i a1r

The
Widdow Ranter

Or,
The History of
Bacon in Virginia.

A
Tragicomedy,
Acted by their Majesties Servants.

Written by Mrs A. Behn.

London,Printed for James Knapton at the
Crown in St. Paul’s Church-Yard. 16901690.

ii a1v iii a2r

To the much Honoured Madam Welldon.

Madam,

Knowing Mrs. Behn in her Life-time deſign’d to Dedicate ſome of of her Works to you, you ha ehave a Naturall Title, and claim to this and I could not wi houtwithout being unjuſt to her Memory, but fix your name to it, who ha ehave not only a Wit above that, of moſt of your Sex; but a goodneſs and Affability Extreamly Charming, and Engaging beyond Meaſure, and perhaps there are few to be found like you, that are ſo Eminent for Hospitallity, and a Ready and Generous Aſſiſtance to the diſtreſs’d and Indigent, which are Quallities that carry much more of Divinity with them, then a Puritanicall outward Zeal for Virtue and Religion.

Our Author, Madam, who was ſo true a Judge of Wit, was (no doubt of it) ſatisfyed in the Patroneſs ſhe had pitcht upon: If ever ſhe had occaſion for a Wit and Senſe like yours ’tis now, to Defend this (one of the laſt of her Works) from the Malice of her Enemies, and the ill Nature of the Critticks, who have had Ingratitude enough not to Conſider the Obligations they had to her when Living; but to do thoſe Gentlemen Juſtice, ’tis not (altogether) to be Imputed to their Critticiſm, that the Play had not that Succeſs which it deſerv’d, and was expected by her Friends; The main fault ought to lye on thoſe who had the management of it. Had our Authour been alive ſhe would have Committed it to the Flames rather than have ſuffer’d it to have been Acted with ſuch Omiſſions as was made, and on which the Foundation of the Play Depended: For Example, they thought fit to leave out a Whole Scene of the Virginian Court of Judicature, which was a lively reſemblance of that Country-Juſtice; and on which depended a great part of the Plot, and wherein were many unuſuall and very Naturall J ſtsJests which would at least have made ſome ſort of People Laugh: In another Part of the Play is Omitted the appearance of the Ghoſt of the Indian King, Kill’d by Bacon ,and tho’ the like may have been Repreſented in other Plays, yet I never heard or found but that the ſight was very agreeable to an Audience, and very Awfull: beſ idesbesides the Apparition of the Ghoſt was neceſſary, for it was that which ſtruck a Terror A2 in iv a2v in the Queen, and fright’ned her from heark’ning to the Love of Bacon, believing it a horrid thing to receive the Careſſes and Embraces of her Huſbands Murderer: And Laſtly, many of the Parts being falſe Caſt, and given to thoſe whoſe Tallants and Genius’s ſuited not our Authors Intention: Theſe, Madam, are ſome of the Reaſons that this Play was unſucceſsfull, and the beſt Play that ever was writ muſt prove ſo: if it have the Fate to be Murder’d like this.

However, Madam, I can’t but believe you will find an hours diverſion in the reading, and will meet with not only Wit, but true Comedy, (tho’ low,) by reaſon many of the Characters are ſuch only as our Newgate afforded, being Criminals Transported.

This Play, Madam, being left in my hands by the Author to Introduce to the Publick, I thought my ſelf oblig’d to ſay thus much in its defence, and that it was alſo a Duty upon me to chooſe a Patroneſs proper for it, and the Author having pitcht upon your name to do Honour to #ornamentsome of her Works, I thought your Protection, could be ſo uſefull to none, as to this, whoſe owning it may Silence the Malice of its Enemies; Your Wit and Judgment being to be Submitted to in all Caſes; Beſides your Natural Tenderneſs and Compaſſion for the Unfortunate, gives you in a manner another Title to it: The preference which is due to you upon ſo many Accounts is therefore the Reaſon of this preſent Addreſs, for at the worſt, if this Play ſhould be ſo Unfortunate as not to be thought worthy of your Acceptance; Yet it is certain, that its worth any Man’s while to have the Honour of ſubſcribing himſelf,

Madam, Your Moſt Obedient Humble Servant,

G.J.

v a3r

Dramatis Perſonæ

Mr. Bowman. Indian King called Cavarnio.

Mr. Williams. Bacon ――Generall of the Engliſh.

Mr. Freeman. Colonel Wellman deputy Governor

Mr. Harris. Colonel Downright a Loyall Honeſt Count.

Mr. Alexander. Hazard

Mr. Powell. Friendly

Two Friends known to one an– other many years in England.

Mr. Sanford.Dareing

Mr. Cudworth. Fearleſs.

Lieutenant Generals to Bacon

Mr. Bright. Dullman.A Captain.

Mr.Underhill. Timerous Cornet.

Mr. Trefuſe Whimſey

Mr.Bowen. Whiff.

Mr.Barns. Boozer

Juſtices of the Peace, and very great Cowards.

Brag.A Captain,

Grubb. One Complain’d on by Capt. Whiff for calling his Wife Whore

Mr. Blunt A Petitioner againſt Brag

Mr. Baker. Parson Dunce formerly a Farrier fled from Eng– land, And Chaplain to the Governour.

Clerk

Boy.

Mrs.Bracegirdle, Indian Queen call’d Semernia,belov’d by Bacon.

Mrs. Knight. Madam Surelove: belov’d by Hazard.

Mrs. Jordon. Mrs. Crisante. Daughter to Col. Down.

Mrs. Currer. Wid. Ranter in Love with Dareing.

Mrs. Cory. Mrs.Flirt.

Mrs.Whimſey.

Mrs. Whiff.

2. Maids.

Prieſts,

Indians,

Coachman,

Soldiers,

with other Attendants

SCENE Virginia in Bacons Camp.
vi a3v

Books Newly Printed for James Knapton, at the Crown, in St Paul’s Church-Yard.

vii a4r

Prologue, By Mr. Dryden.

Heav’n ſave ye Gallants: and this hopefull Age,

Y’are welcome to the downfall of the Stage:

The Fools have labour’d long in their Vocation;

And Vice, (the Manufacture of the Nation)

O’re-ſtocks the Town ſo much, and thrives ſo well,

That Fopps and Knaves grow Druggs and will not ſell.

In vain our Wares on Theatres are ſhown,

When each has a Plantation of his own.

His Cauſe ne’r fails for whatſoe’re he ſpends,

There’s ſtill Gods plenty for himſelf and Friends.

Shou’d Men be rated by Poetick Rules,

Lord what a Pole would there be rais’d from Fools!

Mean time poor Wit prohibited muſt lye,

As if ’twere made ſome French Commodity.

Fools you will have, and rais’d at vaſt expence,

And yet as ſoon as ſeen, they give offence.

Time was, when none would cry that Oaf was mee,

But now you ſtrive about your Pedigree:

Bawble and Cap no ſooner are thrown down,

But there’s a Muſs of more then half the Town.

Each one will challenge a Child’s part at leaſt,

A ſign the Family is well increas’d

Of Forreign Cattle! there’s no longer need,

When w’are ſupply’d ſo faſt with Engliſh Breed.

Well! Flouriſh, Countrymen: drink ſwear and roar,

Let every free-born Subject keep his Whore;

And wandring in the Wilderneſs about,

At end of 40 years not wear her out.

But when you ſee theſe Pictures let none dare

To own beyond a Limb or ſingle ſhare:

For where the Punk is common! he’s a Sot,

Who needs will Father what the Pariſh got.

viii a4v

Epilogue.

Gallants you have ſo long been abſent hence,

That you have almoſt cool’d your dilligence,

For while we ſtudy or revive a Play,

You like good Husbands in the Country ſtay,

There frugally wear out your Summer Suite,

And in Frize Jerkin after Beagles Toot,

Or in Monntero Caps at field fares ſhoot,

Nay ſome are ſo obdurate in their Sin,

That they ſwear never to come up again.

But all their charge of Cloathes and treat Retrench,

To Gloves and Stockings for ſome Country Wench.

Even they who in the Summer had miſhaps,

Send up to Town for Phyſick for their Claps.

The Ladyes too are as reſolv’d as they,

And having debts unknown to them, they ſtay,

And with the gain of Cheeſe and Poultry pay.

Even in their Viſits, they from Banquets fall,

To entertain with Nuts and bottle-Ale.

And in diſcourſe with ſecreſy report

Stale-News that paſt a Twelve-month ſince at Court.

Thoſe of them who are moſt refin’d, and gay,

Now learn the Songs of the laſt Summers Play:

While the young Daughter does in private Mourn,

Her Loves in Town, and hopes not to return.

Theſe Country grievances too great appear;

But cruell Ladies, we have greater here;

You come not ſharp as you were wont to Playes;

But only on the firſt and ſecond Days:

This made our Poet, in his viſits look

What new ſtrange courſes, for your time you took.

And to his great regret he found too ſoon,

Baſſet and Umbre, ſpent the afternoon:

So that we cannot hope to ſee you here

Before the little Net work Purſe be clear.

Suppoſe you ſhould have luck;――

Yet ſitting up ſo late as I am told,

You’l looſe in Beauty, what you win in Gold:

And what each Lady of another ſays,

Will make you new Lampoons, and us new Plays.

1 b1r 1

Act I

Scene I.

A Room With ſeverall Tables. Enter Hazard in a Travelling Habit, and a Sea-Boy Carrying his Port-mantle.

Haz.

What Town’s this Boy?

Boy.

James-Town, Maſter,

Haz.

Take care my Trunk be brought aſhore to Night, and there’s for your Pains.

Boy.

God bleſs you Maſter.

Haz.

What do you call this Houſe?

Boy.

Mrs Flirts, Maſter, the beſt Houſe for Commendation in all Virginia.

Haz.

That’s well, has ſhe any handſome Lady’s Sirrah?

Boy.

Oh! She’s woundly handſome her ſelf Maſter, and the Kindeſt Gentlewoman—look here ſhe comes Maſter—God bleſs you Miſtriſs, I have brought you a young Gentleman here.

Flirt.

That’s well, honeſt Jack—Sir, you are moſt heartily Welcome.

Haz.

Madam, your Servant;

Salutes her.

Flirt.

Pleaſe you to walk into a Chamber Sir.

Haz.

By and by, Madam, but I’le repoſe here a while for the coolneſs of the Air.

Flirt.

This is a Publick Room, Sir, but ’tis at your Service.

Haz.

Madam, you oblige me.

Flirt.

A Fine-ſpoken Perſon—A Gentleman I’le warrant him, come Jack, I’le give thee a Cogue of Brandy for old acquaintance.

Exeunt Landlady and Boy. Hazard Pulls out Pen, Ink and Paper, and goes to Write. Enter Friendly.

Friend.

Here Nell, a Tankard of Cool drink quickly.

Nell.

You ſhall have it, Sr.

Friend.

Hah! Who’s that Stranger? he ſeems to be a Gentleman.

Haz.

If I ſhould give Credit to mine Eyes, that ſhould be Friendly.

Friend.

Sr, you ſeem a ſtranger, may I take the Liberty to preſent my Service to you?

Haz.

If I am not miſtaken Sr, you are the only Man in the world B whom 2 b1v 2 whom I would ſooneſt Pledge, you’l Credit me if three years Abſence has not made you forget Hazard.

Friend.

Hazard, my FreindFriend! come to my Arms and Heart.

Haz.

This Unexpected Happineſs O’re Joys me. Who could have Imagin’d to have found thee in Virginia? I thought thou hadſt been in Spain with thy Brother.

Friend.

I was ſo till Ten Months ſince, when my Uncle Colonell Frendly dying here, left me a Conſiderable Plantation; And faith I find Diverſions not altogether to be deſpis’d; the God of Love Reigns here, with as much Power, as in Courts or Popular Cities: but prethee what Chance, (Fortunate for me) drove thee to this part of the New World?

Haz.

Why (faith) Ill Company, and that Common Vice of the Town, Gaming, ſoon run out my Younger Brothers Fortune, for Imagining like ſome of the Luckier Gameſters to Improve my Stock at the Groom-Porters, Ventur’d on and loſt all—My Elder Brother an Errant Jew, had neither Friendſhip, nor Honour enough to Support me but at laſt was mollified by perſwaſions and the hopes of being for ever rid of me, ſent me hither with a ſmall Cargo to ſeek my fortune,—

Friend.

And begin the world withall.

Haz.

I thought this a better Venture then to turn Sharping Bully, Cully in Prentice and Country Squires, with my Pocket full of falſe dice, your high and low Flats and Bars, or turn broker to young Heirs; take up goods to pay ten-fold at the Death of their Fathers, and take Fees on both ſides; or ſet up all night at the Groom-Porters begging his Honour to go a Guinnay the better of the lay. No, Friendly, I had rather ſtarve abroad then live Pitty’d and diſpiſed at home.

Friend.

Thou art in the Right, and art come juſt in the Nick of time to make thy Fortune—Wilt thou follow my advice?

Haz.

Thou art too honeſt to Command any thing any thing that I ſhall Refuſe.

Friend.

You muſt know then, there is about a mile from James-Town a Young Gentlewoman—No master for her Birth, her Breeding’s the beſt this world affords, ſhe is Marryed to one of the Richeſt Merchants here, he is Old and Sick, and now gone into England for the Recovery of his Health, where he’l e’en give up the Ghoſt, he has writ her word he finds no Amendment, and Reſolves to ſtay another Year, the Letter I accidently took up and have about me; ’tis easily Counterfeited and will be of great uſe to us.

Haz.

Now do I fancy I conceive thee.

Friend.

Well, hear me firſt, you ſhall get another Letter writ like this Character, which ſhall ſay, you are his Kinſman, that is come to Trafick in this Country, and ’tis his will you ſhould be received into his Houſe as ſuch.

Haz. 3 b2r 3

Haz.

Well, and what will come of this?

Friend.

Why thou art Young and Handſome; She Young and Deſiring; ’twere eaſy to make her Love thee, and if the Old Gentleman chance to dye, you Gueſs the reſt, you are no Fool.

Haz.

Ay, but if he ſhou’d return—

Friend.

If—Why if ſhe Love you, that Other will be but a ſlender Bar to thy happineſ; For if thou canſt not Marry her, thou mayſt lye with her, (and Gad) a Younger Brother may pick out a Pritty Livelyhood here that way, as well as in England—Or if this fail, there thou wilt find a perpetual Viſiter the Widdow Ranter, a Woman bought from the Ship by Old Coll. Ranter, ſhe ſerv’d him half a year, and then he Marry’d her, and dying in a year more, left her worth Fifty thouſand Pounds Sterling, beſides Plate and Jewells: She’s a great Gallant, But aſſuming the Humour of the Country Gentry, her Extravagancy is very Pleaſant, ſhe retains ſomething of her Primitive Quallity ſtill, but is good natur’d and Generous.

Haz.

I like all this well.

Friend.

But I have a further End in this matter, you muſt know there is in the ſame Houſe a Young Heireſs, one Coll. Downright’s Daughter, whom I Love, I think not in Vain, her Father indeed has an Implacable hatred to me, for which Reaſon I can but ſeldom Viſit her, and in this Affair I have need of a Friend in that Houſe.

Haz.

Me you’re ſure of.

Friend.

And thus you’l have an Opportunity to Mannage both our Amours: here you will find Occaſion to ſhew your Courage as well as Expreſs your Love; For at this time the Indians by our ill Management of Trade, whom we have Armed againſt Our ſelves, Very frequently make War upon us with our own Weapons, Tho’ often coming by the Worſt are forced to make Peace with us again, but ſo, as upon every turn they fall to Maſſacring us whereever we ly expoſed to them.

Haz.

I heard the news of this in England, which haſtens the new Governours arrivall here, who brings you freſh Supplys.

Friend.

Would he were landed, we hear he is a Noble Gentleman.

Haz.

He has all the Qualities of a Gallant Man, beſides he is Nobly Born.

Friend.

This Country wants nothing but to be People’d with a wellborn Race to make it one of the beſt Collonies in the World, but for want of a Governour we are Ruled by a Councill, ſome of which have been perhaps tranſported Criminals, who having Acquired great Eſtates are now become your Honour, and Right Worshipfull, and Poſſeſs all Places of Authority; there are amongſt ’em ſome honeſt Gentlemen who now begin to take upon ’em, and Manage Affairs as they ought to be.

Haz.

Bacon I think was one of the Councill.

B2 Friend. 4 b2v 4

Friend.

Now youyou have named a Man indeed above the Common Rank, by nature Generous; Brave Reſolv’d and Daring, who ſtudying the Lives of the Romans and great Men, that have raiſed themſelves to the moſt Elevated fortunes, fancies it eaſy for Ambitious men, to aim at any Pitch of Glory, I’ve heard him often ſay, Why cannot I Conquer the Univerſe as well as Alexander? or like another Romulus form a new Rome, and make my ſelf Ador’d?

Haz.

Why might he not? great Souls are born in common men ſometimes as well as Princes.

Friend.

This Thirſt of Glory cheriſht by Sullen Melancholly, I believe was the firſt Motive that made him in Love with the young Indian Queen, fancying no Hero ought to be without his Princeſs. And this was the Reaſon why he ſo earneſtly preſt for a Commiſſion, to be made General againſt the Indians, which long was promis’d him, but they fearing his Ambition, ſtill put him off, till the Grievances grew ſo high, that the whole Country flockt to him, and beg’d he would redreſs them,— he took the opportunity, and Led them forth to fight, and vanquiſhing brought the Enemy to fair terms, but now inſtead of receiving him as a Conquerour, we treat him as a Traytor.

Haz.

Then it ſeems all the Crime this brave Fellow has committed, is ſerving his Country without Authority.

Friend.

’Tis ſo, and however I admire the Man, I am reſolv’d to be of the Contrary Party, that I may make an Intereſt in our new Governour; Thus ſtands affairs, ſo that after you have ſeen Madam Sure-Love, I’le preſent you to the Councill for a Commiſſion.

Haz.

But my Kinſmans Character—

Friend.

He was a Leſter-ſhire younger Brother, came over hither with a ſmall fortune, which his Induſtry has increas’d to a thouſand pound a year, and he is now Coll. John Sure-love, and one of the Councill.

Haz.

Enough.

Friend.

About it then, Madam Flirt to direct you.

Haz.

You are full of your Madams here.

Friend.

Oh! ’tis the greateſt affront imaginable, to call a woman Miſtris, tho’ but a retale Brandy-munger.—Adieu!—one thing more, tomorrow is our Country-Court, pray do not fail to be there, for the rarity of the Entertainment: but I ſhall ſee you anon at Sureloves where I’le Salute thee as my firſt meeting, and as an old acquaintance in England—here’s company, farewell.

Exit Friend.
Enter Dullman, Timerous, and Boozer. Hazard ſits at a Table and writes.

Dull.

Here Nell—Well Lieutenant Boozer, what are you for?

Enter Nell.

Booz.

I am for Cooling Nants, Major:

Dull 5 b3r 5

Dull.

