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Marcelia:

or the
Treacherous Friend.

A Tragicomedy.
As it is Acted at the Theatre-Royal, by
His Majeſties Servants.

Written by Mrs. F. Boothby.

Licenc’d, 1669-10-09October 9. 1669
Roger L’Eſtrange.

London, Printed for Will. Cademan at the
Popes-Head in the lower Walk of the New Exchange,
and Giles Widdowes at the Maidenhead in
Alderſgate-ſtreet, 16701670.

02 A1v 03 A2r

To the Honourable and moſt Accompliſhed LadyYate, of Harvington in Worceſterſhire. Madam!

Since the moſt weak, ought to endeavour the moſt powerful Defenders; I could no where elect a perſon whoſe Accompliſhments renders them ſo capable to that requiſite, as your Ladyſhip: Which Motive I onely have to hope and plead my Pardon by, for my Preſumption in imploring your Protection. A2Ma-04A2v Madam, This earthy effect of my ignorant Brain, you will find an Engin, which will give all your Perfections and Virtues employment in the moſt eminent degree; ſince it not only requires your unequal’d Eloquence and Wiſdom, to appoſe the Cenſuring world, upon this uncommon action in my Sex: but your Goodneſs to pardon the many and high defects, which you will there find to condemn.

Sinners look not upon their own weak merits, by Heavens Bounty, when they implore Benefits: For if they ſhould turn their Eyes to their inward View, and regulate their Petitions by their Deſervings; they would bluſh and grown dumb to all Requeſts. This Line, Madam, I muſt draw to my own Center; who muſt wholly ow all your tranſcending Favours, to your generous and noble Humour, which makes the World your Admirers, and fixes unalterably to the power of your Commands,

Your moſt humble Servant and Kinſwoman,

F. Boothby.

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Prologue to Marcelia.

Im hither come, but what d’ye think to ſay?

A Womans Pen preſents you with a Play:

Who ſmiling told me I’d by ſure to ſee,

that once confirm’d, the Houſe wou’d empty be.

Not one yet gone!――

Well, I’l go tell her you are all ſo juſt,

You’l laugh at her on Knowledg, not on Truſt.

I know ſhe’l ſend me back, but what to do,

He goes off

When I have learn’d of her, I’l tell it you.

Comes agen.

Gueſs now the Meſſage: ſhe prays ye to be gone,

You’l croud her Wit to death in ſuch a Throng

Of Wits, ſhe ſays, which no Conſumptions have,

And hers is weak, e’en going to the grave.

She wonders much that ye ſhould all deſire

To ſtay, and witneſs when it does expire.

One comes to him.

Meſſ

Hark ye the Poeteſs does angry grow.

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Prol.

I cannot make ’em whether they will or no.

’Tis better be a Dog, then Womans ſlave,

That knows not what ſhe would, or would not have.

With Ballading I think ſhe mad is grown,

And by her Prologue fain would make it known.

She need not be ſo hasty; faith her Play

Will witneſs that her Reaſon’s gone aſtray:

For when that it is done, I’m almoſt ſure,

You’l give her Bedlam for Reward or Cure.

Another comes to him and whiſpers.

What more? nay then I never ſhall have done;

Now I’ve command to court ye one by one:

When I return to ſend her word by me,

Who will her Judges, who her Lawyers be.

If that the Wits will plead her cauſe, ſhe’l ſtay;

If not, ſhe fairly means to run away:

For if her Judges they reſolve to ſit,

She neither Pardon nor Reprieve ſhall get.

But ſtill ſhe hopes the Ladies out of Pride

And Honor, will not quit their ſexes ſide:

Though they in private do her faults reprove,

They’l neither puublick ſcorn nor laughter move.

But ſhould they all in cenſuring be ſevere,

’Tis ſtill the Critick Men ſhe most does fear:

For if that Solomon now liv’d, and writ;

They’d cry, Piſh, hang’t, there’s nothing in’t of Wit.

The 07 A4r

The Actors Names.

Sigiſmund, King.

Melinet, his Favourite.

Lotharicus A nobleman, in love with Marcelia.

Euryalus, Siſter to Marcelia.

Almeric, an Eminent Lord.

Valaſco, an Eminent Lord.

Lucidore, a wild Lord.

Peregrine, a Traveller.

Moriphanus, a proud, ſilly, rich fellow.

Graculus, his Man,

Du-prette, Servant to Melinet,

Meraſpas, Servant to Lotharicus.

Philampras, a Villain.

Three Villains more.

Marcelia, a noble Lady, Coſin to Melinet.

Deſha, her Woman.

Calinda, the Kings Miſtreſs.

Ericinia, her Friend.

Arcaſia, a Lady

Perilla, a rich Widdow.

Pages, Foot-Boys, Maskers, Guards, and Attendants.

The Scene, France. 08 A4v 09 B1r

Marcelia: Or the Treacherous Friend.

Act I. Scene 1.

Enter Valaſco and Almeric.

Alm.

Have you ſeen Melinet of late?

Val.

No, not ſince he miſs’d the place he thought himſelf ſo ſure of at the Court; his aſpiring ſoul will not eaſily let him digeſt the croſs events of Fate.

Alm.

It ſeems a marvel to me he had it not, for the King does reflect upon him more than common rays of favour; ſuch, as in my mind may reaſonably give his hopes large compaſs.

B Val. He 10 B1v

Val.

