt to my Honeſty after all you can do, and, if I deſign’d you foul play, I would not acquaint you thus freely, as I do, with all the Coxcomb’s proceedings: Pray leave him to my management, and for once truſt a Woman’s Revenge; I’ll warrant you I’ll handle him ſo as ſhall give you more pleaſant Satisfaction than any you can propoſe; nothing ſo ſharpens our Sexe’s Invention, as Revenge, the darling Delight of our Nature; and, if I do not purſue mine home, may the Curſe of being thought diſhoneſt, without knowing the pleaſure of it, fall upon me.

Freem.

Urania, I do dnot ſuſpect you of any Deſign to abuſe me, but, as I believe you honeſt, I would have the World do ſo too. Beſides, there is no Fort ſo impregnable, that may not one time or other, with long Aſſaults of Stratagem, be taken: But I will have Patience, and ſee the reſult of your Deſigns; and, if they do not ſatiſfie me very well, will then take my own Meaſures with him.

Uran.

Agreed, with all my Heart, here is the Letter I juſt now received from him, and likewiſe my Anſwer.

Gives him two ſeveral Billets. Freem. reads. Dear Mrs. Honyſuckle, I don’t know what a Devil you have done to me, but I can neither eat, drink, or ſleep, for thinking of thoſe dear, damn’d Eyes, that have ſet my Heart on fire; let me know when that troubleſome Property, your Husband, is out of the way, and I will fly to aſſure you, I am your devoted Slave, S. Wouldbe. B2 Freem. 4 B2v 4

Freem.

Familiar, ſawcy Fool, I know his Impudence ſo well, I do not wonder at him: But now for yours.

Reads. ’Tis impoſſible to gain any opportunity by my Husband’s being abroad, becauſe then I am confined to the Barn; but, if you dare, for my ſake, metamorphiſe your Breeches into Petticoats, but avoiding the ſeeing of my Husband, and you may paſs with all the ſecurity poſſible: To night, in Play-time, will be very convenient, it being a new one, we ſhall in all likelihood be empty of Company; ſo that you may have the opportunity, if you deſire it, of being alone, with your obliged humble Servant.

Freem.

What mean you by this, Urania? Sure you miſtook when you gave me this Letter? What is your Deſign? The Devil take me if I can imagine.

Looks ſurly.

Uran.

Why, firſt to draw the Woodcock into the Net, and then to uſe him as I think fit. Pray relie on me, and be not ſo ſuſpicious, for, if you are, you unravel my whole Deſign.

Freem.

I can ſcarce confine my Anger to a Jeſt; but, for once, I truſt you, But if you play me falſe, and make me thus the Property, as he calls me, of my own Diſgrace, look to’t, by Heaven I’ll murder thee.

Uran.

Your Threats no way terrifie me, having no Deſigns that will give you any cauſe of Diſpleaſure: I’ll diſpatch away a Meſſenger to my Gallant, and, in the mean time, give you your Inſtructions, for you muſt be aſſiſtant to me.

Freem.

Well, go in, I’ll follow you immediately.

Ex. Urania. Freeman Solus.

I never had the leaſt reaſon to diſtruſt her Honeſty, tho’ I’m not perfectly ſatiſfied with this Letter of hers; but I’ll watch her narrowly, and it ſhall ſcape me hard if ſhe deceive me.

Exit. Freem. Scene
5 B3r 5

Scene III.

St. James’s Park. Enter Lovewell croſſing the Stage; Charlot and Juliana following him in Mens Cloaths.

Char.

Thus far we have kept ſight of him, ſee we don’t looſe him now.

Jul.

No, he’s turning again this way.

Charl.

Well, if I like his Humour and Senſe as well as his Perſon, my ſearch is at an end; for this is my Man, I believe he’ll make an excellent Frugal Husband, he has led us a ſweet Jaunt; I am very weary, but muſt not complain. O, here he comes again, I’ll accoſt him, and try what Mettle he’s made of.

Jul.

Why ſure thou art not ſtark mad; s’life he’ll beat us, do you ſee how ſurly he looks.

Char.

No Parlying now; Prepare to ſecond me, whilſt I give the Onſet.

Jul.

Thou’rt a Mad-Wench, but I’ll not fly from my Colours.

Char.

Well ſaid Girl, now I like thee; but here he is.

Enter Lovewell, as croſſing the Stage, Charlot ſtops him.

Char.

Give a Stranger leave Sir, to diſturb your Meditations, which ſeem to be as ſerious, as if you had juſt received the fatal Nay, and were now breathing Vengeance againſt Fortune, Love, and Woman-kind.

All the while ſhe ſpeaks, he ſurveys her from Head to Foot.

Love.

Indeed, you miſtake, young Sir, I was thinking of no ſuch Trifles: thoſe Fooleries belong to your Years, or at leaſt are only then excuſable, But I believe you’r diſpoſed to be merry, Gentlemen, and at this time I am very unfit Company for you; the ſerious Humour I am in, will not agree with yours.

Jul.

Is it the effects of being croſt in ſome Deſign, makes you ſo, or your natural Temper?

Love.

Neither Sir, but why does it concern you to know.

Char. 6 B3v 6

Char.

Becauſe we would gladly divert it, Sir, would you accept of our Endeavours towards it, by admitting us into your Company.

Jul.

There’s nothing ſo pernicious to Health, as the indulging of Melancholy, and we having a particular intereſt in yours, muſt by no means leave you with ſo dangerous a Companion.

Love.

A particular Intereſt in my Health, for what end, Sir?

Char.

Oh, for ſeveral: My future Happineſs and all my Joy on Earth depends upon it, had I as many Lives as Argus’s Eyes, I’d hazard ’em all for the preſervation of yours.

Love.

Hey day! whence grows this mighty kindneſs? I fear Sir, you are miſtaken; I do not remember I ever had the honour to ſee you before.

Char.

I have evidences enough confirms me, you’re the Man that has cruelly robb’d a near and dear Relation of mine of her Repoſe for ever, and except you reſtore it her by reciprocal Love, I fear the worſt effects of this unhappy Paſſion.

Love.

Oh Sir, I find you deſign to divert your ſelf inſtead of me.

Love walking off.

Char.

By Honour, Truth, and all that’s Sacred, I’m ſerious.

CharCharlot. catching hold off him.

Love.

Well Sir, bring me to the Lady, I’m not ſo cruelly inclined, to let a pretty Woman languiſh for any civil Kindneſs I can do her.

Char.

O Heavens! Julia! if he ſhould be Married! I dare not proceed, till I know, do you ask him the Queſtion, for I have not Courage.

CharCharlot. aſide to Julia.

Jul.

Never fear it, he has not the Slovenly Air of a Married Man, but you ſhall ſoon be ſatiſfied.

Pray Sir, give me leave to ask you an impertinent Queſtion. Are you Married?

To him.

Love.

Heavens forbid, ’tis the only happineſs I can boaſt.

Char.

Perhaps you may find it a greater than you are aware of, before we part, if you uſe it to your advantage.

Jul.

What think you, Sir, of a young Beautiful Lady with a great Fortune, who loves you well enough to throw her ſelf into your Arms? Could you find in your Heart think you to refuſe her.

Love.

Why Faith, my little Acquaintance, theſe would all very well agree with a Man under my circumſtances; but pray Gentlemen, unriddle, and let me know the good Fortune you tantalize me with.

Char.

Well Sir, I will moſt faithfully diſcharge my Meſſage, I have as I told you, a Relation that is infinitely dear to me, who is, if the World does not flatter her, not Unhandſome; Young I’m ſure ſhe is, and not Ill-humour’d, but what ſupplies all Defects, is a Fortune not deſpicable, being by the Death of her Mothers Father, who was a Rich Eaſt-India Merchant, poſſeſt of 1500l. a Year, beſides a conſiderable value in Money and Jewels; but what renders her moſt worthy of your Affections, is that ſhe paſſionately loves you, loves you 7 B4r 7 you to Madneſs, from the firſt Moment ſhe ſaw you, and muſt be ever miſerable to live without you.

Jul.

Alas, it is not poſſible ſhe can live at all, without a ſuitable Return to her Affection, you cannot ſure Sir, be cruel to a young Lady.

Love.

Looks ſurly. Ah poor Lady, it may be ſo. To Julian. But you had beſt Sir, put your Friend upon ſome other Subject, for we ſhall not be Company for each other long, if he proceeds in this; one of you I preſume have been dabling with your Lady’s Mothers Woman, and wants a convenient Tool to cover ſhame; you were ſtrangely ill-adviſ’d to pick me out, there be Cullies enough to ſerve your groſs purpoſe, for whatever Opinion you may have of your moving Rhetorick, you’ll find it no eaſie matter to impoſe upon a Man, who has had more Experience of the Town than your Years will give you leave to know. ’Tis your Youth indeed that beſt excuſes your Folly, in attempting a Man you have no reaſon either from his Character (if you ever heard it) or that Converſation you have had with him, to think a Fool fit for the uſe I find you deſign me.

Is walking off.

Char.

By Heaven, and all that’s good, you do me wrong: I’m senſible how hard a matter it would be to impoſe on you, or did ſhe think you ſo, I’m ſure would ſcorn you; may all the Happineſs I wiſh my ſelf, prove endleſs Torments, if every Word I have ſaid, be not ſincerely true.

CharCharlot. holds him and looks concerned.

Love.

What, I warrant, ’tis ſome good Pious Alderman’s Wife, that finding her Husband defective, wants a Drudge to raiſe an Heir to the the Family, ’tis indeed the common Game we younger Brothers live by.

Jul.

Sir, does our Habits or Addreſſes merit no better an Opinion, than ſo ſordid a Thought of us: Beſides, did we not tell you, ſhe is a Rich Young Heireſs, and conſequently unmarried.

Love.

Pardon me, Sir, I had forgot that, but there follows a greater miſchief; ſhe’s, I ſuppose, for Honourable Love: No, I’m for none of that. If ſhe’l accept of a Civil Kindneſs or ſo, I’ll do my beſt to pleaſeherplease her.

Char.

When I have told you Sir, that this Lady whom you pleaſe to be ſo witty upon, is Siſter to Sir Charles Frankford, think if you can hope for any thing from her, but what Marriage which you ſo much deſpiſe, entitles you to; if you do not know him, give your ſelf the trouble to enquire after him, and his Siſter Charlot, whom perhaps you may not find ſo contemptible, as you imagine; or at leaſt if ſhe does not merit your Love, ſhe may a little more reſpect.

Love.

This looks very real, it may be true, and I like an unlucky Dog be too incredulous.

Aſide.

Sir, I moſt earneſtly intreat your Pardon, Sir Charles Frankford I know very well, and have often heard of his beautiful Siſter, but yet you muſt give me leave to diſtrust my own merit, ſo much as to think ſhe cannot caſt away a Thought, much leſs her Love on ſo unworthy an Object of it, as the unhappy Lovewell.

Char. 8 B4v 8

Char.

You’re as ſuſpicious as an old Lady, that Marries a Young Man, is of a Handſome Chamber-Maid, (but no more Doubts and Scruples dear Infidel, but if you reſolve to Marry this kind-hearted Lady, make me the Meſſenger.

Love.

Well, conduct me to the Lady, we ſhall make the beſt Bargain, I hope you would not have me Marry without ſeeing her.

Char.