Here Nell, a quart of Nants, and ſome Pipes and ſmoak.

Tim.

And do ye hear Nell, bid your Miſtriſ come in to Joke a little with us, for adzoors I was damnable drunk laſt night, and am better at the petticoat than the bottle to day.

Dull.

Drunk laſt night, and ſick to day, how comes that about Mr. Juſtice? you uſe to bear your Brandy well enough.

Tim.

Ay your ſhier-Brandy I’le grant you, but I was Drunk at Coll. Downrights with your high Burgundy Claret.

Dull.

A Pox of that Paulter Liquor, your Engliſh French wine, I wonder how the Gentlemen do to drink it.

Tim.

Ay ſo do I, ’tis for want of a little Virginia Breeding: how much more like a Gentleman ’tis, to drink as we do, brave Edifying Punch and Brandy,—but they ſay the young Noble-men now and Sparks in England begin to reform, and take it for their mornings Draught, get Drunk by noon, and deſpiſe the Lowſey Juce of the Grape.

Enter Mrs. Flirt.

Dull.

Come Landlady, come, you are ſo taken up with Parſon Dunce, that your old friends can’t Drink a Dram with you,—what no ſmutty Catch now, no Gibe or Joke to make the Punch go down Merrily, and advance Trading? Nay, they ſay, Gad forgive ye, you never miſs going to Church when Mr. Dunce Preaches—but here’s to you

drinks.

Flir.

Lords, your Honours are pleas’d to be merry—but my ſervice to your Honour.

drinks.

Haz.

Honours, who the Devill have we here? ſome of the wiſe Councill at leaſt, I’d ſooner took ’em for Hoggerds.

aſide.

Flirt.

Say what you pleaſe of the Doctor, but I’le ſwear he’s a fine Gentleman, he makes the Prettieſt Sonnets, ay, and Sings ’em himſelf to the rareſt Tunes.

Tim.

Nay the man will ſerve for both Soul and Body, for they ſay he was a Farrier in England, but breaking turn’d Life-guard man, and his Horſe dying—he Counterfeited a Deputation from the Biſhop, and came over here a Subſtantiall Orthodox: but come, where ſtands the Cup?—here, my Service to you Major.

Flirt.

Your Hononurs are pleas’d—but me-thinks Doctor Dunce is a very Edifying Perſon, and a Gentleman, and I pretend to know a Gentleman,—For I my ſelf am a Gentlewoman; my Father was a Barronet, but undone in the late Rebellion—and I am fain to keep on Ordinary now, Heaven help me.

Tim.

Good lack, why ſee how Virtue may be bely’d—we heard your Father was a Taylor, but truſting for old Olivers Funerall, Broke, and ſo came hither to hide his head,—but my Service to you; what, you are never the worſe?

Flirt.

Your Honours knows this is a Scandalous place, for they ſay

your 6 b3v 6

your Honour was but a broken Exciſe-man, who ſpent the Kings money to buy your Wife fine Petticoats, and at last not worth a Groat, you came over a poor Servant, though now a Juſtice of Peace, and of the Honourable Council.

Tim.

Adz zoors, if I knew who ’twas ſaid ſo, I’d ſue him for Scandalum Magnatum.

Dull.

Hang ’em Scoundrells, hang ’em, they live upon Scandal, and we are Scandall-Proof,—They ſay too, that I was a Tinker and runing the Country, robb’d a Gentlemans Houſe there, was put into Newgate, got a reprieve after Condemnation, and was Tranſported hither— And that you Boozer was a Common Pick-pocket, and being often flogg’d at the Carts-tale, afterwards turn’d Evidence, and when the times grew Honeſt was fain to fly.

Booz.

Ay, Ay, Major, if Scandal would have broke our hearts, we had not arriv’d to the Honour of being Privy-Councellors—but come Mrs. Flirt, what never a Song to Entertain usus?

Flirt.

Yes, and a Singer too newly come aſhore:

Tim.

Adz zoors, let’s have it then:

Enter Girl, who ſings, they bear the Bo.

Haz.

Here Maid, a Tankard of your Drink;

Flirt.

Quickly Nell, wait upon the Gentleman;

Dull.

Pleaſe you Sir to taſt of our Liquor—My ſervice to you I ſee you are a Stranger and alone, pleaſe you to come to our Table.

He riſes and comes.

Flirt.

Come Sir, pray ſit down here, theſe are very Honourable Perſons I aſſure you,—This is Major Dullman, Major of his Excellencies own Regiment, when he Arrives, this Mr. Timorous, Juſtice a Peace in Corum. This Capt. Boozer, all of the Honourable Councill.

Haz.

With your leave, Gentlemen;

ſits.

Tim.

My ſervice to you ſir;ſ

drinks.

What have you brought over any Cargo Sir, I’le be your Cuſtomer.

Booz.

Ay, and cheat him too, I’le warrant him.aſide

Haz.

I was not bred to Merchandizing Sir, nor do intend to follow the Drudgery of Trading.

Dull.

Men of Fortune ſeldom travell hither Sir, to ſee faſhions.

Tim.

Why Brother, it may be the Gentleman has a mind to be a Planter, will youyou hire your ſelf to make a Crop of Tobacco this year?

Haz.

I was not born to work Sir.

Tim.

Not work Sir, zoors your betters have workt Sir, I have workt my ſelf Sir, both ſet and ſtript Tobacco, for all I am of the Honourable Councill not work quoth a—I ſuppoſe Sir you wear your fortune upon your Back Sir.

Haz.

Is it your Cuſtom here Sir to affront Strangers? I ſhall expect ſatisfaction.

Riſes.
Tim. 7 b4r 7

Tim.

Why does any body here owe you any thing?

Dull.

No, unleſs he means to be paid for drinking with us—ha, ha, ha.

Haz.

No Sir, I have money to pay for what I drink: here’s my Club—my Guinia,flings down a Guinia. I ſcorn to be oblig’d to ſuch Scoundrells;riſes in huff

Tim.

Let him alone, let him alone Brother, how ſhould he learn manners, he never was in Virginia before.

Dull.

He’s ſome Covent-Garden Bully;

Tim.

Or ſome broken Citizen turn’d Factor,

Haz.

Sir you lye, and you’re a Raſcall,flings the Brandy in’s face.

Tim.

Adz zoors he has ſpill’d all the Brandy.

Tim.runs behind the door, Dull. and Booz. ſtrike Hazard.

Haz.

I underſtand no Cudgel-Play, but wear a ſword to right myſelf. draws, they run off.

Flirt.

Good heavens, what quarelling in my Houſe?

Haz.

Do the Perſons of Quallity in this Country treat ſtrangers thus?

Flirt.

Alas Sir, ’tis a familiar way they have, Sir.

Haz.

I’m glad I known it,—Pray Madam can you inform one how I may be furniſht with a Horſe and a guide to Madam Sure Loves?

Flirt.

A moſt Accompliſht Lady, and my very good friend you ſhall be Immediately— Exeunt.

Scene, II

Enter Wellman, Downright, Dunce, Whimsey, Whiff, and others.

Well.

Come Mr. Dunce, tho’ you are no Councellour, yet your Council may be good in time of neceſſity, as now.

Dun.

If I may be worthy advice, I do not look upon our danger to be ſo great from the Indians, as from young Bacon, whom the People have nick-nam’d Fright-all.

Whim.

Ay, Ay that ſame Bacon, I would he were well hang’d, I am afraid that under pretence of killing all the Indians he means to Murder us, Ly with our Wives, and hang up our little Children, and make himſelf Lord and King.

Whiff.

Brother Whimſey, not ſo hot, with leave of the Honourable Board, My Wife is of Opinion, that Bacon came ſeaſonably to our Aid, and what he has done was for our defence, the Indians came down upon us, and Raviſht us all, Men, Women, and Children.

Well.

If theſe Grievances were not redreſt we had our reaſons for it, it was not that we were inſenſible Capt. Whiff of what we ſuffer’d from the Inſolence of the Indians: But all knew what we muſt expect from Bacon that by Lawfull Authority he had Arriv’d to ſo great a Commandmand 8 b4v 8 mand as Generall, nor would we be huſt out of our Commiſſions.

Down.

’Tis moſt certain that Bacon did not demand a Commiſſion out of a deſign of ſerving us, but to ſatisfy his Ambition and his Love, it being no ſecret that he paſſionately Admires the Indian Queen, and under the pretext of a War, intends to kill the King her Husband, Eſtabliſh himſelf in her heart, and on all occaſions have himſelf a more formidable Enemy, than the Indians are.

Whim.

Nay, nay, I ever foreſaw he would prove a Villain.

Whiff.

Nay, and he be thereabout, my Nancy ſhall have no more to do with him.

Well.

But Gentlemen the People dayly flock to him, ſo that his Army is too Conſiderable for us to oppoſe by any thing but Policy.

Down.

We are ſenſible Gentlemen that our Fortunes, our Honours, and our Lives are at Stake, and therefore you are call’d together, to conſult what’s to be done in this Grand Affair, till our Governour and Forces arrive from England; The Truce he made with the Indians will be out to Morrow.

Whiff.

Ay, and then he intends to have another bout with the Indians. Let’s have Patience I ſay till he as thrum’d their Jackets, and then to work with your Politicks as ſoon as you pleaſe.

Down.

Colonel Wellman has anſwer’d that point good Captain Whiff, ’tis the Event of this Battle we ought to dread, and if won or loſt will be equally fatall for us, either from the Indians or from Bacon

Dunce.

With the Permiſſion of the Honourable Board I think I have hit upon an Expedient that may prevent this Battle, your Honours ſhall write a Letter to Bacon, where you ſhall acknowledge his Services, invite him kindly home, and offer him a Commiſſion for General—

Whiff.

Juſt my Nancys Counſell—Doctor Dunce has ſpoken like a Cherubin, he ſhall have my voice for General, what ſay you Brother Whimſey?

Dunce.Whim.

I ſay, he is a Noble fellow, and fit for a General.

Dun.

But conceive me right Gentlemen, as ſoon as he ſhall have render’d himſelf, ſeize him and ſtrike off his Head at the Fort.

Whiff.

Hum! his head—Brother

Whim.

Ay, Ay, Doctor Dunce speaks like a Cherubin.

Well.

Mr Dunce, your Counſell in extremity I confeſs is not amiſs, but I ſhould be loath to deal diſhonourably with any man.

Down.

His Crimes deſerve death, his life is forfeited by Law, but ſhall never be taken by my conſent by Trechery: If by any Strategem we could take him a-live, and either ſend him for England to receive there his Puniſhment, or keep him Priſoner here till the Governour arrive, I ſhould agree to’t, but I queſtion his coming in upon our Invitation.

Dun.

Leave that to me —

Whim. 9 c1r 9

Whim.

Come, I’le warrant him, the Rogue’s as ſtout as Hector, he fears neither Heaven nor Hell.

Down.

He’s too Brave and Bold to refuſe our ſummons, and I am for ſending him for England and leaving him to the Kings Mercy.

Dun.

In that you’l find more difficulty Sir, to take him off here will be more quick and ſudden: for the people worſhip him.

Well.

I’le never yield to ſo ungenerous an expedient. The ſeizing him I am content in the Extremity wherein we are, to follow. What ſay you Collonel Downright? ſhall we ſend him a Letter now while this two days truce laſts, between him and the Indians?

Down.

I approve it.

All.

And I, and I, and I.

Dun.

If your Honours pleaſe to make me the Meſſenger, I’le uſe ſome arguments of my own to prevail with him.

Well.

You ſay well Mr Dunce, and we’l diſpatch you preſently.

Ex. Wellm. Dow. and all but Whim. Whiff. & Dunce.

Whiff.

Ah Doctor, if you could but have perſuaded Collonel Wellman & Collonel Downright to have hang’d him—

Whiff.Whim.

Why Brother Whiff you were for making him a Generall but now.

Whiff.

The Councills of wiſe States-men Brother Whimſey muſt change as cauſes do, d’ye ſee.

Dun.

Your Honours are in the right, and whatever thoſe two leading Councellors ſay, they would be glad if Bacon were diſpacht, but the punctillio of Honour is ſuch a thing.

Whim.

Honour, a Pox on’t, what is that Honour that keeps ſuch a Buſtle in the world, yet never did good as I heard of.

Dun.

Why ’tis a Fooliſh word only, taken up by great men, but rarely practic’d,—but if you would be great men indeed—

Whiff.

If we would Doctor, name, name the way.

Dun.

Why, you command each of you a company—when Bacon comes from the Camp, as I am ſure he will,(and full of this ſilly thing call’d Honour will come unguarded too,) lay ſome of your men in Ambuſh along thoſe Ditches by the Sevana about a Mile from the Town, and as he comes by ſeize him, and hang him upon the next Tree.

Whiff

Hum—hang him! a rare Plot.

Whim.

Hang him—we’l do’t, we’l do’t Sir, and I doubt not but to be made Generall for the Action—I’le take it all upon my ſelf.

aſide.

Dun.

If you reſolve upon this, you muſt about it inſtantly—Thus I ſhall at once ſerve my Country, & revenge my ſelf on the Raſcall for affronting my Dignity once at the Councell-Table by calling me Farrier.

Ex. Doctor

Whiff.

Do you know Brother what we are to do?

Whim.

To do, yes, to hang a Generall, Brother, that’s all.

Whiff.

All, but is it Lawfull to hang any Generall?

C Whim. 10 c1v 10

Whim.

Lawfull, yes, that ’tis Lawfull to hang any Generall that fights againſt Law.

Whiff.

But in what he has done, he has ſerv’d the King and our Country, and preſerv’d all our Lives and Fortunes.

Whim.

That’s all one, Brother, if there be but a Quirk in the Law offended in this Caſe, tho’ he fought like Alexander, and preſerv’d the whole world from perdition, yet if he did it againſt Law, ’tis Lawful to hang him; why what Brother, is it fit that every impudent fellow that pretends to a little Honour, Loyalty & Courage, ſhould ſerve his King and Country againſt the Law? no, no, Brother, theſe things are not to be ſuffer’d in a Civill Government by Law Eſtabliſh’d,—wherefore let’s about it—

Exeunt

Scene III.

Surelove’s Houſe. Enter Ranter and her Coachman.

Ran.

Here Jefery, ye D unken Dog, ſet your Coach and Horſes upup, ’le not go till the Cool of the Evening, I love to ride in Fresco.

En. a Boy.

Coach.

Yes, after hard drinking—aſide it ſhall be done, Madam.

Ran.

How now Boy, is Madam Surelove at home?

Boy.

Yes Madam.

Ran.

Go tell her I am here, Sirrah.

Boy.

Who are you pray, forſooth?

Ran.

Why you Son of Babbone don’t you know me?

Boy.

No Mada, I came over but in the laſt Ship.

Ran.

What from Newgate or Bridewell? from ſhoving the Fumbler, Sirrah, Lifting or ſifting the Cly?

Boy.

I don’t underſtand this Country-Language forſooth, yet.

Ran.

You Rogue, ’tis what we tranſport from England firſt—go ye Dog, go tell your Lady, the Widow Ranter is come to dine with her—I hope I ſhall not find that Rogue Dareing here, sniveling after Ex. Boy. Mrs. Chriſante: if I do, by the Lord, I’le lay him thick, pox on him why ſhould I love the Dog, unleſs it be a Judgment upon me. Enter Sure-love and Chriſante. —My dear J well how do’ſt do?—as for you Gentlewoman you are my Rivall, & I am in rancour againſt you till you have renounc’d my Dareing.

Chriſ.

All the Interest I have in him Madam, I reſign to you.

Ran.

Ay—but your houſe lying ſo near the Camp, gives me Mortal fears— but prethee how thrives thy Amour with honeſt Friendly?

Chriſ.

As well as an Amour can, that is abſolutely forbid by a Father on one ſide, and purſu’d by a good reſolution on the other.

Ran.

Hay Gad, I’le warrant for Friendlys reſolution, what, tho’ his Fortune be not anſwerable to yours, we are bound to help one another, —here Boy-ſome Pipes and a Bowle of Punch, you know my humour Madam, I muſt Smoke and Drink in a Morning, or I am Maukiſh all day.

Sure. 11 c2r 11

Sure.

But will you drink Punch in a Morning?

Ran.

Punch, ’tis my Mornings draught, my Table-drink, my Treat, my Regalio, my every thing, ah my dear Surelove, if thou woud’ſt but refreſh & Chear thy heart with Punch in a morning, thou wou’dſt not look thus Clowdy all the Day.

Enter Pipes and a Great Bowl, ſhe falls to ſmoaking

Sur.

I have reaſon Madam to be Melancholy, I have receiv’d a Letter from my Husband, who gives me an account that he is worſe in England than when he was here, ſo that I fear I ſhall ſee him no more, the Doctors can do no good on him.

Ran.

A yvery good hearing. I wonder what the Devill thou haſt done with him ſo long? an old fuſty weather-beaten Skelleton, as dri’d as Stock-fiſh, and much of the Hue,—come, come, here’s to the next, may he be young, Heaven, I beſeech thee.

drinks.

Sure.

You have reaſon to praiſe an old man, who dy’d and left you worth fifty thouſand Pound.

Rant.

’Ay Gad—and what’s better Sweet-heart, dy’d in good time too, and left me young enough to ſpend this fifty thouſand pound in better Company—reſt his Soul for that too.

Chriſ.

I doubt ’twill be all laid out in Bacons Mad Lieutenant Generall Dareing.

Ran.

Faith I think I could lend it the Rogue on good Security.

Chriſ.

What’s that, to be bound Body for Body?

Ran.

Rather that he ſhould love no bodies Body beſides my own but my Fortune is too good to truſt the Rogue, my money makes me an Infidell.

Chriſ.

You think they all love you for that:

Ran.

For that, Ay what elſe? if it were not for that, I might ſit ſtill and ſigh, and cry out, a Miracle! a Miracle! at ſight of a Man within my doors:

Enter Maid.

Maid.

Madam here’s a young Gentleman without would ſpeak with you.

Sure.

With me, ſure thou’rt miſtaken, is it not Friendly?

Maid.

No Madam ’tis a Stranger;

Rant.

’Tis not Dareing that Rogue, is it?

Maid.

No Madam;

Rant.

Is he handſome? does he look like a Gentleman?

Maid.

He’s handſome and ſeems a Gentleman.

Rant.

Bring him in then, I hate a conversation without a Fellow,—hah —a good handſome Lad indeed:

Enter Hazard with a Letter.

Sure.

With me Sir would you ſpeak?

Haz.

If you are Madam Surelove.

Sure.

So I am call’d;

Haz.

Madam I am newly arriv’d from England, and from your Husband my kinsman bring you this—

gives a Letter

Rant.

Pleaſe you to ſit Sir;

C2 Haz. 12 c2v 12

Haz.

She’s extreamly handſome—

aſide—ſits down

Rant.

Come Sir will you Smoke a Pipe?

Haz.

I never do Madam—

Rant.

