A1r

Marcelia:

or the
Treacherous Friend.

A Tragicomedy.
As it is Acted at the Theatre-Royal, by
His Majesties Servants.

Written by Mrs. F. Boothby.

Licenc’d, 1669-10-09October 9. 1669
Roger L’Estrange.

London, Printed for Will. Cademan at the
Popes-Head in the lower Walk of the New Exchange,
and Giles Widdowes at the Maidenhead in
Aldersgate-street, 16701670.

A1v A2r

To the Honourable and most Accomplished
Lady Yate, of Harvington
in Worcestershire.
Madam!

Since the most weak, ought to
endeavour the most powerful
Defenders; I could no
where elect a person whose
Accomplishments renders
them so capable to that requisite, as your
Ladyship: Which Motive I onely have
to hope and plead my Pardon by, for my
Presumption in imploring your Protection. A2Ma-A2v
Madam, This earthy effect of my ignorant
Brain, you will find an Engin, which will
give all your Perfections and Virtues employment
in the most eminent degree; since
it not only requires your unequal’d Eloquence
and Wisdom, to appose the Censuring world,
upon this uncommon action in my Sex: but
your Goodness to pardon the many and high
defects, which you will there find to condemn.

Sinners look not upon their own weak merits,
by Heavens Bounty, when they implore
Benefits: For if they should turn
their Eyes to their inward View, and regulate
their Petitions by their Deservings;
they would blush and grown dumb to all Requests.
This Line, Madam, I must draw
to my own Center; who must wholly ow all
your transcending Favours, to your generous
and noble Humour, which makes the World
your Admirers, and fixes unalterably to the
power of your Commands,

Your most humble Servant and Kinswoman,

F. Boothby.

A3r

Prologue
to
Marcelia.

Prol.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Im hither come, but what d’ye think to say?

A Womans Pen presents you with a Play:

Who smiling told me I’d by sure to see,

that once confirm’d, the House wou’d empty be.

Not one yet gone!――

Well, I’l go tell her you are all so just,

You’l laugh at her on Knowledg, not on Trust.

I know she’l send me back, but what to do,

He goes off

When I have learn’d of her, I’l tell it you.

Comes
agen.

Guess now the Message: she prays ye to be gone,

You’l croud her Wit to death in such a Throng

Of Wits, she says, which no Consumptions have,

And hers is weak, e’en going to the grave.

She wonders much that ye should all desire

To stay, and witness when it does expire.

One comes
to him.

Mess

Hark ye the Poetess does angry grow.

A3 Prol. A3v

Prol.

I cannot make ’em whether they will or no.

’Tis better be a Dog, then Womans slave,

That knows not what she would, or would not have.

With Ballading I think she mad is grown,

And by her Prologue fain would make it known.

She need not be so hasty; faith her Play

Will witness that her Reason’s gone astray:

For when that it is done, I’m almost sure,

You’l give her Bedlam for Reward or Cure.

Another comes to him and whispers.

Prol.[Speaker label not present in original source]

What more? nay then I never shall have done;

Now I’ve command to court ye one by one:

When I return to send her word by me,

Who will her Judges, who her Lawyers be.

If that the Wits will plead her cause, she’l stay;

If not, she fairly means to run away:

For if her Judges they resolve to sit,

She neither Pardon nor Reprieve shall get.

But still she hopes the Ladies out of Pride

And Honor, will not quit their sexes side:

Though they in private do her faults reprove,

They’l neither puublick scorn nor laughter move.

But should they all in censuring be severe,

’Tis still the Critick Men she most does fear:

For if that Solomon now liv’d, and writ;

They’d cry, Pish, hang’t, there’s nothing in’t of Wit.

The A4r

The Actors Names.

Sigismund, King.

Melinet, his Favourite.

Lotharicus INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched. A nobleman, INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.in love with INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.Marcelia.

Euryalus, INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.Sister to INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.Marcelia.

Almeric, INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.an Eminent INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.Lord.

Valasco, INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.an Eminent INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.Lord.

Lucidore, INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.a wild INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.Lord.

Peregrine, a Traveller.

Moriphanus, a proud, silly, rich fellow.

Graculus, his Man,

Du-prette, INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.Servant to INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.Melinet,

Meraspas, INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.Servant to INTERNAL ERROR. Please report to wwp@neu.edu that cb is unmatched.Lotharicus.

Philampras, a Villain.

Three Villains more.

Marcelia, a noble Lady, Cosin to Melinet.

Desha, her Woman.

Calinda, the Kings Mistress.

Ericinia, her Friend.

Arcasia, a Lady

Perilla, a rich Widdow.

Pages, Foot-Boys, Maskers, Guards,
and Attendants.

The Scene, France. A4v B1r

Marcelia:
Or the
Treacherous Friend.

Act I. Scene 1.

Enter Valasco and Almeric.

Alm.

Have you seen Melinet of late?

Val.

No, not since he miss’d the place
he thought himself so sure of at
the Court; his aspiring soul
will not easily let him digest the
cross events of Fate.

Alm.

It seems a marvel to me he had
it not, for the King does reflect upon him more than common
rays of favour; such, as in my mind may reasonably
give his hopes large compass.

B Val. He B1v

Val.

He does so, but his was a grant of our deceased
King, which his Majesty promised to ratifie; or else doubtless
he had carried it: but men of his temper, and nobly
born, without Estates, think Fortune is a cripple, if she
does not with winged hast answer their deserts.

Alm.

Hold, here he is coming, with a musing and unsatisfied
countenance.

Enter Melynet.

Val.

How now, Melynet, what, dull and melancholy?

Mel.

My looks, my Lord, wear my fortunes livery:

But I was just now thinking how many considerable

Places I have been likely to possess;

And my stars, my unlucky stars,

They still prevent me with their baser influences.

Oh I could curse them! had they made me a fool,

Or without Spirit or Ambition

I should have thank’d ’em; but they’ve furnish’d me

With all the requisites to a rising Fortune,

And yet deny success.

Val.

I’faith, the truth of’t is, they have afforded thee

Wit, subtilty, policie, and what else is necessary,

Enough to have discharg’d any office in the Kingdom,

To thy own advantage; and that’s now the onely end

To which most of the greatest Statesmen tend.

Alm.

I, for they are wiser than in the old time,

When Honour and Honesty were so much ador’d:

They of that age were altogether in love with Fame,

And having their lives read with admiration in a chronicle.

But the Politicians now are of another stamp:

What’s present’s only theirs, they cry; and had rather

Purchase one life here in a good estate,

Than the inheritance of that talk’d of,

That is to come hereafter. ’Tis true,

Expectation is a hungry Diet.

Mel. You B2r

Mel.

You would think so, if your Lordship were to live

Upon it as many do.

Alm.

I should so, but not in thy condition,

Who art already look’d upon by eve ry man of judgment,

As in all likelihood to be the Court Blazing-star.

Mel.

That expression will bear a various inte rpretation:

Or great, or mischievous, or both: perhaps

By divination he gives it for my Motto.

Well, I beg your Lordships pardon, for I must leave you.

Val.

Why, pry’thee, what hast of business

Calls you away?

Mel.

I am engag’d to meet six or seven Friends.

Val.

No friends, as you love me: a Friend is a thing

More rare than a Phoenix, and thou talk’st of them,

As if they were as common as Fishes

And did like them increase and multiply.

Mel.

Well, your Servant.
Exit Melynet.

Val.

I wonder whether the King still intends the

Marriage of Calinda: there are many

Wagers in the town about it.

Alm.

O! Monarchs and Subjects are two different things,

And a sudden rise to eminent Honour or Fortune,

Commonly proves like the Turks Mutes to an old

Affection; strangle it quite: and ’tis whisper’d

By the most knowing. that the Kings Love has at present

the cold fit of an aguish distemper on it, to that Lady.

But well, are you for my company this afternoon, or not?

For I am design’d to go home: I am promis’d the sight of

A fellow that will needs be thought a Lord:

They say he’l make a man dy with laughing.

Val.

Then I’m resolv’d not to see him to day:

For I have a great mind to live till to morrow,

And for this afternoon I’ll throw it away

Amongst the Ladies.

Exeunt.
B2 Scene B2v

Scene 2.

Enter Calinda and Ericina.

Eric.

Let not your grief take yet such full possession

Of your heart, till more of time gives the assurance

Of what is onely now your passions fear.

Cal.

Alas Ericina! it is that uncertainty

Which makes Loves greatest Hell; were I but once

Assur’d, I should be less concern’d.

But whilst I doubt I nothing can resolve:

Reason and scorn, which then would prove my cure,

I am now by that unhappy motive (that you urge

To lessen my affections) forbid their use:

For ’tis not his new acquired greatness

Can keep my heart in slavery. It was

His Noble Mind I lov’d. And that the greatest

Ebb of Fortune could ne’er have given change to.

Indeed I did adore his virtues, and made

Him Soveraign of my heart, despising in

My thought for him, all those that onely could

Pretend advantages in Wealth, which possibly

They did inherit by their Fathers crimes.

But if I find he is turn’d Apostate

To what gave being to my Passion:

I shall depose him here, to let him see

Points to
her heart.

His Honour lost, his Crowns despis’d by me.

Eric.

If the assurance of his unconstancie

Will prove so much less afflicting than the fear,

Force your belief to that Conclusion,

His actions afford enough of cause.

Cal.

Ah! Ericina, thou then dost think him chang’d.

Eric.

It ill would suit the Friendship I profess,

Still by dissembling my thoughts to his advantage,

To help to shipwrack so your quiet,

Urging B3r

Urging the Uncertainty of what,

I must confess I do no longer doubt.

Cal.

Nor I no longer that I’m quite undone!
Aside.

Eric.

And I will tell you.

Cal.

Oh hold, Ericina;

Keep to thy self those thoughts, which if set free,

With furious floods of grief would deluge me.

Eric.

Can you believe your ruine I design?

Whose life is dearer to me far than mine.

No, Calinda, what I have done was only but to try,

Whether the Cure your Reason did propose,

Your Courage could endure the application of.

Cal.

How could your pity let you make experiments,

On my Misfortune to improve your knowledg?

Or what of satisfaction do you find

From the assurance that my tongue has boasted,

Without consulting of my heart, the resolution

Of that indifferencie and change, if he

Prove false, my soul can never find for him.

You us’d to take so great an interest in

My sufferings as made their weight seem less.

But you unkindly now do seek to multiply my griefs,

and they already overpress my Mind.

Eric.

My love can easily forgive the highest

Injuries with which you charge my innocence:

For, I perceive, the disquiet of your thoughts dethrones

Your Reason. But ’tis hard to be Physician,

Where the Disease admits such alteration,

As makes the Remedie uncertain.

Enter Page.

Page.

Madam, my Lord Valasco, with some Ladies,

Are come to wait upon you.

Cal.

Go, let them know I’ll attend them.

How ill does Conversation suit my mind,

Who can in nothing, now, contentment find!

Exeunt.
B3 Scene B3v

Scene 3.

Enter Almeric and Peregrine.

Per.

This Kingdom has known strange and wonderful

Changes since my absence, for who wo’d e’er ha’thought

Sigismond should have come to be our Soveraign?

Heaven having given so many just Pretenders

To th’Crown, before his Right could put in claim.

Alm.

’Tis true, Peregrine, but Fortunes children

Are always heirs to what she pleases.

And all his actions both in Peace and War,

Have still been crown’d with such success and glory,

As made him justly thought one of her Darling sons.

And though there are many whose wants in worth,

And height of Envy, made them strive to clip

His Honours wings: yet I must needs confess,

I think he merits what he wears.

Per.

I doubt not your Opinion; but with what

A kind of temper did he at first demean

Himself in his new Soveraignty?

Alm.

With such a Moderation as shew’d he thought

The weighty troubles that do attend the Crown

Of a well governing Prince, would far exceed

The pleasure of an expected Power and Greatness.

Per.

Yet we see those cares which Crowns create.

Are burthens, which all the great ones of the world

Do strive to carry; to which when right of birth

Is wanting, they make usurping Power, and

Treasons guilt become their unresisted title.

And certainly, what is so often purchased

By th’ death of Millions, and the height of Crimes,

When lawfully acquir’d, may well excuse

A more than common joy exprest in such

An elevated Fortune.

Alm. No B4r

Alm.

No doubt it does; and ’twas the general expectation,
and our surprize the greater, finding his looks
And actions shew such an unmov’d indifferencie.

Per.

That might beget amazement, for sudden satisfaction

or high cares seldom or never keep within those

bounds, Reason or policie prescribes them. But he resolv’d

to shew by something far from common in Mankind,

Fortune was Just, not blind, in giving him a Sceptre.

But who amongst all the Court is likely to carry

The name of Favorite?

Alm.

He that possesses the greatest share is Melynet,
Nephew to the late Lord Euryalus, that was the fair Marcelia’s
Father. His growth in greatness was like a Mushrom,
so suddain, which has begot much wonder in the
Court. Enter Lucidore.
Oh Lucidore!

Luc.

Nay hold, no quarreling; I have been suffering
Sufficiently for my breach of promise.

Alm.

Why pr’ythee? what Disaster, that the knowledg
may make some satisfaction?
For I dare swear it is some Comical accident.

Luc.

If to lose a Mans Reason first, and then all his Money,
be matter of Mirth; it is so: for that’s the true character
of my condition.

Alm.

As how?

Luc.

Why, just as I left you the other night, I met with
our new Favourite; and straight my brain was seiz’d with
a piece of policy, to try if I could drink away his Understanding,
and keep so much of my own to play the Justice
of Peace with him, and sift out the Reason of his so much
admir’d greatness with the King: but I, like other Statesmen,
fail’d in my Design, and made my self as uncapable
of Questions, as he was of Answers. But that which makes
me the most mad, and will make thee the most merry, was, thatB4v
that I must needs be shaking of my Elbow, and pay the first
Tribute to his fortune and success in Gaming.

Alm.

Why, you could do no less in complement, than
since you would learn him to play, to teach him at your
own costs and charges. But now confess, what did you lose?

Luc.

Enough t’have purchas’d half his patrimony,

When he came to Court: a thousand pound,

And something more.

Per.

He plays deep for a new Gamester, but he thinks

With reason, his Fortune’s like to have no bottom.

Alm.

I pity thy condition, for I know thy losses

Would have made thee merry a month together,

In ways much more agreable to thy humor.

Luc.

It would so; but ’tis gone, and the Devil go with
it: The wish is no Treason I hope, for he was never yet,
to my knowledg prohibited a Favorites company.

Per.

If he were, they would divide the soul of their usual
preferment from the bodily.

Alm.

I, for give him his due, he’s a sociable Fellow,
and infinitely esteem’d by all persons of all condiditions, the
Clergy, Statesman, the Lawyer, the Citizen, poor and
rich, all strive for his Friendship, his Counsel, his Assistance;
there is such pulling and halling who shall have
him, that ’tis well he can be here, and there, and everywhere.

Luc.

That’s no part of my Faith; for he has often fail’d
me in business of no small concernment to his service, and
my satisfaction: and yet I am certain he has not had a
more faithful Friend in all the world than I have been,
take one time with another.

Alm.

That I’l witness for thee is a truth, and therefore

He can’t be excus’d of ingratitide, if he

Gives thee any reason of complaint.

Luc.

I know not the Design, but I am confident He C1r

He will send me to heaven whether I will or no.

Alm.

If he does, thou wilt be the first Saint,

That ever came there of the Devils making.

Luc.

If I am, as sure as thou livest, he does intend that
wonder; well, farewell.

Alm.

Nay, we’l all go together.

Exeunt.

Scene 4.

Enter Sigismund and Melynet, and a Guard at
distance. Attendants

Mel.

Sir, I perceive something does discompose

The quiet of your mind, and would it not

Appear too bold presumption in a Subject,

I would most humbly beg the cause.

Sig.

Melynet, your judgment makes a true interpretation,
and ’tis only from thy Love and Interest that I can
hope a change.

Mel.

Your Majesties high bounty that rais’d me from
that nothing which I was in fortune to what I am, by the
so envy’d glory of your favour; besides the duty which I
ow you as my Soveraign, doubly commands my life to be
a ready Sacrifice on all occasions, where that offering can
purchase you the least of satisfaction.

Sig.