No Sir, be to Morrow Morning exactly at Nine a Clock, at Roſamond’s Pond, ſhe’ll meet you there with one Lady more, both mask’d, ſhe that gives you her Hand, accept with it her Heart and Perſon, but come not, if you do not fully reſolve to Marry her; conſider of it till to Morrow Morning. Come Cozen, I believe by this time we have tired the Gentleman of our Company.

Jul.

But, firſt, let’s know your final Reſolution.

Love.

’Tis to meet the Lady however.

Jul.

We may truſt to her Charms for the reſt.

Char.

Well Sir, adieu; remember Nine.

Love.

Fear not, I’m too much pleas’d with the imagination of my approaching Happineſs to forget it.

Char.

We’ll ſet you down where you pleaſe.

Love.

With all my Heart, I lodge in Leiceſter-fields.

Char.

That’s in our way, come Sir.

Exeunt Omnes.

The End of the First Act.

Act
9 C1r 9

Act II.

Scene I.

Enter SquireWouldbe, with a Letter in his Hand, Reading.

Iam the luckieſt Fellow that ever was born, I was ſurely wrapt in my Mother’s Smock, none of all the weak Sex can find in their Heart to deny me: I have moſt powerful Charms, that’s certain. But Oh, ye Gods! that a Man of my Parts ſhould be born of ſuch mean Parents! I muſt haſten, for ’tis near Six.

Enter Dowdy. SquireWouldbe puts the Letter haſtily up.

Sq. Wouldbe.

Pox on her, now ſhall I be plagu’d with her Impertinence.

Aſide.

Dow.

Nay, I will ſee that Paper, what is it you put up ſo haſtily: Let me ſee you Rebel you, for I’m reſolv’d I will ſee it, that I will.

Running to him.

Sq. Wouldbe.

See, what would you ſee? ’tiſ nothing but a Libel. There, take it, bid the Maid bring my Cloak and my Sword; I’m juſt ſent for out, to a Client.

Gives her a wrong Paper.

Dow.

Is this all? here take it again; but you ſhan’t go out to ne’er a Client in England, that you ſha’nt: Marry gap! Go to a Client, and leave me to Sup alone, after I have got a Hot Supper for you too. You Don’t care for my Company, that you don’t: I don’t care, I’ll go and tell my Mother, that I will, I won’t be uſed ſo.

Gives him the Paper. Crys and Snivels as ſhe ſpeaks. C Sq. Would. 10 C1v 10

Sq. Wouldbe.

I muſt wheedle the Fool; not that I care for the Mother more than the Daughter, but I ſhall loſe many a good forfeited Pawn in the Year, if any Complaints are made.

Aſide.

Dow.

What’s that you mutter to your ſelf? I ſwear and proteſt I will go to my Mother, and make her fetch Home all the Plate and Linnen in your Houſe, you Rebel you, and ſee where you can get more: Was not I the making of you? Now you’d leave me, and a Hot Supper, for a Client. Marry come up.

She going off, he catches hold of her.

Sq. Wouldbe.

Nay, prithee Bunny, don’t be nangry; as true as I am God A’mighty’s Child, I’ll come Home to Supper; pay Bunny let I go.

Makes a Courteſy and looks ſimply.

Dow.

You ſhant go, that you ſhant, you Rebel you.

She pouts and looks ſurly.

Sq. Wouldbe.

If you won’t let me go to my Clients, how ſhall I be able to maintain my Family. Let me go Bunny, and indeed and indeed I’ll give you a Fine New Petticoat, ſuch a one as your Neighbour Mrs. Whatyoucallun has.

Dow.

But will you come Home to Supper then at Eight a Clock?

Sq. Wouldbe.

I will truly, Bunny, what have you got?

Dow.

A moſt lovely Buttock of Beef and Cabbage; do Puggey, pray come Home. Ha, but will you?

Fawns upon him, and Kiſſes him.

Sq. Wouldbe.

Deed I will Mrs. Honeyſuckle, turn dive I one, two te Buſſes, nay, one mo: B’y Bunny.

Dow.

Your a Wicked Man, well go, but make haſte Home.

Sq. Wouldbe.

Heaven make thankful, I am at laſt rid of her nauſeous fondneſs.

Aſide.

B’y b’y, I’ll take my Cloke within.

Exit. Sq. Wouldbe.

Dow.

B’y dear Rogue, oh ’tis a ſweet-natured Man, he’s ſtrangely fond of me.

Enter Beldam.

How now Daughter, where’s my Son?

Dow.

He’s juſt gone out Mother, but he’ll come Home again to Supper.

Bel.

He’d beſt, or he may look for the Point Cravat: I have here for him a Forfeited Pawn, of no leſs than one of the King’s Officers, Mr. Conſtable of our Pariſh, ’tis almost ſpick and ſpan new, he never wore it but of Sundays. But are you ſure Daughter, he’ll come back to Supper, or elſe I will not leave it.

Dow.

O, I am ſure he will, for he promiſed me, and he’s never worſe than his Word. Poor Rogue! O, he’s the kindeſt Wretch, Mother, that ever 11 C2r 11 ever was, he grows fonder and fonder every day than other. Won’t you ſup with us Mother? Poor Wretch, he longs to ſee you.

Bel.

No, Daughter, I cannot ſtay, I have appointed a Cuſtomer to be at Home at Seven, to take in a Silver Tankard, which I will ſend to you, for that you have, is call’d Home, and I am to return it to Morrow; this is one much of the ſame value, the change will hardly be perceived.

Dow.

But you will bring it before you take the other Home I hope; for my Puggey will drink out of nothing but Silver.

Bel.

Ai, Ai, that I will, ſince you ſay my Son is ſo good, you ſhall have any thing. Here, take what I have brought for him; remember my love to him, and ſo good Night, Daughter; I muſt be gone.

Dow.

Good Night, Forſooth, if you muſt. Exit BelBeldam. ’Tis a rare thing to have ſuch a Mother; ſhe’s always giving my Puggy one good thing or other, which makes him take care to pleaſe me: ſhe will one time or other diſgrace me, by coming in her every Day Cloaths; I am aſhamed to call her Mother in them.

Exit. DowDowdy. C2 Scene
12 C2v 12

Scene II.

Sir Charles’s Garden. Enter Sir Charles Frankford and Sir Roger Marwood, with Muſick.

Sir Char.

I think Sir Roger, we muſt give my Siſter, and Cozen Julia, an Eſſay of our Serenade; the Song is pretty and may properly be applied to any of the fair Sex: But is it not very gallant to treat a Siſter thus?

Sir Roger.

I believe, Sir Charles, if Madam Juliana had not a greater ſhare in it than your Siſter, ſhe’d loſe her part in this Entertainment.

Sir Char.

I muſt own my fair Cozen has charm’d me; but I have of late obſerv’d her grown ſo thoughtful, I fear her Heart already is engag’d, which make me fear to own any Pretenſions to it.

Sir Roger.

She cannot ſure be inſenſible to the Brother of Charlot, whom ſhe ſo tenderly loves; advance your Addreſſes, you have a good Advocate.

Sir Char.

No, I’ll ſee that Mad Siſter of mine diſpos’d of firſt: I’d give Five Hundred Guineas to ſee her in love; for I dare not own my being ſo, till ſhe’s a little tamed. She’ll only make me her ſport, as ſhe does all Mankind beſides.

Sir Roger.

I think SirChar.Charles you ſhould rather give it to ſecure her from it if poſſible; for what Aſſurance have you ſhe will not blind with that mad Paſſion, be betrayed to match her ſelf to one unworthy of her Merit, and bring an Alliance to your Family, you’d bluſh to own.

Sir Char. 13 C3r 13

Sir Char.

No, I dare ſwear for her; however frollickſome ſhe is in her Humour, ſhe’d ſcorn to look on any Thing was baſely born: but I have often heard her declare ſhe would, when ever ſhe married, match her ſelf where ſhe found more Merit than Eſtate. I know ſo well her Pride in that Concern, I dare truſt the Honour of our Family in the Hands.

Sir Rog.

Then if ſhe ſhould throw her ſelf away upon ſome well-born younger Brother, not worth a Groat, I find you would eaſily forgive her.

Sir Char.

She has a plentiful Fortune, enough to make any Man happy; ſhe’s free and abſolute, and has as much Right to diſpoſe of her ſelf and Fortune as I of mine.

Sir Rog.

It argues but little Kindneſs, for your Siſter to be ſo careleſs of her Advantage.

Sir Char.

You need not inſtruct me in my Kindneſs for my Siſter, ſhe never found any want of it, nor ſhall ſhe. But whence comes your Concern for her, Sir Roger?

Sir Rog.

As ſhe’s the Siſter of my deareſt Friend: But come, let’s have that Song. Are you ſure they’re together?

Sir Char.

They ſeldom part ſo ſoon, you know. Come, Gentlemen, let’s have the Song.

To the Muſick.

Song.

Young Celinda’s youthful Charms,

Fills the admiring Town with wonder;

The ſtubbornſt Heart, her Eyes alarms,

And makes them to her Power surrender.

Face, 14 C3v 14

Face, and Shape, and Wit ſo rare!

Heavens Maſter-piece ſhe was deſign’d:

A graceful Mien, and ſuch an Air,

Nothing excells it but her Mind.

Tho’ Women envy, Men admire;

Her Eyes, in all, do Love inſpire.

Sir Rog.

I think the Door opens.

Sir Char.

Pray, Gentlemen, retire a little, we’ll come to you immediately in the Street.

Ex. Muſick. Enter Charlot and Juliana in their own Cloaths; and Betty.

’Tis they, let’s get behind this Arbour, from whence we may diſcover what they ſay; they certainly will go in there; ’tis the uſual place of diſcourſing their Secrets in: Perhaps I may pay for my liſtening; but I cannot reſiſt ſo ſweet a temptation.

They go behind the Arbour; Charlot and Juliana go into the Arbour. Juliana’s Maid ſtays without. Charlot ſpeaks as ſhe enters the Arbour.

I told you ’twas but your Fancy; I was ſure no Muſick, nor no one elſe, but my Brother, would enter here, and he is not at home. Now, my dear Julia, do not you applaud my happy Fortune? Is it not better, thus to chuſe for One’s ſelf amongſt a Multitude, than out of a few, whoſe Intereſt, more than Love, ſolicites me? If all things prove but ſucceſsful to my Wiſhes, in this Affair, I ſhall be perfectly happy; if my dear Julia was but ſo, I could not wiſh my ſelf another Joy.

Jul.

Nothing would more alleviate my Grief, than conſtantly to ſee you ſo; which is the hearty wiſh of your unhappy Friend.

Char. 15 C4r 15

Char.

You heighten your own Trouble, by your obſtinate refuſal to let him know, what I am ſure he’d accept with Joy: For Heavens ſake let me tell him, I’m confident he’ll bleſs me for’t, and ſo will you hereafter.

Jul.

I’ll ſooner yield my Body to the Stake, than own a Paſſion for a Man thinks me not worth his taking notice of: No, my dear Charlot, I beg you to conceal it, as you would do a fatal Secret, that would betray my Life; for, the firſt Minute he diſcovers it, I’ll put it out of his Power ever to ſee me more.

Char.

It grieves my Soul, to ſee you thus afflicted, and will not give me leave to eaſe your Pain; but, be aſſured, I never will betray the leaſt of all your Thoughts, without your free Conſent.

Jul.

No matter what becomes of wretched Juliana, ſo my dear Charlot’s happy.

Char.