Oh fy upon’t youyou muſt learn then, we all ſmoke here, ’tis a part of good breeding,—well, well, what Cargo, what goods have ye? any Poynts, Lace, rich Stuffs, Jewells; if you have I’le be your Chafferer, I live hard by, any body will direct you to the widow Ranters.

Haz.

I have already heard of you, Madam.

Rant.

What you are like all the young Fellows, the firſt thing they do when they come to a ſtrange place, is to enquire what Fortunes there are.

Haz.

Madam I had no ſuch Ambition:

Rant.

Gad, then you’re a fool, Sir, but come, my ſervice to you; we rich Widdows are the beſt Commodity this Country affords, I’le tell you that.

this while ſhe reads the Letter.

Sure.

Sir, my Husband has recommended you here in a moſt particular manner, by which I do not only find the eſteem he has for you, but the deſire he has of gaining you mine, which on a double ſcore I render you, firſt for his ſake, next for thoſe Merits that appear in your ſelf.

Haz.

Madam, the endeavours of my life ſhall be to expreſs my Gratitude for this great Bounty;

Enter Maid.

Maid.

Madam Mr. Friendly’s here:

Sure.

Bring him in;

Haz.

Friendly,—I had a dear Friend of that name, who I hear is in theſe Parts—Pray Heaven it may be he.

Rant.

How now Charles.

Enter Friendly.

Friend.

Madam your Servant—Hah! ſhould not I know you for my dear friend Hazard?

Embracing him.

Haz.

Or you’re too blame my Friendly?

Friend.

Prethee what calm brought thee aſhore?

Haz.

Fortune de la garr, but prethee ask me no queſtions in ſo good Company; where a minute loſt from this Converſation is a misfortune not to be retriev’d:

Friend.

Do’ſt like her Rogue—

ſoftly aſide.

Haz.

Like her! have I ſight, or ſenſe—Why I adore her.

Friend.

My Chriſante, I heard your Father would not be here to day, which made me ſnatch this opportunity of ſeeing you.

Rant.

Come, Come, a Pox of this whining Love, it ſpoyls good company:

Friend,

You know my dear friend, theſe opportunities comes but ſeldom, and therefore I muſt make uſe of ’m.

Rant.

Come, come, I’le give you a better opportunity at my Houſe to morrow, we are to eat a Buffilo there, and I’le ſecure the old Gentleman from coming.

Friend.

Then I ſhall ſee Chriſantoe once more before I go:

Chriſ. 13 c3r 13

Chriſ.

Go—Heavens—whether my Friendly?

Friend.

I have received a Commiſſion to go againſt the Indians, Bacon being ſent for home.

Rant.

But will he come when ſent for?

Friend.

If he refuſe we are to Endeavour to force him.

Chriſ.

I do not think he will be forc’d, not even by Friendly.

Friend.

And faith it goes againſt my Conſcience to lift my Sword againſt him, for he is truly brave, and what he has done, a Service to the Country, had it but been by Authority.

Chriſ.

What pity ’tis there ſhould be ſuch falſe Maxims in the World, that Noble Actions how ever great, muſt be Criminall for want of a Law to Authoriſe ’em.

Friend.

Indeed ’tis pity that when Laws are faulty they ſhould not be mended or aboliſht.

Rant.

Hark’ye Charles, by Heaven if you kill my Dareing I’le Piſtol you

Friend.

No, widdow I’le ſpare him for your ſake,

They joyn with Surelove

Haz.

Oh ſhe is all Divine, and all the Breath ſhe utters ſerves but to blow my Flame.

Enter Maid

Maid.

Madam dinner’s on the Table――

Sure.

Pleaſe you Sir, to walk in—come Mr. Friendly.

ſhe takes Hazard

Rant.

Prethee good wench bring in the Punch-Bowle:

Exeunt.

Act II.

Scene I.

A Pavillion. Diſcovers the Indian King and Queen ſitting in State, with Guards of Indians Men and Women attending: to them Bacon richly dreſs’d, attended by Daring, Fearleſs, and other Officers, he bows to the King and Queen, who riſe to receive him.

King.

I Am ſorry Sir, we meet upon theſe terms, we who ſo often have embrac’d as friends.

Bac.

How charming is the Queen? aſide. War, Sir, is not my bus’neſs, nor my pleaſure: Nor was I bred in Arms; My Country’s good has forc’d me to aſſume a Soldiers life: And ’tis with much regret that I Employ the firſt effects of it againſt my Friends; Yet whilſt I may— Whilſt this Ceſſation laſts, I beg we may exhcange thoſe Friendſhips, Sir, we have ſo often paid in happier Peace.

King.

For your part, Sir, you’ve been ſo Noble, that I repent the fatall difference that makes us meet in Arms. Yet tho’ I’m young I’m ſenſible of Injuries; And oft have heard my Grandſire ſay—That we were Monarchs once of all this ſpacious World; Till you an unknown People landing here, Diſtreſs’d and ruin’d by deſtructive ſtorms, Abuſing all our Charitable Hoſpitality, Uſurp’d our Right, and made your friends your ſlaves.

Bac.

I will not juſtify the Ingratitude of my fore-fathers, but finding here my Inheritance, I am reſolv’d ſtill to maintain it ſo, And by my ſword which 14 14 c3v which firſt cut out my Portion, Defend each inch of land with my laſt drop of Bloud.

Queen.

Ev’n his threats have charms that pleaſe the heart:aſide

King.

Come Sir, let this ungratefull Theme alone, which is better diſputed in the Field.

Queen.

Is it impoſſible there might be wrought an underſtanding betwixt my Lord and you? ’Twas to that end I firſt deſired this truce, My ſelf propoſing to be Mediator, To which my Lord Cavarnio ſhall agree, Could you but Condeſcend—I know you’re Noble: And I have heard you ſay our tender Sex could never plead in vain.

Bac.

Alas! I dare not truſt your pleading Madam? A few ſoft words from ſuch a Charming mouth would make me lay the Conqueror at your feet as a Sacrifice for all the ills he has done you.

Queen.

How ſtrangely am I pleas’d to hear him talk aſide

King.

Semernia ſee—the Dancers do appear; Sir will you take your ſeat? to Bacon

He leads the Queen to a ſeat, they ſit and talk.

Bac.

Curſe on his ſports that interrupted me, My very ſoul was hovering at my Lip, ready to have diſcover’d all its ſecrets. But oh! I dread to tell her of my pain, And when I wou’d, an Awfull trembling ſeizes me, And ſhe can only ſcour my dying eyes, read all the Sentiments of my Captive heart.

ſits down, the reſt wait.
Enter Indians that dance Anticks; After the Dance the King ſeems in diſcourſe with Bacon, the Queen riſes, and comes forth.

Qu.

The more I gaze upon this Engliſh Stranger, the more Confuſion ſtruggles in my Soul, Oft I have heard of Love, and oft this Gallant Man (When Peace had made him pay his idle Viſits) Has told a thouſand tales of dying Maids, And ever when he ſpoke, my panting heart, with a Prophetick fear in ſigh reply’d, I ſhall fall ſuch a Victim to his Eye.

Enter an Indians.

Indian

Sir here’s a Meſſenger from the Engliſh Council to the King Deſires admittance to the General.

Bac.

With your Permiſſion Sir, he may advance.

to the King
Re-enter Indian with Dunce.A Letter.

Dun.

All health and Happyneſs attend your honour, This from the Honourable Council:gives him a Letter.

King.

I’le leave you till you have diſpatch’d the Meſſenger, and then expect your preſence in the Royal Tent.

Exeunt King, Queen, and Indians.

Bac.

Lieutenant, read the Letterto Daring.

reads

Dareing.

Sir, the neceſſity of what you have Acted makes it pardonable, and we could wiſh we had done the Country, and our ſelves ſo much Juſtice to have given you that Commiſſion you deſired—We now finde it reaſonable to raiſe more forces, to oppoſe theſe Inſolences, which poſſible yours may be 15 c4r15 be too weak to accompliſh, to which end the Council’s ordered to meet this Evening, and deſiring you will come and take your place there, and be pleas’d to accept from us a Commiſſion to Command in Chief in this War—Therefore ſend thoſe Soldiers under your Command to their reſpective houſes, and haſt, Sir, to your affectionate Friends—

Fear.

Sir, I fear the hearts and Pen did not agree when this was writ

Dar.

A plague upon their ſhallow Politicks! Do they think to play the old game twice with us?

Bac.

Away, you wrong the Council, who of themſelves are Honourable Gentlemen, but the baſe Coward fear of ſome of them, puts the reſt on tricks that ſuit not with their nature.

Dunce.

Sir, ’tis for noble ends you’re ſent for, and for youryour ſafety I’le engage my life.

Dar.

By Heaven and ſo you ſhall—and pay it too with all the reſt of your wiſe-headed Council.

Bac.

Your zeal is too Officious now: I ſee no Treachery, and can fear no danger.

Dun.

Treachery! now Heavens forbid, are we not Chriſtians Sir, All Friends and Countrymen! believe me Sir, ’tis Honour calls you to increaſe your fame, and he who would diſſuadediſſuade you is your Enemy.

Dar.

Go cant, Sir to the rabble — for us — we know you.

Bac.

You wrong me when you but ſuſpect for me, let him that acts diſhonorably fear. My innocence, and my good ſword’s my guard.

Dar.

If you reſolve to go, we will attend you.

Bac.

What go like an Invader? No Daring, the Invitation’s friendly, and as a friend, attended only by my menial Servants, I’le wait upon the Council, that they may ſee that when I could Command it I came an humble Suppliant for their favour—You may return, and tell ’em I’le attend.

Dunce.

I kiſs your Honour’s hand—

goes out.

Dar.

’Sdeath will you truſt the faithleſs Council Sir, who have ſo long held you in hand with promiſes, That curſe of States-men, that unlucky vice that renders even Nobility deſpis’d.

Bac.

Perhaps the Council thought me too aſpiring, and would not add Wings to my Ambitious flight.

Dar.

A pox of their conſidering caps, and now they find that you can ſoar alone, they ſend for you to knip your ſpreading wings. Now by my ſoul you ſhall not go alone.

Bac.

Forbear, leſt I ſuſpect you for a mutineer; I am reſolv’d to go.

Fear.

What, and ſend your Army home? a pretty fetch:

Dar.

By Heaven we’le not disband—not till we ſee how fairly you are dealt with: if you have a Commiſſion to be General, here we are ready to receive new orders: If no—We’l ring ’em ſuch a Thundring Peal ſhall beat the Town about their Treacherous Ears.

Bac.

I do Command you not to ſtir a man, Till you’re inform’d how I am 16 16 c4v am treated by ’em:—leave me all—

Exeunt Officers.
While Bacon reads the Letter again, To him the Indian Queen, with Women waiting.

Queen.

Now while my Lord’s aſleep in his Pavilion I’le try my power with the General, for an Accomodation of a Peace: the very dreams of war fright my ſoft ſlumbers that us’d to be employ’d in kinder Bus’neſs.

Bac.

Ha!—The Queen――What happyneſs is this preſents it ſelf which all my Induſtry could never gain?

Queen.

Sir――

approaching him

Bacon.

Preſt with the great Extreams of Joy and Fear I trembling ſtand, unable to approach her:

Queen.

I hope you will not think it fear in me, tho’ tim’rous as a Dove, by nature fram’d: Nor that my Lord, whoſe youth’s unskill’d in War can either doubt his Courage, or his forces, that makes me ſeek a Reconcilation on any honourable terms of Peace.

Bac.

Ah Madam! if you knew how abſolutely you command my Fate I fear but little honour wouldwould be left me, ſince what ſo e’re you ask me I ſhould grant.

Queen.

Indeed I would not ask your Honour, Sir, That renders you too Brave in my eſteem. Nor can I think that you would part with that. No not to ſave your Life.

Bac.

I would do more to ſerve your leaſt Commands than part with triviall Life.

Queen.

Bleſs me! Sir, how came I by ſuch a Power?

Bac.

The Gods, and Nature gave it you in your Creation, form’d with all the Charms that ever grac’d your Sex.

Queen.

I’ſt poſſible? am I ſo Beautifull?

Bac.

As Heaven, or Angels there:

Queen.

Suppoſing this, how can my Beauty make you ſo obliging?

Bac.

Beauty has ſtill a power over great Souls, And from the moment I beheld your eyes, my ſtubborn heart melted to compliance, and from a nature rough and turbulent, grew Soft and Gentle as the God of Love.

Queen.

The God of Love! what is the God of Love?

Bac.

’Tis a reſiſtleſs Fire, that’s kinddl’d thus—takes her by the hand and gazes on her. at every gaze we take from fine Eyes, from ſuch Baſhfull Looks, and ſuch ſoft touches—it makes us ſigh—and pant as I do now, and ſtops the Breath when e’re we ſpeak of Pain.

Queen.

Alas, for me if this ſhould be Love!aſide.

Bac.

It makes us tremble, when we touch the fair one, And all the bloud runs ſhiv’ring thro’ the veins, The heart’s ſurrounded with a feeble Languiſhment, The eyes are dying, and the Cheeks are pale, The tongue is faltring, and the body fainting.

Queen.

Then I’m undone, and all I feel is Love,aſide. If Love be Catching Sir, by looks and touches, Let us at diſtance parley— or 17 17 d1r or rather let me fly, For within veiwview, is too near—

aſide

Bac.

Ah! ſhe retires――diſpleas’d I fear with my preſumptious Love,—Oh pardon, faireſt creature:kneels

Queen.

I’le talk no more, our words exchange our Souls, and every look fades all my blooming honour, like Sun beams, on unguarded Roſes. —take all our Kingdoms—make our People Slaves, and let me fall beneath your Conquering Sword. But never let me hear you talk again or gaze upon your Eyes――goes out

Bac.

She Loves! by Heaven ſhe Loves! And has not art enough to hide her Flame, tho’ ſhe have Cruel honour to ſuppreſs it. However, I’le purſue her to the Banquet.Exit

Scene II.

The Widdow Ranters- Hall Enter Sure-Love fan’d by two Negro’s, followed by Hazard.

Sure.

This Madam Ranter is ſo prodigious a Treater—oh! I hate a room that ſmells of a great Dinner, and what’s worſe a deſert of Punch and Tobacco—what! are you taking leave ſo ſoon Couſin?

Haz.

Yes Madam, but ’tis not fit I ſhould let you know with what regret I go,—but buſineſs will be obey’d.

Sure.

Some Letters to diſpatch to Engliſh Ladies you have left behind —come Couſin Confeſs:

Haz.

I own I much admire the Engliſh Beauties, but never yet have put their Fetters on—

Sure.

Never in Love—oh then you have pleaſure to Come.

Haz.

Rather a Pain when there’s no hope atrends it,

Sure.

Oh ſuch diſeaſes quickly cure themſelves,

Haz.

I do not wiſh to find it ſo; For even in Pain I find a pleaſure too.

Sure.

You are infected then, and came abroad for cure.

Haz.

Rather to receive my wounds Madam;

Sure.

Already Sir.—who e’re ſhe be, ſhe made good haſt to Conquer, we have few here, boaſt that Dexterity.

Haz.

What think you of Chriſante, Madam?

Sure.

I muſt confeſs your Love & your Diſpair are there plac’d right, of which I am not fond of being made a Confidant,coldly ſince I’m aſſur’d ſhe can Love none but Friendly.

Haz.

Let her Love on, as long as life ſhall laſt, let Friendly take her, and the Univerſe, ſo I had my next wiſh,—ſighs Madam it is your ſelf that I adore,—I ſhould not be ſo vain to tell you this, but that I know you’ve found the ſecret out already from my ſighs.

Sure.

Forbear Sir, and know me for your kinsmans wife, & no more:

Haz.

Be Scornfull as you pleaſe, rail at my paſſion, and refuſe to hear D it; 18 d1v 18 it; yet I’le Love on, and hope in ſpight of you, my Flame ſhall be ſo conſtant and Submiſſive, it ſhall compell your heart to ſome return.

Sure.

You’re very Confident of your power I perceive, but if you chance to finde your ſelf miſtaken, ſay your opinion and your affectation were miſapply’d, and not that I was Cruell,Ex. Surelove

Haz.

Whate’re denyalls dwell upon your Tongue, your eyes aſſure me that your heart is tender,goes out

Enter the Bag-Piper, Playing before a great Boule of Punch, carryed between two Negro’s, a Highlandler Dancing after it, the Widdow Ranter led by Timerous, Chriſante by Dullman; Mrs. Flirt and Friendly all dancing after it; they place it on the Table.

Dull.

This is like the Noble Widdow all over I’faith,

Tim.

Ay, Ay, the widdows Health in a full Ladle, Major, drinks —but a Pox on’t what made that young Fellow here, that affronted us yeſterday Major?while they drink about

Dull.

Some damn’d Sharper that wou’d lay his Knife aboard your Widdow Cornet.

Tim.

Zoors if I thought ſo, I’d Arreſt him for Salt and Battery, Lay him in Priſon for a Swinging fine and take no Baile.

Dull.

Nay, had it not been before my Mrs here, Mrs Chriſante, I had ſwing’d him for his yeſterdays affront,—ah my ſweet Miſtris Chriſante —if you did but know what a power you have over me—

Chriſ.

Oh you’re a great Courtier Major:

Dull.

Would I were any thing for your ſake Madam.

Ran.

Thou art any thing, but what thou ſhouldſt be, prethee Major leave off being an old Buffoon, that is a Lover turn’d to ridicule by Age, conſider thy ſelf a Meer rouling Tun of Nants,—a walking Chimney, ever Smoaking with Naſty Mundungus,—and then thou haſt a Countenance like an old worm-eaten Cheeſe,

Dull.

Well widdow, you will Joake, ha, ha, ha—

Tim.

Gad’, Zoors She’s pure Company, ha, ha—

Duce.Dull.

No matter for my Countenance— Coll. Downright likes my Eſtate and is reſolv’d to have it a Match.

Friend.

Dear Widdow, take off your Damn’d Major, for if he ſpeak another word to Chriſante, I ſhall be put paſt all my patience, and fall foul upon him.

Ran.

S’life not for the world—Major I bar Love-making within my Territories, ’tis inconſiſtent with the Punch-Bowle, if you’l drink, do, if not be gone:

Tim.

Nay Gad’s Zooks if you enter me at the Punch-Boule, you enter me in Politicks—well ’tis the beſt Drink in Chriſtendom for a Stateſman,they drink about, the Bag-Pipe playing

Rant. 19 d2r 19

Ran.

Come, now you ſhall ſee what my high Land-Vallet can do—

a Scots Dance

Dull.

So—I ſee let the world go which way it will, widdow, you are reſolv’d for Mirth,—but come—to the converſation of the times.

Rant.

The times, why what a Devill ailes the times, I ſee nothing in the times but a company of Coxcombs that fear without a Cauſe.

Tim.