Thou art my Friend, what name commands a greater
Distance I’l forget; but what I now shall try thy kindness
in, Requires more thy wit and judgments use,
Than dangers hazard. You have a Kinswoman,
Melinet, whom I have found too fair, and fear
That I shall find as cruel: it is Marcelia, I wear
Her chains, yet not without attempting to have
Broke them; but I perceive resistance is in vain.
The more I strive, the faster I am ty’d.
Nothing but Death her Fetters can divide.
But why standst thou so surpriz’d, as if thou didst C Rival C1v
Rival me in my passion?

Mel.

I wish I did Sir, so that there were no other;

But what concern I shew comes from my fear’d defect

Of power, not will, to serve your Majesties Commands.

Sig.

I do believe thee, and I know

The interposing Difficulty that stands

Between me and my hopes; a pre-engagement

Of her heart to brave Lotharicus: but may not

A King and Crown laid prostrate at her feet,

Tempt her Ambition to command her love?

Has she put off so much her Sexes frailty,

That such a Present cannot shake her constancie?

Mel.

She has often in my hearing given him that

Assurance, Sir, and though words are but airy

Sounds, till the temptation proves their substance:

Yet I have so much knowledg of her humor,

As makes me fear they shall not want that seal.

But all that my power can act in her perswasion, Sir,

To move her to a sense of that high glory,

I will give your Majesty the assurance of in some few days.

Sig.

Go my dear Melinet and sound her thoughts;

For thou wilt in her answer to me bring,

The happiness or ruine of thy King.

Exit Melinet.

Oh mighty Love! whose power is not limited

More in a Prince than Slave! how dost thou force

My heart to turn a Rebel to my virtue!

Making my passion master of my honor,

My Reason of no farther use than to condemn the crime

I act in giving to another that heart,

Which I so often vow’d to my Calinda!

Thus in my soul I find a civil war;

But Love o’er Virtue has the vict’ry far:

For whosoe’er does see Marceliaes eyes,

Must break their faith, and fall her sacrifice.

Exit.
Scene C2r

Scene 5.

Enter Moriphanus and Graculus.

Mor.

Sirrah, I would fain know why you should pay me
less respect than Beggars do? they can say, My Lord, and
your Lordship.

Gra.

Because I know you better to be no Gentleman.aside
But if I must say, an’please your Lordship, what shall I say
to make your Lordships honorable title pass for currant, if
it should be questioned?

Mor.

What shouldst thou say? say I am an outlandish
Lord. Well, a man of ambitious thoughts had better be
hang’d, than keep a fellow that cannot make a lie.

Grac.

Good my Lord pardon me, I shall have one presently;
but my Lord, you have not the mien nor breeding
of a Lord: I think I had best say you are a sprout of one of
those English Lords of Nol’s new creation in the old Rebellion

Mor.

I’faith Graculus ’twill do rarely well.

Grac.

But my Lord, since you are resolv’d upon so much
greatness, you must needs enlarge your retinue.

Mor.

So I will, Graculus, and I will keep them all in several
Liveries.

Grac.

They will be taken for other mens Servants then.

Mor.

No, no, thou art a fool; they will be all known
to be my men, and only wearing the several Liveries of
those several Families that have match’d into my house.

Grac.

What a most excellent fancy was this! some of
the chief Liveries, I hope Master, (I cry your Lordship
mercy) shall be black and green, orange tawny and red,
and black and deep blew.

Mor.

Excellent well! thou hast a rare conceit in the
choise of colors; but pr’ythee let my own suit be trim’d
with the black and deep blew.

C2 Grac. C2v

Grac.

’Tis ten to one but your cowardly carkas may be
trim’d with black and blew before you leave the town.

asiaside

Mor.

I have one thing more to tell thee of; I’l leave the
taking of my boys to thee: but be sure thou dost instruct
them, that as they follow me, ever as I turn my head (as I
shall do very often) that they all stand still and put off their
hats, for it is a great point of breeding in all Foot-boys,
and of state in Masters. And go to my Taylor, and bid
him make hast with my cloaths, and let every thing that
is in the Mode be doubled upon them.

Grac.

I shall, my Lord.

Exeunt.

Scene 6.

Enter Melinet and du Prette his Man.

Mel.

Hast thou been with my Lord Lotharicus?

Du-Pr.

Yes Sir, and he bid me return his service, and
tell you he will not stir abroad, in expectation of your
company; but he prays it may before the hour of his
usual visits.

Mel.

Well, leave me. Exit du Prette.

Alas, my Lord! I must prevent those visits:

The ruine of your Love must lay the strong

Foundation to my lasting Greatness.

In which design, if that my plot does fail,

Farewel my puff of honor―― for all actions,

Tho ne’er so well design’d by strength of reason,

And prosecuted by the faithfullest Love,

If unsuccesful, finds small acknowledgment.

It is only being blest by Fortune in the end, that gives the
intention value. That’s the unjust scale, by which the
world weighs all things. But why should I condemn ingratitude
as Vice, that for ambition turn a Villain, and betray
my friend? Yet ’tis not I am guilty, though I act the
Crime; ’tis the abusive world which throws such heaps ofC3r
of injuries and scorns on wanting Virtue, that mans courage
cannot bear it; at least mine shall not, if a stretch’d
Conscience will relieve me.

I’l grasp a fortune though I heav’n let go,

That I have heard of, but ’tis This I know.

Act II. Scene 1.

Enter Peregrine, Lucidore, Almeric and Valasco.

Alm.

When wilt thou grow tame, Lucidore?

Luc.

When Usurers commonly grow mad, when I
have lost all my money, and that I am forc’d to think of
Marriage for the convenient support of some rich widows
Jointure, which very reflection should I continue in it but
a quarter of an hour, it would make me look as serious as
any English sanctified Brother, that intends the Reformation
of Religion.

Per.

Are you so great a Woman-hater then?

Luc.

No Sir, you mistake me: I am not an Enemy to
the Sex, but to that ceremony; I would be a Ladies servant,
but not her Prentice: I love not to seal words of
Complement for term of life, as that of taking a woman
for better or worse.

Val.

If living single were an argument of Understanding,
we might justly be esteem’d one of the wisest Nations
of the world; for most of our young Gallants decline
Marriage, and take Mistresses, by which they gain diseases
in their youth, to make a Wife necessary for a Nurse in
their age: and things taken by way of necessity, can lay
no charge upon us for defect of Reason.

Luc.

Right, for it is then the offspring of it.

C3 Alm. Well, C3v

Alm.

Well, could I have my wish, it should be to see
Lucidore in Love.

Luc.

Why, I am in Love, infinitely in Love, up to the
head and ears in Love.

Alm.

Sure thy Mistress is very kind then, thou art so
merry.

Luc.

She is so, she denies me nothing that I ask her.

Alm.

She is very coming too it seems. Pr’ythee tell
me, is she thy particular Mistress, or is she one that may
be generally so to all thy Friends?

Luc.

No Sir, I will assure you I am not so free to keep a
communicative Mistress.

Val.

Why, canst thou seriously love any thing?

Luc.

Yes, when the object’s worthy; and I presume her
infinitely so, her charms beget so many slaves.

Per.

I fain would see her: I dare be confident she will
make none of me.

Val.

Nor of me.

Alm.

And I dare warrant you for my particular.

Luc.

You are all fair promisers, Gentlemen; if you
will lay a hundred Pistols a piece, or so, you shall see her:
Nay more; I’l take your own words whether you love or
not; you shall be the accusers of your own hearts, and
then I’l be the Executioner of your Purses. This is fair
play, here’s no false Dice nor Cards, all’s above board.

Per.

That’s true, but you hold the sight too costly; you
forget that we can see the Creation of the World for 18
pence, where there are twenty fine sights besides the Woman.
A hundred Pistols to see a Woman! Why, it had
been enough for Adam to have offer’d, when Eve was
promised and not made.

Luc.

Well, I percieve you have examin’d your Conscience,
and find you are frail, and dare not venture your
Money, for all your boasting.

Alm.

But we will hazard our Liberties, and that’s of
greater value.

Luc. C4r

Luc.

I, but I never lov’d to expose my friends to danger,
unless some profit may accrew by it to them or me;
and all from this will be the certain knowledg, that you
know not yourselves, and that’s an Article of Faith I have
already put into my Creed.

Val.

But ’tis not in ours, and we would not have thee
have the start of us in Faith and Works too.

Luc.

Well, I’l leave you Gentlemen.

Per.

Faith thou shalt not, for we will go with thee and
see thy Mistress.

Luc.

Well, I will for this once save your longings: the
name of a Mistress has so wound up your curiosities; that
I find your tongues will be like the perpetual Motion in importunities,
till that be satisfied.

Per.

Shall we go with thee now, and see her?

Luc.

No, I am otherwise engag’d; to morrow I am at
your service.

Alm.

Remember your promise, and do not have us answer’d,
you are from home, as Misers use to do to save
their meat, when a friend bids himself to Dinner.

Luc.

No, for there must be no Courtship you know,
that’s against the Laws of Friendship, to buy a bargain out
of another mans hands.

Exeunt.

Scene 2.

Enter Melinet and Lotharicus.

Mel.

You have often encouraged me to hope all proofs
of your affection, and I cannot doubt your friendship.

Loth.

You need not, your own merits, and relation to
Marcelia, has fetter’d me your servant; therefore command
me without the introduction of a Complement.

Mel.

Why then, my Lord, I know you have an interest
in Arcasia, and I must beg you to make use of it to my assistance,
for I confess my heart has found the power of her
Charms.

Loth. You C4v

Loth.

You need not blush to own them, she is an object
worthy of your inclinations; and I am glad your choice
directed you, where I may pay part of the obligations back
I have so often owed unto your friendship: not but your
own deserts will be your best Orators.

Mel.

My Lord, I know my self better, than to admit the
least hope from those vain apprehensions: but being presented
by you, the esteem she holds of your judgment will
doubtless keep her, from searching too inquisitively into
those defects, which might with justice blast my hopes.

Loth.

You are too eminently deserving for to need such
an imposter help: but Melinet, be confident I will speak
the truth, with all the earnestness a Friend can urge: to
promise more were to exceed my power.

Mel.

If you could perswade her to the Gardens, you
would have greater opportunity and more of time.

Loth.

I will, and use all my interest.

Mel.

Pray be secret in it.

Loth.

You need not fear, she has too many Pretenders
that would becom concern’d.

Mel.

I fear you not to any but Marcelia.

Loth.

Well, be confident she shall not know it.

Mel.

Give me your hand and honor upon it.

Loth.

There ’tis, an Oath I never broke yet, and so farewell,
for I must go and see her: your servant.

Mel.

I would go too, but I saw her but last night, and
she likes not my company, she will needs have it that I am
melancholy grown.

Exeunt.

Scene 3.

Enter Graculus and a company of Beggar-boys.

Grac.

Come Boys, let me see you make your legs,
whilst I have it in my head how it may be done: for I
have bin at the Dancing-schole a purpose to learn my self, that D1r
that I might correct you upon knowledg. Come my
brave Boys, the most mannerly The Boys put off their
hats, and make several
ridiculous Congies.

shall have the best Livery.
Excellent well done: I do not
think ther’s a parcel of better bred Boys in Town, considering
their Qualities.
Let me see you run Boys. They run.
Oh bravely done! they are so nimble of heel, they’l
quickly run out of a Foot-body into a Gentleman of the
Chamber.

Boy.

Would you would let us go Sir to the Dancing-
School, that we might see the fashion of it; I warrant
you we would observe, and have some of it away with
us.

Grac.

These Rogues would watch their time, and be
stealing: take heed of that Boys; at the end of that
hangs a Halter: Never go beyond the Rules of Cheating,
by that you will secure your Necks, and it will put a value
on your Wit, it is a general quality, and much approv’d:
He that has never made use of it, has never bin
truly in the Fashion. Your Gentile Cheats, they go to
Gaming-houses; your Complementing Cheats, frequent
Ladies Lodgings; your Flattering Cheats, follow
Courts; your Learned Cheats, the Barr; your Seditious
Cheats, the Pulpit: And such Cheats as you and
I may be, and I thank Mercury I am, Noble-mens-services,
or the places about Fools, Prodigals, or allow’d of
Mad-men, which is the same. But you must be secret,
Boys; keep your tongues idle, and set your wits to
work, and in a short time we will be our Masters Equals
in Fortune, keep men our selves, and be company for the
best.

Enter Valasco and Perigrine.

Val.

What’s that Fellow going to do with those Boys?

D Per. I D1v

Per.

I warrant he is some Parish Officer, and is having
them to some House of Correction.

Val.

I’le ask him. Prethee Friend, what dost thou intend
to do with those Boys?

Grac.

Perform one of the works of mercy on them;
cloath the naked: put ’em into Liveries, and let ’em out
like Hackney-Coaches. It will be no small conveniency
to younger Brothers when they go a woing, to make themselves
Fortunes among some of the She slender-wits, with
full Purses, who are so taken with a Feather, Pages, and
Footmen, that they had rather marry a man well attended,
without either brain or money, then any one of more
substance, and less shew.
I hope you are no Courtiers, Gentlemen.

Val.

Why prethee?

Grac.

For fear you should beg a Fine for my having
the benefit of my brain for my Fortune, or get my design
prohibited; but if you do, ther’s thousands will curse
you; who, according to their occasions, would be glad
(I most heartily) to know where to encrease or lessen
their Retinue, as their Purses would permit ’em, which
is most commonly a young huffing Gallants very uncertain
friend?

Val.

Do you hear this jearing Rascal?

Per.

It was ever so; your ordinary Fellows have no
Breeding; they’l throw out their jests at any time, let it
light where it will, though their Crowns be crack’d for
it: and though they be blunt Fellows, their words many
times have sharp edges.

Val.

Well, farewell Friend; if we are no Courtiers,
one of us has bin a Souldier, and they ought by their Profession
to be as good at begging.

Grac.

That’s true, but they are not so successful; they
commonly act like themselves bluntly, without consideration,ration,D2r
and are usually denied without much ceremony;
therefore if one of you is still a Souldier, you might be
heartily glad if the King could unanimate you, and set
you up in his Armory, that when he had no Wars, you
might have no wants.

Per.

Well, God-a-mercy Tell-troth.

Exit Per with
Valasco.

Grac.

Come Boys, I’le go case you first,
Then have you to my Lord in Whimsey.

Exeunt.

Scene 4.

Enter Melynet, and presently after a Page.

Page.

Sir, here is a Letter my Lord Lotharicus sent
when you were abroad.

Breaks it open, and reads.

Mel.

“‘My Lord, I have perswaded your Fair Mistris to
the Gardens this night; where, if you think fit, you may
take the opportunity of discovering your Passion: if not,
I will, according to my promise, be your faithful Advocate;
and hope to place you in that esteem in her
thoughts, as may give you what is but Justice, the Precedency
of all the rest of your Rivals; which is a service
passionately courted by
Your faithful servant, Lotharicus.’”

And must be treacherously rewarded!

Base Fortune! that offers me no other ways to come to

Greatness, but by the paths of Infamy! But hold Honor,

forbear thy whispers in my Soul.

I’m too far gone, thou sound’st retreat too late,

And now, for Virtues pay, no more will wait.

I’le not rewards in th’other world expect,

And present benefits for hope neglect.

It is Ambition’s Dictates I pursue

And following them; I cannot stay with you:

Then toss my Soul no more in Tempests so,

Nor make my Conscience thus my Fortunes Foe.

D2 Go, D2v

Go, and in Princes minds take up thy Seat,

I’le not forget thee quite, when once I’m great.

Marcelia, I am coming to throw such rage and jealousie

into thy heart, as shall, like Lightning, consume thy love

for thy Lotharicus; I’le raise a Tempest that shall destroy

him, and give no warning by a Thunder-clap.

Exit.

Scene 5.

Enter Marcelia and Desha.

Marc.

Methinks this day has time much longer then usually
they are; strangely long, to me at least it seems so:
How ha’s done to thee?

Desha.

As others, Madam; I have no cause to make
me judge this days motion slower then the rest.

Marc.

No more have I.

Desh.

It would not seem so tedious then in passing.
But Madam, I much wonder My Lord Lotharicus has not
bin here today.

Marc.

Very well apply’d: but the hours took not
their increase, I will assure you, from his absence; not
but that his company would have made ’em much more
pleasant I confess.

Desh.

And by consequence not so long.

Marc.

I wish my Cousin Melynet were here; and yet
his conversation now is not very diverting: The flowing
of his Fortune has given his Mirth an Ebb.

Enter a Page.

Page.