He does ſo, but his was a grant of our deceaſed King, which his Majeſty promiſed to ratifie; or elſe doubtleſs he had carried it: but men of his temper, and nobly born, without Eſtates, think Fortune is a cripple, if ſhe does not with winged haſt anſwer their deſerts.

Alm.

Hold, here he is coming, with a muſing and unſatiſfied countenance.

Enter Melynet.

Val.

How now, Melynet, what, dull and melancholy?

Mel.

My looks, my Lord, wear my fortunes livery:

But I was juſt now thinking how many conſiderable

Places I have been likely to poſſeſs;

And my ſtars, my unlucky ſtars,

They ſtill prevent me with their baſer influences.

Oh I could curſe them! had they made me a fool,

Or without Spirit or Ambition

I ſhould have thank’d ’em; but they’ve furniſh’d me

With all the requiſites to a riſing Fortune,

And yet deny ſucceſs.

Val.

I’faith, the truth of’t is, they have afforded thee

Wit, ſubtilty, policie, and what elſe is neceſſary,

Enough to have diſcharg’d any office in the Kingdom,

To thy own advantage; and that’s now the onely end

To which moſt of the greateſt Stateſmen tend.

Alm.

I, for they are wiſer than in the old time,

When Honour and Honeſty were ſo much ador’d:

They of that age were altogether in love with Fame,

And having their lives read with admiration in a chronicle.

But the Politicians now are of another ſtamp:

What’s preſent’s only theirs, they cry; and had rather

Purchaſe one life here in a good eſtate,

Than the inheritance of that talk’d of,

That is to come hereafter. ’Tis true,

Expectation is a hungry Diet.

Mel. You 11 B2r

Mel.

You would think ſo, if your Lordſhip were to live

Upon it as many do.

Alm.

I ſhould ſo, but not in thy condition,

Who art already look’d upon by eve ry man of judgment,

As in all likelihood to be the Court Blazing-ſtar.

Mel.

That expreſſion will bear a various inte rpretation:

Or great, or miſchievous, or both: perhaps

By divination he gives it for my Motto.

Well, I beg your Lordſhips pardon, for I muſt leave you.

Val.

Why, pry’thee, what haſt of buſineſs

Calls you away?

Mel.

I am engag’d to meet ſix or ſeven Friends.

Val.

No friends, as you love me: a Friend is a thing

More rare than a Phoenix, and thou talk’ſt of them,

As if they were as common as Fiſhes

And did like them increaſe and multiply.

Mel.

Well, your Servant.
Exit Melynet.

Val.

I wonder whether the King ſtill intends the

Marriage of Calinda: there are many

Wagers in the town about it.

Alm.

O! Monarchs and Subjects are two different things,

And a ſudden riſe to eminent Honour or Fortune,

Commonly proves like the Turks Mutes to an old

Affection; ſtrangle it quite: and ’tis whiſper’d

By the moſt knowing. that the Kings Love has at preſent

the cold fit of an aguiſh diſtemper on it, to that Lady.

But well, are you for my company this afternoon, or not?

For I am deſign’d to go home: I am promiſ’d the ſight of

A fellow that will needs be thought a Lord:

They ſay he’l make a man dy with laughing.

Val.

Then I’m reſolv’d not to ſee him to day:

For I have a great mind to live till to morrow,

And for this afternoon I’ll throw it away

Amongſt the Ladies.

Exeunt.
B2 Scene 12 B2v

Scene 2.

Enter Calinda and Ericina.

Eric.

Let not your grief take yet ſuch full poſſeſſion

Of your heart, till more of time gives the aſſurance

Of what is onely now your paſſions fear.

Cal.

Alas Ericina! it is that uncertainty

Which makes Loves greateſt Hell; were I but once

Aſſur’d, I ſhould be leſs concern’d.

But whilſt I doubt I nothing can reſolve:

Reaſon and ſcorn, which then would prove my cure,

I am now by that unhappy motive (that you urge

To leſſen my affections) forbid their uſe:

For ’tis not his new acquired greatneſs

Can keep my heart in ſlavery. It was

His Noble Mind I lov’d. And that the greateſt

Ebb of Fortune could ne’er have given change to.

Indeed I did adore his virtues, and made

Him Soveraign of my heart, deſpiſing in

My thought for him, all thoſe that onely could

Pretend advantages in Wealth, which poſſibly

They did inherit by their Fathers crimes.

But if I find he is turn’d Apoſtate

To what gave being to my Paſſion:

I ſhall depoſe him here, to let him ſee

Points to her heart.

His Honour loſt, his Crowns deſpis’d by me.

Eric.

If the aſſurance of his unconſtancie

Will prove ſo much leſs afflicting than the fear,

Force your belief to that Concluſion,

His actions afford enough of cauſe.

Cal.

Ah! Ericina, thou then doſt think him chang’d.

Eric.

It ill would ſuit the Friendſhip I profeſs,

Still by diſſembling my thoughts to his advantage,

To help to ſhipwrack ſo your quiet,

Urging 13 B3r

Urging the Uncertainty of what,

I muſt confeſs I do no longer doubt.

Cal.

Nor I no longer that I’m quite undone!
Aſide.

Eric.

And I will tell you.

Cal.

Oh hold, Ericina;

Keep to thy ſelf thoſe thoughts, which if ſet free,

With furious floods of grief would deluge me.

Eric.

Can you believe your ruine I deſign?