Take but the ſame Method, and you may be ſo too; for, ſhould my Deſigns fail, the way I’ve laid them, I’ll openly own them, and then I do not fear being denied; tho’ ’twould vex me heartily, to miſs the Pleaſure of knowing, whether I’m belov’d or not.

Jul.

Alas! your Paſſion’s but in jeſt; you do not yet know the Torments, to wake whole Nights with reſtleſs Thoughts.

Char.

No, no, never will; where ere I lov’d, I’d tell him ſo, and break that uſeleſs piece of Modeſty, impoſ’d by Cuſtom, and gives ſo many of us the Pip.

Jul.

I wiſh I had your merry Heart; but I am now ſo ſerious, that the leaſt Jeſt is unſavoury to me. Prithee Betty ſing the laſt new Song I gave you.

Char.

Nay, if thou’rt come to Rhiming, thou’rt in Love indeed.

Song.

Reſtleſs in Thoughts, diſturb’d in Mind,

Short Sleep’s deep Sighs: Ah much, I fear,

The inevitable Time aſſign’d,

By Fate, to Love’s approaching near.

When 16 C4v 16

When the dear Object preſent is,

My flutt’ring Soul is all on fire:

His ſight’s a Heaven of Happineſs;

And, if he ſtays, I can’t retire.

Tell me, ſome one, in Love well read,

If theſe be Symptoms of that Pain.

Alas, I fear, my Heart is fled,

Enſlav’d to Love, and Love in vain.

Char.

That’s your own Fault: But come, let’s in, the Air grows cool.

Jul.

I’ll wait on you to your Chamber, and there leave you to your Repoſe.

Exit. CharCharlot. JulJuliana. and BetBetty. Sir Charles comes forward and ſpeaks.

Well, what think you now, Sir Roger, had I not reaſon for my Suſpicion? I have paid for my Curioſity; but I am only too well aſſur’d of what I fear’d before.

Sir Rog.

Suppoſe, Sir Charles, you ſhould prove the Man: I dare believe I gueſs not much amiſs, who ſhould your Siſter take ſuch Liberty with, as to offer to declare a buſineſs of that nature to, but to you?

Sir Char.

I wiſh no happier Fortune: But much I fear my Stars are not ſo kind.

Sighs.

Sir Rog.

We forget our Muſick; or, at leaſt, they’ll think ſo.

Sir Char.

Come, let’s to ’em.

Exit. Sir Charles and Sir Roger. Scene
17 D1r 17

Scene III.

A Tavern Kitchin. Enter Freeman, Urania, and Cook-Maid.

Ura.

Doll, do you be ſure to keep the Kitchin clear, we muſt be as quick as poſſible for fear of Interruption by Companies coming in.

Freem.

Pl―― on him, if he would but make haſte, there is now but one Company in the Houſe.

Doll

looking out.

O he’s here, Sir, juſt got out of a Chair.

Ura.

Run you Doll, and bring him in here; and get you gone, Freeman, you know your end.

Ex. Doll.

Freem.

I warrant I’ll rememb0er it with a Vengeance.

Ex. Freeman. Doll returns with Eſq; Wouldbe in Womans Cloths, and Exit.

Eſq; Wouldbe.

makes a Curtchy, goes up to her.

Your Servant, ſweet Mrs. Strawberry, am not I a pretty Gentlewoman? Now tum dive I a Buſs.

Ura.

Fie Sir, what do you mean, you know there’s always Capitulation before a Surrender; you muſt promiſe Conſtancy, Secrecy, and a thousand other things beſide, before we come to the main point.

Eſq; Wouldbe.

Heark you dear Child, is this a place to make Conditions in? What a Devil made you bring me into the Kitchin, your Chamber had been a properer place for what we have to ſay and do?

Ura.

Ai, but to have ſent you up alone, or carried you up directly, might have given cauſe of ſuſpicion to my Servants, which now I avoid by taking you from hence.

Eſq; Wouldbe.

Let’s loſe no time, dear Child, but go where Love and Beauty calls.

Aſide.

I Gad, that was a high touch if it paſſes for my own.

To her.

Come, come, do not delay my Bliſs, your Houſe begins to fill; and we may loſe this bleſſed Opportunity.

Ura.

Well, come then, but you muſt be ſure to be very Civil.

Eſq. W.

Ay, ay, as Civil as you deſire.

Leaves off amazedly, hearing Freeman’s Voice. Freeman within aloud.

Freem.

A Man, ſay you, in Womens Cloths with my Wife? D―― him, give me my Sword, I’ll ſtick him to the Wall.

Ura.

O Heavens what will you do, your betray’d!

Eſ. W. ſhakes and ſhews great ſigns of fear.

Sw――s what ſhall I do? here’s ne’er a Hole to creep in, as I ſee, that will hide a Mouſe.

D Feerreem 18 D1v 18

Freem.

within.

Here, Sirrah, charge this Piſtol for me whilſt I charge the other, perhaps he’s arm’d for a Surprize; but I’ll Maul the Dog, I’ll lay his Letchery for him I warrant him.

Ura.

ſeeming in a great fright.

You’re a dead Man if you do not do ſomething preſently.

Looking about ſees the Cyſtern.

Here, here, get into the Cyſtern, there is as it happens but very little Water in it.

Eſq; W.

Ah Lord, any where ſo I may but ſave my dear Life; well this is a Judgment upon me for coveting my Neighbour’s Wife, if I had been at home with my own, I need not have feared any body.

Gets into the Cyſtern. Enter Freeman Armed looking about.

Freem.

What have you done with your Metamorphos’d Gallant, produce him you’d beſt, for if he eſcape my Fury you ſhall feel it, you Jezebel you.

Ura.

What is’t you mean, are you mad to make me and your ſelf ridiculous? I know of never a Gallant that I have, if you do you had beſt find him out; Who is it puts theſe Crotchets in your Crown? you never had reaſon to believe ill of me, and why ſhould you hearken to every Fool’s Tale?

Freem.

Why, had not you a Man with you in Womens Cloths?

Ura.

I have had no body with me but my Midwife, and if you had come ſooner you might have examined if you pleaſed.

Freem.

Indeed Urania, I am too blame to ſuſpect you upon every idle ſtory; but I was told that Eſq; Wouldbe was with you in Womens Cloths; pray forgive my Paſſion.

Ura.

Indeed you are unkind, but I can forgive you more than this.

Freem.

Have an Eye to the Bar, for I am ſent for out, but will not ſtay.

Ex. Freeman. Eſq; Wouldbe peers out.

Eſq; Wouldbe.

Is he gone? I’m almoſt drowned, the Water’s come in ever ſince I’ve been here.

Ura.

He is, you may venture forth.

Aſide.

Pray Heaven I hold from laughing.

Eſq; Wouldbe comes out dropping wet.

Eſq; Wouldbe.

What ſhall I do, I ſhall catch my death, with all theſe wet Cloths about me?

Ura.

Here, take this Key, and go up to the Star, there’s a Bed provided for you, and as ſoon as I can ſecure my Husband I’ll come to you.

Eſq; W.

Dear, kind, charming Creature, how you revive me? but are you ſure he’s gone now, and the coaſt clear, for ’tis impoſſible I can take Sanctuary in the ſame place again, for by this time ’tis full of Water.

Ura.

You’ll have no more occaſion, I hope, but if you ſhould, I think you muſt hide there in the Feather-Tub; pointing to a Feather-Tub.

Eſq; 19 D2r 19

Eſq; W.

I wiſh I had ſeen that before t’would have ſaved me a Ducking.

Ura.

Alas, I forgot it in my fright, but had beſt be gone for fear of a Surprize again.

Juſt as he goes to the Door, he heres trampling within, returns in a great Fright, and jumps into the Feather-Tub, and ſays,

Ay Lord, he’s here again.

Ura.

This was ſuch an unexpected Jeſt, I ſhall burſt with Laughing. She goes to him. ’Tis only your fear, here’s no body coming, my Husband’s gone out, and will not return this hour.

Eſq; W.

comes out all over Feathers.

For the Lord’s ſake don’t let me ſtay here I ſhall be frighted out my wits.

Ura.

Go as ſoon as you pleaſe, lock your ſelf in, and put the Key under the Door againſt I come.

Eſq; W.

See, ſee, is there no body ſtirring?

Ura.

Not a Mouſe, go make haſte.

Exit Eſq; Wouldbe. Enter Freeman Laughing.

So I think I have had my Jeſt too to make him go into the Feather-Tub.

Ura.

You heard me mention it, did you?

Freem.

Yes, and I knew his fear would make him take to it upon the leaſt noiſe; are all things in readineſs above?

Ura.

Ay, never fear, let me alone for Miſchief.

Ex. Free. and Ura.

The end of the Second Act.

Act III.

Scene I.

Scene draws, diſcovers Eſq; Wouldbe undreſſing himſelf to go to Bed.

Wouldbe.

My fright’s amoſt over, but I’m plaguy Wet and Cold, P―― confound the Cuckold. Going towards the Bed with the Candle in his Hand falls in at a Trap Door up to his Neck, and puts his Candle out. Hey! what the Devil’s come to me now; am I going quick to Hell? Enter two Devils, with Torches, and point at him. Help! help! will no body come to my reſcue? the Devil’s come for me indeed.

D2 Dance. 20 D2v 20 Dance. Enter two more Divels, who join in a Dance with other two frighting and seizing him, he crys out and ſhews great ſigns of fear after the Dance; two more enters and ſings.

Devil.

Say Brother Divel ſay, what must be done,

With this wicked Mortal, whoſe Glaſs is now run,

Wee’ll dip him in Styx to abate his hot Lust,

Then headlong to Hell we the Letcher will thrust,

Wee’ll laugh at his Torments and jest at his Groans,

The Horns he deſign’d he ſhall feel in his Bones.

Let’s away with him then to great Pluto our King,

Who expects before this the lewd Victim wee’ll bring.

They take him up and carry him off, who roars out help, The Devil, the Devil. Enter Freeman and Urania Laughing.

Freem.

So I think we have ſufficiently frighted the Fool, but what haſt ordered them to do with him now?

Ura.

To carry him home juſt in the pickle he’s in to his Wife.

Freem.

Sure the Coxcomb will never venture hither again?

Ura.

If he do, my next Revenge ſhall be more home.

Freem.

I would at any time loſe a Nights ſleep for ſo much ſport: ’Tis time to raiſe the reſt of the Family, and then try to get a little ſleep.

Ura.

With all my heart, my Head akes a Laughing.

Scene II.

Mr. Lovewell knocks at a Door, Enter Servant.

Love.

Is Sir Roger Marwood within?

Servant.

Yes Sir, I’ll acquaint him you are here, if you pleaſe to walk in.

Lovewell goes in, returns, and after him Sir Roger drest to go out.

Love.

Sir Roger, your Servant, you’re an early riſer I ſee; I thought I had been time enough to your levee?

Sir Roger.

That you might have been, had not Sir Charles Frankford ſent in great haſte to ſpeak with me; for early riſing is not a fault I am often guilty of.

Love.

You are very happy, Sir Roger, to have ſo free acceſs where ſo much Beauty is your daily Entertainment; how is it poſſible to defend your Heart from ſo many Charms the lovely Charlot, they ſay, is Miſtreſs of. But is ſhe ſo beautiful as the Town reports? for I never ſaw her.

Sir Rog.

She is indeed beyong Imagination, but of ſo ſtrange and fantaſtical a Humour no one can pleaſe her; you have more right to pretend to her Favours than I; for ſhe ſo much declares againſt a Man of an Eſtate, I dare not think of Addreſſing.