Madam, here is my Lord Melynet.

Exit Page.

Desh.

Madam, you see your wishes has their grant, as
soon as ask’d.

Enter Melynet.

Marc.

Cousin, your servant: you were the last I was
talking of, and sure I am you are the first I see.

Mel.

I dare not credit such a Complement; two such Obli-D3r
Obligations are too eminently great at once, for any but
Lotharicus.

Marc.

If you knew how unkind he has bin to day,
you would not judge so.

Mel.

Alas, I know.

Sighs.

Marc.

What?

Mel.

I know not what I was about to say, my head’s
so full of business, one thought drives out another.

Marc.

Sure whatsoe’re they are, they are but troublesome
reflections; they have chang’d your humor strangely.
But pray Cousin tell me, What is it that so much
destroys the quiet of your mind, and makes you wear
so sad a countenance? You need not fear to trust me with
a secret, though I am a Woman: My friendship cannot
let me see you so much a stranger to your wonted temper,
without desire to bear a part of your misfortune.

Mel.

I do so little doubt your kindness, that I fear your
love would make you take the greatest share; and that
almost certain knowledge makes me keep it from you.
But leave this discourse, Has not Lotharicus bin here to
day?

Marc.

No Cousin; he has not bin so kind.

Mel.

Not here to day! poor Cousin.

Sighs.

Marc.

What’s the matter, dear Melynet, tell me;
You look surpriz’d: is not Lotharicus well?

Mel.

Very well.

Marc.

Why did you sigh, and look so sad?

Mel.

Sure you mistook: And if I did, it was only pitying
your condition: I know the time must seem tedious
when an expected Lover does not come: And if you
please to make it less appear, we’l take a walk into the
Gardens.

Marc.

I shall willingly accept that offer; for some Air,
after so hot a day, will not appear unpleasant.

Exeunt.
Scene 6. D3v

Scene 6.

Enter Lotharicus and Arcasia, in a Garden.

Loth.

Are you still resolv’d then to make all your servants
equally unhappy Madam? Shall not he be bless’d to
boast the glory of your favours?

Arcas.

I am so far, my Lord, from putting such a value
on my weak Merits, that I conceive he would be most unfortunate
that I should chuse; and therefore being so equally
oblig’d to all for their esteem, I will never be so
injuriously unjust to any.

Loth.

I am sorry I must prove so unfortunate a Suppliant
for one whom I so much esteem, and does so well deserve.

Arcas.

My Lord, I should but ill demonstrate the
friendship that I have still profess’d to pay you, if my
consent to your request should give you power to wrong
your friend so far? You see I am too sollicitous to keep
up your interest in all hearts, as well as mine, e’re to consent
to be the cause that you should justly forfeit it.

Loth.

I’le stand the hazard, Madam, of all dangers in
that kind; my fears are far greater from my unsuccessful
suit; and therefore ’tis in vain to think to complement
me out of my request: that Court-quality I am too well
acquainted with, to be deceiv’d in Madam.

Arcas.

I see, my Lord, our intentions want Interpreters,
as well as Languages; they are so seldome understood
in their true meaning. But since you will force me
in my own vindication to make good what I’ve said, I
think you do not love your friend, or else you’d not prefer
him where you have given such convincing proofs you
did not like; for if you had, you would have doubtless
ask’d the service for your self, as well as have bespoken it
for another.―― It takes; I could laugh exaside. tremelyD4r
tremely to see how strangely I have surpriz’d him, and
how seriously he is studying complementally to word a
Tragical Denial to my Comical Affection.

I perceive, my Lord, you little thought to have found
a Courtship where you came to make one; but persons
of Merit are often subject to such accidents. I have heard
some swear they have had a hundred of them in their
days; nay some, more then Arithmetick could number:
I hope your Conquest is not yet arriv’d to such a large
accompt: You see, my Lord, how different our intentions
are, I strive to gain you for my self, and you to win
me for another.

Loth.

I know, Madam, the greatness of your heart too
well, to have the vanity to think you would throw away
your favours on one, whose wants in all things worthy
such a blessing, forbids his boldness to attempt to beg it.

Arcas.

My Lord, pray spare that confidence in your
friends behalf, which for your self do so much decline:
And to recompence that Obligation, I will no longer
fright you with my pretended Passion: I am your friend
They walk up and
down, and talk softly;
he makes several
bows and submissions
to her.
in substance, your Lover but in Chimera:
But I thought it Justice to
deprive his heatrrt of quiet, that
came to rob my Soul of Reason.

Enter Melynet and Marcelia.

Marc.

There’s Lotharicus Cousin.

Mel.

Where? Ha! Lotharicus, and she with him!

Marc.

Who is it Cousin? do you know her?

Mel.

No matter who she is, or whether she were at all.

Marc.

I am afraid, and yet I know not what I fear:
I’le go meet her, and see who she is, see if I know her.

Mel.

Her name’s Arcasia; go not for the world;
you are undone and if you do.

Marc.

Why, what secret does your Soul contain, by whichD4v
which you judge I must be so unfortunate? I must and
will go.

Mel.

Pray stay, your Passion will betray too much
Love, and make that prove his scorn, which once created
all his happiness. Come, let us be gone.

Marc.

Cousin, you are unkind, to put my my till-now
setled joys upon the rack of so much fear: I cannot stir;
I here shall fix like a cold Marble Stone. See how he does his Adorations pay!Thus, poor Marcelia, he did thee betray!
Methinks his Soul should shake to let Heaven see his
Perjury: But Cousin, could you, as I am sure you did,
know he was false, and keep me ignorant of his being so?

Mel.

I must confess I did, and found it too weighty
for my friendship to support, and thought your Love
would prove less able.

Marc.

He then is false: unhappy knowledge, that
comes so much too late, and yet so too too soon!

Mel.

If your Courage equal but your other Excellencies,
and that you will command your Passion to obey
your Reason, I will secure you a Revenge shall equal his
High Perjury, And make him burst with rage, or else return,And in the Hell of his past falshood burn.
But you must never let him know that you do think him
chang’d, for then all that you act, he will suppose the
violence of your Love, and prove his pleasure, not his torment.
Befriend your Sexes Honor, and be not thought to
whine, to love, and be despis’d: Scorn and neglect him,
but give him not a reason why; you are sufficiently convinc’d
within; you have a Cause, and need not jusitfie the
Act by a Demonstration of it; that may Eclipse your
Glory, and augment his Pride.

Marc.

Oh that my dear Brother Euryalus were return’dturn’dE1r
from his Travels! But I have ever known you Master
of so much Reason, that I can hope no better assistance
In this Extreme, where I will act a part,
Your friendship counsels, though it break my heart.

Mel.

Come, let’s be gone then, least we are discover’d.

Marc.

We need not: See, they are about to leave
the Garden by the other gate. Oh my Lotharicus! But
why do I say my Lothicarus?
Th’art false Lotharicus, and lost to me,
Unless these wash away thy Perjury.

She weeps.

Mel.

Can you shed tears for one that you should hate?
Such meanness shews you merit such a Fate.
Leave: you have made a Conquest much more glorious,
the King adores you, whom if you ne’re can love, will
make you at least thus far fortunate, that your perfections
will with greater splendour shine in the whole worlds Opinion.
My advice is, that you use it to your own advantage,
and either build your Fortune, or reduce your
Servant; for if you fail in both, your judgment will be
question’d.

By favouring one, the other may repent;

And all I wish is but your high content.

If that your seeming change can’t make him burn,

To build your greatness, all your Passions turn:

Command, as Sov’reign, him you would obey;

Make him your Slave, that did your Love betray.

Marc.

I cannot promise I shall e’re be free,

But I will colours wear of Victory;

And my sad thought dress up in such disguize,

As shall deceive the most informing eyes.

Thus I an inward Martyr must become,

And seem to triumph, when I’m most undone.

Exeunt.
E Scene 7. E1v

Scene 7.

Enter Moriphanus and Graculus.

Mor.

In my mind, Graculus, I am most compleatly modified:
All the rest of my Brother Gallants may keep
their beds, or put on their riding suits to day; I shall not
leave, I think, an eye of a Lady for one of them: I shall
have a fling at all their hearts; I am arm’d from head to
foot with such an assault of bravery, Graculus; some will
be taken with the Garniture of my shoes, others with
the silk of my Suit; some with my Band, others with my
Perriwig will be lost in Love. The Widdow Perilla, and
all.

Grac.

But the Devil a one with your person, I aside
dare swear.―― But you have left out the wonderfull’st
temptation of all, your Lordships Wisdom.

Mor.

I had forgot it, it was quite out of my head, Graculus:
if it had bin much in the mode, I should have remember’d
it: but hang’t, ’tis almost out of fashion: not
one Gallant of a hundred makes any reckoning of it. To
say the truth, Graculus, it may well be left off now, for it
has bin in use ever since the creation by report.

Grac.

’Tis very true in troth, and things of much greater
value have bin laid aside for antiquity sake: for, for
ought that I can find, it is all that can be alledg’d against
Honesty, that it is old. But I hope that there will be some
Wardrobes made of these castaway cloaths of our Ancestors,
that the next Age, if they like it better than ours
does, they may bring it into use again: for they are now
both asham’d to shew their faces.―― But my Lord, you
have forgot to buy a Sword.

Mor.

But I remember that it is unlawful to commit
Murther, that’s the reason, Graculus.

Grac.

The Reason, for what?

Mor. E2r

Mor.

For not laying out my money to no purpose, on a
thing I shall never use.

Grac.

You know not what occasion may be offer’d.

Mor.

I know the greatest that can be, shall be none to
me: whemn I’m resolv’d, I’m resolv’d. Besides, I have
made a solemn Oath on my own part to that, never to
break it; and that makes it a double obligation.

Grac.

You had as good put it to the hazard in the Natural
way of breaking it, if an affront require it; for I
doubt you’l hardly live without.

Mor.

I’l warrant thee, Graculus, I’l come into no such
Criminaries; I’l not fight for my Religion, I’l sooner leave
it: nor for my Estate, I will sooner let it go. And if it
were not High-Treason against the King, and hanging-
Treason against my own Neck, I would tell thee what I
would do for the King too.

Grac.

Never fear my Lord; you know if you should
come to be hang’d, the sooner it is done, the sooner you
are out of the danger of attempting or receiving Manslaughter,
or wilful Murther.

Mor.

I will tell thee, for I cannot hold: why, Graculus,
neither more nor less, then I will do for my Religion,
and my Estate; that is as good as to say, and the very
self-same thing that I have said, I will not fight: No, and
if nothing else can serve turn, against the World, the
Flesh, and the Devil, they shall even take their course
with me Graculus.

Knock without.

Grac.

My Lord, here’s all your PaGraculus looks
out, returns
and says.

ges, Foot-men, Gentleman of the Horse,
Secretary, Valet de Chambre, Steward,
Butler; here’s all your whole Family in view.

Mor.

Why, I did not bid thee take me any other servants
but Foot-men.

Enter all the Boys in Liveries.

Grac.

No more I have not, my Lord, but all these E2 several E2v
several Officers are to be hatch’d out of these Eggs.

Mor.

I am much pleas’d: I’le go to a Play first, then
to the Gardens, come home late, go to bed without a supper,
for fear of being sick with a full stomack.

Grac.

But what shall the Boys and I do, my Lord?

Mor.

Do as I do; I’le have as much care of their
healths, as of my own.

Grac.

So, very good; here’s cloathing of the naked,
and starving of the hungry: The last is to be put for a
Spiritual Work of Mercy, for it has much of Air in it.

Mor.

I cannot see my way Graculus; Going out he
stumbles.

I’le turn the hinder part of my head of
hair before.

Grac.

Hang these Perriwig makers, they have made
the Bush so big, the Owl can’t see through it:

Exeunt.

Scene 8.

Enter King and Lords.

Alm.

The King is strangely discomposed.

Val.

I, and if I am not much mistaken, it is some Female
Beauty causes his high distemper.

Lucid.

Well, if this be the effects of Love, I hope I
shall never let my eyes sacrifice the contentment of my
heart to any She alive.

Alm.

Indeed when Women govern there, farther then
in Complement, they strangely unhinge mens humors.

The King whispers to Valasco. Valasco
goes to them again.

Val.

It is his Majesties will that we should leave him:
Only, if Melynet comes, that happy Favorite of Fortune,
he is allow’d admittance.

Exeunt all but the King.

King.

Were Friendship half so diligent as Love’s impatient,
Melynet had e’re this crown’d my desires with
some assurance of success, or left me to the force of my
Dispair; for hopes and fears are the Convulsions of the
mind: Fantastick Fortune! that madest me both at once, aE3r
a King and Captive, fettering my heart when thou didst
Crown my head.

By Acts, like these, ’tis Love does make us know,

He in his Slaves does no distinction show.

When by a Sov’raigns right I Millions sway,

That makes me most a Womans Power obey.

I, that my Neighb’ring Kingdoms keep in fear,

Can nothing bring to daunt this passion here.

Points to his
heart.

It braves my Courage, and my Honour too;

Oh Conquering Love, what is’t thou canst not do!

Thou tumblest mighty Empires to the ground;

Nothing beyond thy Circulation’s found.

Enter Melynet.

Mel.

Welcome my dearest Friend, beyond all wishes
but Marcelia’s Love.

King.

I dare not ask thee, yet I fain would know,

What I shall hear too soon, or else too slow.

Mel.

Sure, Sir, my Looks does not a Sentence wear,

To give your wishes reason to dispair:

My Face would ill interpret (then) the joy

I have, and bring you, if it hopes destroy.

King.

Does my fair Mistris then my Love allow?

Tell me Melynet, tell me quickly how?

I am impatient; thou did’st never know

What Passion was, thy answer comes so slow.

Will she, for me, her lov’d Lotharicus quit?

Mel.

Love is a Child; she’l rule it with her wit.

I find Sir, nothing so powerful in her heart, to give your
Majesties hopes discouragement: Something has lately
hap’ned, by which Lotharicus has lost some ground in
her affection; and that which makes me almost confident,
Sir, of your success, is, she seems much more to doubt
the truth I tell her of your Love, then disapprove it; and
where that is strongly urg’d, the Present never is unwelcome.

King. E3v

King.

’Tis true: but their desires of taking in of heart
proceeds not always from their Inclinations; it is the general
humor of that Sex to glory in the number of their
Sacrifices, yet hardly will allow in their whole lives to
pay the interest of one Offering back.

Mel.

Were they as cautious in their gifts of Love, as
you conclude them, Sir, their Sex had ne’re bin tax’d of
so much Levity.

King.

My fears are only now, she will not change; and
if she does, I then shall fear as much she’ll change again.

How can he happy be, whose unkind Fate,

Gives in his greatest joy, a doubting State.

Mel.

Never give way, Sir, to thoughts so injurious to
your quiet; her Reason will soon shake off her Feverish
Reliques of Affection to Lotharicus: they will perhaps
some little time make a weak opposition; but the Antidote
I have given her of your Majesties inclinations, will
infallibly expel that poyson.

King.

I’l go and visit her presently, Melynet, that from
my own experimented hopes, as well as thine, I may secure
my heart.

Mel.

Sir, if I may without offense perswade your Majesty,
defer it till the solemnity of your Birth-day’s past:
I then will bring her to the Court, and there the particular
honor that your Majesty may do her by a publick Address,
giving by that the Lawrel to her beauty from the other
fair ones, will infinitely conduce unto the conquest.
There is no surer way, than baiting of their pride to catch
their hearts.

King.

I will expect that seeming Age of time.

How I shall pass it, none but those can tell,

That heav’n has seen, and yet must stay in hell.

Exeunt.

The End of the Second Act.

Act. III. E4r

Act III. Scene 1.

Enter Lucidore.

Luc.

I must go look my longing Lords, and whet up
their desires of seeing my Mistress, with a day or two’s expectation
longer, the sight will come too cheap else, and
lessen their obligations, if I afford it at their first request.

Enter Valasco, Almeric, Peregrine.

Val.

Oh my Lord, you are well met: we were coming
to you for performance of your promise: we could hold
out no longer, you have rais’d our hopes to such a height
of expectation.

Alm.

I’faith the fancy of her beauty does so hant our
imaginations, we cannot sleep nor eat quietly for conceiting
of her, what I dare swear shall never prove.

Luc.

Well, conceit her what you please, you are not
like to see her this two long days, and so farewel.

Per.

Nay, we’l go with thee and hant thy ghost, till
thou let’st us see the desired apparition.