Whoſe life is dearer to me far than mine.

No, Calinda, what I have done was only but to try,

Whether the Cure your Reaſon did propoſe,

Your Courage could endure the application of.

Cal.

How could your pity let you make experiments,

On my Misfortune to improve your knowledg?

Or what of ſatisfaction do you find

From the aſſurance that my tongue has boaſted,

Without conſulting of my heart, the reſolution

Of that indifferencie and change, if he

Prove falſe, my ſoul can never find for him.

You uſ’d to take ſo great an intereſt in

My ſufferings as made their weight ſeem leſs.

But you unkindly now do ſeek to multiply my griefs,

and they already overpreſs my Mind.

Eric.

My love can eaſily forgive the higheſt

Injuries with which you charge my innocence:

For, I perceive, the diſquiet of your thoughts dethrones

Your Reaſon. But ’tis hard to be Phyſician,

Where the Diſeaſe admits ſuch alteration,

As makes the Remedie uncertain.

Enter Page.

Page.

Madam, my Lord Valaſco, with ſome Ladies,

Are come to wait upon you.

Cal.

Go, let them know I’ll attend them.

How ill does Converſation ſuit my mind,

Who can in nothing, now, contentment find!

Exeunt.
B3 Scene 14 B3v

Scene 3.

Enter Almeric and Peregrine.

Per.

This Kingdom has known ſtrange and wonderful

Changes ſince my abſence, for who wo’d e’er ha’thought

Sigiſmond ſhould have come to be our Soveraign?

Heaven having given ſo many juſt Pretenders

To th’Crown, before his Right could put in claim.

Alm.

’Tis true, Peregrine, but Fortunes children

Are always heirs to what ſhe pleaſes.

And all his actions both in Peace and War,

Have ſtill been crown’d with ſuch ſucceſs and glory,

As made him juſtly thought one of her Darling ſons.

And though there are many whoſe wants in worth,

And height of Envy, made them ſtrive to clip

His Honours wings: yet I muſt needs confeſs,

I think he merits what he wears.

Per.

I doubt not your Opinion; but with what

A kind of temper did he at firſt demean

Himſelf in his new Soveraignty?

Alm.

With ſuch a Moderation as ſhew’d he thought

The weighty troubles that do attend the Crown

Of a well governing Prince, would far exceed

The pleaſure of an expected Power and Greatneſs.

Per.

Yet we ſee thoſe cares which Crowns create.

Are burthens, which all the great ones of the world

Do ſtrive to carry; to which when right of birth

Is wanting, they make uſurping Power, and

Treaſons guilt become their unreſiſted title.

And certainly, what is ſo often purchaſed

By th’ death of Millions, and the height of Crimes,

When lawfully acquir’d, may well excuſe

A more than common joy expreſt in ſuch

An elevated Fortune.

Alm. No 15 B4r

Alm.

No doubt it does; and ’twas the general expectation, and our ſurprize the greater, finding his looks And actions ſhew ſuch an unmov’d indifferencie.

Per.

That might beget amazement, for ſudden ſatisfa

ction or high cares ſeldom or never keep within thoſe

Reaſon or policie preſcribes them. But he re

ſolv’d to ſhew by ſomething far from common in Man­

who amongſt all the Court is likely to carry

The name of Favorite?

Alm.

He that poſſeſſes the greateſt ſhare is Melynet, Nephew to the late Lord Euryalus, that was the fair Marcelia’s Father. His growth in greatneſs was like a Muſhrom, ſo ſuddain, which has begot much wonder in the Court. Enter Lucidore. Oh Lucidore!

Luc.

Nay hold, no quarreling; I have been ſuffering Sufficiently for my breach of promiſe.

Alm.

Why pr’ythee? what Diſaſter, that the knowledg may make ſome ſatisfaction? For I dare ſwear it is ſome Comical accident.

Luc.

If to loſe a Mans Reaſon firſt, and then all his Money, be matter of Mirth; it is ſo: for that’s the true character of my condition.

Alm.

As how?

Luc.

Why, juſt as I left you the other night, I met with our new Favourite; and ſtraight my brain was ſeiz’d with a piece of policy, to try if I could drink away his Underſtanding, and keep ſo much of my own to play the Juſtice of Peace with him, and ſift out the Reaſon of his ſo much admir’d greatneſs with the King: but I, like other Stateſmen, fail’d in my Deſign, and made my ſelf as uncapable of Queſtions, as he was of Anſwers. But that which makes me the moſt mad, and will make thee the moſt merry, was, that16B4v that I muſt needs be ſhaking of my Elbow, and pay the firſt Tribute to his fortune and ſucceſs in Gaming.

Alm.

Why, you could do no leſs in complement, than ſince you would learn him to play, to teach him at your own coſts and charges. But now confeſs, what did you loſe?

Luc.

Enough t’have purchaſ’d half his patrimony,

When he came to Court: a thouſand pound,

And ſomething more.

Per.

He plays deep for a new Gameſter, but he thinks

With reaſon, his Fortune’s like to have no bottom.

Alm.

I pity thy condition, for I know thy loſſes

Would have made thee merry a month together,

In ways much more agreable to thy humor.

Luc.

It would ſo; but ’tis gone, and the Devil go with it: The wiſh is no Treaſon I hope, for he was never yet, to my knowledg prohibited a Favorites company.

Per.

If he were, they would divide the ſoul of their uſual preferment from the bodily.