Love.

That can be only an extravagant way of Talking, ſhe cannot think an Eſtate, where ’tis but an Embelliſhment to both Qualifications, a Fault.

Sir 21 D3r 21

Sir Rog.

Sir Charles indeed is of your opinion, but I am much miſtaken if he does not quickly find it, the real Sentiments of her Heart; for laſt Night we heard ſhe and Madam Juliana, her Cozen, diſcourſing in the Garden; ſhe talkt of Love and ſome deſign ſhe had in hand to day, ſhe fear’d being croſt in, but what that was Heaven knows.

Love.

aſide.

Hah, this abſolutely confirms me, ’tis real, I am impatient till I ſee her, well Sir Roger, I’ll take my leave of you, I hinder your intended viſit.

Sir Rog.

I muſt confeſs, I am very eager to ſee Sir Charles in hopes to hear more of his Siſter’s deſign.

Love.

Shall I ſee you any where in the Evening, Sir Roger?

Sir Rog.

With all my heart.

Love.

Where?

Sir Rog.

I ſhall be at Lockets from 8 to 10 or later.

Love.

I will, if poſſible, wait on you there.

Exeunt.

Scene III.

St. James’s Park. Enter Charlot and Juliana Maskt.

Jul.

I ſee you’ll really meet him then?

Char.

Ay, and marry him too, if he has Courage enough to venture on me.

Jul.

’Tis a ſtrange Reſolution, Heaven ſend you may never have reaſon to repent it; think well, my Dear, what you do, conſider it is irrevocable.

Char.

Prithee forbear; Thy ſerious Notions almoſt ſpoil my deſign; but know my Juliana, I have given him my Heart, and will my Perſon, for I paſſionately love him.

Jul.

I wiſh him worthy of his happy Fortune; the time draws near; does not your Heart go a pit a pat?

Char.

Yes, for fear he’ll not come.

Jul.

looking out.

That care is at an end, prepare for the Combat, for yonder comes your Antagoniſt.

Char.

’Tis he indeed, my Courage almoſt fails me, but ’tis too late to retreat; I’ll ſtand the brunt let what will be the event.

Enter Love, and gazes on them. Charlot advances towards him, pulls off her Glove and gives him her Hand, which he kiſſes.

Love.

If the whole Piece prove as beautiful as this Sample, I find I’m undone already; come unmask, dear Madam, and kill me quite.

Jul.

Not to ſhew a better Face, but better Nature; I’ll give her my Sample.

Pulls off her Mask.

Love.

’Twas kindly ſaid and done. To Char.But I gad Madam, if you mean to preſerve the Conqueſt of my Heart intirely to your ſelf, you’d beſt put by that cloud, for there are dangerous Eyes.

Looking at Juliana. Jul. 22 D3v 22

Jul.

She’ll ſoon reduce the Rebel to his Obedience, convince him of the Truth, by ſhewing him a Proſpect of that Heaven which is alloted for him.

Char.

No, I’ll leave it to his Imagination, which perhaps may be to my advantage; and if you have Courage enough to venture on me as you ſee me, here’s my Hand and Heart, and all that’s mine to be intirely yours.

Love.

’Tis a large Proffer; but I’m for none of Fortune’s blind Bargains, come upon the ſquare, dear Lady, and I am for you; I ever had an averſion to a Vizu-Mask, it ſhall be one of my Articles, that from this day Forward you ſhall never wear one.

Char.

With all my heart, conditionally that this day the only one in which I muſt reign, I may wear it at pleaſure.

Love.

After you have diſcovered that Face which is to charm me out of my Liberty, I’ll agree to all you deſire.

Char.

pulling off her Mask.

As you’re a Man of Honour, ſtand to your word, for now I claim you as my own.

Love.

eagerly kiſſing her Hand.

By Heavens, an Angel! dear charming Creature, diſpose of your happy Slave for ever; I am now no more the cautious illnatur’d Fellow, I have been all this time; I am all o’er Love and Rapture, come lovely Creature, lets away to Church, where I may make you mine without danger of ever loſing you.

Char.

Laughing.

Mercy on me! what an Alteration’s here! from whence proceeds this mighty Change?

Love.

Could you expect leſs from that betwitching Face, enough to tempt Diogenes from his Tub, and make that ſurly Stoick, turn Epicure; Heaven never made ſuch dazzling Beauty but to do Miracles, I’m now Love’s Convert. Aſide.So I find I’m a Woman’s Aſs already; I am dowright damnably in Love, and will through this Matrimonial Gulph, if I periſh in the attempt.

Char.

You’re very ſerious Sir, pray don’t conſider too much, I may chance to loſe a Husband by it.

Love.

I am thinking how very happy I ſhall be when the Divine Charlot’s mine; come dear Madam, I will delay my bliſs no longer.

Char.

Ay, for Heavens ſake, let’s away while this Paſſion laſts, this Violence will ſoon be over, and then the Tide will turn.

Love.

It never, never ſhall, dear charming Angel.

Char.

to Jul.

Come Cozen, you muſt be our Witneſs.

Jul.

I wiſh I may be ever ſo to all that makes you happy.

Exeunt om
Scene 23 D4r 23

Scene IV.

Enter Esq; Wouldbe and Dowdy.

Eſq; W.

Nay, pray dear Bunny, don’t be nangry indeed and indeed; I was taken up by the Watch and carried to the Round houſe.

Dow.

Yes, yes, a likely matter, and how came you out pray?

Eſq; W.

Why the Devil ſent four of his Life-guard, and took me out by main force.

Dow.

Don’t think to make a Fool of me, but tell me the truth, you’d beſt, you Rebel you; who was it brought you home, they lookt like Devils indeed; but how come you in this pickle to come home without your Cloths?

Eſq; W.

Aſide.

What the Devil ſhall I ſay now! Pauſes a little. Why indeed Bunny I cannot tell, for I was damnable Drunk, and did not know I was in the Round-houſe till I wakt this Morning and found my ſelf there: Pray Bunny fordgive I, as true as I am God Almighty’s Child, I won’t do ſo no more.

Kneels and makes pitiful Faces.

Dow.

Get you gone, you Fool, and don’t make you ſelf ſuch an Aſs; you are like to wear your old Cloths till Eaſter, for you ſhall have no new ones.

Eſq; W.

Nay, pray Bunny now don’t be ſo nangry; indeed I do love Bunny.

Riſes, kiſſes and fawns on her.

Dow.

You have ſuch a way with you; well, come then, but will you be good?

Eſq; W.

I will indeed Bunny, go and bid the Maid warm my Bed, for I am very weary with my laſt Nights Loging; if any body comes to ſpeak with me, let me not be diſturbed.

Dow.

I will my Dear, poor Wretch, I’ll go and make you ſome Butter’d- Ale too.

Exeunt Dowdy.

Eſq; W.

Ay do, ſo I have appeas’d one Fool; I’m damn’d Mad at this Diſappointment, if I thought Urania had a hand in it, I’d be revenged of her, by Publiſhing to the Town I had lain with her; I did verily believe the Devil had run away with me, till I diſcover’d one of them to be Ben the Drawer; ’twas certainly a Contrivance of Freeman’s, I’ll return it to him with the honourable Badge of a pair of Horns. I’ll ſleep three or four Hours, and then write to her for another Appointment, I doubt not but the kind Soul is willing.

Exit Eſq; W.
Scene 24 D4v 24

Scene V.

Enter Lovewell, Charlot, and Juliana, at the Blew Poſts in the Haymarket.

Love.

Now, my dear Charlot, that I can call you mine; how much I prize the Bleſſing you ſhall find by the great Value I ſhall ſet on you.

Char.

You are wonderous Devout, but ’twill ne’er laſt long: The ſawcy Name of Husband will in ſhort time claim its Lawful Authority. But pray Mr. Lovewell, haſten Dinner.

Enter Servants with Dinner.

Jul.

’Tis here you are always happy; you can but wiſh and have.

Love.

Come, Ladies, fall to, if you have any Appetite; I muſt reſtrain mine, though Grace is ſaid.

Char.

If you have any to what’s here lets ſit ―― Remember this is my Day of Power; and being the laſt that I muſt Reign, you muſt expect me to be very tyrannical.

Jul.

All Happineſs to you both, and may it ever continue.

Drinks to ’em

Char.

As much to dear Juliana in the Man ſhe loves.

Love.

Succeſs and Happineſs attend us all. What think you of a Song, Ladies, ’twill give us time to eat.

Char.

With all my Heart.

Love.

Call in the Muſick there? Exit Waiter Enters with Muſick. To the Muſick. Come, pray oblige us with a Song.

A Dialogue by a Man and Woman.

Woman.

Oft have you told me that you lov’d,

And askt how I your Flame approv’d;

Of Love and Flames I’ve heard ’tis true,

Yet never till it came from you.

But I would know what ’tis ſo call’d,

Before my Heart in’t be involv’d.

Man.

’Tis a deſire in the Mind,

A pleaſing Pain, and Joy refin’d.

Life 25 E1r 25

Life is a dull inſipid Thing,

Where Love its Bleſſing does not bring.

The Gods themſelves, who Joys diſpence,

Have felt its mighty influence.

Woman.

If Gods that Power have own’d, alas! I fear

I ſtrive in vain to keep my Freedom here.

Man.

Reſign it then, and bleſs me with your love,

A Glory I’d not change to move

The brighteſt Star in all the Orb above.

Woman.

If you will promiſe ever to be true,

My Heart and Freedom I’ll give up to you.

Man.

As well the Needle from his Pole may move,

As I to Love and Thee unfaithful prove.

Chorus together.

In Love and in Pleaſure we’ll paſs all our Nights,

And each day we’ll revel with ſome new Delights.

Thus we’ll Live and Love on, till together we Die;

And in each other Arms to Elizium will fly.

Ex. Muſick.

Char.

Now, Mr. Lovewell, you muſt give my Cozen and I permiſſion to leave you for a little time, to go to the Exchange to provide ſome Neceſſaries; and becauſe I will not leave you idle, pray take Pains to tell that Purſe of Gold.

Love.

Since it muſt be ſo, what you pleaſe. But I hope you will not make it long before you return.

Char.

You ſhall not ſtay for us half an Hour.

Love.

Where will you go when you come back?

Char.

We’ll diſcourse of that when we meet again; farewell. Come Cozen.

Ex. CharCharlot. and Juliana. Lovewell waits on them to the Door, returns, ſists down, and tells the Gold.

Five hundred Pieces; a pretty Sum, and not unwelcome at this time. I Gad I was a very lucky Fellow to have a pretty rich young Lady thus thrown into my Arms, juſt in the Ebb of my Fortune.

Enter Frank with a Note. Enter Waiter with a Letter.

Wait.

Here’s a Note, Sir, left for you at the Bar, as they went out.

Ex. Waiter. E Love. 26 E1v 26

Love.

Ha! What ſhould be the meaning of this! Opens, and reads. ――Diſpoſe of your ſelf as your Humour ſerves you, when you have done with the Employment I left you; for you will meet at this time with no other Entertainment from your Bride.

Drawer ready.