Exeunt.

Scene 2.

Enter Lotharicus at one door, and
Melinet at another.

Loth.

I do not think but we were both of us upon one
design, going in pursuit of one another.

Mel.

You have reason to believe, my Lord, I carry a
passion in my heart, sufficiently impatient till I know my
doom, which you ere this had found the effect of, but that
Marcelia has kept me some hours her Prisoner, to make me
promise to carry her to Court.

Loth. E4v

Loth.

I then perceive I am discarded from that service:
and were you any but the person that you are, I should
grow jealous of you.

Mel.

To divert you from that humor, pray satisfie my
wishes, how do you find Arcasia’s inclinations? I durst
not come my self, and stand the Sentence.

Loth.

I cannot give you hopes as you deserve; her resolution
seems at present to be fix’d still to be Mistress of
her own freedom; She says, the service of no man living
shall prevail to buy her out: I hope time may change her
humor; Womens first resolutions seldome stand good in
Law against their second thoughts: This for your satisfaction,
you have no Rival that’s more fortunate.

Mel.

If I must not possess her heart, I’le pleasure take
at least to think no other does.

And hope, while ’tis to an Election free,

Fortune at last may kindly give it me.

Exeunt.

Scene 3.

Enter Marcelia.

Marc.

How shall I force my self to shew disdain,

Since still, in spight of me, he here will raign?

Love will not quit this place to rage or scorn,

Points to
her heart.

But keeps his Int’rest as the Eldest born.

Reason and Honor, whither are ye gone?

That I this Childish Passion find so strong.

Will you be slaves to Love? resign the Field?

So many Odds, and yet so poorly yield.

But ’tis not much our weak Sex should submit,

Since Man’s couragious Soul can’t Master it.

Enter Page.

Page.

My Lord, Lotharicus is come, Madam.

Exit Page.

Marc.

Well. Enter Lotharicus at a distance.
He comes.

Grief F1r

Grief now retire; act here thy Tragick part,

Points to
her heart.

But do not make my eyes betray my heart.

Loth.

I’m come Marcelia.――

Goes to imbrace her.

Marc.

――Whither pray so fast? Puts him back.

They often fall that make too much of hast.――

Loth.

Has my forc’d absence made you angry grow?

Marc.

You do mistake; your coming makes me so.

Loth.

Ha! what’s this I hear! I know it cannot be,

Thou art not chang’d thus to thy self, nor me.

This coldness comes not, Dearest, from thy heart;

It is some pretty trick of Love and Art.

Yet sure you do not so my passion doubt,

You need to take these ways to find it out.

Marcelia turns aside.

Marc.

I scorn much Art, but I could rage express,

To see he’d fool me with a new Address.

Turns to him.

Indeed I do not; and I must confess

With the same truth, my own is grown much less.

Loth.

I am surpriz’d; Can you unblushing say,

You have your Faith and Honor thrown away?

Come, come, no more; you’l make my fears too strong.

Marc.

I care not what they are, so you’d be gone.

Loth.

What is’t you mean, Marcelia? what to do?

Marc.

No more, nor less, but tell you what is true.

I’m chang’d: Is that so great a wonder grown?

There are examples from both Sexes known.

I wish you’d leave me now; I fain would be

From Conversation, as from Passion free.

This is no Complement I must confess:

But, without study, ’tis my humors dress.

Loth.

Are you Marcelia that I did adore?

I may be gone, grief lets me say no more.

Exit.

Marc.

He’s gone, and does a seeming passion show, sighs

Such as none hardly from a true can know.

F It F1v

It is no wonder Women ruin’d be,

If all can counterfeit as well as he.

Sits down. Enter Melynet.

Mel.

What new misfortune does your Soul oppress?

Marc.

Lotharicus has bin here; you now may guess:

Mel.

For him still sad! Fie, fie, you are too blame,

To let your Love so much your courage shame.

Marc.

When Love and Reason has a War begun,

Grief can’t be hid, until the Vict’ries won.

Mel.

If he were here, I’m sure he was so wise,

With his first flame, his second to disguize:

I know he with great oaths confirm’d his Passion,

He did not else dissemble well in fashion.

Marc.

He did as much as Love could make those do,

That found their Mistris false, when they were true.

Mel.

That sight, I hope, straight mov’d you to belief.

Marc.

It did not that, but it encreas’d my grief.

No, I have done, what I but ill could do,

I scorn’d him much, to keep my word with you.

I hope that time will make it natural grow;

Till then my heart will never quiet know.

Mel.

No more, no more of these sad thoughts; I am
come to beg a favor of you; it is to go to Court with
me to night, and see the Mask; it will divert you much.

Marc.

Such sights to sickned joys sorrows augment,

A Grave can only (now) give me content.

Mel.

I must not, nor I will not be deny’d.

Marc.

I’m by my promise, to your counsels ty’d.
Exeunt.

Scene 4.

Enter Moriphanus, Graculus, and Footmen.

Mor.

There’s to be some doings to day at Court, ’tis
the Kings Birth-day; Graculus, thee and I’le go see’t.

Grac.

I wish we could, my Lord, but they’l not let us
in.

Mor. F2r

Mor.

Not let us in! that’s a good one; not let us in! Walks up and down, and looks upon himself,
pulls out a great deal of money.

Not let us in! what think’st thou, Graculus, will not good
store of these tempt? Besides, I am as gallant as the
proudest of them, and as impudent as the best: And I’le
tell thee, Graculus, they shall not keep us out: I’le fill my
Hat of these, and cry, “Make room Courtiers.”

Grac.

That, I confess, my Lord, will be an excellent
Orator for us; it is the most taking Language to speak in
to all persons; ’tis strangely intelligible!―― But, my
Lord, let you and I do a frolick for once: You are infinitely
brave, and I am in my worst Cloaths, and for sport’s
sake, let us see which shall get in first: Let me carry the
full Exchequer in my pocket, and do you carry an Eloquent
Oration, which shall be pick’d out for your purpose
from some of Cicero’s works.

Mor.

Tell not me of works, as long as I carry a Key
shall do the work for us both.

Exeunt.

Scene 5.

Enter Lotharicus.

Loth.

How weak is man, to place so much of his contentment
in a Woman, whose change depends on their
unconstant humors, not their Reason! Those joys must
needs be still uncertain of which they are Foundations.
Ha! now I think of it, Melynet told me she had ingag’d
him to carry her to Court: Sure she does design some
Conquest there; perhaps Ambition has supplanted Love.
Oh Jealousie! thou Torturer of the heart! I find thou
now begin’st to seize my Soul! I’le be there too.――

By strict observance I’le her thoughts discover;

See if I’m scorn’d in hopes of some new Lover.

Exit.
F2 Scene 6. F2v

Scene 6.

Enter several Lords and Ladies, and take their
Seats: Presently after the King, Lucidore, Perigrine,
Almeric, and other Attendants. The King looks
round, and bows to all the Ladies..

King.

Look to your hearts, my Lords, to night; Love
is resolv’d, I find, to set them all to work: He has sent so
many Beauties hither, I fear I shall go off my self a Prisoner.

Per.

If you become ingag’d, Sir, ’tis all our duties to
attend your Majesty.

Luc.

I am gone already.

Alm.

How Lucidore? what’s become of your Mistris?

Luc.

Faith ev’n crouded up in a corner of my heart, out
of civility to make these Ladies room.

King.

Which is the Beauty that has charm’d thee, Lucidore?

Luc.

Your Majesty would laugh, if I should tell you
how that devillish little blind God has serv’d me.

King.

Prethee let me hear then.

Luc.

Faith, Sir, that the Ladies might not fall out about
the Conquest, he has made me in Love with all;
with every one: he has compounded their several Beauties,
and given it me at once in a Pill.

King.

So many Ladies taken in Love-powder at once,
I confess, is a good large proportion.

Luc.

All my hopes is, they’l prove like Leaden Bullets,
one make another pass.

King.

Well, well, Lucidore; Cupid will find his time
to make you love in earnest, grow tame, and melancholly.

Val.

Sir, he has a Mistris for all he talks thus madly,
and has ingag’d that we shall see her.

King.

He’s mad indeed then.

Luc. F3r

Luc.

Does your Majesty think that Love will bring me
into my wits?

King.

I think it can hardly put thee farther out.

Luc.

Well, if he turns once a mender of Head-pieces,
by my consent he shall be imploy’d first among
Statesmen, that sit at the Stern in Government of Nations:
As for my particular, I’le dispence with my own
cure; till he has done his work in that kind; for the general
good ought to be prefer’d before private interest.

Alm.

He has found him an imployment will hold
him tack till the day of Judgment, without having any
thing to do with private brains.

The King talks to Almeric: Moriphanus knocks
to get in, Valasco looks out, sees him, and
turns to Lucidore.

Val.

O’my Conscience here is the supposed Lord at
the door, we have heard so much talk of, by his incomparable
dress.

Luc.

Prethee let him in, he’ll make us very merry: It
will be more divertisement to the King and Ladies, then
the Masque.

Val.

But he has brough a whole Regiment of Footmen
with him.

Luc.

Keep them out; but let him in prethee.

Enter Moriphanus and Graculus. Lucidore goes to the King.

Luc.

And please your Majesty, here’s a suppos’d Lord
will make you laugh: He takes himself, I believe, for an
Ambassador; he comes from Yellow-land, a Country
adjacent to Green-land; I am confident by his dress.

King.

I confess, if his in-side be like his King smiles.
out, he will not be wanting to us for sport: I think you
must attaque him Lucidore.

Moriphanus looks much upon himself, and walks up
towards Lucidore.
Luc. F3v

Luc.

I see he’ll begin with me first, and please your Majesty.

Mor.

I hear there is to be dancing here to night; so I
was resolv’d to come and make one, with the rest of my
fellow Noble-men.

Luc.

You wrong your self, my Lord, if you think here’s
any one fit to be your fellow; you are not to be match’d
in ne’re a Court in Christendome.

Mor.

No, Sir, I came not with that intention; my
heart is dispos’d of, and therfore you’l loose your labour,
loose your labour in troth, to speak in the behalf
of any of these Ladies, if they were in love to death
with me; for all that I can do for them, after I have said,
“Dye they must, and dead they were,” is, “God have mercy of
their Souls.”

Luc.

’Tis a hard case for you all, Ladies; you hear the
doleful answer before you ask the question. To Graculus.
Pray, what’s your inexorable Lords name?

Grac.

He’s of an antient Family, I assure you, Sir; he’s
ally’d to above three parts of the world; his name,
“Mor-if-an-ass”, which is by interpretation, turning it backward,
――If an Ass, there’s more.

Luc.

I am inform’d of your Pedigree, my Lord, by
your man; I am acquainted with abundance of your
house, I thank ’em, they have made me very merry.

Mor.

I believe your Lordship, they’l let none be sad
of their acquaintance; every one that comes into their
companies, or mine, we look upon as one of us.

Enter Melynet and Marcelia at the door, and Lotharicus
at another privately.
The King looks earnestly on Marcelia.

King.

Melynet, you are a happy man; and will be no
less envy’d, whose interest could bring so great a wonder
to the Court to night, so daz’ling a Sun at mid-night.

Mel. F4r

Mel.

She will be much more envy’d Sir, and if she
shine so in your Sphear.

King.

Bring here that conquering Beauty.

Marc.

I know the distance of a Subject, Sir, too well,
proudly to take what I have so little Title to by Birth or
Nature.

King.

By one ’tis less then you deserve; and you already
have gain’d that interest here, Points to his heart.
you easily may make the other undisputed too.

Marc.

Victories so much above belief, excuse those
that your Majesty gives them to for your divertisement,
from a Reply.

King.

But you have no cause Madam, to plead that
reason for your silence; you know your power too well,
but you decline to own it from other Motives, which in
your answer, possibly, would speak you cruel.

Marc.

I know none, Sir, shall ever keep me from the
due sense of what your Majesty is, and what I am; and
if I both remember well, I hope my actions never shall
offend my duty.

King.

But if time, Marcelia, gives me no more of happiness
then that, I shall be at as great a loss as now:
Love does require to be answer’d with something of the
same Species of it own.

Marc.

Who wants the one, Sir, in that measure as their
condition and their obligations ought to have it, never
pays the other well.

The King talks to her softly, she smiles, and
seems satisfied with what he says.

King.

Come fair Marcelia, I wish it may prove worthy
the honor of thy view.

The King leads her off; all the rest of the
Lords and Ladies follow.――Moriphanus
catches one of the Ladies, and says:
Mor. F4v

Mor.

By your leave, my Lady, I am resolv’d to lay
hope of you for my share.

She laughs: He leads her
out under the arm.
Lotharicus stays behind, and grows into a rage at
the Kings Courting Marcelia.

Loth.

Hell, and its Furies! Oh I must be gone!

My Rage will for my Reasson prove too strong.

Woman! what art thou but mans tempting shame,

That did’st at first his soul with weakness stain:

And still that power keep, and still betray:

Oh that some Plague had took you all away!

False Sex! that neither truth nor love does know,

But what ambitious pride can overthrow.

Thou Storm of Jealousie, thy fury lay,

Or else my duty will be cast away.

Oh Love! how you those raging Billows rowl,

Which whirl-winds of dispair raise in my soul!

Hold, hold, Revenge! if thou the Vict’ry gain,

I shall my Honor with some Murther stain.

It is my King that does my Rival grow;

That Name is Sacred: Reason, keep it so.

Cruel Marcelia! since thou false would’st prove,

Why did you place so high your change in Love?

Had any other rob’d me of my rest,

My Sword should search my quiet in his brest.

Hence, hence, false woman! thou’rt unworthy grown;

Still in this injur’d heart to keep thy Throne.

In vain, Lotharicus, thou hop’st relief,

Till death does give it, by the force of grief.

Exit.

Scene 7.

Enter Masquers, &c. The Masque ended.

King.

You are sad, Marcelia, you take no pleasure in
these divertisments.

Marc. G1r

Marc.

I must confess, Sir, my humor was ever dull, unfit
for mirth.

King.

If you continue it, I shall become so too by
Sympathy.

Exeunt Omnes: The King leading out
Marcelia.

Scene 8.

Enter Lotharicus.

Loth.

My heart affords my soul no rest.

But I will leave the Kingdom, go and try,

Whether my Love will with her absence dye:

That is a cure in Infant Passions known;

But thine, Lotharicus; too strong is grown:

She in thy Soul her Empire will possess;

Not all thy Power can make her Power less.

Enter Melynet.

Mel.

My Lord, I’m come as much oppress’d with trouble
from my Friendship, as I am sure you must be from
your Love, to see your self so wrong’d by an unconstant
Woman.

Loth.

Her injuries to me, will prove advantages to
you; therefore you have no reason to share my grief, no
more then I can take contentment in those joys her change
may bring you, in the increasing favors of the King.

Mel.

My Soul is not so mean, to wish to build my rising
Honor on my Friends misfortunes: No, Lotharicus,
whatsoe’re you think, my heart is generous enough to be
content, that they should ebb to nothing, if that could
bring Marcelia back to what she ought to be, and make
you happy.

Loth.

No more, dear Melynet, you are too brave, and I
too base to doubt thee: But I have receiv’d such wrongs
from Love, as something may excuse my questioning of
Friendship.

G Mel. G1v

Mel.

It may, and justly does; you’re wrong’d indeed;
we both are injur’d; for she unworthily could find no other
out, to make an instrument to your abuse, and her
design, but me: I must be chose out that unhappy man
to carry her to Court; as if she thought the trouble
would not be great enough, unless she made your Friend
to help it forward.

Loth.

No, it was not that; she did believe your power
there would make her more regarded, that gave you
the imployment.

Mel.

Curse on the Cause, if her desires from that did
find success; my power there made your affections ruine.
What fatal minute was my unhappy interest born in! But
I’le revenge my self; I’le set all the Engines in the Court
to work, and blast her growing hopes of ever being a
Queen: ’Tis those that puff her up to the contempt she
does express of your affections.

Loth.

Has she then boasted to you of her neglects?

Mel.

I, and gloried in her Falshood; but I hope she
shall be made repent from her lost expectations.

Loth.

I must confess that would allay part of my misery,
to see her unsuccessful in her ambitious wishes; the
news of that would be acceptable when I am gone.

Mel.

You gone! whither my Lord?

Loth.

I do intend to leave the Kingdom with all the
speed I can.

Mel.