Alm.

I, for give him his due, he’s a ſociable Fellow, and infinitely eſteem’d by all perſons of all condiditions, the Clergy, Stateſman, the Lawyer, the Citizen, poor and rich, all ſtrive for his Friendſhip, his Counſel, his Aſſiſtance; there is ſuch pulling and halling who ſhall have him, that ’tis well he can be here, and there, and everywhere.

Luc.

That’s no part of my Faith; for he has often fail’d me in buſineſs of no ſmall concernment to his ſervice, and my ſatisfaction: and yet I am certain he has not had a more faithful Friend in all the world than I have been, take one time with another.

Alm.

That I’l witneſs for thee is a truth, and therefore

He can’t be excuſ’d of ingratitide, if he

Gives thee any reaſon of complaint.

Luc.

I know not the Deſign, but I am confident He 17 C1r

He will ſend me to heaven whether I will or no.

Alm.

If he does, thou wilt be the firſt Saint,

That ever came there of the Devils making.

Luc.

If I am, as ſure as thou liveſt, he does intend that wonder; well, farewell.

Alm.

Nay, we’l all go together.

Exeunt.

Scene 4.

Enter Sigiſmund and Melynet, and a Guard at diſtance. Attendants

Mel.

Sir, I perceive ſomething does diſcompoſe

The quiet of your mind, and would it not

Appear too bold preſumption in a Subject,

I would moſt humbly beg the cauſe.

Sig.

Melynet, your judgment makes a true interpretation, and ’tis only from thy Love and Intereſt that I can hope a change.

Mel.

Your Majeſties high bounty that raiſ’d me from that nothing which I was in fortune to what I am, by the ſo envy’d glory of your favour; beſides the duty which I ow you as my Soveraign, doubly commands my life to be a ready Sacrifice on all occaſions, where that offering can purchaſe you the leaſt of ſatisfaction.

Sig.

Thou art my Friend, what name commands a greater Diſtance I’l forget; but what I now ſhall try thy kindneſs in, Requires more thy wit and judgments uſe, Than dangers hazard. You have a Kinſwoman, Melinet, whom I have found too fair, and fear That I ſhall find as cruel: it is Marcelia, I wear Her chains, yet not without attempting to have Broke them; but I perceive reſiſtance is in vain. The more I ſtrive, the faſter I am ty’d. Nothing but Death her Fetters can divide. But why ſtandſt thou ſo ſurpriz’d, as if thou didſt C Rival 18 C1v Rival me in my paſſion?

Mel.

I wiſh I did Sir, ſo that there were no other;

But what concern I ſhew comes from my fear’d defect

Of power, not will, to ſerve your Majeſties Commands.

Sig.

I do believe thee, and I know

The interpoſing Difficulty that ſtands

Between me and my hopes; a pre-engagement

Of her heart to brave Lotharicus: but may not

A King and Crown laid proſtrate at her feet,

Tempt her Ambition to command her love?

Has ſhe put off ſo much her Sexes frailty,

That ſuch a Preſent cannot ſhake her conſtancie?

Mel.

She has often in my hearing given him that

Aſſurance, Sir, and though words are but airy

Sounds, till the temptation proves their ſubſtance:

Yet I have ſo much knowledg of her humor,

As makes me fear they ſhall not want that ſeal.

But all that my power can act in her perſwaſion, Sir,

To move her to a ſenſe of that high glory,

I will give your Majeſty the aſſurance of in ſome few days.

Sig.

Go my dear Melinet and ſound her thoughts;

For thou wilt in her anſwer to me bring,

The happineſs or ruine of thy King.

Exit Melinet.

Oh mighty Love! whoſe power is not limited

More in a Prince than Slave! how doſt thou force

My heart to turn a Rebel to my virtue!

Making my paſſion maſter of my honor,

My Reaſon of no farther uſe than to condemn the crime

I act in giving to another that heart,

Which I ſo often vow’d to my Calinda!

Thus in my ſoul I find a civil war;

But Love o’er Virtue has the vict’ry far:

For whoſoe’er does ſee Marceliaes eyes,

Muſt break their faith, and fall her ſacrifice.

Exit.
Scene 19 C2r

Scene 5.

Enter Moriphanus and Graculus.

Mor.

Sirrah, I would fain know why you ſhould pay me leſs reſpect than Beggars do? they can ſay, My Lord, and your Lordſhip.

Gra.

Becauſe I know you better to be no Gentleman.aſide But if I muſt ſay, an’pleaſe your Lordſhip, what ſhall I ſay to make your Lordſhips honorable title paſs for currant, if it ſhould be queſtioned?

Mor.

What ſhouldſt thou ſay? ſay I am an outlandiſh Lord. Well, a man of ambitious thoughts had better be hang’d, than keep a fellow that cannot make a lie.

Grac.

Good my Lord pardon me, I ſhall have one preſently; but my Lord, you have not the mien nor breeding of a Lord: I think I had beſt ſay you are a ſprout of one of thoſe Engliſh Lords of Nol’s new creation in the old Rebellion

Mor.

I’faith Graculus ’twill do rarely well.

Grac.

But my Lord, ſince you are reſolv’d upon ſo much greatneſs, you muſt needs enlarge your retinue.

Mor.

So I will, Graculus, and I will keep them all in ſeveral Liveries.

Grac.

They will be taken for other mens Servants then.

Mor.