Death, Hell, and Furies! what can this mean! Am I thus Jilted at laſt by ſome lewd Woman! O Sot! that I could think one of Charlot’s Birth and Fortune would marry at that wild Rate. She only took up that Name to gull the eaſy Coxcomb, unthinkful Fool; I could curſe my ſelf, her, the Sex, and all the World. What ſhall I do, O dear damn’d Impoſtor! By Heaven I love her ſo, I can ſcarce repent I have made her mine; were ſhe but Honeſt, which much I fear, I would not change her for the Worlds Empreſs. But why do I flatter thus a ſenſeleſs Paſſion? This Toad, for ought I know, a leud Proſtitute, who only has drawn me in to go to Goal for her. O there it is! Some falſe fair Devil, forſaken by her Keeper, that wanted only a Husband for that uſe, or elſe to Father ſome Body’s Child: But however, ſhe is no very poor Whore.

Shews the Purſe.

But this is no Place to Expoſtulate in. Here Drawer.

Drawer.

Did you call, Sir?

Enter Dubois.

Love.

Ay, what’s to pay?

Drawer.

All’s paid, Sir, by the Ladies?

Exit Drawer.

Love.

So that’s ſome Comfort ſtill; come chear thy Heart, Lovewell; all yet may be well: They’re Jilts of Quality however. I believe it is e’en ſome Lady errant that’s run mad reading of Don Quixot; but hang’t, jeſting is a little Unſavory at this time. I’ll ſee if I can find out Sir Roger Marwood, who may tell me ſome Tidings of the true Charlot, though not of my fair damn’d Devil; O curſe of my Credulity.

Well; ſince this damn’d Jilt is gone,

I am fairly rid of all the Sex in one.

Exit Lovewell.

The end of the Third Act.

Act IV.

Scene I.

Enter Lovewell, and Drawer.

Love.

Is Sir Roger Marwood here?

Draw.

Yes, Sir.

Love.

Who’s with him?

Draw.

Only Sir Charles Frankford.

Love. 27 E2r 27

Love.

Tell them Lovewell deſires to know if he may have admittance to them.

Enter Sir Roger.

Draw.

Yes, Sir, I will.

Love.

’S death, what ſhall I do? Tell him I’m married, he’ll only laugh at me, as all the World will do beſides. He’s here! Heavens what ſhall I ſay?

Sir Roger.

Why ſo ceremonious, Mr. Lovewell, to your Friends? Come, come in, we are all alone, and ſhall be glad of a third Perſon to make us Company.

Love.

Mine will be but very indifferent at this time; for I’m curſedly out of Humour.

Sir Roger.

I’m ſorry for that, and much more ſo, if you have any juſt Occaſion; but come we’ll endeavour to divert you.

Love.

’Twill be ineffectual at this time. Aſide. Call Drawer. I’ll follow you, Sir.

Ex. SirRogRoger. and Love. Scene draws, diſcovers Sir Charles Frankford writing at a Table. Glaſſes and Bottles. Enter to him Sir Roger Marwood, and Lovewell.

Sir Charles.

riſes.

Mr. Lovewell, your Servant: You’ll pardon me I did not wait on you. I was writing an Excuſe to my Siſter, whom I promiſed to fetch home from Kenſington this Evenning, but an unexpected Buſineſs is fallen out which hinders me. You’ll give me leave to make an end.

Sits down.

Love.

Ay, pray Sir Charles. To him.Has Madam Charlot been long out of Town, Sir Charles?

Aſide. So I find I’m indeed ruined, ſhe’s out of Town. Oh! I could Curſe!

Sir Char.

She went but this Morning to make a Viſit to a Relation we have there, who ſhe brings home with her; I’m ſending my Coach for her, ſhe would go this Morning into a Hackny.

Love.

Ha! ſome Hopes ſtill. Aſide. To SirCharCharles.If your Coach goes empty, pray, Sir Charles, give me leave to make use of it, for I am obliged to be at Kenſington to Night to mount the Guard.

Sir Char.

With all my Heart; ’tis at your Service.

Love.

I’ll loſe no time then, for fear the Ladies ſhould ſtay for it.

Sir Char.

I’m ſorry to loſe your good Company ſo ſoon, but I’m likewiſe ingaged. Here, who waits?

Enter Drawer.

Sir Char.

Bid one of my Servants come to me.

Draw.

Yes, Sir.

Ex. Drawer. E2 Sir Char. 28 E2v 28 Enter Footman.

Sir Char.

Here, give this Letter to the Coach-man, and bid him carry it to my Siſter at my Aunt Treaters, and wait on the Gentleman where he pleaſes.

Love.

Sir Charles, your Servant. Sir Roger, yours. Aſide.So now if I can but get this Letter from the Coach-man, which I ſuppoſe will be no hard matter to effect, I ſhall certainly find whether it be my Charlot, or no.

Ex. Lovewell.

Sir Rog.

This Lovewell’s a pretty Gentleman. I have often thought he’s in all Circumſtances the very Man I have heard your Siſter wiſh for to meet in a Husband: But how goes the Buſineſs with your fair Cozen Juliana? I dare believe ſhe loves you.

Sir Char.

I dare believe ſo too: But only as ſhe is a Relation, I fear ſome happier Man is the Subject of her Sight.

Sir Rog.

That you may ſoon reſolve your ſelf, by diſcovering your Paſſion to your Siſter, who knows the deepeſt Secrets of her Heart.

Sir Char.

’Tis true, I may: But I ſo much fear the Diſcovery will not be to my Advantage, that I find ſome Pleaſure in being unreſolved, to hope the beſt.

Sir Rog.

Take Courage, Sir, and try: My Life on’t ’tis you, and only you that takes up all her Thoughts.

Sir Char.

Well, I’ll venture, let the Event be what it will: But come, Sir, Roger, we ſhall out ſtay our time, ’tis now near Six, the Hour which we appointed to be at Whitehall.

Ex. Sir Char. and Sir Rog.

Scene II.

Enter Freeman and Urania at ſeveral Doors.

Ura.

I find there is no getting rid of this opinionated Blockhead’s ſawcy Importunities, but by expoſing him to the whole Town, which I’ll venture bearing a Share in to be revenged of him: Haſt the Letter Freeman?

Free.

Yes, here it is. I warrant old Madam Beldam catches at it as greedily as ſhe would a Client for her Son.

Urania 29 E3r 29 Urania takes it, and reads. Madam, I cannot ſee ſo much Goodneſs as your vertuous Daughter is poſſed with, abuſed ſo groſly by the Lewdneſs of her Husband, without (if it is poſſible) making you ſenſible of it; if you will be further informed, be this Evening at Seven a Clock in St. James’s Park, where you may be convinced how great a Brute he is to her, by finding him with a Wench. Your Friend unknown.

Ura.

You have adapted it to her Capacity; but I thought you would have writ it to Madam Dowdee her ſelf.

Free.

O no; it might have lighted in the Husband’s Hands, and that would ſpoil all: But have you anſwered his Letter?

Ura.

Yes; and appointed him to be here at Nine, to come in Boldly, and call for a Room, and to let me alone with the reſt, which I’d contrive for him. I warrant him I’ll be as good as my Word; be ſure to get ſome Cherry Bounce for them, you know they are all Souls.

Free.

I’ll warrant I’ll have that ſhall do their Buſineſs for ’em: I’ll put the Letter into the Penny Poſt my ſelf.

Ura.

And I’ll go and ſee the Chamber prepared for him.

Exeunt.

Scene III.

Enter Charlot, Juliana, Bellaſira, with a Servant.

Char.

A Gentleman ſay you come in my Brother’s Coach with a Letter for me?

Serv.

Yes, Madam.

Char.

Do you know his Name?

Serv.

Yes, Madam, ’tis I think Mr. Lovewell.

Char.

Go tell him I’ll wait on him preſently. Exit Serv. Now, my dear Girl, you muſt aſſiſt me, or all my Deſigns are croſt.

Bell. 30 E3v 30

Bell.

What is it you wou’d have us do?

Char.

Come in, and I will tell you.

Exeunt omnes. Enter Lovewell, and Servant.

Serv.

’Please, Sir, to ſtay one Moment here, my Lady will come to you preſently.

Love.

Thank you honeſt Friend. I have eaſily compaſſed the Letter; but never was poor unfortunate Lover upon a Rack as I am this Minute, between Hope and Fear.

Enter Bellaſira.

Love.

aſide. By Heavens I am loſt! It is not my Charlot. I am ſo confounded I know not what to ſay. Goes to her, and ſalutes her. Madam, Sir Charles made me ſo happy to be the Meſſenger of this to his fair Siſter, Madame Charlot, whom I preſume you are.

Gives her the Letter.

Bell.

My name is Charlot, and Siſter to Sir Charles Frankford; but I am amazed why he ſhould give a Gentleman the trouble his meaneſt Servant could have performed.

Love.

Ruined and loſt! Curſt, curſt, deluded Fool! Aſide. Madam, ’twas at my earneſt Intreaty to have an Opportunity to make me Welcome where I could hope none, but from ſuch an Introducer. I’m ſo diſtracted I know not what I ſay, or do.

Aſide.

Bell.

You ſeem diſorder’d. Sir, are you not well? Pleaſe you to ſit?

Love.

No, Madam; I’m taken on the ſudden with a ſtrange Dizineſs in my Head, nothing but the Air will do me good. Madam, your moſt humble Servant.

Exit Lovewell.

Bell.

So this is but one part over, the greateſt yet remains behind: I’ll in and diſpatch this Letter after him.

Exit Bell. Enter Mrs. Belldam, and Dowdy.

Dow.

I don’t care, I will tell him that I will; and I’ll tear his Eyes out, a Rebel as he is.

Blubbering and Crying.

Beld.

Nay, pray Daughter be perſwaded, that will make make him be upon the march; let us go into this St. James’s Park, and catch him there, and then we’ll ſwinge him off both together.

Dow.

But don’t go in that pickle, Mother; ’twill Diſgrace me now I am a Gentlewoman. Oh, oh, oh! that he ſhould Cuckold me that have been the making of him.

Beld.

Have patience, Daughter; perhaps it a Story laid upon him. I’ll go home, and put on my beſt Cloaths, and come preſently.

Ex. Beld. Dow. 31 E4r 31

Dow.

Well, I will go and ſee whether he is there, or no; but I’ll up for a Dram of Comfort, for my Spirits are caſt quite down.

Exit Dow.

Scene VIV.

Enter Lovewell reading. If it may be permitted me to hope any thing from the Diſorder I ſee in you at our laſt Converſation, I would gladly believe it to my Advantage; the Sight of you has given me an infinite deal of Diſquiet, but your Abſence an inſupportable Pain. I conjure you to return to me with all ſpeed you can, that I may know what Reception my Heart may find with you, upon whom I have beſtowed it unaskt. I demand yours in return, upon which depends the Felicity of Charlot. Lovewell ſpeaks, and ſighs.

I would it was in my Power to give. What has my curſed Fortune reſerved me for! Muſt I ever be her Sport! I’m Jilted by a falſe Charlot, when I might have had the true one. But that is not the worſt of my Miſery; for to compleat it, and make me truly wretched, I love this Falſe, Unknown, beyond my Reaſon, and all Things. Here ſhe comes, and I’m more out of Countenance than ſhe’ll pretend to be.

Enter Bellaſira.

Love.

To anſwer your Commands, Madam, I am come; not that I dare wiſh any thing from the Hopes you give me here. Shews the Letter. Such Bleſſings does not belong to the unhappy Lovewell, who ſerves only for the Sport of Fortune, and all the World beſides.

Bell.