I cannot wish it; yet I must confess ’tis wisely done.

I must approve what I would fain prevent;

But I believe you’l then find most content.

And, may be, when she knows that you are gone,

Her pride may grow more weak, her love more strong.

Loth.

I know not that; but I must beg your pardon,
for I must go and take some Order about my Journey: I
will not now bid you my last Adieu; but when we meet againG2r
again, I then believe that we shall part for ever.

Exit
Lotharicus.

Mel.

I shall be much deceiv’d else: All things happen
as I could wish; Fortune has plotted for me.
She’s a good Assistant where she is a Friend,
Fix her but constant stars until the end.

Enter Du-Prette.

Du-Pr.

My Lord, the King has sent for you.

Mel.

I’le go to him presently; but I must give thee
instructions first concerning that I intrusted last night to
thy fidelity: Lotharicus intends to travel speedily; make
it thy business to know directly when he goes, and follow
him; I’le furnish thee with moneys this night: Do
it as soon as thou canst with any safety, thy reward shall
wait thee: Be sure and speedy, and make thy Master thine
for ever; and one more powerful then he to pay thy services.

Du-Pr.

I want not courage, Sir; and for my Conscience,
it reaches, I’le assure you, from one Pole to the other;
he cannot travel out of the compass of it.

Exeunt.

Scene 9.

Enter Lucidore, Peregrine, and Valasco.

Per.

What ail’st thou to laugh so?

To Lucidore.

Luc.

To think how impatient you are to see one of the
oldest Witches in the world: For, to deal ingenuously
with you, my Mistris is neither better nor worse, but even
so.

Alm.

Why, thou hast not brought us hither to put
such a trick upon us?

Luc.

Put her upon you: As bad as she is, I love her
too well, and have too much use for her my self, to complement
you so far to make you any such offer.

Per.

We shall without any opposition in our inclinationsG2 tions G2v
leave you her possession: Were she blind, lame,
deaf, or dumb, or any thing else but Old, ’twere tollerable:
But Old do you say?

Luc.

I, as the Creation almost.

Per.

Why, certainly thou art turn’d Projector, and
think’st to go to heaven with a new invention by the mortified
way of sinning: you had e’en as good take the old
Road, for the Devil will way-lay you in the journey; and
where he sends a Post-boy for a Guide, the Passengers commonly
lodge at his Inns.

Val.

What is she Old does he say? O most abominable,
insupportable, intollerable, Old! Why art thou so
mad in all things else, and so tame in the choice of thy
Mistris? Old! Oh Time! what would women give
they had you by the ears, to pull you back again!

Per.

We may let that string alone; for there are some
of our Sex would be bribing as deep as any of them for
that benefit, for many reasons: First, because they would
have the World a little like Heaven, by times going
backward and forward, and by that means prevented of
coming to an end. Secondly, from a just belief, that Ladies
doat not of that in us, which we so much despise in
them; they are not to marry Methusalem, no more then
we do the Witch of Endor.

Luc.

And yet, before any of your brains are worthy of
the place of Privy-Councel, Old Age must have lent you
some of his Experiments, as well as Nature Wit.

Alm.

Then thou took’st thy Mistris to fit thee for a
Polititian?

Luc.

If she live so long with me till I come to be made
use of in that kind, I shall owe much to her power I dare
swear.

Val.

Prethee, for laughter-sake, let us see this Wonder-worker.

Luc. G3r

Luc.

Well, keep your distance, and you shall.

Alm.

Thou hast given us caution enough in her Character
of Antiquity for that.

Per.

I’le be hang’d if she be either Old, or Ugly; she
might be her own Guardian then; he need not keep her
under Lock and Key.

The Scene opens, and there lies heaps of money up
and down; and there stands five persons about
the Table with bags in their hands, dress’d in
Antick habit: (as others at the door) They
come out and dance, and keep time with their
Bags and Pockets.

Luc.

What think you, Gentlemen, of her? There she
is; and her Attendants: Her servants shall give you a
Dance.

They all laugh.
The Dance ended.

You see this is the Mistris of my heart and pleasure;
I purchase her by the sale of my Lands.

Per.

And yet I’le be hang’d if she does not run away
from thee.

Luc.

Well, I am of thy mind for that: But do you
not all love her? Confess, confess.

Per.

The truth of it is, we should all lye horribly if
we did deny that; we all adore her, and are her most
humble and faithful servants; for without her, there is no
satsfaction in this World.

Luc.

No, nor hardly a place in the other World, in
Hell or Heaven, but what she helps to purchase. You
may send your Venture by her to which you please.

Val.

That’s true Lucidore; but I believe thou only
keep’st a Correspondence in the Lower Region.

Luc.

I do so: It was always my fortune to keep company
with such as you are, all Merchants of that place:
I do not think yet amongst us all, we have interest enough toG3v
to make one Bill of Exchange so good as to pass there.

Per.

There’s not one of a thousand that goes about to
try till fifty or threescore, nor so much as think of it; the
Seas are very rough thither, and troublesome.

Luc.

I, hang’t; and one shall be sure to be pleasure-sick
all the way, and must be still taking of bitter Portions to
expel the gross humors of our inclinations; not one
Cordial allow’d of; live or die, sink or swim, not one satisfaction
to be had till the Voyage is ended: I am not
old enough yet to think of Fasting and Prayer,; when I
have some years over my head, I shall begin to do as other
Grave ones have done before me, leave those Vices
that will no longer keep me company, and think of Heaven
out of necessity.

Per.

Nay, I dare swear, thou wilt not endeavour to go
thither, till thou art a Criple both by diseases and time, if
Death will let thee live so long.

Luc.

I believe thou would’st be as glad as I, that thy
life was Copy-hold-Land, that as one were out, thou
mightest renew another.

I hate such Fools, us cannot be content

With pleasures which that World to this hath lent.

Exeunt
Omnes.

The End of the third Act.

Act IV. Scene 1.

The Scene chang’d to Lyons. Enter Lotharicus passing one way, and Euryalus another.

Eury.

Ha! my dearest Friend Lotharicus! what unexpected
accident of Fortune has given me this happiness
at Lyons?

Loth.

Her most malicious one to me.

Eury. G4r

Eury.

How? Does our meeting, after so long an absence,
prove so unwelcome? Time has a changing power
over all things then I see.

Loth.

Do not injure so much that friendship I have
preserv’d so faithfully, and will continue to my Grave,
that little time my griefs will let me live.

Eury.

I fear Marcelia’s dead, and dare not ask: The
sadness of thy look confirms it to me.

Loth.

She is indeed; and I, that Death no longer can
out-live.

Eury.

Poor Sister! Poor Marcelia!

Loth.

You need not grieve, my Lord, she’s only dead
to me.

Eury.

Can you believe I can be so insensible of loosing
in a Sister, what you so much lament the loss of in a Mistris?
If she had perfections that rendred her worthy of
your sorrow, they have as just a claim to mine.

Loth.

Oh, dear Euryalus, it is not the death she ows to
Nature makes me sad; it is her death to me, and all the
Vows she made me.

Eury.

How? do you tell me she’s unworthy grown;
so lost to Virtue? Lotharicus, do not strain friendship up
so high, by charging of my Blood with Crimes.

Loth.

I give them not that name; but I, with joy,
would empty all my veions, and let life out, so that my
knowledge gave my words the Lye.

Eury.

Grown false without a Cause?

Loth.

I say not so; I will not make her Accusation
more guilty then it is.

Eury.

I understand not this mysterious Language; if
you have basely given her reason for to change, condemn
not the effect of your own Act; but draw, and justifie
your injuring me in her.

Loth.

She has a cause from her Ambition; but my LoveG4v
Love was never yet so Criminal to give her any: You are
like to have the King your Brother; that will render you I
suppose contented, though it make your friend still miserable.

Eury.

How, the King!

Loth.

Yes: I give not this account for fear of fighting;
you know I dare, and can, defend my life, though
now death would become so welcome, I should unwillingly
resist it.

Eury.

Ne’re think a Crown can come in competition
with my friendship; I love my Sov’reign as a Loyal Subject,
will give my Life and Fortunes to preserve his
Rights, and him: This is my duties Obligation: But I
had rather give Marcelia to thy Arms, then see her plac’d
upon his Throne; nor shall she sit there and triumph over
thy injur’d joys.

Loth.

I cannot wish, my generous friend, that you
should make your sense of my unhappiness, an injury to
your Fortunes.

Eury.

I’le sink ’em all, but I’le restore thee to thy lost
contentment. I’le teach her ignorant Soul, that Acts of
Honor is the Noblest greatness: I had rather have her
live in Fame for Virtue when she’s dead, then in a Title.

Loth.

Pray force not her inclinations: I had rather
still be miserable, then make her so from your Power.
Gifts of constraint, though in themselves the highest
blessing, are burthensome: Her person, without her
heart, can be no happiness; and both, I know you cannot
give me the possession of.

Eury.

No more, my friend. How long do you intend
to stay in these parts?

Loth.

But till to morrow: My thoughts are restless,
and I follow them.

Eury.

How far do you intend to travel?

Loth. H1r

Loth.

Till I arrive at my wish’d journeys end.

Eury.

What place is that?

Loth.

’Tis Death, ’tis Death, my Friend: till then I’le
rove about the World, and give my self no constant habitation.

Exeunt. The Scene changes.

Scene 2.

Enter Marcelia and Desha.

Marc.

My Brother is come to Lyons, I hear; I will go
write him word how false Lotharicus is proved. Go, send
the Page where I bid you.

Desha.

Yes, Madam.

Exit Desha.

Marc.

What strange effects of Fortune do I prove!

How variously she in my life doth move!

A Prince so brave, and in his Power so great,

Forc’d to beg favors humbly at my feet:

She never for thy glory more could do,

Then she in that, Marcelia, did for you.

Pride could not raise, nor swell my hopes more high,

Then she has given me Power to satisfie:

Nor can she bring my heart to more distress,

Then she has done in all my happiness:

Then bribes me with a Crown to be content,

And makes Ambition prove Loves Monument.

But love, if true, did never Power know,

That greater, then it self, could ever grow;

But that of Heaven; when it within the Soul

Does monstrous prove, and Virtue would controul.

No, no, I still must love whilst I have breath;

Nothing can give my passion date, but death.

But that Lotharicus mayn’t pleasure take,

To think that his doth sleep, and mine doth wake;

I’le force my courage, give me to thee King,

Though I shall be a heartless offering:

H And H1v

And on a Throne in secret mourn that Fate

Destroy’d his Love, and rais’d me to such State.

As Princes ought, I then will act my part,

Not make my face prospective to my heart;

Nor give the Kings contentment cause to doubt,

When his consin’d, my Love does wander out:

My griefs and passions all shall inward burn;

The brace, their bodies, makes their troubles Urn.

Exit Scene changes to a Garden.

Scene 3.

Enter Perilla and Arcasia.

Arcas.

This fine Evening, methinks, should fill the
Garden full of company.

Enter Moriphanus, Graculus, and Boys.

Ha! what have we here? A Knight of the Sun upon
my life.

Per.

You are mistaken, he goes for an Outlandish
Lord.

Arc.

Prethee what’s his name?

Per.

Moriphanus.

Arc.

Oh, I know him now, at leasst in Character: he
seeks to be your Servant.

Per.

You are much deceiv’d, it is to be my Master:
The first time of his Visit he speaks all Matrimony, and
left the discourse of Love for the second Interview: Marriage
is the Captain, I will assure you, of this discourse,
and Love the Lieutenant.

Arc.

Nay, ’tis well if affection has any office in business
of that kind; for there is nothing speaks a Gallant
now so ill-bred, as Marrying and Loving both in a place.
But prethee let’s make towards him, for I long to be censuring
your Servant: Perhaps I may find more Merit in
him then report speaks, for that seldome knows any mean inH2r
in disparagement or praise.

Laughs.

Per.

If your curiosity be so great, you shall go by your
self, for I’m resolv’d he shall not see me.

Arc.

If his company be so troublesome, the most
certain way to be rid of it, is to marry him; and at the
present put on your Mask, and that will secure you: for
I must go that way and meet him.

Laughs extrememly.

Per.

Prethee what’s the matter you laugh so exceedingly?

Arc.

I am conceited you us’d your Servant very roughly
when he waited on you last: Confess, did not you
make your servants beat him?

Per.

Why should you think so prethee?

Arc.

By the trimming of his Suit with that deep
Blew and Black: upon my Conscience it is an Embleme
of some favours of yours in that kind; for he looks like
one that would be cudgell’d, put off his hat, and give
thanks.

Per.

Nay, for that matter, I dare swear for him, he
would, as submissively as any man, take a beating, if any
one would bestow the pains to give it him.

Arc.

Well, I am most strangely taken with the Mounsieur,
as I live; I’d give a hundred Pistols he were in love
with me: My Doctor tells me I am going into a Consumption;
but I dare swear his company but one two
moneths would cure me. O most incomparable Don
Quixot
! what faces and postures he has!

Per.

Prethee let us go, thou hast laugh’d enough; and
if thou hold’st thy humor any longer, thou wilt put me
into the same vein, and that will make me be look’d on
as a mad Widdow.

Arc.

The more mad, the more fashionable; as long as
thou art sure thy Husband is safe enough, for ever coming
back again to use thee worse by taking of it ill, thou
need’st not care,

H2 Per. H2v

Per.

What would I give now that my Year of Mourning
were as much worn out as my Melancholly?

Mor.

Have I not seen you before, Ladies?

Comes to them.

Arc.

That Question you must answer your self; examine
your memory, and give account to your knowledg:
But if you have seen me before, and have forgot me, I
shall take it inconceiveably ill, that you should have
turn’d me out of your head as long as the room was
empty.

Mor.

What fine expressions these Ladies have for any
thing they speak of, Graculus?

Aside to his man.

Grac.

O yes, my Lord, they are so us’d to good Language,
they can call you a Fool in a Complement, and
you shall never the wiser for it.

Mor.

Not the wiser for it, sayest thou?

Grac.

No, not one jot I’faith.

Arc.

Do you remember as yet?

Mor.

No, upon my Honor, I can’t call to mind neither
your face, nor hers in the Mask.

Arc.

Then your Lordship knows a face no better in a
Vizard, then out of it. Are you not acquainted with our
names neither?

Mor.

No, I swear upon the Title of a Lord: But pray
Ladies, do me that high favour to tell me what I may
call you.

Arc.

Why, we will give you leave to be our God-father;
call us what you please; but we dare not trust
you with our Names, you are so great a Gallant: Shall
we Perilla?

Mor.

What is she my dearly beloved Mistris Perilla?

Arc.

I thought as much; no sooner know her name,
but taking away her reputation: You are gotten into the
perfect Road of the Town I see.

Per.

I am Perilla, since I am discover’d, but not your
Mistris.

Mor. H3r

Mor.

By my Honor, I’le swear before all the Judges in
the Kingdome, you are, and shall be.

Per.

What, whether I will or no? Pray how many
Mistrisses more has your deserving Lordship?

Mor.

Not one more in the world.

Per.

Not in possession, but in report; for a right Gallant
never keeps account in that kind upon truth, but as
his humor serves him for boasting, and his memory to
repeat over a good long Catalogue of Ladies names.

Arc.

Be sure to reckon, my Lord, that none of the rest
of the Modes of the Town may give in a larger Bill of
Ladies favors; for if you do, you are lost if you think of
Marriage with her; for she has sworn whosoever she
makes her Husband, shall have bin as much, if not more,
the Favorite of her Sex, then any.

Mor.

Why, I can be as much as the best then in their
esteem.

Arc.

Can be? that’s not enough, there’s no glory to
be had in that by talking upon supposition: You must say
you have bin.

Per.

Well, you will not confess then how many Mistrisses
you have had, my Lord?

Mor.

If you examine me upon Oath, I must; for my
Conscience is very tender.

Per.

Upon Oath? you may be confident I do.

Mor.

Why then truly I must needs say, I have had
all the Ladies almost in the Suburbs, and City, from the
Bib to the Furr’d Gown, lay aside all thoughts of their
Honor and Virtue for my sake.

Per.

Well, your Lordship has gained much upon my
affection, by this acknowledgment of the general favor
you have had amongst us: I’le have your Mistrisses poll’d,
and if no young Blade bring me a larger Bill of Fare out
of the Country, ’tis ten to one but you shall know my
mind in a week or two.

Enter H3v Enter Peregrine and Lucidore.

Per.