No, no, thou art a fool; they will be all known to be my men, and only wearing the ſeveral Liveries of thoſe ſeveral Families that have match’d into my houſe.

Grac.

What a moſt excellent fancy was this! ſome of the chief Liveries, I hope Maſter, (I cry your Lordſhip mercy) ſhall be black and green, orange tawny and red, and black and deep blew.

Mor.

Excellent well! thou haſt a rare conceit in the choiſe of colors; but pr’ythee let my own ſuit be trim’d with the black and deep blew.

C2 Grac. 20 C2v

Grac.

’Tis ten to one but your cowardly carkas may be trim’d with black and blew before you leave the town.

aſiaſide

Mor.

I have one thing more to tell thee of; I’l leave the taking of my boys to thee: but be ſure thou doſt inſtruct them, that as they follow me, ever as I turn my head (as I ſhall do very often) that they all ſtand ſtill and put off their hats, for it is a great point of breeding in all Foot-boys, and of ſtate in Maſters. And go to my Taylor, and bid him make haſt with my cloaths, and let every thing that is in the Mode be doubled upon them.

Grac.

I ſhall, my Lord.

Exeunt.

Scene 6.

Enter Melinet and du Prette his Man.

Mel.

Haſt thou been with my Lord Lotharicus?

Du-Pr.

Yes Sir, and he bid me return his ſervice, and tell you he will not ſtir abroad, in expectation of your company; but he prays it may before the hour of his uſual viſits.

Mel.

Well, leave me. Exit du Prette.

Alas, my Lord! I muſt prevent thoſe viſits:

The ruine of your Love muſt lay the ſtrong

Foundation to my laſting Greatneſs.

In which deſign, if that my plot does fail,

Farewel my puff of honor―― for all actions,

Tho ne’er ſo well deſign’d by ſtrength of reaſon,

And proſecuted by the faithfulleſt Love,

If unſuccesful, finds ſmall acknowledgment.

It is only being bleſt by Fortune in the end, that gives the intention value. That’s the unjuſt ſcale, by which the world weighs all things. But why ſhould I condemn ingratitude as Vice, that for ambition turn a Villain, and betray my friend? Yet ’tis not I am guilty, though I act the Crime; ’tis the abuſive world which throws ſuch heaps of21C3r of injuries and ſcorns on wanting Virtue, that mans courage cannot bear it; at leaſt mine ſhall not, if a ſtretch’d Conſcience will relieve me.

I’l graſp a fortune though I heav’n let go,

That I have heard of, but ’tis This I know.

Act II. Scene 1.

Enter Peregrine, Lucidore, Almeric and Valaſco.

Alm.

When wilt thou grow tame, Lucidore?

Luc.

When Uſurers commonly grow mad, when I have loſt all my money, and that I am forc’d to think of Marriage for the convenient ſupport of ſome rich widows Jointure, which very reflection ſhould I continue in it but a quarter of an hour, it would make me look as ſerious as any Engliſh ſanctified Brother, that intends the Reformation of Religion.

Per.

Are you ſo great a Woman-hater then?

Luc.

No Sir, you miſtake me: I am not an Enemy to the Sex, but to that ceremony; I would be a Ladies ſervant, but not her Prentice: I love not to ſeal words of Complement for term of life, as that of taking a woman for better or worſe.

Val.

If living ſingle were an argument of Underſtanding, we might juſtly be eſteem’d one of the wiſeſt Nations of the world; for moſt of our young Gallants decline Marriage, and take Miſtreſſes, by which they gain diſeaſes in their youth, to make a Wife neceſſary for a Nurſe in their age: and things taken by way of neceſſity, can lay no charge upon us for defect of Reaſon.

Luc.

Right, for it is then the offspring of it.

C3 Alm. Well, 22 C3v

Alm.

Well, could I have my wiſh, it ſhould be to ſee Lucidore in Love.

Luc.

Why, I am in Love, infinitely in Love, up to the head and ears in Love.

Alm.

Sure thy Miſtreſs is very kind then, thou art ſo merry.

Luc.

She is ſo, ſhe denies me nothing that I ask her.

Alm.

She is very coming too it ſeems. Pr’ythee tell me, is ſhe thy particular Miſtreſs, or is ſhe one that may be generally ſo to all thy Friends?

Luc.

No Sir, I will aſſure you I am not ſo free to keep a communicative Miſtreſs.

Val.

Why, canſt thou ſeriouſly love any thing?

Luc.

Yes, when the object’s worthy; and I preſume her infinitely ſo, her charms beget ſo many ſlaves.

Per.

I fain would ſee her: I dare be confident ſhe will make none of me.

Val.

Nor of me.

Alm.

And I dare warrant you for my particular.

Luc.

You are all fair promiſers, Gentlemen; if you will lay a hundred Piſtols a piece, or ſo, you ſhall ſee her: Nay more; I’l take your own words whether you love or not; you ſhall be the accuſers of your own hearts, and then I’l be the Executioner of your Purſes. This is fair play, here’s no falſe Dice nor Cards, all’s above board.

Per.

That’s true, but you hold the ſight too coſtly; you forget that we can ſee the Creation of the World for 18 pence, where there are twenty fine ſights beſides the Woman. A hundred Piſtols to ſee a Woman! Why, it had been enough for Adam to have offer’d, when Eve was promiſed and not made.

Luc.