But if theſe fears were laid and Bacon were hang’d, I look upon Virginia to be the happieſt part of the world, gads Zoors,—why there’s England—’tis nothing to’t—I was in England about 6 years ago, & was ſhew’d the Court of Aldermen, ſome were nodding, ſome ſaying nothing, and others very little to purpoſe, but how could it be otherwiſe, for they had neither Bowle of Punch, Bottles of wine or Tobacco before ’em to put Life & Soul into ’em as we have here: then for the young Gentlemen —Their fartheſt Travels is to France or Italy, they never come hither

Dull.

The more’s the Pitty by my troth,drinks.

Tim.

Where they learn to Swear Mor-blew, Mor-Dee:

Friend.

And tell you how much bigger the Louvre is then White-Hall; buy a ſute A-la-mode, get a ſwinging Cap of ſome French Marquis, ſpend all their money and return juſt as they went.

Dull.

For the old fellows, their bus’neſs is Uſury, Extortion, and undermining young Heirs.

Tim.

Then for young Merchants, their Exchange the is Tavern, their Ware-houſe the Play-houſe, and their Bills of Exchange Billet-Deaxs, where to ſup with their wenches at the other end of the Town,—now Judge you what a Condition poor England is in: for my part I look upon’t as a loſt Nation gads zoors.

Dull.

I have conſider’d it, and have found a way to ſave all yet:

Tim.

As how I pray,

Dull.

As thus, we have men here of great Experience and Abillity— now I would have as many ſent into England as would ſupply all places, and Offices, both Civill and Military, de fee, their young Gentry ſhould all Travell hither for breeding, and to learn the miſteries of State.

Friend.

As for the old Covetous Fellows, I would have the Tradeſmen get in their debts, break and turn Troupers.

Tim.

And they’d be ſoon weary of Extortion gadz zoors;

Dull.

Then for the young Merchants, there ſhould be a Law made, none ſhould go beyond Ludgate;

Frie.

You have found out the only way to preſerve that great Kingdom,

drinking all this while ſometimes

Tim.

Well, Gad zoors ’tis a fine thing to be a good Stateſman,

Fri.

Ay Cornet, which you had never been had you ſtaid in old England.

Dull.

Why Sir we were ſomebody in England,

Frie.

So I heard Major,

Dull.

You heard Sir, what have you heard, he’d a kid-Naper that ſays D2 he 20 d2v 20 he heard any thing of me—and ſo my ſervice to you—I’le ſue you Sir for ſpoiling my Marriage here, by your Scandalls with Mrs. Chriſante, but that ſhan’t do Sir, I’le marry her for all that, & he’s a Raſcal that denies it.

Frie.

S’death you Lye Sir—I do.

Tim.

Gad zoors Sir Lye to a Privy-Councellor, a Major of Horſe, Brother, this is an affront to our Dignities, draw and I’le ſide with you.

they both draw on Friendly, the Ladies run off.

Fri.

If I diſdain to draw, ’tis not that I fear your baſe and Cowardly force, but for the reſpect I bear you as Magiſtrates, and ſo I leave you—

Tim.

An Arrant Coward Gad zoors.

goes out

Dull.

A meer paultroon, and I ſcorn to drink in’s Company.

Exeunt, putting up their Swords.

Scene III.

A Sevana, or large Heath. Enter Whimsey, Whiff, and Boozer, with ſome Soldiers, Arm’d.

Whim.

Stand—ſtand—and hear the word of Command—do ye ſee yon Cops, and that Ditch that runs along Major Dullman’s Plantation.

Booz.

We do.

Whim.

Place your Men there, and lye Flat on your Bellies, and when Bacon comes (if alone) ſeize him dy’ſee:

Whiff.

Obſerve the Command now, (if alone) for we are not for bloud-ſhed.

Booz.

I’le warrant you for our Parts.Exeunt all but Whim & Whiff

Whim.

Now we have Ambuſht our men, let’s light our Pipes and ſit down and take an Encouraging dram of the Bottle.

pulls out a bottle of brandy out of his Pocket—they ſit.

Whiff.

Thou art a Knave and haſt Emptyed half the Bottle in thy Leathern Pockets, but come here’s young Fright-all’s health.

Whim.

What, wilt drink a mans health thou’rt going to hang?

Whiff.

’Tis all one for that, we’le drink his health firſt, and hang him afterwards, and thou ſhalt pledge me de fee, and tho’ ’twere under the Gallows.

Whim.

Thou’rt a Traytor for ſaying ſo, and I defy thee.

Whiff.

Nay, ſince we are come out like Loving Brothers to hang the Generall, let’s not fall out among our ſelves, and ſo here’s to you drinks tho’ I have no great Maw to this buſineſs:

Whim.

Prethee Brother Whiff, do not be ſo Villanous a Coward, for I hate a Coward.

Whiff.

Nay ’tis not that—But my WhiffWhimsey, my Nancy dreamt to night ſhe ſaw me hang’d.

Whim.

’Twas a Cowardly Dream, think no more on’t, but as dreams are 21 d3r 21 are Expounded by Contraries, thou ſhalt hang the Generall.

Whiff.

Ay—but he was my friend, and I owe him at this time a hundred Pounds of Tobacco.

Whim.

Nay, then I’m ſure thoud’ſt hang him if he were thy brother.

Whiff.

But hark—I think I hear the Neighing of horſes; where ſhall we hide our ſelves, for if we ſtay here, we ſhall be Mawl’d damnably.

Exeunt both behind a Buſh, peeping. Enter Bacon, Fearleſs and 3 or 4 Footmen.

Bac.

Let the Groom lead the Horſes o’re the Sevana we’le walk it on Foot, ’tis not a quarter of a Mile to the Town; & here the Air is cool.

Fear.

The Breazes about this time of the day begin to take Wing and fan refreſhment to the Trees and Flowers.

Bac.

And at theſe hours how fragrant are the Groves:

Fear.

The Country’s well, but the People ſo,

Bac.

But come let’s on—they paſs to the Entrance.

Whim.

There Boys—The Soldiers come forth and fall on Bacon

Bac.

Hah! Ambuſh—

Draws, Fearleſs and Footmen draw, the Soldiers after a while fighting take Bac. & Fear, they having laid 3 or 4 Dead.

Whiff.

So, ſo, he’s taken. Now we may venture out.

Whim.

But are you ſure he’s taken?

Whiff.

Sure can’t you believe your Eyes, come forth, I hate a Coward— Oh Sir, have we caught your Mightineſs?

Bac.

Are you the Authors of this Valliant Act? None but ſuch Villainous Cowards dar’ſt have attempted it:

Whim.

Stop his railing tongue.

Whiff.

No, no, let him rail, let him rail now his hands are tyed, ha, ha, Why good Generall Fright-all, what was no body able d’ye think to tame the Roaring Lyon?

Bac.

You’le be hang’d for this?!

Whim.

Come, come, away with him to the next Tree.

Bac.

What mean you Villains?

Whiff.

Only to hang your Honour a little, that’s all. We’le teach you Sir, to ſerve your Country againſt Law.

As they go off, Enter Daring with Soldiers.

Dar.

Hah—My General betray’d—this I ſuſpected.

His Men come in, they fall on, Releaſe Bacon and Fearleſs and his Man, who get Swords. Whim’s Party put Whim and Whiff before ’em ſtriking ’em as they Endeavour to run on this ſide or that, and forcing ’em to bear-up, they are taken after ſome Fighting.

Fear.

Did not the General tell you Rogues, you’d be all hang’d?

Whiff.

Oh Nancy, Nancy, how Prophetick are thy Dreams?

Bac. 22 d3v 22

Bac.

Come let’s on—

Dar.

S’death what mean you Sir?

Bac.

As I deſign’d—to preſent my ſelf to the Council:

Dar.

By Heavens we’le follow then to ſave you from their Treachery ’twas this that has befallen you that I fear’d, which made me at a diſtance follow you.

Bac.

Follow me ſtill, but ſtill at ſuch a diſtance as your Aids may be aſſisting on all occaſion— Fearleſs go back and bring your Regiment down, and Daring let your Sergeant with his Party Guard theſe Villains to the Council.

Ex. Bac. Dar. & Fearleſs

Whiff.

A Pox on your Worſhips Plot;

Whim.

A Pox on your forwardneſs to come out of the hedge.

Ex. Officers with Whim & Whiff.

Scene IV.

The Council-Table. Enter Coll. Wellman, Coll. Downright, Dullman, Timerouſe, and about 7 or 8 more Seat themſelves.

Well.

You heard Mr. Dunce’s opinion Gentlemen, concerning Bacon’s coming upon our Invitation. He believes he will come, but I rather think, tho’ he be himſelf undaunted, yet the perſuaſions of his two Lieutenant- Generalls, Daring and Fearleſs may prevent him, —Colonel, have you order’d our Men to be in Arms?Enter a Soldier.

Down.

I have, and they’l attend further order on the Sevana:

Sol.

May it pleaſe your Honours, Bacon is on his way, he comes unattended by any but his Footmen, and Coll. Fearleſs.

Down.

Who is this Fellow?

Well.

A ſpy I ſent to watch Bacon’s Motions.

Sol.

But there is a Company of Soldiers in Ambuſh on this ſide of the Sevana to ſeize him as he paſſes by.

Well.

That’s by no order of the Council.

Omnes.

No, no, no order;

Well.

Nay, ’twere a good deſign if true,

Tim.

Gad zoors would I had thought on’t for my Troup,

Down.

I am for no unfair dealing in any Extremity.

Enter a Meſſenger in haſt.

Meſ.

An’t pleaſe your Honours, the ſaddeſt news—An Ambuſh being laid for Bacon, they ruſht out upon him, on the Sevana, and after ſome fighting took him and Fearleſs

Tim.

Is this your ſad News—zoors would I had had a hand in’t.

Brag.

When on a ſudden, Daring and his Party fell in upon us, turn’d the tide—kill’d our men and took Capt. Whimſey, and Capt. Whiff Pris’ners,ners, 23 d4r 23 ners, the reſt run away, but Bacon fought like a fury.

Tim.

A bloudy Fellow;

Down.

Whim. and Whiff? they deſerve death for Acting without order

Tim.

I’m of the Colonels opinion, they deſerve to hang for’t.

Dull.

Why Brother, I thought you had wiſht the Plot had been yours but now?

Tim.

Ay, but the Caſe is alter’d ſince that, good Brother,

Well.

Now he’s Exaſperared paſt all hopes of a Reconciliation.

Dull.

You muſt make uſe of the Stateſman’s refuge, wiſe diſſimulation.

Brag.

For all this Sir, he will not believe but that you mean Honourably, and no perſuaſions could hinder him from Coming, ſo he has diſmiſt all his Soldiers, and is Entring the Town on foot,

Well.

What pitty ’tis a brave Man ſhould be Guilty of an ill Action.

Brag.

But the noiſe of his danger has ſo won the hearts of the Mobile, that they encreaſe his Train as he goes, & follow him in the Town like a Victor.

Well.

Go wait his comingEx. Brag. he grows too popular, and muſt be humbled,

Tim.

I was ever of your mind Colonel.

Well.

Ay right or Wrong—but what’s your Counſell now?

Tim.

E’en as it us’d to be, I leave it to wiſer heads.Enter Brag.

Brag.

Bacon Sir is Entring.

Tim.

Gad zoors wou’d I were ſafe in Bed,

Dull.

Colonel keep in your heat and treat Calmly with him,

Well.

I rather wiſh you wou’d all follow me, I’d meet him at the head of all his noiſy Rabble, and ſeize him from the rout.

Down.

What Men of Authority diſpute with Rake-Hells? ’tis below us Sir.

Tim.

To Stake our Lives and Fortunes againſt their nothing.

Enter Bacon, after him the Rabble with Staves and Clubs bringing in Whim. & Whiff bound.

Well.

What means this Inſolence—What Mr. Bacon do you come in Arms?

Bac.

I’de need Sir come in Arms, when men that ſhould be Honourable can have ſo poor deſigns to take my life.

Well.

Thruſt out his following Rabble.

Firſt Rab.

We’le not Stirr till we have the General ſafe back again.

Bac.

Let not your Loves be too Officious—but retire—

1ſt. Rab.

At your Command we vaniſh—the Rabble retire.

Bac.

I hope you’l pardon me, if in my own defence I ſeiz’d on theſe two Murderers.

Down.

YouYou did well Sir, ’twas by no Order they Acted,—ſtand forth and here your Sentence—in time of war we need no Formall Tryalls to hang Knaves that Act without order.

Whiff. 24 d4v 24

Whiff.

Oh Mercy Mercy Collonell—’twas Parſon Dunce’s Plot.

Down.

Iſſue out a warrant to Seize Dunce Immediately—you ſhall be carry’d — to the Fort to Pray—

Whim.

Oh Good your Honour I never Pray’d in all my Life,

Down.

From thence Drawn upon a Sledg to the Place of Execution, —where you ſhall hang till you are dead—and then be cut down and —

Whim.

Oh hold—hold—we ſhall never be able to endure half this:

kneeling

Well.

I think th’offence needs not ſo great Puniſhment, their Crime Sir is but equall to your own, acting without Commiſſion.

Bac.

’Tis very well Explain’d Sir,—had I been Murder’d by Commiſſion them, the Deed had been approv’d, and now perhaps, I am beholding to the Rable for my Life:—

Well.

A fine pretence to hide a Popular fault, but for this once we Pardon them and you,

Bac.

Pardon, for what? by Heaven I Scorn your Pardon, I’ve not offended Honour nor Religion:

Well.

You have offended both in taking Arms,

Bac.

Shou’d I ſtand by and ſee my Country ruin’d, my King dishonour’d, and his Subjects Murder’d hear the ſad Crys of widdows and of Orphans, You heard it Lowd, but gave no pitying care to’t, And till the war and Maſſacre was brought to my own door, my Flocks, and Heards ſurpriz’d, I bore it all with Patience, Is it unlawfull to defend my ſelf against a Thief that breaks into my doors?

Well.

And call you this defending of your ſelf?

Bac.

I call it doing of my ſelf that right, which upon Juſt demand the Councill did refuſe me, If my Ambition as you’re pleas’d to call it, made me demand too Much, I left my ſelf to you:

Well.

Perhaps we thought it did,

Bac.

Sir you affront my Birth,—I am a Gentleman, And yet my thoughts were humble—I wou’d have fought under the meaneſt of your Paraſites—

Tim.

There’s a Bob for us Brother;to Dull

Bac.

But ſtill you put me off with promiſes—And when compell’d to ſtir in my defence I call’d none to my aid, and thoſe that came, ’twas their own wrongs that urg’d ’em:

Down.

’Tis fear’d Sir, under this pretence you aim at Government:

Bac.

I ſcorn to anſwer to ſo baſe an accuſation, the height of my Ambition is, to be an honeſt Subject.

Well.

An honeſt Rebell, Sir—

Bac.

You know you wrong me, and ’tis baſely urg’d—but this is trifling—here are my Commiſſions.

Throws down Papers. Down. reads. Down. 25 e1r 25

Down.

—To be General of the Forces againſt the Indians and Blank Commiſſions for his Friends.

Well.

Tear them in peicespieces — are we to be impoſed upon? Do ye come in Hoſtile manner to compel us?

Down.

Be not to rough Sir, let us argue with him――

Well.

I am reſolved I will not.

Tim.

Then we are all Dead Men, Gudzoors! he will not give us time to ſay our Prayers.

Well.

We every day expect freſh Force from England, till then, we of our ſelves ſhall be ſufficient to make Defence, againſt a ſturdy Traytor.

Bac.

Traytor, ’Sdeath Traytor ―― I defie ye, but that my Honour’s yet above my Anger; I’d make you anſwer me that Traytor dearly.Riſes.

Well.

Hah — am I threatned — Guards ſecure the Rebel.

Guards ſeize him.

Bac.

Is this your Honourable Invitation? Go—Triumph in your ſhort Liv’d Victory, the next turn ſhall be mine.Exeunt Guards with Bac.

A noiſe of Fighting—Enter Bacon, Wellman, his Guards Beat back by the Rabble, Bacon ſnatches a Sword from one, and keeps back the Rabble, Tim. gets under the Table.

Down.

What means this Inſolence!

Rab.

We’l have our General, and knock that fellows brains out, and hang up Collonel Wellman.

All.

Ay, ay, Hang up Wlelellman.

The Rabble ſeize Wellman, and Dullman, and the reſt.

Dull.

Hold, hold Gentleman, I was always for the General.

Rab.

Let’s Barbicu this Fat Rogue.

Bac.

Begone, and know your diſtance to the Councel.The Rabble let ’em go.

Well.

I’d rather periſh by the meaneſt hand, than owe my ſafety poorly thus to Bacon.

In Rage.

Bac.

If you perſiſt ſtill in that mind I’le leave you, and Conquering, make you happy ’gainſt your will.Ex. Bacon and Rabble, Hollowing a Bacon, a Bacon.

Well.

Oh Villanous Cowards, who will truſt his Honour with Sycophants ſo baſe? Let us to Arms――by Heaven I will not give my Body reſt, till I’ve Chaſtiz’d the boldneſs of this Rebel.Exeunt Well. Down. and the reſt all but Dullman, Tim. Peeps from under the Table.

Tim.

What is the Royſtering Hector gone, Brother?

Dull.

Ay, ay, and the Devil go with him. Looking ſadly, Tim. comes out.

Tim.

Was there ever ſuch a Bull of Baſhan? Why what if he ſhould come down upon us and kill us all for Traytors?

Dull.

I rather think the Councel will Hang us all for Cowards— ah—oh—a Drum――a Drum――oh—He goes out.

E Tim. 26 e1v 26

Tim.

This is the miſery of being Great, We’re Sacrific’d to every turn of State.

Act III. Scene I.

The Country Court, a great Table, with Papers, a Clerk writing. Enter a great many people of all ſorts, then Friendly, after him Dullman.

Friend.

How now Major; what, they ſay Bacon ſcar’d you all out of the Council yeſterday: What ſay the People?

Dull.

Say? they Curſe us all, and Drink young Frightall’s Health, and ſwear they’ll fight thro Fire and Brimſtone for him.

Friend.

And to morrow will hallow him to the Gallows, if it were his chance to come there.

Dull.

’Tis very likely: Why I am forc’d to be guarded to the Court now, the Rabble ſwore they would De Wit me, but I ſhall hamper ſome of ’em. Wou’d the Governour were here to bear the brunt on’t, for they call us the Evil Counſellors.Enter Hazard, goes to Friendly. Here’s the young Rogue that drew upon us too, we have Rods in piſs for him ifaith. Enter Timerous with Bayliffs, whiſpers to Dullman, after which to the Bailiffs.

Tim.

Gadzoors that’s he, do your Office.

Bayl.

We arreſt you Sir, in the Kings name, at the ſuit of the Honourable Juſtice Timerous.

Haz.

Juſtice Timerous, who the Devil’s he?

Tim.

I am the man Sir, de ſee, for want of a better; you ſhall repent Gad zoors your putting of tricks upon perſons of my Rank and Quality.

After he has ſpoke he runs back as afraid of him.

Haz.

Your Rank and Quality!