I believe you found nothing in my Letter, Sir; (tho I muſt Bluſh to own it) but what looks too ſincerely to give the leaſt miſtruſt it was not real: Heaven is not truer than that Charlot Loves, Languiſhes, and without a grateful Senſe of her unbounded Paſſion, Dies for you.

Love.

Heaven has not now another Curſe in ſtore to make me more unhappy.

Bell.

Is then my Youth and Fortune ſo contemptible, that it would only heap up Miſeries upon the Man I love? The generous offer I make you of my Heart is not a common Prize; no, my dear Lovewell, ſhe ſighs for I muſt call you ſo, ’tis unacquainted in Love’s wide Labyrinth, and there will loſe its way.

Love.

Forbear, dear Madam, to diſtract me with this Angel’s Goodneſs, I am not worthy of the leaſt of all this mighty Kindneſs, I wiſh ’twere in my power to give my Heart to her that beſt deſerves it, for none has ſo juſt a Claim as the 32 E4v 32 the Divine Charlot. You have treated me with that Sincerity that ’twould be a Baſeneſs I never ſhould forgive my ſelf to betray you with ſuch hopes, (Pardon the Expreſſion) I cannot juſtly give; in ſhort Madam, to my Eternal Confuſion I ſpeak it, I am not a Maſter of my Inclinations, I love with all the Ardour of prevailing Paſſion, a falſe ungrateful Woman, and what renders my Folly inexcuſable, one I know not, nor ever perhaps may ſee again.

Bell.

And can you be ſo unjuſt to your ſelf, and cruel to me, to ſcorn my real Love for a Chimera?

Love.

Expreſs my curſt Misfortune by ſom gentler term, I beg you that does not ſuit with the reſpect that I will always pay you.

Bell.

If you will ſtill prefer a baſe ungrateful Woman before the trueſt Love that e’er poſſeſt a tender Virgin’s Breaſt, yet grant me this one Boon, that I may always know where to hear of you, I mean, no wrong to your ingrate, or to trouble you with the Perſecution of my unwelcome Love.

Love.

Be aſſur’d, dear Madam, you always ſhall command me in that and all things elſe, that lies within my power.

Bell.

Well Sir, I will not detain you longer in this uneaſie Entertainment.

Love.

kiſſes her Hand.

Adieu, dear Madam, you ſhall very ſpeedily hear of the unhappy Lovewell.

Ex. Lovewell.

Bell.

So I think I have done pretty well for a young beginner, but I muſt give an account of my ſuceſs, that I believe they have heard it all.

Exit Bell.

Scene V.

St. James’s Park. Enter Beldam and Dowdy, Beldam drest in an old faſhion Point Coif, a lac’d Mazarene Hood over her Face, an A-la-mode Scarf lac’d round ruffled full behind, both Mask’d.

Belld.

I wonder how the Miſſes, as they call ’em do, that were theſe Masks, I never wore one before; I am all in a Sweat with it, how can you bear yours?

Pulls off her Mask and wipes her Face.

Dow.

Oh, I have learnt to wear one ſince I was a Gentlewoman.

Enter ſeveral Men and Women croſſing the Stage.

Beld.

What a World of fine Folks here is, but I don’t ſee my Son yet?

Dow.

He may be a t’other ſide, let us go round.

Enter Freeman.

Freem.

So, there’s my Game, to them. You ſeem Ladies, to be in ſearch of ſome body, can I aſſiſt you?

Dow.

You? why, what are you?

Freem.

A Knight Adventurer, to ſerve all pretty Ladies.

Beld. 33 F1r 33

Beld.

What, I warrant you, you take us for Miſſes now, becauſe we have got Masks; but I’d have you to know my Daughter and I are not for your turn, we are none of this end of the Town Folks.

Freem.

Pray good angry old Gentlewoman, I mean no harm, nor do not take you for any of this end of the Town Ladies; but would perhaps if you would accept the Service, help you to a ſight of him you come to find.

Dow.

Why, how do you know who we come to find?

Freem.

Know, why I know by the Stars, not only that, but all your moſt ſecret Thoughts, did you never hear of Partridge?

Beld.

Yes, he that makes Almanacks, I always buy his, becauſe he Noſticates, as they call it, what will come to paſs.

Freem.

Why, I am he, I can tell you now what you come here for.

Dow.

O Mother! he may tell me perhaps where we may find my Rebel.

Freem.

Ay, that’s a ſmall matter in my Art, to let you ſee I perfectly know your Concerns; you come here expecting to find your Husband with his Mis, at Roſamonds Pond.

Beld.

Oh Daughter, this is certainly Dr. Partridge, and he can tell this by Strology; may be he may tell us where to find him.

Dow.

Pray Sir, be ſo kind if you can.

Freem.

Can, that’s a good one, why, I’ll carry you to the very Houſe; nay, the very Room where he is, if you’ll go with me.

Dow.

Your Servant good Sir, I’ll go with all my heart, ſhan’t us Mother?

Beld.

Yes, if the Learned Doctor pleaſes; but will you go with us, good Sir Doctor?

Freem.

Yes, that I will, to Dowdy lets ſee your Hand Lady, looks in her Hand Hah, you were born under Vulcan, you muſt have a care of Horns; I doubt you have been a little too near his Forge already by your Complexion, let me ſee, you’ll have ſeven Children, as beautiful and wiſe as the Mother, and as honeſt and modeſt as the Father; you’ll be a Widow very ſpeedily, that is, within theſe five or ſix Years, next Husband ſhall keep a Coach.

Beld.

O good Sir, tell me if I ſhall live to ſee that day.

Shews her Hand to him.

Freem.

Yes, you may, if you ſpare your Brandy-Bottle a little more than you do.

Beld.

Aſide.O Lord, I ſee he knows all I do, I wiſh he does not find out from whence I furniſh my Daughter’s Houſe with fine Sugar, Spice, &c. and Candles, and make Mrs. Lockup the Houſe-keeper be turn’d out of her place.

Freem.

Well, come Ladies, ſhall I conduct you where I promiſed? I have ſet a Spell upon him, that he cannot ſtir till I come.

Dow.

Ay, come Mother, I long to be at him.

Beld.

My Fingers itch too, I’ll pull off his Point Cravat again with a Vengeance.

Freem.

Come Ladies, I’ll lead the way.

Exeunt omnes. F Scene
34 F1v 34

Scene VI.

Enter Charlot and Juliana at ſeveral Doors.

Char.

O Coz, Juliana, I was juſt ſeeking; I have a Secret to diſcover to you gives me a great deal of pleaſure; my Brother is paſſionately in Love, and juſt now confeſt it to me, and has engaged me to be his Advocate, will not you aſſiſt me?

Jul.

Cruel Charlot, why this to me, do you triumph over my Miſfortune?

Char.

Unkind Juliana, to think I would, ’tis you your ſelf has charmed him.

Jul.

I fear ’twas Gratitude, and not his Choice, made him think on me unfaithful Creature, to betray to him the deareſt Secret of my Life, and force an Inclination, perhaps he ne’er had thought of.

Char.

By all that’s good, my Dear, you wrong me, he own’d it to me with all the ſigns of Fear your Heart was prepoſſeſt; he ever heard our late Converſation in the Garden, and charged me if I knew you would not receive his Addreſſes favourably, never to tell you the leaſt tittle of it; I gave him ſo much Incouragement as to revive his hopes.

Jul.

And ſo you Diſcourſe ended, did it?

Char.

No, I told him then of my Marriage, which he was far from being angry at, but blamed me a little for uſing of him ſo; and promiſed to forgive me, upon Condition I would prevail with you to accept his Addreſſes.

Jul.

You need not doubt ſucceeding, my Heart too much pleads for him, to need another Advocate.

Char.

Lets go my to my Cozen Bell. I left her with my Brother, and flew with all Impatience to bring theſe happy Tidings.

Exeunt.

The end of the Fourth Act.

Act V.

Scene I.

Enter Charlot and Sir Roger Marwood.

Sir Rog.

You could not, Madam, have made a better Choice, for Lovewell wants not Virtues to make him in all things a compleat Gentleman, but an Eſtate, which his Elder Brother was born to, and he beſt deſerves; but why will you uſe him thus, Madam?

Char.

Only to find which he has moſt Eſteem for, my Perſon or Eſtate.

Sir Rog.

That was a Trial to be made before, and not now; when ’tis not in your power to revoke what you have done.

Char.

’Tis, I own, a fooliſh Curioſity; but pray Sir Roger, no more Objections, but if you will oblige me, do as I deſire.

Sir 35 F2r 35

Sir Rog.

Well, Madam, I will, upon two Conditions; firſt; That you uſe your Intereſt with your pretty Cozen, you have brought to Town with you, to accept the Prize ſhe has made of my Heart; and ſecondly, To put poor Mr. Lovewell out of his pain to Night, by diſcovering his Happineſs to him.

Char.

I engage my Honour for both, do but as I deſire for two or three Hours, and after I’ll be guided by you.

Sir Rog.

I’ll obey you, Madam, but remember the Conditions.

Exit. Sir Rog. Enter Juliana, Bellaſira.

Char.

What have you done with my Brother?

Bell.

My Aunt is entertaining him with Politicks, which we thought we had but little concern in; ſo have left them to ſettle the Nation, whilſt I come to ſettle my Heart; but I find you have diſpoſed of him whoſe hands I did deſign to put it in: Prithee what haſt done with him, I ſhall grow monſtrous jealous, if you do not give a very good account of him?

Char.

Hey day! what are you in Love too! Sure the little God will empty his Quiver in our Family, for never was ſuch a Company of Loving Souls?

Jul.

You ſee ’tis dangerous jeſting with edge Tools; You cannot, Charlot, but in honour aſſiſt her, for ’twas you that ſcrew’d her up to a Love Key.

Char.

I am glad to find her ſo inclin’d, for Sir Roger juſt now engaged me to be his Interceſſor.

Bell.

You’ll find it no hard task to perſwade me to a good Opinion of him; but have you engaged him in your Affair?

Char.

Yes, he is gone about it; but I have yet another part for you, and then I’ll undeceive him.

Bell.

I’ll do any thing you’d have me promiſe, but that; for I’ll ſwear I am in pain for him.

Char.

I do ſincerely promiſe you I will, I wait but for Sir Roger’s return, and then you ſhall know my farther deſign; come let’s now in and releaſe my Brother.

Enter Sir Roger Marwood.

Love.

Sir Roger, your moſt humble Servant, you are the only Man that now is only welcome to me; how can you have ſo much Goodneſs to throw away a Thought on one ſo wretched?

Sir Rog.

I ne’er forſake my Friends in their diſtreſs, I wiſh I could bring comfort to your trouble; all I can ſay, is, ſtill to hope the beſt; a day or two may perhaps unriddle the Myſtery, and you may yet be happy. But come, Mr. Lovewell, you muſt go out with me, I will not leave you alone to your melancholy Thoughts.

Love.

I am at your Service, diſpoſe of me as you pleaſe.

Sir Rog.

Are you ready?

Love.

Always to wait on you.

Exeunt. F2 Enter 36 F2v 36 Enter again in the Street, Sir Roger and Lovewell.

Sir Rog.

aſide.

It goes againſt my nature to betray this Man, though ’tis but in a Jeſt; here are the Raſcals coming.

Enter Four Bayliffs. They ſeize Lovewell’s Sword before he ſees them.

Sir Rog.

Hah! what mean you Hell-hounds?

First Bayliff.