Well, I percieve you have examin’d your Conſcience, and find you are frail, and dare not venture your Money, for all your boaſting.

Alm.

But we will hazard our Liberties, and that’s of greater value.

Luc. 23 C4r

Luc.

I, but I never lov’d to expoſe my friends to danger, unleſs ſome profit may accrew by it to them or me; and all from this will be the certain knowledg, that you know not yourſelves, and that’s an Article of Faith I have already put into my Creed.

Val.

But ’tis not in ours, and we would not have thee have the ſtart of us in Faith and Works too.

Luc.

Well, I’l leave you Gentlemen.

Per.

Faith thou ſhalt not, for we will go with thee and ſee thy Miſtreſs.

Luc.

Well, I will for this once ſave your longings: the name of a Miſtreſs has ſo wound up your curioſities; that I find your tongues will be like the perpetual Motion in importunities, till that be ſatisfied.

Per.

Shall we go with thee now, and ſee her?

Luc.

No, I am otherwiſe engag’d; to morrow I am at your ſervice.

Alm.

Remember your promiſe, and do not have us anſwer’d, you are from home, as Miſers uſe to do to ſave their meat, when a friend bids himſelf to Dinner.

Luc.

No, for there muſt be no Courtſhip you know, that’s againſt the Laws of Friendſhip, to buy a bargain out of another mans hands.

Exeunt.

Scene 2.

Enter Melinet and Lotharicus.

Mel.

You have often encouraged me to hope all proofs of your affection, and I cannot doubt your friendſhip.

Loth.

You need not, your own merits, and relation to Marcelia, has fetter’d me your ſervant; therefore command me without the introduction of a Complement.

Mel.

Why then, my Lord, I know you have an intereſt in Arcaſia, and I muſt beg you to make uſe of it to my aſſiſtance, for I confeſs my heart has found the power of her Charms.

Loth. You 24 C4v

Loth.

You need not bluſh to own them, ſhe is an object worthy of your inclinations; and I am glad your choice directed you, where I may pay part of the obligations back I have ſo often owed unto your friendſhip: not but your own deſerts will be your beſt Orators.

Mel.

My Lord, I know my ſelf better, than to admit the leaſt hope from thoſe vain apprehenſions: but being preſented by you, the eſteem ſhe holds of your judgment will doubtleſs keep her, from ſearching too inquiſitively into thoſe defects, which might with juſtice blaſt my hopes.

Loth.

You are too eminently deſerving for to need ſuch an impoſter help: but Melinet, be confident I will ſpeak the truth, with all the earneſtneſs a Friend can urge: to promiſe more were to exceed my power.

Mel.

If you could perſwade her to the Gardens, you would have greater opportunity and more of time.

Loth.

I will, and uſe all my intereſt.

Mel.

Pray be ſecret in it.

Loth.

You need not fear, ſhe has too many Pretenders that would becom concern’d.

Mel.

I fear you not to any but Marcelia.

Loth.

Well, be confident ſhe ſhall not know it.

Mel.

Give me your hand and honor upon it.

Loth.

There ’tis, an Oath I never broke yet, and ſo farewell, for I muſt go and ſee her: your ſervant.

Mel.

I would go too, but I ſaw her but laſt night, and ſhe likes not my company, ſhe will needs have it that I am melancholy grown.

Exeunt.

Scene 3.

Enter Graculus and a company of Beggar-boys.

Grac.

Come Boys, let me ſee you make your legs, whilſt I have it in my head how it may be done: for I have bin at the Dancing-ſchole a purpoſe to learn my ſelf, that 25 D1r that I might correct you upon knowledg. Come my brave Boys, the moſt mannerly The Boys put off their hats, and make ſeveral ridiculous Congies. ſhall have the beſt Livery. Excellent well done: I do not think ther’s a parcel of better bred Boys in Town, conſidering their Qualities. Let me ſee you run Boys. They run. Oh bravely done! they are ſo nimble of heel, they’l quickly run out of a Foot-body into a Gentleman of the Chamber.

Boy.

Would you would let us go Sir to the Dancing- School, that we might ſee the faſhion of it; I warrant you we would obſerve, and have ſome of it away with us.

Grac.

Theſe Rogues would watch their time, and be ſtealing: take heed of that Boys; at the end of that hangs a Halter: Never go beyond the Rules of Cheating, by that you will ſecure your Necks, and it will put a value on your Wit, it is a general quality, and much approv’d: He that has never made uſe of it, has never bin truly in the Faſhion. Your Gentile Cheats, they go to Gaming-houſes; your Complementing Cheats, frequent Ladies Lodgings; your Flattering Cheats, follow Courts; your Learned Cheats, the Barr; your Seditious Cheats, the Pulpit: And ſuch Cheats as you and I may be, and I thank Mercury I am, Noble-mens-ſervices, or the places about Fools, Prodigals, or allow’d of Mad-men, which is the ſame. But you muſt be ſecret, Boys; keep your tongues idle, and ſet your wits to work, and in a ſhort time we will be our Maſters Equals in Fortune, keep men our ſelves, and be company for the beſt.

Enter Valaſco and Perigrine.

Val.

What’s that Fellow going to do with thoſe Boys?

D Per. I 26 D1v

Per.

I warrant he is ſome Pariſh Officer, and is having them to ſome Houſe of Correction.

Val.

I’le ask him. Prethee Friend, what doſt thou intend to do with thoſe Boys?

Grac.