That’s the Widdow I told thee of; Moriphanus
is her Servant.

Luc.

He shall be hang’d before he shall have her; I
could almost love her enough to Marry her my self.

Per.

Nay, she’s very rich too.

Luc.

Double temptations! I am resolv’d I’le get acquainted
with her; and if she and I can agree, ’tis odds
but I shall have a fling at Matrimony before I die.

Per.

Well, Arcasia, let us leave the Garden now, the
Air is sharp, and if I stay longer, I am afraid my Love
will catch cold.

Arc.

What, when the Fire’s by?

Mor.

It cannot indeed, Madam; if you mean me, I’le
stay as long as you please.

Per.

I wont venture it longer; I find it not well already.

Exeunt omnes, præter Lucid. and Peregrine.

Luc.

Come, Peregrine, let us follow that day-star.

Exeunt. Scene changes to Marseills.

Scene 4.

Enter Du-Prette and 3 Villains.

Du-Pr.

I am mad that Philampras is not to be found.

1 Vill.

Why, you know it was not to be done till to
morrow.

Du-Pr.

That’s true; but the wind may serve before
that time, and then he’s gone: Now we may be sure of
him; he must come this way from the place he sups.――
Be sure that you dispatch him.

2 Vill.

Fear not; we’ll make him safe enough for ever
rising in judgment against you in this world, what e’re he
does in the next.

Enter Lotharicus, and two lighting
him with Torches.

Du-Pr.

Here he comes.

The H4r The Villains assault him, and the men with Torches
run away: Lotharicus draws to defend
himself.

Loth.

I would willingly die, but not by the hands of
Villains.

He fights bravely, kills one of the Villains; they wound
him in many places, and he falls.

3 Vill.

He’s gone to Heaven or Hell, and has took one
of us with him for his Attendance.

Du-Pr.

Are you sure he’s dead?

3.Vill.

I, sure enough, unless he has more lives then
one.

Du-Pr.

For fear he should not, I’le give him my last
blessing.

1 Vill.

Hold; he’s dead I’le warrant Pulls out a Pistol.
you; and the noise of that going off, will bring in company,
and betray us: If you are not satisfied, we’ll open
two or three Casements more to let his Soul pass out by;
but ’tis unnecessary.

Hark; I hear a noise; let’s They go back to wound him
again, and hear a noise.

fly; we shall be taken.

3 Vill.

What shall we do with our dead companion?

1 Vill.

Leave him, he is not known here.

Exeunt omnes. Enter Meraspas and Philampras, and two other
men with Torches.

Phil.

Pray let us make all the hast we can: I have bin
all this Evening to find you or your Lord out.

Meras.

Had not your business bin of such high importance
to my Lord, as you say, I would have borrow’d an
hours time longer to have drank with my friends here.

1 Man.

Another time will do as well: we will go with
you as far as the house, and there take our leaves; to
morrow we’ll meet again.

Meras.

I wonder what it is a clock?

Phil. H4v

Phil.

Between eleven and twelve.

2 Man.

What’s that lies yonder?

1 Man steps forth.

1 Man.

Ha! a Gentleman kill’d.

Meras.

Heaven bless my Lord. Goes to him and looks.
O, it is my Lord! It is my Lord that’s murthered! Oh
cursed Villains that have done this, and cursed I that was
not with him to have hope to defend his life, or lost my
own in endeavouring of it! What shall I do?

2 Man.

There is no remedy now, poor Gentleman.

Meras.

Pray help me take up his Body, and carry it
home.

Exeunt with Body of Lotharicus. Scene changes to a Garden.

Scene 5.

Enter Calinda and Ericina.

Eric.

Are you resolv’d still to give up your self to so
much sadness? Is it so great a wonder to find men false,
that you no better are prepar’d, from reasonable expectation,
to meet this change and common trouble?

Cal.

It is true, Ericina, our afflictions do usually receive
abatement from not being single Sufferers; but love
admits not of allays, like other ills; nor is that humor
(in my mind) so generally to be boasted of: Besides,
Love, when it first takes possession of our hearts, deprives
us of our Reason; and that’s the chief resisting
strength, by which we opposition make against all other
accidents of Fortunes malice.

Eric.

I cannot think a Passion by Gods and Men so Deified,
can carry in it so much destructive danger; for if it
robs our Souls of Reason, it makes us like to Beasts:
And certainly Heaven ne’re design’d that Metamorphosis,
from whence we have receiv’d the highest proof of that
All-conquering Passion: Besides, some with their Reason
make their Choice, and what it does approve, it may subsistI1r
subsist with, or banish it, if it too far intrude: That
Reason is very weak and sluggissh, that suffers any Passion
to grow so strong as to supplant it.

Cal.

I do not wish thee so much ill as ’tis unhappily to
Love, or else I should be glad to see how you would rule
your inclinations, which I confess you mannage well in
supposition.

――Would mine were governed by fancy too;

I, Player-like, could raign as well as you.

We can, unmov’d, hear others sufferings tell,

Which, if our own, we should not bear it well.

Eric.

You can no trouble have but what is mine;

My love does make my share as great as thine.

Unkind Calinda, what is’t you intend?

To punish your false Lover in your Friend

Can his inconstancy make you despise,

That friendship which you once so much did prize?

If you so great injustice will allow,

Ne’re censure him; he did not break his Vow:

And who the self-same Errors will commit,

In prudence ought in others pardon it.

Cal.

You of injustice talk, whilst only I

Find from you both so much you fain would die.

Friendship and Love to me are cruel grown;

I wish to Heav’n that I had neither known.

Were yours true, you would not mine suspect,

Our doubt grows strongest from our own defect.

You on my Love a blemish fain would throw,

That in your change you might less guilty show.

Those that are wise do setting Suns forsake,

And with the rising ones their friendships make.

You know who ’tis has set his heart on fire;

Improve your int’rest e’re the flame expire.

I Love I1v

Love that plays Truant once without a cause,

Will still an Out-law be to Honor’s Laws:

And days, whose mornings do appear most bright,

Are often over-cast before ’tis night.

If she his seeming passion entertain,

His half-made vows will cost his eyes some rain.

Eric.

She cannot greater show’rs for Love let fall,

Then I shall do for friendships Funeral.

Calinda, by my death you soon will know,

Whither to that I have bin true or no:

Then I am sure that you will grow more just,

And shed some tears for your unkind mistrust.

Cal.

If that can cure thy griefs my doubts have bred,

I’le make my eyes another Deluge shed,

Dear Ericina, can y’a pardon give,

To an offence makes me unfit to live?

Eric.

I can forgive much more then you can do:

Love, in that kind, ne’re yet a limit knew.

Cal.

I grieve to think I should a debt contract,

Of which I cannot pay the Int’rest back.

Eric.

And I am sad to see your heart possest

Still with that Love, which gives your thoughts no rest.

Cal.

Thy charming voice would make them calmer grow.

Eric.

I’d sing, and ne’re give off, if I thought so.

Cal.

Sing then that Song my humor suits and mind,

I’le sit down here, if thou wilt be so kind.

She sits down, and leans melancholly
upon her arm.

Ericinia[Speaker label not present in original source]

Song.

1

Eric.

Oh, you powerful Gods, if I must be,

An injur’d Off’ring to Love’s Deity,

Grant my revenge, this Plague on men,

That Women ne’re may love agen:

Then I2r

Then I’le with joy submit unto my Fate,

Which by your Justice gives their Empire date.

2

Depose that proud insulting Boy,

Who most is pleas’d when he can most destroy:

O! let the World no longer govern’d be,

By such a Blind and Childish Deity;

For if you Gods be in your Power severe,

We shall adore you not from love, but fear.

3

But if you’l his Divinity maintain

O’re men, false men, confine his rost’ring raign:

And when their Hearts Love’s greatest torments prove,

Let that not pity; but our laughter move.

Thus scorn’d and lost to all their wishes aim,

Let Rage, Despair, and Death, then end their flame.

’Tis very late, my dear Calinda, and we had best be gone.

Cal.

It may be so, for time does slowly pass,

That runs by high Afflictions Hour-glass.

Exeunt.

Scene 6.

Enter Euryalus reading a Letter.

Eur.

If thou had’st such reason for thy change, I do not
blame thee then, Marcelia; I would I had receiv’d thy
Letter sooner, e’re Lotharicus and I had parted, I would
have justified thou Nobly did’st to slight him, and entertain
the Kings Address, since he so basely left thee for another;
nor shall he scape the punishment of his Perjuries,
for I will follow him to give him death.

Enter Du-Prette, and two Villains fighting.

1 Vill.

Did’st thou think to make us do thy work, and
cheat us of our wages? we pursu’d thee hither to Lyons
to give thee death for thy deceit.

They wound him, he falls. I2 Enter I2v Enter Euryalus passing, and two Footmen.

Du-Pr.

Oh Lotharicus, Lotharicus! thy murder is reveng’d.
Oh Heaven! how constantly you still pursue.

Eur.

Ha! what art thou that talk’st of Lotharicus
murder? Tell me, or I will take that remnant of thy
life away, and by thy words, hast that black guilt upon
it? Speak quickly.

Du-Pr.

Sir, ’tis not the threat of Death can force me to
confess, since I shall make my life, by doing it, a forfeiture
to Justice: But from repentance and remorse I tell――
my name’s Du-Prette, and I know you to be my Lord Euryalus:
I’le say no more whilst Witnesses are by; now
take my life, and if you think it fit; or if you let me longer
live, I will inform you all I know; that which shall
give your Courage and your Sword new edge, and Noble
work.

Eur.

Help carry him off.

The footmen take him up.

Look that thou do it, as promis’d, then discover;

I’le spare one Villain to betray another.

Exeunt. Scene changes.

Scene 7.

Enter Lucidore and Peregrine.

Luc.

That little Trumpeter, Cupid; has so perpetually
sounded in my thoughts the Widdows Perfections; her
Wit, her Beauty, and her Wealth, as he has caus’d an
uproar in my heart, and some of my own Subjects has
listed themselves Souldiers under her Command.

Per.

Which prethee are turn’d Rebels?

Luc.

My Will, my Inclinations, my Covetousness, and
my Vanity, to take her from the rest of my Servants; and
they so stoutly fight my former resolutions, and my reason,
that, hang me, I believe they’l get the day, and tumble
me head long into a Married Life, and make me grow grey,I3r
grey, and grave, with a Whither-go-ye, squalling Kitlings,
and Curtain Lectures.

Per.

Certainly thou art a strange lover of Hell, that
thou wilt be running into it before thy time.

Luc.

No, you mistake; Marriage is a preparative for
another place, both by the mortification of it, and the
honesty.

Enter Moriphanus, Graculus, and Footmen.

Per.

Your Rival has bin to see the Widdow.

Luc.

I’le Rival his Coxcomb if he comes any more
there. Do you hear Sir? Turns to Moriphanus.
I am inform’d you are the Widdow Perilla’s servant.

Mor.

I scorn your words; I her servant! I’d have you
to know I think to make her my Wife, and she thinks to
make me her Husband. I her servant!

Luc.

Well, whatsoe’re she thinks, you had best think
of her no more, or win her now by your Sword.

Mor.

Win her? did not I tell you just now, I have
won her already? and I am not such a Fool to fight for
any thing that’s my own: Stake another Lady to her, and
have at you who shall have both.

Luc.

But then you shall fight.

Mor.

Shall fight?

Luc.

I, shall fight, or be beaten.

Mor.

Oh, I thought you had bin a man of that Authority,
to have made me fight whither I would or no. I tell
you then, Sir, I love her so well, I’d sooner be beaten for
her sake, then fight for any woman in the world besides.

Per.

This is a rare Coward; we’ll have excellent sport
with him.

Luc.

Why, you may take your own Election, either
fight, be beaten, or forbear coming there.

Mor.

Well, Sir, since I may take my own choice, I’le
take time to consider of it; I won’t resolve on any thing
too hastily.

Grac. I3v

Grac.

My Lord, you know your own certain mind already,
and had as good tell it before you go.

Moriphanus offers to go off, and Lucidore
takes him by the sleeve.

Luc.

Nay, you are not like to stir till you have, Sir.

Mor.

Why, Sir, then I will, because I don’t much
care if I do.

Studies.

And now, Sir, I have consider’d of it, I’le neither fight
nor be beaten for any woman, as long as there’s God’s
plenty of them in the world. Here’s a quarter and a do
about a woman indeed!

Luc.

Why then you’l come no more there?

Mor.

No that I won’t: But what if she comes to me?
I warrant you’l go and challenge her too, and fight with
her: you think she’s to be won by fighting; but, alas,
you are deceiv’d, she is not to be won by the Blade;
there’s a Bill in the case which you know not of, which
will prevail before the Sword.

Luc.

But it shan’t be long before I know the Bill, and
the business.

Mor.

But what if I will not tell you? am I bound to
tell you all I know.

Luc.

No, not if you’l fight; but you must otherwise,
I tell you that.

Mor.

You should not need to press me thus to fight,
had I not made a vow, the last man I kill’d in seven years,
never to answer nor make a challenge to any man living:
no, you should have no cause to call upon me twice.

Grac.

To run away.

Aside.

Mor.

You’d find I would not be abus’d. O that the
time were expir’d: you put me into such a rage, that my
passion must vent it self some way. Falls a crying, and turns to Grac.
Graculus, did’st never hear that fighting was Physical?

Grac. I4r

Grac.

Not I, upon my life, my Lord.

Mor.

Why then, if thou dar’st take my word for it, it is.

Grac.

But Sir, what makes you weep?

Mor.

My vow, Graculus, my vow!

Wipes his eyes.

Per.

Your pretence of a vow, is but an excuse for your
Cowardice.

Grac.

Why, in troth, my Lord, if I were as you, I
would fight, and for once break a vow made in cold blood,
now your courage is so spur’d and chaf’d with these quarrelling
Lords.

Mor.

Let me see, let me see. Hum; no way Studies.
left to break this rotten Engagement, and fight?

Grac.

Yes, my Lord, you may easily break it where
’tis rotten.

Luc.

If you can find none in your Conscience, send but
for half a dozen Advocates, give ’em double fees, and
they’l find you one in theirs, and a point in Law to make
it good.

Mor.

If it can be done by them; I’le make my own
Conscience do’t as well, and save me that charges: And
suppose I am resolv’d to fight, there’s more to be consider’d
of then just that; there’s time, weapon, and place.

Per.

That you shall have the liberty to Elect.

Mor.

Well then, let me consider; as to the time I can’t
do it this seven years, I am sure, I have business for every
particular day; and if I appoint ten or twenty years
hence, and am call’d to take my place of Honor in the
other world before, then you’l say, I am not a man of my
word; a Knave, a Cheat, a Rascal, or some such thing:
Therefore it shall be a Duel in the other world.

Grac.

O brave, my Lord, that will do rarely: But who
shall be your Seconds?

Mor.

Hold thy prating: I’le nominate my self who
shall be both our Seconds: He shall have Alexander the Great, I4v
Great
, and the Maid of Orleance, and I’le have Sampson,
and William the Conquerour.

Grac.

I, my Lord, do so; stand to your hold; for you
may lend Sampson, if you list, one of your Jaw-bones,
and then he shall fight with Alexander the Great.

Luc.

If you will fight, or dare fight, fight now for
your Mistris: we’ll find another quarrel to exercise your
courage in th’other world.

Mor.

I tell you I will not fight a stroak till the time
appointed; so I may have some cowardly dog-trick or other
put upon me: I’le have all that ever liv’d from the
Creation, to that day, stand by when I Duel, to see that
there is fair play. And so no more of that: I’m in great
hast, and must leave your angry Honors.

Luc.

Hold, hold.

Mor.

I’le neither hold, nor stay: I am going to the
Cutlers to bespeak weapons against the time appointed;
and d’ye hear, be sure you meet me there.

Exeunt.

Scene 8.

Enter Melynet reading a Letter.

Mel.

Lotharicus dead! thou hast bravely done,

And justly the reward of Death hast won;

Which thou shalt have; but e’re thou com’st at it,

Thou must another Tragedy commit.

My Fortune now is almost made secure,

There is but one blow more it can endure:

Euryalus, thou must not live to be

And interposing Cloud ’twixt that and me:

For e’re my greatness shall be so withstood,

I’le make my passage through a Sea of Blood.

My Soul is with too towring hopes possest:

To be by thoughts of Conscience now supprest:

Nor shall Euryalus prolong the date,

Which I have given for his dying Fate.