No harm to you, Sir, Mr. Lovewell? I Arreſt you at the Suit of Alderman Saintly in an Action of 10000 l.

Love.

I never heard of ſuch a Name.

Second Bayliff.

I ſuppoſe, Sir, your Lady does.

Love.

Oh does ſhe ſo, Hell confound her for it; nay, Hands off, I’ll follow you upon my Honour, where e’er you’ll carry me.

Firſt Bayliff.

Will you not ſend for Bail, Sir?

Love.

No Sir, I’ll directly to the Goal where I muſt lie.

Sir Rog.

Will not my Bail be accepted? I’ll willingly engage for one.

Love.

By no means, Sir Roger, I will not involve my Friends in my Misfortunes; they muſt e’n take my Body for the Debt; for I am not worth it no way elſe.

Sir Rog.

I’ll ſtrait away to this Alderman Saintly, and ſee what’s to be done.

Exit. Sir Rog.

Love.

Farewel Sir, you’ll find me at the Gate-Houſe; come Sirs, conduct me where you will, I’ll tamely follow; I think the Myſtery is now diſclos’d with a Vengeance.

Exeunt omn. Enter Sir Charles Frankford, Charlot, Juliana and Belliſira.

Sir Char.

Why ſhould you delay my Happineſs, dear Cozen, for the Punctilio of formal Courtſhip; I have long lov’d you, let that attone for it; and if my Siſter does not flatter me, you do not hate me.

Jul.

What would the World, and you your ſelf think of me, to catch at your firſt Proffer, as if I fear’d you would recant? Smiling.I dare truſt your Conſtancy, and ſtay till ’tis convenient.

Sir Char.

To the World you may very well anſwer your Conduct; for it is but confirming the Reports which have been often of it, being ſo deſigned for me, ’tis what I beg of you; and what time’s more convenient than now, at the conſummating my Siſters Wedding?

Jul.

Upon this condition, that you can oblige Sir Roger and my Cozen Bell. to marry at the ſame time I’ll promiſe you.

Sir Char.

Do you diſpoſe her to it? I’ll warrant him, for his is paſſionately in Love with her; what ſay you Cozen, will you obſtruct my Bliſs? for now it alone depends on you.

Bell.

You know, Sir Charles, you may diſpoſe of me, who are my Guardian.

Enter 37 F3r 37 Enter Sir Roger Marwood.

Char.

Now for ſome news from enchanted my Eſquire. She takes Sir Rog. aſide.

Sir Rog.

’Tis done as you commanded; but ’tis well if you do not repent it, for I left him in a deſperate Humour.

Char.

Good Heaven forbid! Sir Roger, pray wait on my Cozen Bell. to him, but do not you appear; by that time ſhe has done, we’ll all be there, to Bell. you have my full Directions.

Exit Sir Roger leading Bellaſira.

Sir Char.

Indeed, Siſter, you have gone too far, in thus impriſoning a Man who ſhortly muſt command you. What is it you Deſign now? If you play him any further Pranks I’ll betray you to him.

Char.

I will not; I have only ſent my Cozen Bell. to once more try him; after which, I, and Sir Roger, will go to him. You, and my Cozens, ſhall be in hearing; and when you find we come to any Agreement, then come in.

Sir Char.

Suppoſe he takes Cozen Bell. at her Word, what think you then?

Char.

Think! why, I ſhall think him a Man: But if he can reſiſt the Temptation, an Angel.

Sir Char.

Come, let us go. I’m very impatient to ſee him diſabuſed.

Exeunt. Enter Turnkey.

Turnkey.

Sir, here is a Gentlewoman deſires to ſpeak with you; Shall I let her in?

Love.

A Gentlewoman! Ay, pray conduct her in; this is a pretty Place to entertain Ladies in, but ’tis her own ſeeking; Who ſhould it be? my fair Devil of a Wife perhaps!

Enter Bellaſira.

Love.

This is indeed amazing Goodneſs! How could you think of a loſt Wretch, dear Madam, forſook by all the World?

Bell.

Not all you ſee, no my dear Lovewell, I never will forſake you, but conſtantly attend your Fortunes; mine cannot be favourable whilſt yours are adverſe; would you but make mine yours, as I will always eſpouſe your Concerns, there ſhould not be a Joy poſſeſt by Charlot, but what ſhould be her Lovewells, and all his Griefs be hers.

Love.

Your Generoſity confounds me, I muſt not add ſo much to that vaſt heap of Favours I ſtand indebted to you for; I’m incapable any way to make the leaſt return.

Bell.

Is it ſo hard to Love? I have Youth and Fortune, is that no Charm?

Love.

Your Perſon is infinitely charming, and that more than Angel’s Goodneſs, not to be reſiſted; but know, dear Madam, ſighs. ſince I muſt tell you, to juſtifie my ſelf from that Ingratitude you juſtly might reproach me with; I am, to my Deſtruction Married, Married, dear Lady; that’s the curſt cauſe of all my Miſery.

Bell. 38 F3v 38

Bell.

Then I am loſt indeed, a fatal Moment that I ſaw you firſt; why were we born to be both unhappy?

Love.

I could, dear Madam, for ever be bleſt with you, but would not wrong your Goodneſs to involve you in my wretched ruin.

Bell.

This is meer excuſe: But for all your Cruelty to me, I’ll free you from this uncomfortable place, and if you’ll ſtill perſiſt in your Ingratitude, expect the Curſe that follows that baſe Sin of never being happy.

Exit.

Love.

For Heavens ſake, dear Madam, ſtay and hear me ſpeak. Following her to the Door. He returns. She’s gone, and much I fear, will keep her word; had I but known her before I was bewitcht by that damn’d Sorcereſs, how happy might we both have been? But I’ll no longer cavil with my Fate, but by a tame Submiſſion to it baffle its utmoſt Malice.

Sits down and reads. Enter SirRoRoger. Marwood and Charlot. Lovewell ſtarts up and throws away his Book.

Love.

Hah! What do I ſee! S’death ’tis the dear Devil her ſelf; now ſhall I play the Fool and be again deluded, for I find I have not power to be heartily angry at her. But how came he with her?

Char.

You ſeem ſurpris’d, Sir, I fear my ſight offends you.

Love.

I wiſh it ne’er had pleas’d me, ſighs falſe Woman, of all the Coxcombs that this Town abounds with, Why was I cull’d out to be your Property! but tell me if thou haſt ſo much Grace left to once ſpeak Truth, how came he with you?

Sir Rog.

As a kind Friend ſhould do to releaſe thee of thy pains, and take them on my ſelf; I love this Lady with all the Blindneſs which attends that Paſſion, marry her at any rate, and Sacrifice the World to give my ſelf that Satisfaction. She has prudently conſider’d your equal want of Fortunes will but make you both miſerable.

Char.

Therefore if you’ll conſent to make void our Marriage, you ſhall this minute be releas’d from this place, if not, ſtay till Neceſſity compels you.

Love.

Treacherous Man, how could you call me Friend, and thus baſely betray me?

Char.

Well, what ſay you, Sir?

Love.

Hell confound you both; no, I’ll ſtill keep thee to be reveng’d of thee, and plague thee for the Wrongs thou haſt done me, ungrateful Creature, to torture thus a Man thou knoweſt lov’d thee from the firſt Moment he ſee that damn’d bewitching Face; wer’t but honeſt, I could love thee ſtill; but I will tear thee from my Heart and never think of thee again, ſighs if poſſible; ſhe weeps ah ſtop thoſe Crocodiles Tears, for though I know them to be ſo, they pierce me to the Soul.

Char.

Can you forgive me, Sir? for all this uſage I long have lov’d you, which made me reſolve ſome way or other to Marry you; how I effected it, I need not tell you, I had no ſooner done it but I repented, believing juſtly you would be provoked to uſe me ill, when once you found I had only borrow’d the name of Charlot, this made me fly your anger.

Love. 39 F4r 39

Love.

And to ſecure your ſelf, ſecured me. Hah! was it ſo? I thank you kind Wife, indeed ’twas wonderous Love.

Char.

Pray hear me out. Sir Roger here, who has long ſolicited me to his unlawful Love, preſuming on the Scantineſs of my Fortune, when he found all other ways ineffectual to obtain me, proffered to marry me; which I likewiſe refuſed, acquainting him withal of my Marriage with you, which made him clap this Action on you, to drive you to the Choice of either renouncing me, or elſe to keep you here.

Love.

Oh Heavens! that ever ſuch a Piece of Villany ſhould harbour in that Heart I always thought was Noble: How could you call me Friend, and thus betray me?

Rog.

aſide.

She makes me appear a pretty Rogue, that’s the truth of it; but I muſt let her run on. You know, Mr. Lovewell, Love and Friendſhip are not compatible, where the Object of it is adored by both.

Love.

Then art thou Honeſt? Come ſwear and damn thy ſelf, you know I am credulous, and ſhall believe you.

Char.

By Heavens, and all that is Sacred, I am chaſt; and love thee at that extravagant Rate, I’d quit a Throne to dwell with thee in Chains, Oh my dear Lovewell, could you meet mine with an equal Paſſion, how happy might we be!

Love.

Yes, in ſome Country, where we could live by Air and Love; for I know not how we ſhall maintain a coſtlier Diet.

Char.

Providence will not let us ſtarve, we muſt truſt to that; I ask you nothing but your Love, I will maintain my ſelf.

Char.

Indeed you wrong my Virtue, I’m truly honeſt, and would not injure you, though in a thought to gain the World; Forgive what’s paſt, and take me to your boſom.

Love.

holds her in his Arms.

Heaven knows how willingly I could, yes, I could love thee, doat on thee, and be thy Fool. Puts her from him.Stand off, vain eaſie Aſs; what am I doing, trapanning of my ſelf again?

Char.

You ſhall not throw me from ye, I’ll follow thus, hangs on him and never will forſake you; and here I ſwear I will not leave this place, till you conduct me hence.

Love.

May I believe you ſerious?

Char.

You muſt, you ſhall; I ever will be yours, with as much Truth as ever Turtle lov’d her deareſt Mate.

Love.

Well, I will live with thee, for Heaven knows I Love thee; and though you have uſed me thus, will always uſe you well.

Sir Rog.

Smiling.

So, Madam, I ſee I’m quite forſaken.

Enter Sir Charles, Juliana, Bellaſira.

Sir Char.

Here are more Witneſſes to your bargain, Mr. Lovewell, than you are aware of; But methinks, my new Brother, you might have askt me leave.

Love. 40 F4v 40

Love.

O, Sir, do not triumph over the Eaſineſs of a deluded Man; I humbly ask your Pardon for the Wrong I did deſign in marrying this fair Impoſter, whom I did indeed believe your Siſter; my love for her tranſported me beyond all thoughts of what I ow’d you.

Sir Charles takes Charlot, and gives her to Lovewell.

Here, Lovewell, take her; for my ſake uſe her well: I’ll leave it to her to juſtify her Procedure to you. But upon my Honour ſhe is my only Siſter, the rich Heireſs, Charlot, whom you firſt believ’d.

Love.

The happy ſequel does indeed make a large amends for all I have ſuffered: But are you ſure we do not Dream? for I am ſo accuſtomed to Miſfortunes I cannot yet believe them real.

Char.

But you were not ſo diffident, Mr. Lovewell, before my Eſtate was added by my Brother’s Diſcovery.

Love.