Perform one of the works of mercy on them; cloath the naked: put ’em into Liveries, and let ’em out like Hackney-Coaches. It will be no ſmall conveniency to younger Brothers when they go a woing, to make themſelves Fortunes among ſome of the She ſlender-wits, with full Purſes, who are ſo taken with a Feather, Pages, and Footmen, that they had rather marry a man well attended, without either brain or money, then any one of more ſubſtance, and leſs ſhew. I hope you are no Courtiers, Gentlemen.

Val.

Why prethee?

Grac.

For fear you ſhould beg a Fine for my having the benefit of my brain for my Fortune, or get my deſign prohibited; but if you do, ther’s thouſands will curſe you; who, according to their occaſions, would be glad (I moſt heartily) to know where to encreaſe or leſſen their Retinue, as their Purſes would permit ’em, which is moſt commonly a young huffing Gallants very uncertain friend?

Val.

Do you hear this jearing Raſcal?

Per.

It was ever ſo; your ordinary Fellows have no Breeding; they’l throw out their jeſts at any time, let it light where it will, though their Crowns be crack’d for it: and though they be blunt Fellows, their words many times have ſharp edges.

Val.

Well, farewell Friend; if we are no Courtiers, one of us has bin a Souldier, and they ought by their Profeſſion to be as good at begging.

Grac.

That’s true, but they are not ſo ſucceſsful; they commonly act like themſelves bluntly, without conſideration,ration,27D2r ration, and are uſually denied without much ceremony; therefore if one of you is ſtill a Souldier, you might be heartily glad if the King could unanimate you, and ſet you up in his Armory, that when he had no Wars, you might have no wants.

Per.

Well, God-a-mercy Tell-troth.

Exit Per with Valaſco.

Grac.

Come Boys, I’le go caſe you firſt, Then have you to my Lord in Whimſey.

Exeunt.

Scene 4.

Enter Melynet, and preſently after a Page.

Page.

Sir, here is a Letter my Lord Lotharicus ſent when you were abroad.

Breaks it open, and reads.

Mel.

My Lord, I have perſwaded your Fair Miſtris to the Gardens this night; where, if you think fit, you may take the opportunity of diſcovering your Paſſion: if not, I will, according to my promiſe, be your faithful Advocate; and hope to place you in that eſteem in her thoughts, as may give you what is but Juſtice, the Precedency of all the reſt of your Rivals; which is a ſervice paſſionately courted by Your faithful ſervant, Lotharicus.

And muſt be treacherouſly rewarded!

Baſe Fortune! that offers me no other ways to come to

Greatneſs, but by the paths of Infamy! But hold Honor,

forbear thy whiſpers in my Soul.

I’m too far gone, thou ſound’ſt retreat too late,

And now, for Virtues pay, no more will wait.

I’le not rewards in th’other world expect,

And preſent benefits for hope neglect.

It is Ambition’s Dictates I purſue

And following them; I cannot ſtay with you:

Then toſs my Soul no more in Tempeſts ſo,

Nor make my Conſcience thus my Fortunes Foe.

D2 Go, 28 D2v

Go, and in Princes minds take up thy Seat,

I’le not forget thee quite, when once I’m great.

Marcelia, I am coming to throw ſuch rage and jealouſie

into thy heart, as ſhall, like Lightning, conſume thy love

for thy Lotharicus; I’le raiſe a Tempeſt that ſhall deſtroy

him, and give no warning by a Thunder-clap.

Exit.

Scene 5.

Enter Marcelia and Deſha.

Marc.

Methinks this day has time much longer then uſually they are; ſtrangely long, to me at leaſt it ſeems ſo: How ha’s done to thee?

Deſha.

As others, Madam; I have no cauſe to make me judge this days motion ſlower then the reſt.

Marc.

No more have I.

Deſh.

It would not ſeem ſo tedious then in paſſing. But Madam, I much wonder My Lord Lotharicus has not bin here today.

Marc.

Very well apply’d: but the hours took not their increaſe, I will aſſure you, from his abſence; not but that his company would have made ’em much more pleaſant I confeſs.

Deſh.

And by conſequence not ſo long.

Marc.

I wiſh my Couſin Melynet were here; and yet his converſation now is not very diverting: The flowing of his Fortune has given his Mirth an Ebb.

Enter a Page.

Page.

Madam, here is my Lord Melynet.

Exit Page.

Deſh.

Madam, you ſee your wiſhes has their grant, as ſoon as ask’d.

Enter Melynet.

Marc.

Couſin, your ſervant: you were the laſt I was talking of, and ſure I am you are the firſt I ſee.

Mel.

I dare not credit ſuch a Complement; two ſuch Obli-29D3r Obligations are too eminently great at once, for any but Lotharicus.

Marc.

If you knew how unkind he has bin to day, you would not judge ſo.

Mel.

Alas, I know.

Sighs.

Marc.

What?

Mel.

I know not what I was about to ſay, my head’s ſo full of buſineſs, one thought drives out another.

Marc.

Sure whatſoe’re they are, they are but troubleſome reflections; they have chang’d your humor ſtrangely. But pray Couſin tell me, What is it that ſo much deſtroys the quiet of your mind, and makes you wear ſo ſad a countenance? You need not fear to truſt me with a ſecret, though I am a Woman: My friendſhip cannot let me ſee you ſo much a ſtranger to your wonted temper, without deſire to bear a part of your misfortune.