Tim.

Ay Sir, my Rank and Quality; firſt I am one of the Honourable Council, next a Juſtice of Peace in Quorum, Cornet of a Troup of Horſe de ſee, and Church-warden.

Frie.

From whence proceeds this Mr. Juſtice, you ſaid nothing of this at Madam Ranters Yeſterday; you ſaw him there, then you were good Friends?

Tim.

Ay, however I have carried my Body ſwimmingly before my Miſtriſs, de ſee, I had rancour in my Heart, Gads zoors.

Friend.

Why, this Gentleman’s a ſtranger, and but lately come a ſhore.

Haz.

At my firſt Landing I was in company with this Fellow and two or 27 e2r 27 or three of his cruel Brethren, where I was affronted by them, ſome words paſt and I drew――

Tim.

Ay ay Sir, you ſhall pay for’t,――why—what Sir, cannot a Civil Magiſtrate affront a Man, but he muſt be drawn upon preſently?

Friend.

Well Sir, the Gentleman ſhall anſwer your Sute, and I hope you’l take my Bail for him.

Tim.

’Tis enough—I know you to be a Civil Person.

Timerous and Dullman take their Places, on a long Bench placed behind the Table, to them Whimſey an Whiff, they ſeat themſelves, then Boozer and two or three more; who ſeat themſelves: Then enter two bearing a Bowl of Punch, and a great Ladle or two in it; the reſt of the Stage being filled with People.

Whiff.

Brothers it has been often mov’d at the Bench, that a new Punch Bowl ſhou’d be provided, and one of a larger Circumference, when the Bench ſits late about weighty affairs, oftentimes the Bowl is emptyed before we end.

Whim.

A good Motion, Clark ſet it down.

Clark.

Mr. Juſtice Boozer the Council has ordered you a writ of Eaſe, and diſmiſs your Worſhip from the Bench.

Boo.

Me from the Bench, for what?

Whim.

The Complaint is Brother Boozer, for Drinking too much Punch in the time of hearing Tryals.

Whiff.

And that you can neither write nor read, nor ſay the Lords Prayer.

Tim.

That your Warrants are like a Brewers Tally a Notch on a Stick; if a ſpecial Warrant, then a Couple. Gods Zoors, when his Excellency comes he will have no ſuch Juſtices.

Booz.

Why Brother, tho I can’t read my ſelf, I have had Dolton’s Country-Juſtice read over to me two or three times, and underſtand the Law; this is your Malice Brother Whiff, because my Wife does not come to your Ware-Houſe to buy her Commodities,—but no matter, to ſhow I have no Malice in my heart, I drink your Health――I care not this, I can turn Lawyer and plead at the Board.Drinks, all Pledge him and hum.

Dull.

Mr. Clark, come, to the Tryals on the Docket.Clark reads.

Clar.

The firſt is between his Worſhip , Juſtice Whiff and one Grubb.

Dull.

Ay, that Grubb’s a Common Diſturber, Brother your Cauſe, is a good Cauſe if well manag’d, here’s to’t.Drinks.

Whiff.

I thank you Brother Dullman,—read my Petition.Drinks.

Clar.

The Petition of Captain Thomas Whiff Sheweth, whereas Gilbert. Grubb, calls his Worſhips Wife Ann Grubb Whore, and ſaid he would prove it; your Petitioner deſires the Worſhipful Bench to take it into Con―― ſideration, and your Petitioner ſhall pray, &c.――Here’s two witneſſes have made Affidavit Viva voce,an’t Like your Worſhips.

E2 Dull. 28 e2v 28

Dull.

Call Grubb.

Clar.

Gilbert Grubb, come into the Court.

Grub.

Here.

Whim.

Well, what can you ſay for your ſelf Mr. Grub.

Grub.

Why an’t like your Worſhip, my wife invited ſome Neighbours wives to drink a Cagg of Syder, now your worſhips wife Madam Whiff being there fuddl’d, would have thruſt me out of doors, and bid me go to my old Whore Madam Whimſey, meaning your Worſhips wife.To Whimſey.

Whim.

Hah! My wife called Whore, ſhe’s a Jude, & I’le arreſt her Husband here—in an Action of debts.

Tim.

Gads zoures ſhe’s no better than ſhe ſhould be I’le warrant her,

Whiff.

Look ye Brother Whimſey, be patient, you know the Humour of my Nancy when ſhe’s drunk, but when ſhe’s ſober, ſhe’s a civil Perſon, and ſhall ask your pardon.

Whim.

Let this be done and I am ſatisfied: And ſo here’s to you drinks.

Dull.

Go on to the Tryal.

Grub.

I being very angry ſaid indeed, I would prove her a greater Whore than Madam Whimſey.

Clar.

An’t like your Whorſhips, he confeſſes the words in open Court.

Grub.

Why, an’t like your Worships, ſhe has had two Baſtards I’le prove it.

Whiff.

Sirrah, Sirrah, that was when ſhe was a Maid, not ſince I married her, my marrying her made her Honeſt.

Dull.

Let there be an order of Court to Sue him, for Scandalum Magnatum.

Tim.

Mr. Clark, let my Cauſe come next.

Clark.

The Defendant’s ready Sir.Hazard comes to the Board.

Tim.

Brothers of the Bench take notice, that this Hector here coming into Mrs. Flirts Ordinary where I was, with my Brother Dullman and Lieutenant Boozer; we gave him good Councel to fall to Work, now my Gentleman here was affronted at this Forſooth, and makes no more to do but calls us Scoundrels, and drew his Sword on us, and had not I defended my ſelf by running away, he had Murdered me, and Aſſaſſinated my two Brothers.

Whiff.

What witneſs have you Brother?

Tim.

Here’s Mrs. Flirt and her Maid Nell, —beſides we may be witneſs for one another I hope; our words may taken.

Clark.

Mrs. Flirt and Nell are Sworn.They ſtand forth.

Whim.

By the Oaths that you have taken, ſpeak nothing but the Truth.

Flirt.

An’t pleaſe your Worſhips, your Honours came to my Houſe, where you found this Young Gentleman; and your Honours invited him to Drink with your Honours: Where after ſome opprobrious words given him, 29 e3r 29 him, Juſtice Dullman, and Juſtice Boozer ſtruck him over the head; and after that indeed the Gentleman drew.

Tim.

Mark that Brother he drew.

Haz.

If I did, it was ſe defendendo.

Tim.

Do you hear that Brothers, he did in defiance.

Haz.

Sir, you ought not to ſit Judge and Accuſer too.

Whiff.

The Gentlemans i’th’ right Brother, you cannot do it according to Law.

Tim.

Gads Zoors, what new tricks, new querks?

Haz.

Gentlemen take notice, he ſwears in Court.

Tim.

Gads Zoors what’s that to you Sir.

Haz.

This is the ſecond time of his ſwearing.

Whim.

What do you think we are Deaf Sir? Come, come proceed.

Tim.

I deſire he may be bound to his Good behaviour, Fin’d and deliver up his Sword, what ſay you Brother?Jogs Dull. who nods.

Whim.

He’s aſleep, drink to him and waken him,――you have have miſt the Cauſe by ſleeping Brother.Drinks.

Dull.

Juſtice may nod, but never ſleeps Brother ――you were at —Deliver his Sword—a good Motion, let it be done.Drinks.

Haz.

No Gentlemen, I wear a Sword to right my ſelf.

Tim.

That’s fine i’faith, Gads Zoors, I have worn a Sword this Duzen year and never cou’d right my ſelf.

Whiff.

Ay, ’twou’d be a fine World if Men ſhou’d wear Swords to right themſelves, he that’s bound to the Peace ſhall wear no Sword.

Whim.

I ſay he that’s bound to the Peace ought to wear no Peruke, that may change ’em for black or white, and then who can know them.

Haz.

I hope Gentlemen I may be allowed to ſpeak for my ſelf.

Whiff.

Ay, what can you ſay for your ſelf, did you not draw your Sword Sirrah?

Haz.

I did.

Tim.

Tis ſufficient he confeſſes the Fact, and we’l hear no more.

Haz.

You will not hear the Provocation given.

Dull.

’Tis enough Sir, you drew—

Whim.

Ay, Ay, ’tis enough he drew—let him be Fin’d.

Friend.

The Gentleman ſhou’d be heard, he’s a Kinſman too, to Collonel John Surelove.

Tim.

Hum—Collonel Sureloves Kinſman.

Whiff.

Is he ſo, nay, then all the reaſon in the World he ſhould be heard, Brothers.

Whim.

Come, come Cornet, you ſhall be Friends with the Gentleman, this was ſome Drunken bout I’le warrant you.

Tim.

Ha, ha, ha — ſo it was Gad Zoors.

Whiff.

Come drink to the Gentleman, and put it up.

Tim 30 e3v 30

Tim.

Sir, my Service to you, I am heartily ſorry for what’s paſt, but it was in my Drink.Drinks.

Whim.

You hear his acknowledgements Sir, and when he is ſober he never quarrels, come Sir ſit down, my Service to you.

Haz.

I beg your Excuſe Gentlemen—I have earneſt buſineſs.

Dull.

Let us adjourn the Court, and prepare to meet the Regiments on the Sevana.All go but Friend and Hazard.

Haz.

Is this the beſt Court of Judicature your Country affords?

Friend.

To give it its due it is not. But how does thy Armour thrive?

Haz.

As well as I can wiſh, in ſo ſhort a time.

Friend.

I ſee ſhe regards thee with kind Eyes, Sighs and Bluſhes.

Haz.

Yes, and tells me I am ſo like a Brother ſhe had— to Excuſe her kind concern, — then bluſh ſo prettily, that Gad I cou’d not forbear making a diſcovery of my Heart.

Friend.

Have a care of that, come upon her by ſlow degrees, for I know ſhe’s Vertuous;—but come let’s to the Sevana, where I’le preſent you to the two Collonels, Wellman and Downright, the Men that manage all till theCarrival of the Governour.

Scene II.

The Sevana or Heath: Enter Wellman, Downright, Boozer, and Officers.

Well.

Have you diſpatcht the Scouts, to watch the Motions of the Enemies? I know that Bacon’s Violent and Haughty, and will reſent our vain attempts upon him; therefore we muſt be ſpeedy in prevention.

Dow.

What forces have you raiſed ſince our laſt order.

Booz.

Here’s a liſt of em, they came but ſlowly in, till we promiſed every one a Bottle of Brandy.Enter Officer and Dunce.

Offi.

We have brought Mr. Dunce here, as your Honour commanded us after ſtrict ſearch we found him this morning in Bed with Madam Flirt.

Dow.

No matter he’l exclaim no leſs againſt the vices of the Fleſh, the next Sunday.

Dunc.

I hope Sir, you will not credit the Malice of my Enemies.

Well.

No more, you are free, and what you councell’d about the Ambuſh was both prudent and ſeaſonable, and perhaps I now wiſh it had taken effect.Enter Friend and Haz.

Friend.

I have brought an Engliſh Gentleman to kiſs your hands, Sir, and offer you his ſervice, he is young and brave, and Kinſman to Col. Surelove.

Well.

Sir, you are welcom and to let you ſee you are ſo, we will give you your Kinſmans command, Captain of a Troup of Horſe-Guards, and which I am ſure will be continued to you when the Governour arrives.

Haz.

I ſhall endeavour to deſerve the Honour, Sir.

Enter Dull., Tim., Whim. and Whiff, all in Buff, Scarf and Feathers. Down. 31 e4r 31

Down.

So Gentlemen, I ſee you’re in a readineſs.

Tim.

Readineſs! What means he, I hope we are not to be drawn out to go againſt the Enemy, Major?

Dull.

If we are, they ſhall look a new Major for me.

Well.

We were debating, Gentlemen, what courſe were beſt to purſue againſt this Powerful Rebel.

Frien.

Why, Sir, we have Forces enough, let’s charge him inſtantly, delays are dangerous.

Tim.

Why, what a damn’d fiery Fellow’s this?

Down.

But if we drive him to Extremities, we fear his ſiding with the Indians.

Dull.

Collonel Downright has hit it; why ſhould we endanger our Men againſt a deſperate Termagant? If he love Wounds and Scars ſo well, let him exerciſe on our Enemies—but if he will needs fall upon us, ’tis then time for us enough to venture our lives and fortunes.

Tim.

How, we go to Bacon, under favour I think ’tis his Duty to come to us, an you go to that Gads Zoores.

Frie.

If he do, ’twill coſt you dear, I doubt Cornet.—I find by our Liſt, Sir, we are four thouſand men.

Tim.

Gads Zoores, not enough for a Breakfaſt for that inſatiate Bacon, and his two LieutenantLieutenant Generals Fearleſs and Daring.Whiff ſits on the ground with a Bottle of Brandy.

Whim.

A Morſel, a Morſel.

Well.

I am for an attack, what ſay you Gentlemen to an attack?— What, ſilent all?—What ſay you Major?

Dull.

I ſay, Sir, I hope my courage was never in diſpute. But, Sir, I am going to Marry Collonel Downright’s Daughter here—and ſhould I be ſlain in this Battel ’twou’d break her heart;――beſides, Sir, I ſhould loſe her Fortune.Speaks big.

Well.

I’m ſure here’s a Captain will never Flinch.To Whim.

Whim.

Who I, an’t like your Honour?

Well.

Ay, you.

Whim.

Who I? ha, ha, ha: Why did your Honour think that I would fight?

Well.

Fight, yes? Why elſe do you take Commiſſions?

Whim.

Commiſſions! O Lord, O Lord, take Commiſſions to fight! ha ha ha; that’s a jeſt, if all that take Commiſſions ſhould fight—

Well.

Why do you bear Arms then?

Whim.

Why for the Pay; to be called Captain, noble Captain, to ſhow, to cock and look big and bluff as I do; to be bow’d to thus as we paſs, to domineer, and beat our Souldiers: Fight quoth a, ha ha ha.

Friend.

But what makes you look ſo ſimply Cornet?

Tim.

W hy a thing that I have quite forgot, all my accounts for England are to be made up, and I’m undone if they be neglected—elſe I 32 e4v 32 I wou’d not flinch for the ſtouteſt he that wears a Sword—Look big.

Down.

What ſay you Captain Whiff?Whiff almoſt drunk.

Whiff.

I am trying Collonel what Mettle I’m made on; I think I am Valiant, I ſuppoſe I have Courage, but I confeſs ’tis a little of the D―― breed, but a little inſpiration from the bottle, and the leave of my Nancy, may do wonders.Enter Seaman in haſt.

Seam.

An’t pleaſe your Honours, Frightall’s Officers have ſeiz’d all the Ships in the River, and rid now round the Shore, and had by this time ſecur’d the Sandy Beach, and Landed men to Fire the Town, but that they are high in Drink aboard the Ship call’d the Good Subject; the Maſter of her ſent me to let your Honours know, that a few men ſent to his aſſiſtance will ſurprize them, and retake the Ships.

Well.

Now, Gentlemen, here’s a brave occaſion for Emulation—why writ not the Maſter?

Dull.

Ay, had he writ, I had ſoon been amongſt them i’faith; but this is ſome Plot to betray us.

Sea.

Keep me here, and kill me if it be not true.

Down.

He ſays well――there’s a Brigantine and a Shallop ready, I’le Embark immediately.

Friend.

No Sir, your preſence is here more neceſſary, let me have the Honour of the Expedition.

Haz.

I’le go your Volentier Charles.

Well.

Who elſe offers to go.

Whim.

A meer trick to Kidnap us, by Bacon,— if the Captain had writ――

Tim.

Ay, ay, if he had writ――

Well.

I ſee you’re all baſe Cowards, and here Caſhier ye from all Commands and Offices.

Whim.

Look ye Collonel, you may do what you pleaſe, but you loſe one of the beſt dreſt Officers in your whole Camp, Sir――

Tim.

and in me, ſuch a Head Piece.

Whiff.

I’le ſay nothing, but let the State want me.

Dull.

For my part I am weary of weighty affairs.In this while Wellman, Down. Friend. and Haz. talk.

Well.

Command what Men you pleaſe, but Expedition makes you half a Conqueror.Exit Friend. and Haz.

Enter another Seaman with a Letter, gives it to Downright, he and Wellman Read it.

Down.

Look ye now Gentlemen the Maſter has writ.

Dull.

Has he――he might have writ ſooner, while I was in Command,—if he had—

Whim.

Ay Major――if he had—but let them miſs us—

Well.

Collonel haſt with your Men and Reinforce the Beach, while I follow 33 f1r 33 follow with the Horſe;—Mr. Dunce pray let that Proclamation be Read concerning Bacon, to the Souldiers.

Dun.

It ſhall be done Sir, Exit Down. and Well. The Scene opens and diſcovers a Body of Souldiers. Gentlemen how ſimply you look now.

Tim.

—Why Mr. Parſon I have a ſcruple of Conſcience upon me. I am conſidering whether it be Lawful to Kill, tho it be in War; I have a great averſion to’t, and hope it proceeds from Religion.

Whiff.

I remember the Fit took you juſt ſo, when the Dutch Beſieged us, for you cou’d not then be perſwaded to ſtrike a ſtroke.

Tim.

Ay, that was becauſe they were Proteſtants as we are, but Gads Zoors had they been Dutch Papiſts I had maul’d them? but Conſcience—

Whim.

I have been a Juſtice of Peace this ſix years and never had a conſcience in my Life.

Tim.

Nor I neither, but in this damn’d thing of Fighting.

Dun.

Gentlemen I am Commanded to read the Declaration of the Honourable Council to you.To the Souldiers.

All

Hum hum hum—

Booz.

Silence—ſilence――Dunce reads.

Dun.

By an order of Council dated 1670-05-10May the 10 th 1670: to all Gentlemen Souldiers, Marchants, Planters, and whom elſe it may concern. Whereas Bacon, contrary to Law and Equity, has to ſatisfie his own Ambition taken up Arms, with a pretence to fight the Indians, but indeed to moleſt and enſlave the whole Colony, and to take away their Liberties and Properties; this is to declare, that whoever ſhall bring this Traytor Dead or alive to the Council ſhall have three hundred Pounds reward: And ſo God ſave the King.

All.

A Councel, a Councel! Hah— Hollow. Enter a Souldier haſtily.

Sould.

Stand to your Arms Gentlemen, ſtand to your Arms, Bacon is Marching this way.

Dun.

Hah — what numbers has he?

Soul.

About a hundred Horſe, in his March he has ſurpriz’d Collonel Downright, and taken him Priſoner.

All.

Let’s fall on Bacon— let’s fall on Bacon hay ―― Hollow.

Booz.

We’ll hear him ſpeak firſt —and ſee what he can ſay for himſelf.

All.

Ay, ay, we’l hear Bacon ſpeak—Dunce pleads with them.

Tim.

Well Major I have found a Strategem ſhall make us four the Greateſt Men in the Colony, we’ll ſurrender our ſelves to Bacon and ſay we Disbanded on purpoſe.

Dull.

Good――

Whiff.