Exit.
Scene 9. K1r

Scene 9.

Enter Euryalus in disguize; and Desha.

Eur.

Pray go tell your Lady here is a Gentleman has
business of importance with her, and desires to tell it
her in private.

Desh.

I shall acquaint her, Sir.

Exit Desha.

Eur.

All things are in this Kingdome as plentiful and

prosperous, as if that none but Saints inhabited it,

But surely Sin’s infection is grown high,

When Monarchs once their Souls with Murders Dye:

For they are Suns on which the Subjects gaze,

To gather rules for mannaging their ways.

How strictly then are they to Virtue ty’d,

Who, by Example, are a Nations Guide?

Enter Marcelia.

Marc.

Oh, my dear Brother! dear Euryalus, how――
He
puts her back.

Eur.

Thou’rt grown unworthy of such kindness now.

It is not love has brought me back, but hate.

Marc.

Oh Heaven, what have I done to make you say’t!

Eur.

What have you not, could base and barb’rous be?

Murder Lotharicus, dishonour me.

Marc.

I kill Lotharicus! Heaven knows that I,

False as he is, to save his life would die.

For worlds I would not live that grief to know.

Eur.

What Devil helps thee to dissemble so?

Has that black Favorite of Hell’s design,

Taught thee this virtue with the rest to joyn?

Was’t not enough you did his life betray,

To serve your pride made that be took away;

But with your curs’d malicious blasting breath,

Strive, in his Fame, to give him second death?

Or, did your Soul such sharp reprovements give

To your false heart, that fear’d to let him live?

K Could K1v

Could bubling Greatness thy ambition swell

To such a height, to send thee Post to Hell.

Marc.

I have no guilt, I hope, can bring me there,

But in my Grave you’l throw me by dispair;

For nothing’s left to make me wish to stay,

If my Lotharicus be took away.

Where he in ashes is, I’d rather be,

Then here possess the whole worlds Monarchy.

Thy deadliest stroak thou now hast given, Fate;

Marcelia’s strength cannot support the weight.

In life I nothing now but horrors see,

Since earth is rob’d (Lotharicus) of thee.

All it possess’d of great and brave, now lies

Gluttonous Death, thy malice Sacrifice:

Since thou his Noble life refus’d to spare,

No longer this unhappy one forbear.

I court thy cold imbraces to this breast,

For till my soul’s with his, I ne’re shall rest:

And sure it can’t be long before it be,

Since grief and love both strive to set it free.

Eur.

What’s this I see? certain I’m in a dream;

Falshood cannot pretend such high extream.

Marcelia, what to judge I do not know,

Since for his death you so much passion show.

Marc.

Judge what you will, my Innocence you’l prove,

By that which quickly will your doubts remove.

Eur.

Then ’tis that dev’lish Melynet has laid

That plot, which both his Love and Life betraid.

Treacherous Serpent! Monster of Mankind!

How could thy Noble Blood such tincture find?

Or thy false Soul permit thee to divide,

Two hearts which thou did’st find so strongly ty’d?

For he did for thy change such trouble show,

As nothing but the highest flame could know:

His K2r

His daily wishes were, he might expire,

Because he had out-liv’d Marcelia’s fire.

Points to her head.

Marc.

Add, add no more, least reason quit this place,

And after that, then this be left by Grace.

Her heart.

I am a Mortal, and no more can show

Of power, in my passions overthrow.

Eur.

To raise thy miseries I do not design,

But I would have thee th’top of Honor climb:

Refuse the King, then do thy Honor right,

To shew that greatness dazles not thy sight;

For his consent was given to the fact;

And marrying him thou wilt his guilt contract.

Marc.

I’le sooner be to a dead body joyn’d,

Then ever in his guilty Arms confin’d:

No, no, Euryalus, his Crown can’t take,

That Love away, his Virtues could not shake:

From one revenge I gave him my consent,

And from this second I’le his hopes prevent.

Eur.

Dear, dear Marcelia, my most Noble part,

Thou mak’st me jealous of thy generous heart.

Lotharicus will surely in his Grave,

Rejoyce to see thou art so true and brave.

For Melynet, wh’has rais’d him self so great,

By strangling Virtue in it’s proper Seat;

I’le trust this Arm to find me out the way,

The price of Murder in his heart to pay.

The King is by that awful name secure;

Subjects are bound what they do to endure.

Heav’n reserves it self the punishing them:

They are not here to give account to men.

Who strikes at them, Divinity gives a blow;

Whose Vice-Roys Monarchs all are here below.

Exeunt.

The End of the Fourth Act.

K2 Act V. K2v

Act V. Scene 1.

Enter Moriphanus and Graculus.

Mor.

A very likely matter indeed, that she should refuse
to marry me because I would not fight for her: No,
no, she is not so ungodly, and loves me better then to
desire I should venture my life: Besides, I never told her,
or said such a word, that I would kill my self for her, or
kill any man for her, nor go to the Devil for her; and
thou mayst be sure she does not look that I should do
more then my bargain.

Grac.

Why, my Lord, are you so ignorant, I mean unknowing,
to set any bounds to your promise to a Mistris?
Why, you should run full speed unto all you thought
she would have, or could possibly desire, to make her
think you were one mad, and dying for her; and when
y’ have won her, and are married, then you may do as
most married men does, pace them in the performance, or
quite bed-rid them; or if you will keep in the rank of
the best Husbands, why then you must make your Wife
Parson of your Courtings, Vows, and Promises, and give
her the Tyths; for when they have run out of their wits
so far, that it cannot keep’em from going to Service, ’tis
fit they know they have a Master.

Enter Perilla and Arcasia.

Per.

Your Servant, my Lord.

Mor.

No, Madam, I am not so happy to have it so yet.
Was not that well answer’d, Graculus?

To his man.

Grac.

It was answer’d like you self, my Lord.

Per.

Do you observe, Arcasia? The veriest Fool that
is, can expect Government if he marries.

Arc. K3r

Arc.

And well they may: It is but reasonable, that
those Fools that can get into that Authority, should govern
those Fools that gave it: Don’t you think it fit in
judgment, that the least Fool should rule the greater?

Per.

I’le not speak my Opinion to the prejudice of my
intention. But, my Lord, pray what gives me the honor
of this early visit? for I had hardly din’d when you
came.

Mor.

I’le tell you a thing, but I would not have you
trouble your self about it.

Per.

Truly, that high affliction that put me into this
habit, was so great, that it must be something extraordinary
can move me now to any sense of sorrow.―― But let
me know it.

Mor.

I am very much afraid this will; and for all I
came on purpose to tell it you, and ’tis very fit you
should know it, yet you shall not know it, unless you
swear, and give me your hand, you will not grieve about
it.

Per.

I cannot promise you it shall not trouble my heart,
if it should concern you; but I will not make the least
sign of it.

Mor.

Why that’s it now; it does concern me.

Per.

Well, if it does concern you never so much, I
will keep my word, since you have ingag’d me.

Mor.

Then to tell you the truth, the short and the long
is, it was ten thousand to one you had never seen me again:
I was set upon, and like to bin kill’d about you; my
Man can tell here; I brought him on purpose to justifie it,
if you should not believe it.

Perilla and Arcasia laugh.

Per.

In troth I cannot but be extremely merry to hear
the danger is over. Lord, I do but think what a pickle I
should have bin in, if I had known it when it was, by the
joy I find now for the escape.

Grac. K3v

Grac.

He was in a pickle enough for himself and you
too, I’le swear for him, Madam: the thoughts of never
seeing you again wrought strangely upon him, to my
knowledge, in that little time; that fear made him go
lighter from the Gentlemen in personal weight, then he
met them.

They laugh extremely.

Arc.

It seems there was very fowl play; two against one.

Per.

Pray, my Lord, who were those Cowards?

Mor.

My Lord Lucidore, and Peregrine.

Per.

’Tis one of the humors; I ever knew, to forbid other
Suitors, and not offer to come a woing himself.

aside.

Mor.

Nay, I shall always be in danger of my life till
we are married; every one will have a fling at it, thinking
you love me best.

Per.

Alas, my Lord, I would not marry you now you
have told me this, for all the world: for hitherto they
have only intended to kill you, because as yet you have
only intended to marry: but if you should marry in earnest,
they’l kill you so too, for they’l grow desperate when
they’re out of all hopes: So I see plainly I shall be a Widdow
presently; my Vail will be no sooner off, but on again;
and to loose you so soon, would quite break my
heart.

Mor.

Truly I believe it would; for the thoughts of
it almost breaks mine already.

Per.

Nay, now I think of it, it was told for certain by
my Nativity, that my second Husband should be kill’d.

Mor.

But are you to have no more?

Per.

O, yes, yes!

Mor.

Why then I’le be the third; I’le tarry with all
my heart for you, till the danger be over, that is to come
upon the second.

Per.

There’s a far worse, and more un-gentleman-like
death threatens my third and fourth, then all the rest; for
the one will be hang’d, and the other――

Mor. K4r

Mor.

What will become of him?

Per.

Why, without any ceremony, he is to hang himself.

Mor.

I had rather be him then any of the others, because
I know mine own natural aversion against death, and
should have this comfort, at least, that I should not be
forc’d to die against my mind, as long as I was to be my
own Executioner.

Arc.

That’s a thing indeed, my Lord, would make
the danger much less; but if I may advise you, run not
the hazard, you know not what a good Wife may tempt
you to.

Per.

I am resolv’d, I love him so well, he shall never
while I live get my consent, to put him into the danger
of it, nor my self into the possibility of so much grief.

Mor.

Well, meer love of one another I see makes us
both resolve never to marry together: Now there’s not
one of a hundred does so I believe:―― Exeunt Perilla
and Arcasia.

For all that, Graculus, I shall never put
her out of my mind.

Grac.

No, my Lord, if you stay here; no man can forget
a dead Wife but by change of Air; therefore you
must needs go and travel, to get you a fresh appetite to a
new affection.

Mor.

Will that do it, Graculus?

Grac.

I marry will it Sir, I warrant you; ’tis a receipt
Probatum.――

Exeunt.

Scene 2.

Enter Almeric and Lucidore.

Alm.

’Tis true as I tell thee; Peregrine is taken with
Arcasia, and has made an invitation to thy Widdow,
and her, to the Gardens; he intends to give them an entertainment
there.

Luc. K4v

Luc.

Prethee let us be his unbidden Guests for once,
we’ll not be in his debt, I am resolv’d I will send in my
dish.

Alm.

A match, a match.

Exeunt.

Scene 3.

Enter King and Melynet.

Mel.

Lotharicus death, Sir, gives an absolute security
to your love.――

King.

It does inlarge my hopes of having now the full
possession of Marcelia’s heart; but still a gallant man
must be lamented; I, and my Kingdome both, may justly
mourn his death.

Mel.

No doubt, Sir, he does deserve it; and did not
your Majesties concern ballance my sorrow, the loss of
such a friend would cause much greater trouble in my
Soul. But all things, Sir, does and shall still give place
unto my duty.

King.

I doubt thee not in any thing, my Melynet. But
does Marcelia know yet of Lotharicus death?

Mel.

No, Sir; but intend she shall.

King.

Prethee do; for I shall long to know how she
does take it. ’Tis natural in Lovers to be curious in the
search of that which gives them the highest troubles:
and when there is a real wanting cause, our jealousies do
commonly create us some suppositions; and mine does
strongly work in doubts, for all her seeming kindnesses
and promises, they’re all but empty nothings to that passion
her heart once had; and I fear still conceals for dead
Lotharicus.

Mel.

I cannot think it Sir: but I will soon inform my
self, and give your Majesty satisfaction.

Exeunt.
Scene 4. L1r

Scene 4.

Enter Peregrine, Perilla, and Arcasia, in a
Garden. A table set out with several Meats and
Wine: with Attendance.

Pereg.

I could wish I had given my Lord Lucidore an
invitation.

Peril.

I wish you had, for he is most excellent company.

Per.

And much your servant, I am sure, Madam; he is
one of your secret Lovers that has not yet made discovery
of his flame; but it will not be long before the fire
break out, I am confident.

Arc.

I do not think he is constant enough, to think
and say all at one time, he loves.

Peril.

Indeed, he does not seem to be of a humor, that
his heart should be in any danger of ever being made a
womans prisoner.

Per.

Would he were here to answer for himself: I
could find of my heart to send one of my Boys to find
him out.

Arc.

You’l put him upon 24 hours search then:
When he goes out in a morning, by report, he is commonly
lost all that day to any Enquirers. But perhaps his usual
curiosity of seeing the Beauties, may bring him hither
anone.

Peril.

Why, does he take such pains to be rid of his liberty,
to come here to seek for a Conqueror?

Pereg.

No, Madam; it was his Opinion of his own
invincible strength made him so bold to attempt the danger:
He us’d to swear, as long as Cupid was a Child, he
fear’d him not; he had not so poor a spirit to be worsted
by a Boy: If he liv’d so long till he came to be a man,
which he had bin these two thousand years a coming to, L and L1v
and not one jot the forwarder yet, he would then stand
upon his guard against him.

Enter Musick.

Mus.

My Lord Lucidore sent us hither to give your
Lordship a new Lesson.

Per.

I thank him: I wish his Lordship had come himself
too.

They all laugh. The Musick (espying the Boys coming at the other
end of the Stage with a dish) begin to play.

Boy.

’Tis very hot, it burns my fingers; and ’tis very
heavy too: we’ll set it down and dance a little frisk.

They dance. Enter a Mercury with a great Chafin-dish of Coals;
reaches up the dish, sets it thereon.

Mercury.

Why, what have you done Boys? the dish is
quite cold: you forget you carry’d your Lords Love,
which is a Native of Freezland.

Boy.

Why, can it be cold already?

Merc.

Cold already? I, hot and cold, and cold and
hot, a hundred times over, to a hundred several Ladies.

Takes up Coals, and blows under it.

Boy.

Pray stay a little, and we’ll go fetch some Bellows,
and make it boil.

Merc.

Be quick.

Exeunt Boys. Enter presently again with two more Boys, each
with Bellows. They dance with Mercury in the
middle, with the dish and fire in his hand, every
one by turns blowing under the Dish: The
dance ended, Exeunt Boys. Mercury comes up
with the dish to the Table.

Merc.

My Lord Lucidore presents this to you, Madam.

Exit. Perilla opens the dish, there is the form of a Hart made
with wings; in it a Copy of verses directed to the
Incomparable Widow.
They all laugh extremely. Pereg. L2r

Pereg.

What is in it, Madam?

Peril.

Nothing but a copy of Verses.

Arc.

But I am much taken with the Case they came
in; I have a great conceit all mens hearts are thus provided,
they are so soon here, and there, and every where.

Pereg.

All mens are not, Madam; some are fix’d.

Arc.

That is then where the Ladies get to them by
some more then common device, and clip their wings.
But Perilla, the Verses; we will participate as far forth
as the hearing the Courtship.

Perilla reads the Verses.

Perilla[Speaker label not present in original source]

Perilla.

Widdow, Faith I will tell thee true.

My heart’s inflam’d, and ’tis by you:

But my passion will decay,

If you make too long delay.

Flames that with most vigor burn,

Soonest into ashes turn:

Then resolve, and quickly too,

Shall I stay, or bid adieu?

Foolish Lovers that do place

All their pleasures in one face;

Let them for favors long expect,

I soon will have, or soon neglect:

This is not common Courtships way,

But since I lov’d you, ’tis a day:

And if you cannot pay the score,

Y’are poor, and I will trust no more.

I’ve ways my flawed-reproduction2 words to undo,

Without the help of lending you:

I can both drink, and game, and swear,

Does this not tempt you? tell me fair.

Yet I’l a kinder Husband be,

Than those that sin more secretly.

But if you proudly now deny

To love me, Faith I will not dy.

L2 Enter L2v Enter Lucidore with Three Trumpeters, Almeric standing
at a distance as not to be seen.

Luc.

Sound a Charge.

Trumpeters sound.

Perilla.

Why you make Love in open court, my Lord.

Luc.

I do so, Madam, to prevent the scandal of the
world, which would go near else to say, I stole your consent,
if you and I should marry.

Perilla.

But why did you make your Trumpeters sound
a Charge?

Luc.

It is the assault of my Love against your Liberty,
unless you will come presently to parly, and give me some
hopes of an honorable peace betwixt us: nay, I have began
my war in perfect form, I have sent two or three Heralds
to proclaim it in the Market-place.