An Eſtate to one in my Circumſtances is no unwelcome Addition: But be aſſured, dear Madam, from the Sincerity I ever uſed to you, ’tis the leaſt Part of my Joy; but I have, by my knowledge who you are, an unqueſtioned proof of your Virtue, and Sir Roger’s being ſtill my Friend.

Sir Rog.

And ſo you ſhall always find me. To Bell. For here’s my Pretenſions.

Bell.

Do you think, Sir Roger, I can ſo ſoon diſingage aſide my Heart from cruel Mr. Lovewell?

Love.

Fair cruel Lady! how could you torture ſo a wretched Man not then himſelf, with a pretended Love that gave me more diſquiet than my own Troubles? But I am now all Joy, and will unaskt, forgive the World and Fortune for all paſt Injuries; now my dear Charlot’s mine, Heaven has not another Bleſſing left that I think worth the asking.

Char.

You are wonderous Zealous now, pray Heaven it laſts.

Love.

It muſt, it ever ſhall. How can you diſtruſt my love, who have given you ſuch evident Proofs of it?

Sir Rog.

Since Heaven is in this bounteous Humour of diſpencing Bleſſings, why ſhould it be only a niggard to me, and make me only a dull Spectator of your Happineſs? Say; will not you join with me in my Suit to your fair Cozen here?

Looking at Bellaſira.

Sir Char.

She is my Charge, which here I reſign to you. I know ſhe’ll be guided by my Advice; Gives her to Sir Roger, and now Cozen Juliana I claim your Promiſe.

Jul.

Methinks you might ſtay till to Morrow, ’tis time enough, conſidering how long it is to laſt.

Sir Char.

No, we’ll not truſt the Treachery of another Day; Fortune is fickle, and may Frown to Morrow.

Jul.

Well then here’s my Hand, From this Day forward, for better for worſe, &c.

Bell. 40 G1r 41

Bell.

What think you of thoſe Words, Sir Roger, do they not make you tremble?

Sir Rog.

Yes, for fear of ſome fatal Interruption before they come to be pronounced.

Sir Char.

Let’s loſe no time then; I have a Friend will quickly diſpatch the Ceremony.

Exeunt. Enter Freeman, Urania, and Doll.

Ura.

Well, Doll, what have you done with the ’Squire?

Doll.

As you commanded, Madam, conducted him to your Chamber, with charge not to ſpeak but in a Whiſper; and becauſe I’d be ſure he ſhould diſcover nothing by his Candle, I took it away with me, for fear I told him it might be ſeen at Windows, which might occaſion a Suſpition; not being a Room in uſe, he readily conſented; and ſaid, he could find the way to Bed by dark, and ſlipt a Crown into my Hand to ſecure my Maſter not coming up.

Exit Doll.

Free.

So ’tis well, there remains no more now; the Houſe fills a Pace, but the Company I deſign to entertain with this Jeſt is Sir Charles Frankford, and Sir Roger Marwood, who have juſt ſent to beſpeak a Supper here. I’m ſure they bring Company with ’em, they have ordered ſuch a noble one; we had beſt take Orders for it, and then we ſhall have time to entertain them.

Enter Sir Charles, Sir Roger, Lovewell, Charlot, Juliana, Bellaſira, Freeman and Urania.

Ura.

I’ve uſed all Methods to reſtrain his Folly, by ſhewing all the Scorn a virtuous Woman could to a diſhoneſt Love; that but increaſed his Perſecutions till I was weary of being Angry. I thought, by counterfeiting to return his Kindneſs, which his Vanity eaſily induced him to believe, I might draw him into ſome Snare to betray his lewd Intentions to the World, without the hazard of my own Reputation, which is generally ſacrificed to the Malice of a diſappointed Coxcomb. And to perfect my Revenge, I have contrived to let his Wife be witneſs to’t, and ſo leave the Fool to her puniſhing, which he’ll find Plague enough.

Free.

Call in Doll, and let’s begin the Farce. Enter Doll. Come, Doll, to your Poſt. Aloud.Where’s your Miſtreſs, Doll? Doll ſqueaks. Ha! what are you frighted at?

Doll.

Nothing, Sir, but I was almoſt Aſleep, and you surprized me.

Free.

That will not ſerve your turn, Miſtreſs. What do you guard this Door ſo cloſe for, is any Body in that Chamber?

G Doll. 42 G1v 42

Doll.

In this Chamber, Sir, no; who ſhould be here?

Free.

Where is your Miſtreſs, I ſay?

Doll.

My Miſtreſs, Sir; in her Chamber not well, and gone to Bed.

Free.

No, but ſhe is not; for, miſſing her, I have been to ſeek her, not only there, but in all the Rooms in the Houſe, except this. Pray deliver the Key, without more Fooling; for I will ſee what you keep Century for. So by this time I ſuppoſe the Fool is frighted enough. Aloud. Deliver it me, I ſay, you had beſt.

Doll.

Pray, Sir, don’t fright me ſo, there it is.

Gives the Key. Ex. Freem. as into the Room. Freeman within.

That ſhall not ſerve your Turn: I’ll fetch you out of the Chimney here. Doll, bring my Piſtols preſently.

’Sq. W.

within.

O pray, Mr. Freeman, ſpare me this time, and you ſhall never catch me in your Houſe again, nor with your Wife.

Free.

Come down then, or I’ll fetch you, with a Pox to you.

’Sq. W.

O pray, Mr. Freeman, have a little Patience, and I will.

Enter Freeman pulling in ’Sq. W. wrapt in a Blanket.

Free.

Nay, nay, no Strugling; I muſt ſhew the Company my Wife’s Gallant.

They all Laugh.

’Sq. W.

aſide.

Who the Devil have I been with all this time? Here’s Urania, now I find ſhe fools me. To UraUrania. How dare you thus expoſe me; Do not you fear my Revenge?

Ura.

aloud.

Not at all; I have Witneſſes enough to prove both your Intentions and mine: But I have one within you know not of, whom I’ll fetch to you.

Ex. UraUrania.

Free.

Well, ’Squire Wouldbe, I hope, hereafter you’ll leave my Wife to ſuch a poor clowniſh Fellow as my ſelf; you ſee ſhe does not underſtand your Merit, but thinks me good enough for her.

Sq. W.

aſide.

I am aſhamed of my ſelf, that’s the truth of it, which makes me ſilent.

Enter Urania, with Dowdy in a Night-Gown.

Sq. W.

My Wife! nay then I’m ruin’d paſt Redemption. Aſide. How the Devil came ſhe here? But that ſhe has not Senſe enough for an Intrigue, I ſhould ſuſpect ſhe was as much miſtaken in her Bedfellow as my ſelf.

Dow.

Have I catcht you, you Rebel you; I warrant you I’ll do your Errand to my Mother.

’Sq. W.

Nay, good Bunny, not ſo faſt; pray let me know firſt how you came here a Bed with me.

Dow.

Why, Dr. Partridge conjured me here on purpoſe to catch you.

’Sq. W. 43 G2r 43

’Sq. W.

That’s likely; you and I muſt come to a Reckoning about it.

Dow.

Reckon me no Reckonings; there the Doctor can tell you as much.

Pointing to Freeman.

’Sq. W.

This Dr. Partridge! why, this is Freeman, the Maſter of this Houſe. There is ſome Trick in this,To Freeman. I ſuppoſe you have been before hand with me, and given me the Horns, I deſigned you.

Dow.

What do you mean by Horns? Do you think I’d be a Whore?

Free.

’Faith, ’Squire, no: You may keep your dainty Bit to your ſelf; when I have a Miſtreſs it ſhall be one that will have Wit enough to conceal what we do; for o’ my Conſcience ſhe’d tell.

Dow.

aſide.

I can’t imagine how I came here, to ſay truth; for I thought I had been a Bed at home, till that Gentlewoman came and waked me, and bid me ſay what I did.

Ura.

You know, Esq; Wouldbe, how many Diſappointments I have given you juſt in the height of your Expectations, which would never perſwade you was done in ſcorn of your lewd Deſign; this was the only way I thought would rid me of your Saucy Importunity. I did believe it very neceſſary to let your Wife be an Eye-Witneſs of your Faith to her, that ſhe may hereafter take more than uſual Care to keep her Coxcomb to her ſelf; I will not give you the Satisfaction to let you know how I effected it, but if ſhe or her Mother remembers, they may, I’ll only add this; There has been no wrong offer’d to her Honeſty, which you may eaſily believe, if you conſider the Charms of her Wit and Perſon.

Char.

I think ’tis great pity they ſhould not be intirely each others, for they are the beſt match’d Pair I ever ſaw.

Jul.

Indeed, Urania, you are a Woman of a ſingular Virtue, that can reſiſt the force of that tempting Mein and Air.

Sir Rog.

Faith Sir, you’d better march off, theſe Ladies will be too hard for you elſe.

Sir Char.

Ay, prithee Freeman, we have e’n enough of their Companies, diſpoſe of them as you pleaſe.

’Esq. W.

aſide.

Gad I’d be reveng’d of her if I live.

Free.

to Eſq. W..

Well, Sir, you may go if you pleaſe, and take your pretty Lady with you, your Cloths are in the Bar-room where you may dreſs you, there you have you Diſmiſſion from this Company.

Ura.

And what can you leave your dear Mrs. Honiſuckle? tum d’ive I a Buſs, ſure you cannot think but I Love you ſtrangly after all this Proof of my Kindneſs.

They all Laugh.

’Esq. W.

aſide.

P――x C――d ye, I could cry for Madneſs.

Ex.exit

Dow.

Ladies, your Servant; I thank you for all your Complements, and ſhall be very glad to ſee you at my Houſe, going.

They all Laugh.

Ura.

Heark ye, pray take your Booby home with you, and ſee to keep him there.

Dow.

I’ll have nothing to ſay to him, I’ll go home to my Mother and tell her.

Exit Dow.Dowdy Sir 44 G2v 44

Sir Char.

Prithee put out the Coxcomb and bring ſome Muſick with you; what think you Ladies of a Dance?

Char.

With all our Hearts.

Bell.

You ſee what conſtant Things you Men are to your Vows, I waflawed-reproduction2 characters this Fellow ſwore as much Faith and Conſtancy as any of you can.

Char.

Hang the Poor Animals, diſgrace not ſo the Race of Men, to compare him to one; ſuch ſenſleſs Wretches are only lumps of Dirt, not fit for any nobler Form.

Enter Freeman with Muſick.

Love.

So here’s the Muſick; what ſhall we Dance? the Brawls?

Char.

No, by no means, Mr. Lovewell, not on our Wedding-Day, leſt it prove an ill Omen.

Sir Char.

Come, come; I’ll lead up if you’ll follow, every one take his Bride. Freeman, you and your Wife muſt make a Couple.

They Dance, after which this Song.

Look down great Hymen from Above,

Theſe Pairs preſerve in Peace and Love.

May never Jars their Joys molest,

But ſtill a ſweet and Halcyon reſt

Upon their mutual Bliſs attend,

And ev’ry Hour new Pleaſures ſend.

Free.

All Happineſs to you all.

Enter Drawer.

Draw.

Supper waits you Gentlemen.

Sir Char.

Come, Ladies, let’s in and take a ſhort Repaſt; it grows late, and time to be at home, where indeed I ought to have given my Wife her Wedding Supper, but that the Warning was ſo ſhort.

Love.

At laſt the Storm is over blown,

And on that happy Coaſt I’m thrown

Where all my Joys are laid in ſtore,

Heaven cannot give, nor could I ask one more.

Exeunt omnes.

Finis.