Why, I had no other deſign in the World in refuſing to Fight.

Whim.

Nor I, d’e think I wou’d have excus’d it with the fear of diſordering my Cravat String elſe――

F Dun. 34 f1v 34

Dun.

Why Gentlemen, he deſigns to Fire James Town; Murder you all, and then lye with your Wives, and will you ſlip this opportunity of ſeizing him?

Boo.

Here’s a Tarmagant Rogue Neighbours— we’ll Hang the Dog.

All.

Ay, Ay, hang Bacon, hang Bacon.

Enter Bacon, and Fearleſs, ſome Souldiers leading in Downright bound, Bacon ſtands and ſtares a while on the Regiments, who are ſilent all.

Bac.

Well Gentlemen—in order to your fine Declaration you ſee I come to render my ſelf――

Dun.

How came he to know of our Declaration?

Whim.

Rogues, Rogues among our ſelves—that inform.

Bac.

What are ye ſilent all,—not a Man lift his Hand in Obedience to the Council to Murder this Traytor, that has expoſed his Life ſo often for you? Hah what not for three hundred Pound,—you ſee I’ve left my Troops behind, and come all wearied with the Toyles of War, worn out by Summers heats and Winters colds, March’d tedious Days and Nights thro Fogs and Fens as dangerous as your Clamors, and as Faithleſs, —what tho ’twas to preſerve you all in ſafety, no matter, you ſhou’d obey the Grateful Council, and Kill this honeſt Man that has defended you?

All.

Hum, hum hum.

Whiff.

The General ſpeaks like a Gorgon.

Tim.

Like a Cherubin, Man.

Bac.

All ſilent yet ―― where’s that mighty Courage that cryed ſo loud but now? A Council a Council, where is your Reſolution, cannot three hundred Pound Excite your Valour, to ſeize that Traytor Bacon who has bled for you? ――

All.

A Bacon, a Bacon, a Bacon.――Hollow.

Dow.

Oh Villanous Cowards—Oh the Faithleſs Multitude!

Bac.

What ſay you Parſon—you have a forward Zeal?

Dun.

I wiſh my Coat Sir did not hinder me, from acting as becomes my Zeal and DutyDuty.

Whim.

A Plaguy Rugid Dog—that Parſon—

Bac.

Fearleſs ſeize me that canting Knave from out the Herd, and next thoſe Honourable Officers Points to Dull. Whim. Whiff. and Tim..

Fearleſs ſeizes them, and gives them to the Souldiers, and takes the Proclamation from Dunce, and ſhews Bacon, they read it.

Dull.

Seize us, Sir, you ſhall not need, we laid down our Commiſſions on purpoſe to come over to your Honour.

Whiff.

We ever lov’d and honour’d your Honour.

Tim.

So intirely, Sir――that I wiſh I were ſafe in James Town for your ſake, and your Honour were hang’d.Aſide.

Bac.

This fine Piece is of your Penning Parſon—though it be countenanc’dtenanc’d 35 f2r 35 tenanc’d by the Councils Names――Oh in gratitude――Burn— Burn the Treacherous Town―― Fire it immediately――

Whim.

We’ll obey you, Sir――

Whiff.

Ay, ay, we’ll make a Bonfire on’t, and Drink your Honours Health round about it.They offer to go.

Bac.

Yet hold, my Revenge ſhall be more Merciful, I ordered that all the Women of Rank ſhall be ſeiz’d and brought to my Camp. I’ll make their Husbands pay their Ranſoms dearly; they’d rather have their Hearts bleed than their Purſes.

Fear.

Dear General, let me have the ſeizing of Collonel Downright’s Daughter; I would fain be Plundering for a Trifle call’d a Maiden-head.

Bac.

On pain of Death treat them with all reſpect; aſſure them of the ſafety of their Honour. Now, all that will follow me, ſhall find a welcom, and thoſe that will not may depart in Peace.

All.

Hay, a General, a General, a General.

Some Souldiers go off, ſome go to the ſide of Bacon. Enter Dareing and Souldiers with Chriſante, Surelove, Mrs. Whim. and Mrs. Whiff, and ſeveral other Women.

Bac.

Succeſsful Dareing welcome, what Prizes have ye?

Dare.

The Faireſt in the World Sir, I’m not for common Plunder.

Down.

Hah, my Daughter and my Kinſwoman!――

Bac.

’Tis not with Women Sir, nor honeſt Men like you that I intend to Combat; not their own Parents ſhall not be more indulgent, nor better ſafeguard to their Honours Sir: But ’tis to ſave the Expence of Blood, I ſeize on their moſt valu’d Prizes

Down.

But Sir, I know your wild Lieutenant General has long lov’d my Chriſante, and perhaps, will take this time to force her to conſent.

Dare.

I own I have a Paſſion for Chriſante, yet by my Generals Life— or her fair ſelf—what now I Act is on the ſcore of War, I ſcorn to force the Maid I do adore.

Bac.

Believe me Ladies, you ſhall have Honourable Treatment here.

Chriſ.

We do not doubt it Sir, either from you or Dareing, if he Love me――hat will ſecure my Honour, or if he do not, he’s to brave to injure me.

Dare.

I thank you for your juſt opinion of me, Madam.

Chriſ.

But Sir, ’tis for my Father I muſt plead; to ſee his Reverend Hands in Serval Chains—and then perhaps if ſtubborn to your will, his Head muſt fall a Victim to your Anger.

Down.

No my good Pious Girl, I cannot fear Ignoble uſage from the General――And if thy Beauty can preſerve thy Fame, I ſhall not mourn in my Captivity.

Bac.

I’le ne’re deceive your kind opinion of me―― Ladies I hope you’re all of that opinion to.

F2F2 Surel. 36 f2v 36

Surel.

If ſeizing us Sir can advance your Honour, or be of any uſe conſiderable to you, I ſhall be proud of ſuch a ſlavery.

Mrs. Whim.

I hope Sir we ſhan’t be Raviſh’d in your Camp.

Dare.

Fie Mrs. Whimſey, do Souldiers uſe to Raviſh?

Mrs. Whiff.

Raviſh—marry I fear ’em not, I’de have em know I ſcorn to be Raviſh’d by any Man!

Fear.

Ay a my Conſcience Mrs Whiff, you are too good natur’d.

Dare.

Madam, I hope you’l give me leave to name Love to you, and try by all ſub miſive ways to win your heart?

Chriſ.

Do your worſt Sir, I give you leave, if you aſſail me only with your Tongue.

Dare.

That’s generous and brave, and I’le requite it.

Enter Souldier in haſte.

Soul.

The Truce being ended, Sir, the Indians grow ſo inſolent as to attack us eveneven in our Camp, and have kill’d ſeveral of our Men.

Bac.

’Tis time to check their boldneſs, Dareing haſte draw up our Men in order, to give ’em Battel, I rather had expected their ſubmiſſion. The Country now may ſee what they’re to fear,Since we that are in Arms are not ſecure.

Exeunt leading the Ladies.

ACT IV. SCENE I.

A Temple, with an Indian God placed upon it, Prieſts and Prieſteſſes attending; enter Indian King on one ſide attended by Indian Men, the Queen Enters on the other ſide with Women, all bow to the Idol, and divide on each ſide of the Stage, then the Muſick Playing lowder, the Prieſt and Priſteſſes Dance about the Idol, with ridiculous Poſtures, and crying (as for Incantations.) Thrice repeated, Agah Yerkin, Agah Boah, Sulen Tawarapah, Sulen Tawarapah. After this ſoft Muſick plays again, then they Sing ſomething fine, after which the Prieſts lead the King to the Altar, and the Prieſteſſes, the Queen, they take off little Crowns from their Heads, and offer them at the Alter.

King.

Invoke the God, of our Quiocto to declare, what the Event ſhall be of this our laſt War againſt the Engliſh General.

Soft Muſick ceaſes. The 37 f3r 37 The Muſick changes to confuſed Tunes, to which the Prieſt and Priſteſs Dance Antickly Singing between; the ſame Incantation as before, and then Dance again, and ſo invoke again alternately: Which Dance ended a Voice behind the Alter cries, while ſoft Muſick Play――

The Engliſh General ſhall be, A Captive to his Enemy; And you from all your Toyls be freed, When by your hand the Foe ſhall bleed: And ere the Sun’s ſwift courſe be run, This mighty Conqueſt, ſhall be won.

King.

I thank the Gods for taking care of us, prepare new Sacrifice againſt the Evening, when I return a Conqueror, I will my ſelf perform The Office of a Prieſt.

Queen.

Oh Sir, I fear you’l fall a Victim firſt.

King.

What means Semernia, why are thy looks ſo Pale?

Queen.

Alas the Oracles have double meanings, their ſence is doubtful, and their words Inigma’s, I fear Sir I cou’d make a truer interpritation—

King.

How Semernia! by all thy Love I charge thee as you reſpect my Life, to let me know your thoughts.

Queen.

Laſt Night I Dream’d a Lyon fell with Hunger, ſpight of your Guards ſlew you, and bore you hence.

King.

This is thy Sexes fear, and no interpretation of the Oracle.

Queen.

I cou’d convince you farther.

King.

Haſt thou a ſecret thou canſt keep from me? Thy Soul a thought that I muſt be ſtrangerſtranger too? This is not like the Juſtice of Semernia, come unriddle me the Oracle.

Queen.

The Engliſh General ſhall be, a captive to his Enemy; he is ſo Sir already to my Beauty, he ſays he languiſhes for Love of me.

King.

Hah—the General my Rival—but go on—

Queen.

And you from all your War be freed: Oh let me not explain that fatal line, for fear it mean, you ſhall be freed by Death.

King.

What, when by my hand the Foe ſhall bleed?—away—it cannot be—

Queen.

No doubt my Lord, you’l bravely ſell your Life, and deal ſome wounds where you’l receive ſo many.

King.

’Tis Love Semernia makes thee Dream, while waking I’le truſt the Gods, and am reſolved for Battel.

Enter an Indian.

Ind.

Haſt, Haſt Great Sir to Arms, Bacon with all his Forces is prepar’d, and both the Armies ready to engage.

King.

Haſt to my General bid him charge em inſtantly, I’le bring up the ſupplys of ſtout Teroomians, thoſe ſo well skill’d in the Envenom’d Arrow,Exit Indian――Semernia—words but poorly do expreſs the 38 f3v 38 the griefs of parting Lovers—’tis with dying Eyes, and a Heart trembling—thus―― Puts her Hand on his Heart. They take a heavy leave, —one parting Kiſs, and one Love preſſing ſigh, and then farewel— but not a long farewel; I ſhall return Victorious to thy arms,—commend me to the Gods and ſtill remember me.Ex. King.

Queen.

Alas! What pitty ’tis I ſaw the General, before my Fate had given me to the King—but now―― like thoſe that change their Gods, my faithleſs mind ’twixt two opinions wavers; while to the Gods my Monarch I commend; my wandring thoughts in pitty of the General makes that zeal cold, declin’d――ineffectual;――If for the General I, implore the Deieties, methinks my Prayers ſhou’d not aſcend the Skies ſince Honour tells me ’tis an impious zeal. Which way ſo over my Devotion move,I am too wretched to be heard above.

Goes in, all Exeunt.

Scene II.

Shows a Field of Tents, ſeen at ſome diſtance thro’ the Trees of a Wood, Drums, Trumpets and the noiſe of Battel with hollowing. The Indians are ſeen with Battle-Axis to Retreat Fighting from the Engliſh and all go off, when they Re-enter immediately beating back the Engliſh, the Indian King at the head of his Men, with Bows and Arrows; Dareing being at the head of the Engliſh: They Fight off; the noiſe continues leſs loud as more at diſtance. Enter Bacon with his Sword drawn, meets Fearleſs with his Sword drawn.

Fear.

Haſt, haſt Sir to the Entrance of the Wood, Dareings Engaged paſt hope of a retreat, ventring too far, perſuing of the Foe; the King in Ambuſh with his Poyſon’d Archers, fell on and now we’re dangerouſly diſtreſt.

Bac.

Dareing is Brave, but, he’s withal, too raſh, come on and follow me to his Aſſistance—Go out.

A hollowing within, the Fight renews, Enter the Indians Beaten back by Bacon, Dareing and Fearleſs, they Fight off, the noiſe of Fighting continues a while, this ſtill behind the Wood. Enter Indians Flying over the Stage, purſu’d by the King.

King.

Turn, turn ye fugitive slaves, and face the Enemy; Oh Villains, Cowards, Deaf to all Command, by Heaven I had my Rival my in view and Aim’d at nothing but my Conquering him—now like a Coward I muſt fly with Cowards, or like a deſperate Mad-Man fall, thus ſingly midſt the numbers.Follow the Indians.

Enter Bacon inrag’d with his Sword drawn, Fearleſs, and Dareing following him.

Bac.

—Where is the King, Oh ye perfidious Slaves, how have you hid 39 f4r 39 hid from my juſt Revenge—ſearch all the Brakes, the Fuzes and the Trees, and let him not eſcape on Pain of Death.

Dare.

We cannot do wonders Sir.

Bac.

But you can run away—

Dare.

Yes, when we ſee occaſion—yet—ſhou’d any but my General tell me ſo—by Heaven he ſhou’d find I were no ſtarter.

Bac.

Forgive me, I’m Mad— the Kings eſcap’d, hid like a trembling ſlave in ſome cloſe Ditch, where he will ſooner ſtarve than Fight it out.

Re-enter Indians running over the Stage, purſued by the King who ſhoots them as they Fly, ſome few follow him.

King.

All’s loſt—the day is loſt—and I’m betray’d—Oh Slaves, that even Wounds can’t Animate.In Rage.

Bac.

The King!

King.

The General here, by all the Powers betray’d by my own Men.

Bac.

Abandon’d as thou art I ſcorn to take thee baſely, you ſhall have Souldiers chance Sir for your Life, ſince chance ſo luckily has brought us hither; without more aids we will diſpute the day: this ſpot of Earth bears both our Armies Fates, I’le give you back the Victory I have won, and thus begin a new, on equal terms.

King.

That’s Nobly ſaid—the Powers have heard my wiſh! You Sir firſt taught me how to uſe a Sword, which heretofore has ſerv’d me with ſucceſs, but now—’tis for Semernia that it draws, a prize more valu’d than my Kingdom, Sir――

Bac.

Hah Semernia!

King.

Your Bluſhes do betray your Paſſion for her.

Dar.

’Sdeath have we Fought for this, to expoſe the Victor to the Conquer’d Foe?

Fea.

What Fight a ſingle Man— our Prize already.

King.

Not ſo young Man while I command a Dart.

Bac.

Fight him, by Heaven no reaſon ſhall diſſwade me, and he that interrupts me is a Coward, whatever be my Fate, I do command ye to let the King paſs freely to his Tents.

Dar.

The Devils in the General.

Fea.

’Sdeath his Romantick humour will undo us.They Fight and pauſe.

King.

You Fight as if you meant to outdo me this way, as you have done in Generoſity.

Bac.

You’re not behind hand with me Sir in courteſie, come here’s to ſet us even—Fight again.

King.

You bleed apace.

Bac.

You’ve only Breath’d a Vein, and given me new Health and Vigour by it.They Fight again, Wounds on bothſides, the King ſtaggers, Bacon takes him in his Arms, the King drops his Sword: King. 40 f4v 40 How do you Sir?

King.

Like one—that’s hovering between Heaven and Earth, I’m— mounting—ſomewhere—upwards—but giddy with my flight,—I know not where.

Bac.

Command my Surgions,—inſtantly—make haſte Honour returns and Love all Bleeding’s fled.Ex. Fearleſs.

King.

Oh Semernia, how much more truth had thy Divinity than the Predictions of the flattering Oracles. Commend me to her ――I know you’l—viſit—your Fair Captive Sir, and tell her—oh—but Death prevents the reſt.Dies.

Enter Fearleſs.

Bac.

He’s gone—and now like Cæſar I cou’d weep over the Hero I my ſelf deſtroy’d.

Fea.

I’m glad for your repoſe I ſee him there—’twas a Mad hot Brain’d Youth and ſo he dy’d.

Bac.

Come bear him on your Shoulders to my Tent, from whence with all the ſolemn ſtate we can, we will convey him to his own Pavillion.

Enter a Souldier.

Sould.

Some of our Troops purſuing of the Enemy even to their Temples, which they made their Sanctuary, finding the Queen at her Devotion there with all her Indian Ladies, I’d much ado to ſtop their violent rage from ſetting fire to the Holy Pile.

Bac.

Hang em immediately that durſt attempt it, while I my ſelf will flye to reſcue her.

Goes out, they bear off the Kings Body, Ex. all. Enter Whimſey, pulling in Whiff, with a Halter about his Neck.

Whim.

Nay I’m reſolv’d to keep thee here till his Honour the General comes,—what to call him Traytor, and run away after he had ſo generouſly given us our freedom, and Lifted us Cadees for the next command that fell in his Army;—I’m reſolv’d to Hang thee—

Whiff.

Wilt thou betray and Peach they Friend: Thy Friend that kept thee Company all the while thou wert a Priſoner――Drinking at my own charge.—

Whim.

No matter for that, I ſcorn Ingratitude and therefore will Hang thee――but as for thy drinking with me—I ſcorn to be behind hand with thee in Civility and therefore here’s to thee.

Takes a Bottle of Brandy out of his Pocket, Drinks.

Whiff.

I can’t drink.

Whim.

A certain ſign thou wo’t be Hang’d.

Whiff.

You us’d to be a my ſide when a Juſtice, let the cauſe be how it wou’d.Weeps.

Whim.

Ay—when I was a Juſtice I never minded Honeſty, but now I’le be true to my General, and Hang thee to be a great man.—

Whiff. 41 g1r 41

Whiff.

If I might but have a fair Tryal for my Life—

Whim.

A fair Tryal――come I’le be thy Judge—and if thou can’ſt clear thy ſelf by Law I’le acquit thee, Sirrah, Sirrah, what can’ſt thou ſay for thy ſelf for calling his Honour Rebel?Sits on a Drum Head.

Whiff.

’Twas when I was Drunk an’t like your Honour.

Whim.

That’s no Plea, for if you kill a Man when you are Sober you muſt be Hang’d when you are Drunk, haſt thou any thing elſe to ſay for thy ſelf, why Sentence may not paſs upon thee?

Whiff.

I deſire the Benefit of the Clergy.

Whim.

The Clergy, I never knew any body that ever did benefit by em, why thou canſt not read a word?

Whiff.

Tranſportation then—

Whim.

It ſhall be to England then—but hold—who’s this?

Dullman creeping from a Buſh.

Dull.

So the dangers over, I may venture out, —Pox on’t I would not be in this fear again, to be LordEnter Timerous with Battle Ax, Bow and Arrows, and Feathers on his Head. Chief Juſtice of our Court. Why how now Cornet—what in dreadful Equipage? Your Battle Ax Bloody, with Bow and Arrows?

Tim.