Perilla.

Yet, for all that; you have not done like a fair
Enemy, to surprize me without any knowledg of such an
intention.

Luc.

All stratagems are allow’d of, Madam. Could
you expect I would give you notice to fortifie your self against
my siege? Faith I’ad bin an ignorant Souldier then
indeed.

Arc.

No, my Lord, she could not in justice; for if you
had, she would have so strengthen’d her self with an Army
of Reasons of her own and from her Friends, that her
heart would have prov’d another Candy, impregnable.

Per.

And quite tire out the Turkish Emperors Constancy.

Luc.

But, I hope my fair Widow will not be so cruel
to wrack my expectations so long; for if she should, I
have no more to confess than I will confess now, that is,
that I love her infinitely, passionately, unexpressibly, as
much as ever any man did or will love any of the Sex: I do
indeed, Dear Widow! but now if you should heep me in
a great deal of pain by making a Chancery-suit of our Affections,fections, L3r
’tis ten to one but I shall rather deny all this truth
again, than endure such an endless torment.

Per.

Faith, Widow, you must now resolve: this new
fashion’d suiter will have his alms or his answer quickly.

Arc.

I, Madam, you must needs tell my Lord what
you’l do, you don’t know what an injury you may do him,
by keeping him long in suspense; for if his heart should
have taken post to any other place, how do you think his
body should know where to find it?

Perilla.

We’l petition the King to introduce here the
English Law, that is, if he loses it between sun and sun,
the County must make it good.

Per.

That is if it were stollen, Madam.

Perilla.

Well, if it has run away, or lost it self, then he
must have it cry’d.

Luc.

Never think of these ways to baffle me out of my
Heart, Madam, in plain terms you have stoln it; and if
you stir out of this Garden without restitution, or my
consent to keep it, hang me if I send not a Hue and Cry after
you.

Perilla.

It seems, my Lord, you are very sharp set to
my Estate; if you possest that, I believe you would easily
bequeath my person for a Legacy to my next Heir.

Luc.

Lord, Madam, that you should think so! As if a
Rich Mistris were to be prefer’d before a Mistris Rich. Do
you think I am so ill bred to displace your Title so, to put
money before it? No, it shall never take the precedency.
It is as much as I desire that I am certain it is one of your
attendants: for where Marriage is made, and that a servant
to neither party, there is always to be sure but beggarly
house keeping, and I love good company as my life.

Perilla.

Well, I will not injure my wit so much to take
seven years consideration to make up at last a bad bargain:
as if a great deal of time were requisite to undo ones self in,L3v
in, when a quarter of an hour will serve turn as well; and
precipitated indiscretions always will admit of more excuse,
than premeditated follies. This gives you my consent
so soon, my Lord.

Luc.

I care not from whence the line come; so long as
it draws to my Center: I’l accept it good or bad, according
to the old Rule of Marriage.

Perilla.

Well, once within this month we shall both
repent it, after the Parson has ty’d us together.

Luc.

If we do, and the worst come to the worst, ’tis
but one of us making a journey into the other world, and
unmarrying our selves: and when it comes, we’l have
fair play, draw who shall go.

Perilla.

A very just bargain.

Per.

Nothing will break your agreement then I see.

Luc.

But first we’l try to break each others heart.

Exeunt.

Scene 5.

Enter Lotharicus in a Disguise.

Loth.

It is some pleassure since I could not dy, at least
to think that I shall now revenge my wrongs my self, on
my intended Murtherer: and by giving him his merited
Death, punish the false Marcelia too.

And in the bud of her wish’d Queenships honor,

Nip her support, that treacherous Favorite from her.

She little thinks Lotharicus doth live,

So great a ruine to her hopes to give.

Here he must pass, and in this place I’l stay,

And make Death complement him in the way.

Enter Melynet with two boys, Lotharicus meets him.

Mel.

Boys, go where I bid you.――Ha! what’s that
comes there?

Loth.

An injur’d Lover brought by his despair.――
Lotharicus.

Mel. L4r

Mel.

That’s false I’m sure, I know thou sayst not true.

Loth.

His Ghostis rise to give thy crimes their due:
Villain! I live and with this sword will show,
In my revenge, whether’t be true or no:
I all my wrongs upon thy heart will write.

Mel.

No more of words, but let us to’t, and fight.

Boast not before we do the vict’ry try,

Perhaps it may prove your own lot to dy.

Loth.

I could have made my self of that secure,

But that my Courage Treach’ry can’t endure.

Mel.

I’l thank thy Courage and the debt will pay,

By taking thy unhappy life away.

Loth.

Fall on then.

They fight, Melynet
gives back.

――Ha! methinks you back do start,

As if my kindness touch’d you to the heart.

Mel.

What it has done I soon will make thee find:

What think you now Sir, are you paid in kind?

They
fight still.
Enter Valasco, Peregrine, they draw
and come between them.

Per.

Hold this is no good exercise.

Loth.

The best that can be, Sir, to us.

Per.

How, Lotharicus?

Loth.

The same, Sir.

Per.

What wonder’s this? and fighting with his so beloved
friend my Lord Melynet?

Loth.

The wonder is far greater that occasion’d it.

Val.

My Lord Melynet, I am glad we have prevented
the hazard of your life to farther Revenge.

Mel.

You have obstructed me in a Revenge,
Which I could curse you for:――for by preventing
Of his Death, I am undone.

aside.

Loth.

We’l not take our leaves one of another, we shall
have opportunity to meet in some other place.

Exeunt severally.
Scene L4v

Scene 36.

Enter King and Almeric.

King.

I have not seen Melynet to day: I wonder much
he is not come.

Alm.

Doubtless it will not be long before he does
attend your Majesty.

Enter Valasco.

King.

Have you not seen Melynet, my Lord?

Val.

Yes, and it please your Majesty: I came from
him: he is wounded.

King.

How? by what means?

Val.

My Lord Lotharicus is return’d in disguise, and has
set upon him as he was going to Marcelia.

King.

Thou dost mistake, Lotharicus is dead I’le assure
you.

Val.

And please your Majesty he has got such favor in
the other world to come and live again; for I am sure it
is not half an hour since Peregrine and I parted them.

King.

Are you sure ’tis he?

Val.

As sure as my name is Valasco.

King.

What should the meaning of this be? Go and
cause him to be brought before me; I’l hear the motion
of this bold attempt upon the life of Melynet my self. Are
his wounds dangerous?

Val.

No, Sir, very slight: they have both some little
hurt.

King.

Sure Lotharicus’s jealousie has caus’d this quarrel
with Melynet, because he knows I have a value for him,
and by that concludes that he has injur’d him to Marcelia.

Alm.

And please your Majesty, Love from so strong an
argument may be excus’d to grow suspicious.

Exeunt.

Scene 7.

Enter Marcelia meeting Euryalus.

Eur.

I am come to tell thee strange news, Marcelia;
Lotharicus is alive in the Town: he has wounded Melynet, andM1r
and is a Prisoner for it by the Kings command, and is to
be brought before him to the Court: the business is made
very foul, as if he had surpriz’d him cowardly.

Mar.

What a compound of joy and sorrow have you
given me? Poor Lotharicus! thou wilt find a cruel Judg:
I fear they must, by heightning thy guilt, help to abate their
own. I’l go to the Court my self and hear his sentence,
and share his sufferings, if my interest cannot take him off;
I’l try my power first, then show my resolution.

Eur.

Thou mak’st a generous and brave Resolve, we
both will go together: I’l there discover my self, and
help to justifie my Friend, and if there be occasion against
his guilty adversary: It will be time to go, Marcelia.

Marc.

My dear Lotharicus, thou now shalt find,

When most distrest, Marcelia is most kind.

Exeunt.

Scene 8.

Enter King, Melynet, and all the Lords, Guards
and Attendants.
King talks to Melinet.

King.

I am sorry having ever had so great an esteem of
Lotharicus, he should give me cause to condemn him for
his Rashness: but Reason is destroy’d in the wisest men,
when passion does command!――Bring in Lotharicus.

Enter Lotharicus with a Guard at one door, and
Euryalus and Marcelia at another.

King.

What makes me happy in thy presence now,
Marcelia?

Marc.

Though ’tis not fit Sir, Women hither come:
Yet I most humbly beg to hear his doom.

King.

Nothing’s unfit Marcelia does desire,

Or of her King, or Servant can require.

Loth.

There stands my torture, greater than I can

Receive from the command or power of man.

aside.

She comes to feast her pride onely to see

M How M1v

How much my Passion still does fetter me.

Inhuman Woman! lost to all that sense

Which thy soft Sex to suff’rers do dispense.

King.

What was the cause, Lotharicus, that arm’d your
malilce against the life of Melynet?

Loth.

My injuries, Sir.

King.

In your opinion. Were every man a fitting and
allow’d of Judg in’s own cause, we need not then have Ministers
of Justice.

Loth.

I question not the prudence of consider’d and allow’d
of Laws, Sir; though now I sought not their assistance.
But, Sir, in my own defence, I humbly do present
your Majesty this Paper, which renders me incapable
their benefit, and made me strive, by my own hand to
take what I can never expect to have by any other means.

King.

How have you forfeited your right in that kind,
more than your other fellow subjects?

Loth.

You’l in that Paper find, Sir.

The King reads and changes countenance,
grows into fury: turns to Melynet.

King.

Traytor! what hast thou done? is this thy hand?
is it? I know it is: wherewith th’hast set the seal of my
dishonor; charge me with the consent of Murther, and
mountain up my promises their recompence!―― Here,
Read it publickly; my brow wears not a guilt so dark to
keep it in obscurity, although I ow that intended kindness
to brave Lotharicus’s Loyalty.

Peregrine reads.

Per.

“‘Du-Prette, be sure and speedy in the death of Lotharicus,
the King is impatient till he hears it, he will double
thy rewards as I promised.’”

King.

There’s enough. Turns to Melynet.
How durst thou assume the injuring thy Soveraign so?
Though I Marcelia lov’d, I never did design to buy her favors
at the price of all my Honors. By noble ways I bid theeM2r
thee seek to gain me her affection, but not by guilt and
treacherous baseness, Villain. The share thy veins has
in her blood, gives thee thy life: but never after this day
see thy incensed Monarch’s face again! But how came
you by this Letter, Lotharicus?

Loth.

Sir, one Philampras, which was hir’d amongst
others, by Du-prette, Melynet’s man to assasin me understanding
by Du-prette’s Discourse that he had moneys in
his Portmantue, watch’d his opportunity to take it away;
and finding this Letter there, thought he should make more
advantage by that from my Reward, than his promis’d recompence
for my Murther: so left the money to prevent
Duprette’s sudden missing of his Paper; and coming with
my man to discover it, found me as they then supposed
kill’d; but after, on my Recovery, deliver’d it into my
hands.

King.

Oh! how seriously ought Princes first to weigh
the lives and souls of men, before they draw them to their
bosoms! for Favorites that are vitious, are the Cankers
of Kings Courts, and eat in their Soveraigns bosoms.

Mel.

Sir!――

King.

Hold, say no more, thy breath’s infectious grown

And on my Fame has Killing poyson thrown.

Guard, take him away.

Mel.

Vain joys of mortal Life! you fly so fast,

Man hardly knows you are, before y’ are past:

Yet we on you do our affections lay,

As if we here eternally should stay.

Honor, thou now dost give my soul a view

Of what I left when first I banish’d you.

O Virtue! how have I bin led astray,

From thy fair paths, into this Lab’rinth way?

I thought my Fortune on a Rock did stand,

But Guilts foundation still proves foolish sand.

M2 When M2v

When man by Crimes does plots for greatness lay,

Heav’n justly frowns and takes his hopes away.

But though my Life bears characters of shame:

My Death shall leave behind a better Fame.

They that won’t fall, must not on danger stand;

We carry not our Fates in our own hand.

Exit.

King.

Though Love, Lotharicus, did make me be

Thy Rival, I was ne’er thy Enemy:

At lest to take thy life by ways obscure,

My soul such abject thoughts scorn to endure.

To witness it, I this for thee will do:

Marcelia freely shall chuse me or you.

Loth.

Marcelia, Sir, cannot dispute the choice!

Against my self your Goodness has my voice.

And she long since has learn’d to be so wise,

To leave Lotharicus for such a prize.

Pardon me, Sir, that I am sad, that she

Found not such motives for her love in me.

Mar.

I never more desir’d than what in you

I did enjoy, when I believ’d you true:

But when by Melynet I was inform’d,

I and my love was for Arcasia scorn’d:

I then such Reason had to entertain

So great a Monarch, and so high a Flame:

That all I for his Passion since I did do,

Can no condemning censure find for you:

Honor and Virtue still have bin my guid,

My Life has strictly to their Rules bin ty’d.

Loth.

Since Melynet made me so false appear,

You need not more your actions for to clear:

But still as they justly more splendid grow,

My heart does more despairing sorrow know.

King.

Which of us two, Madam, shall happy be?

Mar.

Heav’n leaves me not to an Election free. Both M3r

Both so deserve, Sir, that if I should chuse,

I’d be unjust to him I did refuse.

Oh Gods! what punishment do you design

Marcelia, that neither must be mine!

Love will not let me my Lotharicus leave,

Nor Honor won’t permit I him receive.

The King whispers to Peregrine. Exit Pereg.

King.

To shew that I will still be here within, points
to his brest.

What I am by my birth, my passions King:

My Empire there, by Reasons power maintain,

As well as to my Crown, new Crowns to gain:

I out of Honor will this Justice do,

Against my Love, Marcelia give to you:

Thou art already of her Heart possest;

And with her Person now I’l make thee blest.

Loth.

Sir,――

King.

No more oppose thy bliss with gen’rous strife,

May you be happy in each others life:

My heart to my Calinda I’l restore,

Whose due it was by faith and love before.

Marcelia and Lotharicus kneel.

Loth.

May Fortune showr such Blessings on your head,

That over all the World your power be spread;

That every Monarch that enjoys a Throne,

May that possession from your bounty own.

Eur.

Now take the Blessing which I, Sir, do give,

When you are call’d from hence to Heav’n to live:

And may my Friend prove joys so high refin’d,

he embraces
Loth.

To equal the vast compass of his mind.

Enter Calinda and Peregrine.

Cal.

Sir, I am come my Duty to express.

King.

To me Calinda can ow nothing less;

In publick I my heart away did take:

And I’l in publick Restitution make.

M3 Cal. M3v

Cal.

Your Will can strangely of your Heart dispose,

My Will, as yet, o’r mine no Empire knows.

King.

Yet it may yours perswade, and command mine.

KingCalinda.

You should not then Marceliaes Love decline.

King.

Madam, you have all Reason to express,

As much as you can say in scorns excess:

But Heav’n the greatest faults that are forgive,

’Tis noble, when we may kill, to let live.

Cal.

Had you bin still, Sir, to that Maxim true,

I had not then bin scorn’d, not left by you:

When you the life did take of all my joy,

You show’d not the lest pity to destroy.

But you would have, I find, a Womans breast

With more Compassion and more Love possest.

King.

I’d have thy Heart again thy Love renew,

Since mine does burn with a fresh Flame to you.

Calinda, with my Life I would redeem

What I have done, to call back thy esteem.

Cal.

Your Majesty can strangely overcome,

Scarce wish a Victory before ’tis won:

That price my Heart will never let you pay,

Love’s Gen’ral there, and yields you up the day.

King.

And if I e’er again that gift abuse,

May Heav’n all prayers that I make refuse:

I much admir’d thy Excellence heretofore;

But now Idolater shall turn, and thee adore.

I did not think this would have bin the close:

“Man may design, but Heav’n will still dispose”.

Exeunt Omnes.

Epilogue.

Now I am sure, all look that I should say

Something like asking pardon for the Play:

With low-submission, and I can’t tell what:

Excuse her Writing, Language, and her Plot!

As crafty Poets Guilty cry their Wit,

To make you less severe in tasting it.

But, faith, she scorns such undermining ways,

Of blowing up your pity into praise;

Nor will she do her spirit so much wrong,

To beg what does not to her brow belong.

She says, they’re fools force Fate, before they be

Resolv’d to meet with any Destiny.

But, this revenge she’s sure to have on those,

They’l Cowards be esteem’d that give her blows.

Which strangely takes her! knowing that ye must

Be to your Honor, or your Wit unjust.

Mark how maliciously her snare sh’as laid:

Praise or Condemn, you’re equally betray’d.

Finis.