I’m in the poſture of the times Major—I wou’d not be Idle where ſo much Action was, I’m going to preſent my ſelf to the General with theſe Trophies of my Victory here—

Dull.

Victory—what Victory—did not ſee thee creeping out of yonder Buſh, where thou weret hid all the Fight—ſtumble on a Dead Indian, and take away his Arms?

Tim.

Why, didſt thou ſee me?

Dull.

See thee Ay—and what a fright thou wert in, till thou wert ſure he was Dead.

Tim.

Well, well, that’s all one—Gads zoors if every Man that paſs for Valiant in a Battel, were to give an account how he gain’d his Reputation, the World wou’d be but thinly ſtock’d with Heroes, I’le ſay he was a great War Captain, and that I Kill’d him hand to hand, and who can diſprove me?

Dull.

Diſprove thee—why that Pale face of thine, that has ſo much of the Coward in’t.

Tim.

Shaw that’s with loſs of Blood— Hah I am overheard I doubt— who’s yonder— Sees Whim. and Whiff. how Brother Whiff in a Hempen Cravat String?

Whim.

He call’d the General Traytor and was running away, and I’m reſolved to Peach.

Dull.

Hum—and one witneſs will ſtand good in Law, in caſe of Treaſon—

Tim.

Gads zoors in caſe of Treaſon he’l be Hang’d if it be proved againſt G him 42 g1v 42 him, were there ne’re a witneſs at all, but he muſt try’d by a Councel of War Man—come, come let’s diſarm him――They take away his Arms, and pull a Bottle of Brandy out of his Pockets.

Whiff.

What, I hope you will not take away my Brandy Gentlemen, my laſt comfort.

Tim.

Gads zoors it’s come in good time—we’l Drink it off, here Major――Drinks, Whiff takes him aſide.

Whiff.

Hark ye Cornet—you are my good Friend, get this matter made up before it come to the General.

Tim.

But this is Treaſon Neighbor.

Whiff.

If I Hang—I’le declare upon the Ladder, how you kill’d your War Captain.

Tim.

Come Brother Whimſey —we have been all Friends and loving Magiſtrates together, let’s Drink about, and think no more of this buſineſs.

Dull.

Ay, ay, if every ſober man in the Nation, ſhould be call’d to account of the Treaſon he ſpeaks in’s Drink the Lord have mercy upon us all ――put it up—and let us like loving Brothers take an honeſt reſolution to run away together; for this ſame Frightal minds nothing but Fighting.

Whim.

I’m content, provided we go all to the Council and tell them (to make our Peace) we went in obedience to the Proclamation to kill Bacon, but the Traytor was ſo ſtrongly guarded we could not effect it, but Mum――who’s here――To them, Enter Ranter and Jenny, as Man and Footman.

Rant.

Hah, our four Reverend Juſtices—I hope the Blockheads will not know me—Gentlemen, can you direct me to Lieutenant General Dareings Tents.

Whiff.

Hum, who the Devil’s this—that’s he you ſee coming this way, ’Sdeath yonders Dareing――Let’s ſlip away before he advances. Exeunt all but Ranter and Jenny.

Jen.

I am fear’d with thoſe dead Bodies we have paſt over, for God’s ſake Madam, let me know your deſign in coming.

Rant.

Why? now I’le tell thee――my damn’d mad Fellow Dareing who has my heart and ſoul—Loves Chriſante, has ſtolen her, and carryed her away to his Tents, ſhe hates him, while I am dying for him.

Jen.

Dying Madam! I never ſaw you melancholy.

Rant.

Pox on’t no, why ſhould I ſigh and whine, and make my ſelf an Aſs, and him conceited, no, inſtead of ſnevelling I’m reſolv’d—

Jen.

What Madam?

Rant.

Gad to beat the Raſcal, and bring of Chriſante.

Jen.

Beat him Madam? What a woman beat a Lieutenant General.

Rant.

Hang ’em, they get a name in War, from command, not courage; how know I but I may fight, Gad I have known a Fellow kickt from 43 g2r 43 from one end of the Town to t’other, believing himſelf a Coward, at laſt forc’d to fight, found he could, got a Reputation and bullyed all he met with, and got a name, and a great Commiſſion.

Jen.

But if he ſhould kill you Madam?

Rant.

I’le take care to make it as Comical a Duel as the beſt of ’em, as much in Love as I am, I do not intend to dy it’s Martyr.

Enter Dareing and Fearleſs.

Fear.

Have you ſeen Chryſante ſince the fight?

Dar.

Yes, but ſhe is ſtill the ſame; as nice and coy as Fortune, when ſhe’s courted by the wretched, yet ſhe denys me, ſo obligingly ſhe keeps my Love ſtill in its humble Calm.

Rant.

Can you direct me Sir, to one Dareings Tent:Sullenly.

Dar.

One Dareing—he has another Epithet to his name?

Ran.

What’s that, Raſcal, or Coward?

Dar.

Hah, which of thy Stars young man has ſent thee hither, to find that certain Fate they have decreed.

Ran.

I know not what my Stars have decreed, but I ſhall be glad if they have ordain’d me to Fight with Dareing, ――by thy concern thou ſhou’dſt be he?

Dar.

I am, prithee who art thou?

Ran.

Thy Rival, tho newly arriv’d from England, and came to Marry fair Chriſante, whom thou haſt Raviſh’d, for whom I hear another Lady Dies.

Dar.

Dies for me?

Ran.

Therefore reſign her fairly—or fight me fairly――

Dar.

Come on Sir—but hold—before I kill thee, prithee inform me who this Dying Lady is?

Ran.

Sir I owe ye no Courteſie, and therefore will do you none by telling you—come Sir for Chriſante—draws.They offer to Fight. Fearleſs ſteps in.

Fea.

Hold — what mad Frolicks this? —Sir you Fight for one you never ſaw to Ranter and you for one that Loves you not To Dare.

Dar.

Perhaps ſhe’l Love him as little.

Ran.

Gad put it to the Tryal, if you dare—if thou be’ſt Generous bring me to her, and whom ſhe does neglect ſhall give the other Place.

Dar.

That’s fair put up thy Sword—I’le bring thee to her inſtantly. Exeunt.

Scene

a Tent; Enter Chriſante and Surelove.

Chri.

I’m not ſo much afflicted for my confinement as I am, that I cannot hear of Friendly.

Sure.

Art not perſecuted with Dareing?

Cri.

Not at all, tho he tells me daily of his Paſſion I rally him, and give him neither hope nor deſpair,—he’s here.

G2 Enter. 44 g2v 44 Enter Dareing Fear. Rant. and Jenny.

Dare.

Madam, the Complaiſance I ſhow in bringing you my Rival, will let you ſee how glad I am to oblige you every way.

Ran.

I hope the danger I have expos’d my ſelf too for the Honour of kiſſing your hand Madam, will render me ſomething acceptable―― here are my Credentials――Gives her a Letter.

Cri.

(Reads) Dear Creature, I have taken this habit to free you from an impertinent Lover, and to ſecure the Damn’d Rogue Dareing to my ſelf, receive me as ſent by Collonel Surelove from England to Marry you —favour me—no more—your Ranter—Hah Ranter? Aſide —Sir you have too good a Character from my Couſin Collonel Surelove, not to receive my welcome.Gives Surelove the Letter.

Ran.

Stand by General――Puſhes away DarelingDareing and looks big, and takes Chriſante by the hand and kiſſes it.

Dar.

’Sdeath Sir there’s room—enough—at firſt ſight ſo kind? Oh Youth—Youth and Impudence, what Temptations are you—to Villanous Woman.

Chri.

I confeſs Sir we Women do not Love theſe rough Fighting Fellows, they’re always ſcaring us with one Broil or other.

Dar.

Much good may do you with your tame Coxcomb.

Ran.

Well Sir, then you yield the Prize?

Dar.

Ay Gad, were ſhe an Angel, that can prefer ſuch a callow Fop as thou before a man —take her an domineer.They all laugh. —’Sdeath am I grown Ridiculous.

Fear.

Why haſt thou not found the Jeſt? by Heaven ’tis Ranter, ’tis ſhe that loves you, carry on the humour. aſide Faith Sir, if I were you, I would devote my ſelf to Madam Ranter.

Chri.

Ay, ſhe’s the fitteſt Wife for you, ſhe’ll fit your Humour.

Dar.

Ranter—Gad I’d ſooner marry a She Bear, unleſs for a Pennance for ſome horrid Sin, we ſhould be eternally challenging one another to the Field, and ten to one ſhe beats me there; or if I ſhould eſcape there, ſhe would kill me with Drinking.

Ran.

Here’s a Rogue—does your Country abound with ſuch Ladies?

Dar.

The Lord forbid, half a dozen wou’d ruine the Land, debauch all the men, and ſcandalize all the women.

Fear.

No matter, ſhe’s rich.

Dar.

Ay that will make her Inſolent.

Fea.

Nay ſhe’s generous too.

Dar.

Yes when ſhe’s Drunk, and then ſhe’l laviſh all.

Ran.

A Pox on him—how he vexes me.

Dar.

Then ſuch a Tongue—ſhe’l rail and ſmoak till ſhe choak again then ſix Gallons of Punch hardly recovers her, and never but then is ſhe good Natur’d.

Ran. 45 g3r 45

Ran.

I muſt lay him on――

Dar.

There’s not a Blockhead in the Country that has not――

Ran.

――What—

Dar.

――Been drunk with her.

Ran.

I thought you had meant ſomething elſe Sir.In huff.

Dar.

Nay—as for that—I ſuppoſe there’s no great difficulty.

Ran.

’Sdeath Sir you lye—and you’re a Son of a Whore.Draws and Fences with him, and he runs back round the Stage.

Dar.

Hold—hold Virago—dear Widow hold, and give me thy hand.

Ran.

Widow!

Dar.

’Sdeath I knew thee by inſtinct Widow tho I ſeem’d not to do ſo, in revenge for the trick you put on me in telling me a Lady dy’d for me.

Ran.

Why, ſuch an one there is, perhaps ſhe may dwindle forty or fifty years—or ſo—but will never be her own Woman again that’s certain.

Sure.

This we are all ready to teſtifie, we know her.

Chri.

Upon my Life tis true.

Dar.

Widow I have a ſhrewd ſuſpicion, that you your ſelf may be this dying Lady.

Ran.

Why ſo Coxcomb?

Dar.

Becauſe you took ſuch pains to put your ſelf into my hands.

Ran.

Gad if your heart were but half ſo true as your gueſs, we ſhould conclude a Peace before Bacon and the Council will—beſides this thing whines for Friendly and there’s no hopes.To Chriſante.

Dar.

Give me thy hand Widow, I am thine—and ſo intirely, I will never—be drunk out of thy Company—Dunce is in my Tnet—prithee let’s in and bind the bargain.

Ran.

Nay, faith, let’s ſee the Wars at an end, firſt.

Dar.

May, prithee, take me in the humour, while thy Breeches are on—for I never lik’d thee half ſo well in Petticoats.

Ran.

Lead on General, you give me good incouragement to wear them.

Exeunt.
ACT 46 g3v 46

Act V. Scene I.

The Sevana in ſight of the Camp; the Moon riſes. Enter Friendly, Hazard and Boozer, and a Party of Men.

Fr.

We we are now in the ſight of the Tents.

Booz.

Is not this a raſh attempt, Gentlemen, with ſo ſmall Force to ſet upon Bacons whole Army?

Haz.

Oh, they are drunk with Victory and Wine; there will be naught but Revelling to Night.

Fr.

Would we cou’d learn in wha Quarter the Ladies are lodg’d, for we have no other buſineſs but to releaſe them――but hark—who comes here?

Booz.

Some Scouts, I fear, from the Enemy.

Enter Dullman, Tim. Whim. and Whiff., creeping as in the dark.

Fr.

Let’s ſhelter our ſelves behind yonder Trees—leſt we be ſurpriz’d.

Tim.

Wou’d I were well at home—Gad Zoors—if e’re you catch me a Cadeeing again, I’ll be content to be ſet in the fore-front of the Battel for Hawks Meat.

Whim.

Thou’rt affraid of every Buſh.

Tim.

Ay, and good Reaſon too: Gad Zoors, there may be Rogues hid ――prithee Major, do thou advance.

Dull.

No, no, go on—no matter of ceremony in theſe caſes of running away.They advance.

Fr.

They approach directly to us, we cannot eſcape them—their numbers are not great —let us advance.They come up to them.

Tim.

Oh, I am annihilated.

Whiff.

Some of Frightall’s Scouts; we are loſt men.They puſh each other foremoſt.

Whim.

Oh, they’ll give us no Quarter; ’twas long of you Cornet, that we ran away from our Colours.

Tim.

Me――’twas the Majors Ambition here—to make himſelf a great Man with the Council again.

Dull.

Pox o’ this Ambition, it has been the ruin of many a Gallant Fellow.

Whiff.

If I get home again, the height of mine ſhall be to top Tobacco; would I’d ſome Brandy.

Tim. 47 g4r 47

Tim.

Gads Zoors, would we had, ’tis the beſt Armour againſt fear— hum—I hear no body now—prithee advance a little.

Whim.

What, before a Horſe Officer?

Fr.

Stand on your Lives――

Tim.

Oh, ’tis impoſſible—I am dead already.

Fr.

What are ye—ſpeak—or I’ll ſhoot?

Whim.

Friends to thee――who the Devil are we friends too?

Tim.

E’ne who you pleaſe, Gad Zoors.

Fr.

Hah――Gad Zoors――who’s there, Timerous?

Tim.

Hum—I know no ſuch Scoundrel――Gets behind.

Dull.

Hah—that’s Friendly’s Voice.

Fr.

Right――thine’s that of Dullman――who’s with you?

Dull.

Only Timerous, Whimſey and Whiff, all Valiantly running away from the Arch Rebel that took us Priſoners.

Haz.

Can you inform us where the Ladies are lodg’d?

Dull.

In the hither Quarter in Dareings Tents; you’ll know them by Lanthorns on every corner――there was never better time to ſurprize them――for this day Dareing’s Marry’d, and there’s nothing but Dancing and Drinking.

Haz.

Married! To whom?

Dull.

That I ne’r inquir’d.

Fr.

’Tis to Chriſante, Friend――and the reward of my attempt is loſt. Oh, I am mad, I’ll fight away my life, and my diſpair ſhall yet do greater wonders, than even my Love would animate me too. Let’s part our Men, and beſet his Tents on both ſides.Friendly goes out with a Party.

Haz.

Come, Gentlemen, let’s on—

Whiff.

On Sir――we on Sir?――

Haz.

Ay, you on, Sir――to redeem the Ladies

Whiff.

Oh, Sir, I am going home for money to redeem my Nancy.

Whim.

So am I, Sir.

Tim.

I thank my Stars I am a Batchellor――Why, what a plague is a Wife?

Haz.

Will you March forward?

Dull.

We have atchiev’d Honour enough already, in having made our Campaign here――Looking big.

Haz.

’Sdeath, but you ſhall go—put them in the front, and prick them on—if they offer to turn back run them through.

Tim.

Oh, horrid――The Souldiers prick them on with their Swords.

Whiff.

Oh, Nancy, thy Dream will yet come to paſs.

Haz.

Will you advance, Sir?Pricks Whiff.

Whiff.

Why, ſo we do, Sir; the Devil’s in theſe fighting Fellows.Ex. An Alarm at a diſtance.

Within.

To Arms, to Arms, the Enemy’s upon us.

Dar. 48 g4v 48 A noiſe of fighting, after which enters Friendly with his Party, retreating and fighting, from Dareing and ſome Souldiers, Ranter fighting like a Fury by his ſide, he putting her back in vain; they fight out. Re-enter Daring with Friendly all bloody. Several Souldiers enter with Flambeaux.

Dar.

Now, Sir—what injury have I ever done you, that you ſhould uſe this Treachery againſt me?

Fr.

To take advantage any way in War, was never counted Treachery――and had I Murder’d thee, I had not paid thee half the Debt I owe thee.

Dar.

You bleed too much to hold too long a Parley—come to my Tent, I’ll take a charitable care of thee.

Fr.

I ſcorn thy Courteſie, who againſt all the Laws of Honour and of Juſtice, haſt raviſh’d innocent Ladies.

Dar.

Sir, your upbraiding of my Honour ſhall never make me forfeit it, or eſteem you leſs――Is there a Lady here you have a Paſſion for?

Fr.

Yes, on a Nobler ſcore than thou dareſt own.

Dar.

To let you ſee how you’re miſtaken, Sir, who e’re that Lady be whom you affect, I will reſign, and give you both your Freedoms.

Fr.

Why, for this Courteſie, which ſhows thee brave, in the next Fight I’le ſave thy Life, to quit the obligation.

Dar.

I thank you, Sir――come to my Tent――and when we’ve dreſt your Wounds, and yielded up the Ladies, I’ll give you my Paſsport for your ſafe conduct back, and tell your Friends i’th’ Town we’ll Viſit them i’th’ Morning.

Fr.

They’ll meet you on your way, Sir—

Dar.

Come, my young Souldier, now thou’ſt won my Soul.

An Alarm beats: Enter at another paſſage Boozer with all the Ladies; they paſs over the Stage, while Hazard, Downright, beating back a Party of Souldiers. Dull. Tim. Whim and Whiff, prickt on by their Party to fight, ſo that they lay about them like Madmen. Bacon, Fearleſs and Dareing come in, reſcue their men, and fight out the other Party, ſome falling dead, Bacon, Fearleſs and Dareing return tired, with their Swords drawn. Enter Souldier running.

Sould.

Return, Sir, where your Sword will be more uſeful—a Party of Indians, taking advantage of the Night, have ſet Fire on your Tents, and born away the Queen.

Bac.

Hah, the Queen! By Heaven this Victory ſhall coſt them dear; come, let us fly to reſcue her.Goes out.

Scene changes to Wellman’s Tent. Enter Wellman, Brag, Grub and Officers.

Well.

I cannot ſleep my Impatience is ſo great, to ingage this haughty Enemy, before they have repoſed their weary Limbs—is not yon Ruddy Light the Mornings Dawn.

Bragg. 49 h1r 49

Bragg.

’Tis, and pleaſe your Honour.

Well.

Is there no News of Friendly yet, and Hazard?

Bragg.

Not yet――’tis thought they left the Camp to Night, with ſome deſign againſt the Enemy.

Well.

What Men have they?

Bragg.

Only Boozers Party, Sir.

Well.

I know they are brave, and mean to ſurprize me with ſome handſom Action.Enter Friendly.

Fr.

I ask a thouſand Pardons, Sir, for quitting the Camp without your leave.

Well.

Your Conduct and your Courage cannot Err; I ſee thouſt been in action by thy Blood.

Fri.

Sir I’m aſhamed to own theſe ſlender wounds, ſince without more my luck was to be taken, while Hazard did alone effect the buſineſs; the reſcuing of the Ladies.

Well.

How got ye Liberty?

Fri.

By Dareings generoſity, who ſends you word he’l viſit you this Morning.

Well.

We are prepared to meet him.

Enter Downright, Hazard, Ladies, Whim. Whiff, Dullman, Tim. looking big; Well Embraces Down. —

Well.

My worthy Friend how am I joyed to ſee you?

Dow.

We owe our Liberties to theſe brave Youths, who can do wonders when they Fight for Ladies.

Tim.

With our aſſiſtance Ladies.

Whim.

For my part I’le not take it as I have done, Gad I find when I am Damnable Angry I can beat both Friend and Foe.

Whiff.

When I fight for my Nancy here—adsfiſh I’m a Dragon.

Mrs. Whiff.

Lord you need not have been ſo haſty.

Frien.

Do not upbraid me with your Eyes Chriſante, but let theſe wounds aſſure you I endeavour’d to ſerve you, tho Hazard had the Honour on’t.

Well.

But Ladies we’l not expoſe you in the Camp,—a Party of our Men ſhall ſee you ſafely conducted to Madam Sureloves; ’tis but a little Mile from our Camp.

Fri.

Let me have that Honour Sir.

Chri.

No, I conjure you let your wounds be dreſt, obey me if you Love me, and Hazard ſhall conduct us home.

Well.

He had the Toyl, ’tis fit he have the recompence.

Whiff.

He the Toyl Sir, what did we ſtand for Cyphers?

Whim.

The very appearance I made in the front of the Battle, aw’d the Enemy.

Tim.

Ay, Ay, Let the Enemy ſay how I maul’d ’em—but Gads zoors I ſcorn to brag.

Well.

Since you’ve regain’d your Honour ſo Gloriouſly—I reſtore you to your Commands, you loſt by your ſeeming Cowardiſe.

H Dull 50 h1v 50

Dull.

Valour is not always in Humour, Sir.

Well.

Come Gentlemen, ſince they’re reſolv’d to engage us, let’s ſet our Men in order to receive ’em.

Exit all but the four Juſtices.

Tim.

Our Commiſſions again――you muſt be bragging, and ſee what comes on’t; I was modeſt ye ſee and ſaid nothing of my Proweſs.

Whiff.

What a Devil, does the Collonel think we are made of iron, continually to be beat on the Anvil?

Whim.

Look Gentlemen here’s two Evils—if we go we are dead Men if we ſtay we are hang’d—and that will diſorder my Cravat ſtring— therefore the leaſt Evil is to go—and ſet a good Face on the matter as I do—Goes out ſinging.

Scene, Enter Queen dreſt like an Indian Man, with a Bow in her hand and Quiver at her Back, Anaria her Confidant diſguiſ’d ſo too, and about a Duzen Indians led by Cavaro.

Quee.

I tremble yet, doſt think we’re ſafe Cavaro?

Cav.

Madam theſe Woods are intricate and vaſt; and twill be difficult to find us out—or if they do, this habit will ſecure you from the fear of being taken.

Quee.

Doſt think if Bacon find us he will not know me? Alas my fears and bluſhes will betray me.

Ana.

’Tis certain Madam if we ſtay we Periſh; for all the Wood’s ſurrounded by the Conqueror.

Quee.

Alas ’tis better we ſhou’d Periſh here, than ſtay to expect the violence of his Paſſion; To which my heart’s too ſenſibly inclin’d.

Ana.

Why do you not obey it’s dictates then, why do you fly the Conqueror?

Quee.

Not fly—not fly the Murderer of my Lord?

Ana.

What world, what reſolution can preſerve you, and what he cannot gain by ſoft ſubmiſſion, force will at laſt o’recome.

Quee.

I wiſh there were in Nature one excuſe either by force or Reaſon to compel me:—for oh Anaria—I adore this General,—take from my Soul a Truth—till now conceal’d—at twelve years Old— at the Pauwmungian Court I ſaw this Conqueror. I ſaw him young and Gay as new born Spring, Glorious and Charming as the Mid-days Sun, I watch’d his looks, and liſtned when he ſpoke, and thought him more than Mortal.

Ana.

He has a graceful Form.

Quee.

At laſt a Fatal Match concluded was, between my Lord and me I gave my Hand, but oh how far my heart was from conſenting, the angry Gods are witneſs.

Ana.

’Twas pity.

Quee.

Twelve teadious Moons I paſt in ſilent languiſhment; Honour endeavouring to deſtroy my Love, but all in vain, for ſtill my pain return’d when ever I beheld my Conqueror, but now when I conſider him as 51 h2r 51 as Murderer of my LordFeircely I ſigh and wiſh—ſome other fatal hand had given him his Death—but now there’s a neceſſity I muſt be brave and overcome my Heart: What if I do? ah whether ſhall I fly, I have no Amazonian fire about me, all my Artillery is ſighs and Tears, the Earth my Bed, and Heaven my Canopy.

Weeps. After a noiſe of Fighting.

Hah, we are ſurpris’d, oh whether ſhall I fly? And yet methinks a certain trembling joy, ſpight of my Soul, ſpight of my boaſted Honour, runs ſhivering round my heart.

Enter an Indian.

Ind.

Madam your out guards are ſurpriz’d by Bacon, who hews down all before him, and demands the Queen with ſuch a voice and Eyes ſo Feirce and Angry, he kills with his looks.

Cav.

Draw up your Poyſon’d Arrows to the head, and aim them at his Heart, ſure ſome will hit.

Quee.

Cruel Cavaro, ――wou’d ’twere fit for me to contradict thy Juſtice.Aſides.

Bac.

within. The Queen ye ſlaves, give me the Queen and live!

He Enters furiouſly beating back ſome Indians, Cavaro’s Party going to ſhoot, the Queen runs in.

Quee.

Hold, hold, I do Command ye Bac. Flys on em as they ſhoot and miſs him, and fights like a fury, and wounds the Queen in the diſorder; beats them all out. —hold thy commanding Hand, and do not kill me, who wou’d not hurt thee to regain my Kingdom— He ſnatches her in his Arms ſhe reels.

Bac.

Hah—a Womans Voice,—what art thou? Oh my fears!

Quee.

Thy hand has been too cruel to a Heart—whoſe Crime was only tender thoughts for thee.

Bac.

The Queen! What is’t my Sacreligious hand has done?

Quee.

The nobleſt office of a Gallant Friend, thouſt ſav’d my Honour and haſt given me Death.

Bac.

Is’t poſſible! ye unregarding Gods is’t poſſible?

Quee.

Now I may Love you without Infamy, and pleaſe my Dying Heart by gazing on you.

Bac.

Oh I am loſt――for ever loſt――I find my Brain turn with the wild confuſion.

Quee.

I faint— oh lay me gently on the Earth.Lays her down.

Bac.

Who wants—Turns in rage to his Men make of the Trophies of the War a Pile, and ſet it all on Fire, that I may leap into conſuming Flames—while all my Tents are burning round about me. Wildly Oh thou dear Prize for which alone I Toyl’d. Weeps and lyes down by her.

Enter Fearleſs with his Sword drawn.

Fea.

Hah on the Earth――how do you Sir?

Bac.

What wou’dſt thou?

Fea.

Wellman with all the Forces he can gather attacks us even in our very Camp, aſſiſt us Sir or all is loſt.

H2 Bac. 52 h2v 52

Bac.

Why prithee let him make the World his Prize, I have no buſineſs with the Trifle now; it now contains nothing that’s worth my care, ſince my fair Queen—is Dead,—and by my Hand.

Quee.

So charming and obliging is thy mone, that I cou’d wiſh for Life to recompence it; but oh, Death falls—all cold—upon my Heart like Mildews on the Bloſſoms.

Fea.

By Heaven Sir, this Love will ruin all—riſe, riſe and ſave us yet!

Bac.

Leave me, what e’re becomes of me—looſe not thy ſhare of Glory—prithee leave me.

Qu.

Alas, I fear, thy Fate is drawing on, and I ſhall ſhortly meet thee in the Clouds; till then ――farewel—even Death is pleaſing to me, while thus――I find it in thy Arms――Dies.

Bac.

There ends my Race of Glory and of Life.An Alarm at distance――continues a while.

Bac.

Hah—Why ſhould I idly whine away my life, ſince there are Nobler ways to meet with Death?――Up, up, and face him then— Hark—there’s the Souldiers knell――and all the Joys of Life— with thee I bid farewel――Goes out. The Indians bear off the Body of the Queen.

The alarm continues. Enter Downright, Wellman, and others, Swords drawn.

Well.

They fight like men poſſeſt—I did not think to have found them ſo prepar’d.

Down.

They’ve good intelligence――but where’s the Rebel?

Well.

Sure he’s not in the fight, oh that it were my happy chance to meet him, that while our men look on, we might diſpatch the buſineſs of the War.――Come, let’s fall in again now we have taken breath.

They go out: Enter Dareing and Fearleſs haſtily, with their Swords drawn, meet Whim, Whiff, with their Swords drawn, running away.

Dar.

How now, whether away?In anger.

Whim.

Hah, Dareing here— we are purſuing of the Enemy, Sir, ſtop us not in the purſuit of Glory.Offer to go.

Dar.

Stay —I have not ſeen you in my ranks to day.

Whiff.

Lord, does your Honour take us for Starters?

Fear.

Yes, Sirrah, and believe you are now rubbing off—confeſs, or I’ll run you through.

Whiff.

Oh Mercy, Sir, Mercy, we’ll confeſs.

Whim.

What will you confeſs――we were only going behind yon Hedge to untruſs a point; that’s all.

Whiff.

Ay, your Honours will ſmell out the truth if you keep us here long.

Dar.

Here, carry them Priſoners to my Tent.Ex. Sould. with Wh. & Whiff.

Enter Ranter without a Hat, and Sword drawn. Daring angrily goes the other way.

Ran.

A Pox of all ill luck, how came I to loſe Dareing in the fight? Ha— 53 h3r 53 Hah—who’s here—Dullman and Timerous Dead— the Rogues are Counterfeits—I’ll ſee what Moveables they have about them, all’s Lawful Prize in War.Takes their Money, Watches and Rings: goes out.

Tim.

What, Rob the Dead?—Why, what will this Villanous World come to.Claſhing of Swords juſt as they were going to riſe.

Enter Hazard bringing in Ranter.

Haz.

Thou cou’dſt expect no other Fate Young man, thy hands are yet too tender for a Sword.

Ran.

Thou look’ſt like a good natur’d Fellow, uſe me civilly, and Dareing ſhall RanſomRanſom me.

Haz.

Doubt not a Generous Treatment.Goes out.

Dull.

So, the Coaſt is clear, I deſire to remove my Quarters to ſome place of more ſafety—They riſe and go off.

Well.

’Twas this way Bacon fled. Enter Wellman and Souldiers haſtily. five hundred pound for him who finds the Rebel.Go out.

Scene changes to a Wood: Enter Bacon and Fearleſs, with their Swords drawn, all bloody.

Bac.

’Tis Juſt, ye Gods! That when you took the Prize for which I fought, Fortune and you ſhould all abandon me.

Fear.

Oh fly Sir to ſome place of ſafe retreat, for there’s no mercy to be hop’t if taken. What will you do, I know we are purſu’d, by Heaven I will not dye a ſhameful Death.

Bac.

Oh they’ll have pitty on thy Youth and Bravery, but I’m above their Pardon.A noiſe is heard.

Within.

This way—this way—hay—hallow.

Fear.

Alas Sir we’re undone—I’ll ſee which way they they take.Exit:

Bac.

So near! Nay then to my laſt ſhift. Undoes the Pomel of his Sword. Come my good Poyſon, like that of Hannibal, long I have born a noble Remedy for all the ills of Life. Takes Poyſon. I have too long ſurviv’d my Queen and Glory, thoſe two bright Stars that influenc’d my Life are ſet to all Eternity.Lyes down.

Enter Fearleſs, runs to Bacon and looks on his Sword.

Fea.

—Hah—what have ye done?

Bac.

Secur’d my ſelf from being a publick Spectacle upon the common Theatre of Death.

Enter Dareing and Souldiers.

Dar.

Victory, victory, they fly, they fly, where’s the Victorious General?

Fea.

Here――taking his laſt Adieu.

Dar.

Dying? Then wither all the Laurels on my Brows, for I ſhall never Triumph more in War, where is the wounds?

Fea.

From his own hand by what he carried here, believing we had loſt the Victory.

Bac.

And is the Enemy put to flight my Hero?Graſps his Neck.

Dar. 54 h3v 54

Dar.

All routed Horſe and Foot, I plac’d an Ambuſh, and while they were purſuing you, my Men fell on behind and won the day.

Bac.

Thou almoſt makes me wiſh to Live again, if I cou’d live, now Fair Semernia’s Dead, —But oh—the Baneful Drug is juſt and kind and haſtens me away—now while you are Victors make a Peace—with the Engliſh Councel—and never let Ambition—Love—or Intereſt make you forget as I have done—your Duty—and Allegiance―― farewel――a long farewel――Dies Embracing their Necks.

Dar.

So fell the Roman Caſſius—by miſtake—

Enter Souldiers with Dunce, Tim. and Dullman.

Sould.

An’t pleaſe your Honour we took theſe Men running away.

Dar.

Let ’em looſe—the Wars are at an end, ſee where the General lyes—that great Soul’d Man, no private Body e’re contain’d a Nobler, and he that cou’d have conquer’d all America, finds only here his ſcanty length of Earth, —go bear the Body to his own Pavillion—Souldiers goes out with the Body Tho we are Conquerers we ſubmit to treat, and yeild upon conditions, you Mr. Dunce ſhall bear our Articles to the Councel—

Dun.

With joy I will obey you.

Tim.

Good General let us be put in the agreement.

Dar.

You ſhall be oblig’d—Ex. Dar. Dunc. Dull., and Tim. as Fear. goes out, a Souldier meets him.

Sould.

What does your Honour intend to do with Whim and Whiff, who are Condemn’d by a Councel of War.

Enter Dareing, Dullman Tim. Fearleſs and Officers.

Dare.

You come too late Gentlemen to be put into the Articles, nor am I ſatisfy’d you’re worthy of it.

Dull.

Why did not you Sir ſee us ly Dead in the Field.

Dar.

Yes, but I ſee no wound about you.

Tim.

We were ſtun’d with being knock’d down, Gads zoors a Man may be kill’d with the But end of a Muſquet, as ſoon as with the point of a Sword.

Enter Dunce.

Dun.

The Council Sir wiſhes you Health and Happineſs, and ſends you theſe Sign’d by their Hands—Gives Papers.

Dar.

Reads. That you ſhall have a general Pardon for your ſelf and Friends, that you ſhall have all new Commiſſions, and Dareing to Command as General; that you ſhall have free leave to Inter your Dead General in James Town, and to ratifie this—we will meet you at Madam Sureloves Houſe which ſtands between the Armies, attended by only by our Officers. The councels noble and I’le wait upon them.

Exit Dunce
Scene a Grover near Madam Sureloves, Enter Surelove weeping, Well. Chriſante, Mrs. Flirt, Ranter as before, Down. Haz.. Frien. Booz.. Brag.

Well.

How long Madam have you heard the news of Collonel Surelove’s Death?

Sure 55 h4r 55

Sure.

By a Veſſel laſt Night arriv’d.

Well.

You ſhou’d not grive when men ſo old pay their debt to Nature, you are too Fair not to have been reſerved for ſome young Loves Arms.

Haz.

I dare not ſpeak—but give me leave to hope.

Sure.

The way to oblige me to’t, is never more to ſpeak to me of Love till I ſhall think it fit—Wellman ſpeaks to Downright.

Well.

Come you ſhan’t grant it — ’tis a hopeful Youth.

Dow.

You are too much my Friend to be deny’d—Chriſante to you love Friendly? nay do not bluſh—till you have done a fault, your Loving him is none—here take her young Man and with her all my Fortune—when I am Dead Sirrah—not a Groat before—unleſs to buy ye Baby Clouts.

Fri.

He merits not this Treaſure Sir, can wiſh for more.

Enter Dareing, Fearleſs, Dunce and Officers, they meet Well. and Down. who Embrace em. Dull. and Tim. ſtand.

Dar.

Can you forgive us Sir our diſobedience.

Well.

Your offering peace while yet you might command it, has made ſuch kind impreſſions on us, that now you may command your Propoſitions; your Pardons are all Seal’d and new Commiſſions.

Dar.

I’m not Ambitions of that Honour Sir; but in obedience will accept your goodneſs, but Sir I hear I have a young Friend taken Priſoner by Captain Hazard whom I intreat you’l render me,

Haz.

Sir—here I reſign him to you.Gives him Ranter

Ran.

Faith General you left me but ſcurvily in Battel.

Dar.

That was to ſee how well you cou’d ſhift for your ſelf, now I find you can bear the brunt of a Campaign you are a fit Wife for a Souldier.

All.

A Woman—Ranter――

Haz.

Faith Madam I ſhou’d have given you kinder Quarter if I had known my Happineſs.

Flirt.

I have an humble Petition to you Sir.

Sure.

In which we all joyn.

Flir.

An’t pleaſe you Sir, Mr. Dunce has long made Love to me and on promiſe of Marriage has――Simpers.

Dow.

What has he Mrs. Flirt.

Flir.

Only been a little familiar with my Perſon Sir――

Well.

Do you hear Parſon—you muſt Marry Mrs. Flirt.

Dun.

How Sir, a Man of my Coat Sir, Marry a Brandy-munger.

Well.

Of your calling you mean a Farrier and no Parſon—Aſide to him ſhe’l leave her Trade—and ſpark it above all the Ladies at Church, no more――take her and make her honeſt.

Enter Whim and Whiff ſtript.

Cryſ.

Bleſs me, what have we here?

Whim.

Why, an’t like your Honours, we were taken by the Enemy ――hah Dareing here and Fearless?

Fea. 56 h4v 56

Fea.

How now――Gentlemen were not you two Condemn’d to be Shot for running from your Colours.

Dow.

From your Colours.

Fea.

Yes Sir, they were both liſted in my Regiment.

Dow.

Then we muſt hang them for deſerting us.

Whim.

So out of the Frying Pan—you know where Brother—

Whiff.

Ay—he that’s Born to be Hang’d—you know the reſt, a Pox of theſe Proverbs.

Well.

I know ye well――you’re all rank Cowards, but once more we forgive ye, your Places in the Councel ſhall be ſupply’d by theſe Gentlemen of Sence and Honour. The governour when he comes ſhall find the Country in better hands than he expects to find it.

Whim.

A very fair diſcharge.

Whiff.

I’m glad ’tis no worſe, I’le home to my Nancy.

Dull.

Have we expos’d our Lives and Fortunes for this?

Tim.

Gads zoors I never thriv’d ſince I was a States-man, left Planting, and fell to promiſing and Lying, I’le to my old Trade again, bask under the ſhade of my own Tobacco, and Drink my Punch in Peace.

Well.

Come my brave Youths let all our Forces meet,

To make this Country Happy, Rich, and great;

Let ſcanted Europe ſee that we enjoy

Safer Repoſe, and larger Worlds than they.

Finis.