Mel.

I do ſo little doubt your kindneſs, that I fear your love would make you take the greateſt ſhare; and that almoſt certain knowledge makes me keep it from you. But leave this diſcourſe, Has not Lotharicus bin here to day?

Marc.

No Couſin; he has not bin ſo kind.

Mel.

Not here to day! poor Couſin.

Sighs.

Marc.

What’s the matter, dear Melynet, tell me; You look ſurpriz’d: is not Lotharicus well?

Mel.

Very well.

Marc.

Why did you sigh, and look ſo ſad?

Mel.

Sure you miſtook: And if I did, it was only pitying your condition: I know the time muſt ſeem tedious when an expected Lover does not come: And if you pleaſe to make it leſs appear, we’l take a walk into the Gardens.

Marc.

I ſhall willingly accept that offer; for ſome Air, after ſo hot a day, will not appear unpleaſant.

Exeunt.
Scene 6. 30 D3v

Scene 6.

Enter Lotharicus and Arcaſia, in a Garden.

Loth.

Are you ſtill reſolv’d then to make all your ſervants equally unhappy Madam? Shall not he be bleſs’d to boaſt the glory of your favours?

Arcaſ.

I am ſo far, my Lord, from putting ſuch a value on my weak Merits, that I conceive he would be moſt unfortunate that I ſhould chuſe; and therefore being ſo equally oblig’d to all for their eſteem, I will never be ſo injuriouſly unjuſt to any.

Loth.

I am ſorry I muſt prove ſo unfortunate a Suppliant for one whom I ſo much eſteem, and does ſo well deſerve.

Arcaſ.

My Lord, I ſhould but ill demonſtrate the friendſhip that I have ſtill profeſs’d to pay you, if my conſent to your requeſt ſhould give you power to wrong your friend ſo far? You ſee I am too ſollicitous to keep up your intereſt in all hearts, as well as mine, e’re to conſent to be the cauſe that you ſhould juſtly forfeit it.

Loth.

I’le ſtand the hazard, Madam, of all dangers in that kind; my fears are far greater from my unſucceſsful ſuit; and therefore ’tis in vain to think to complement me out of my requeſt: that Court-quality I am too well acquainted with, to be deceiv’d in Madam.

Arcaſ.

I ſee, my Lord, our intentions want Interpreters, as well as Languages; they are ſo ſeldome underſtood in their true meaning. But ſince you will force me in my own vindication to make good what I’ve ſaid, I think you do not love your friend, or elſe you’d not prefer him where you have given ſuch convincing proofs you did not like; for if you had, you would have doubtleſs ask’d the ſervice for your ſelf, as well as have beſpoken it for another.―― It takes; I could laugh exaſide. tremely31D4r tremely to ſee how ſtrangely I have ſurpriz’d him, and how ſeriouſly he is ſtudying complementally to word a Tragical Denial to my Comical Affection.

I perceive, my Lord, you little thought to have found a Courtſhip where you came to make one; but perſons of Merit are often ſubject to ſuch accidents. I have heard ſome ſwear they have had a hundred of them in their days; nay ſome, more then Arithmetick could number: I hope your Conqueſt is not yet arriv’d to ſuch a large accompt: You ſee, my Lord, how different our intentions are, I ſtrive to gain you for my ſelf, and you to win me for another.

Loth.

I know, Madam, the greatneſs of your heart too well, to have the vanity to think you would throw away your favours on one, whoſe wants in all things worthy ſuch a bleſſing, forbids his boldneſs to attempt to beg it.

Arcaſ.

My Lord, pray ſpare that confidence in your friends behalf, which for your ſelf do ſo much decline: And to recompence that Obligation, I will no longer fright you with my pretended Paſſion: I am your friend in ſubſtance, your Lover but in ChiThey walk up and down, and talk ſoft­ ly; he makes ſeve­ ral bows and ſub­ miſſions to her. mera: But I thought it Juſtice to deprive his heatrrt of quiet, that came to rob my Soul of Reaſon.

Enter Melynet and Marcelia.

Marc.

There’s Lotharicus Couſin.

Mel.

Where? Ha! Lotharicus, and ſhe with him!

Marc.

Who is it Couſin? do you know her?

Mel.

No matter who ſhe is, or whether ſhe were at all.

Marc.

I am afraid, and yet I know not what I fear: I’le go meet her, and ſee who ſhe is, ſee if I know her.

Mel.

Her name’s Arcaſia; go not for the world; you are undone and if you do.

Marc.

Why, what ſecret does your Soul contain, by which32D4v which you judge I muſt be ſo unfortunate? I muſt and will go.

Mel.

Pray ſtay, your Paſſion will betray too much Love, and make that prove his ſcorn, which once created all his happineſs. Come, let us be gone.

Marc.

Couſin, you are unkind, to put my my till-now ſetled joys upon the rack of ſo much fear: I cannot ſtir; I here ſhall fix like a cold Marble Stone. See how he does his Adorations pay!Thus, poor Marcelia, he did thee betray! Methinks his Soul ſhould ſhake to let Heaven ſee his Perjury: But Couſin, could you, as I am ſure you did, know he was falſe, and keep me ignorant of his being ſo?

Mel.

I muſt confeſs I did, and found it too weighty for my friendſhip to ſupport, and thought your Love would prove leſs able.

Marc.

He then is falſe: unhappy knowledge, that comes ſo much too late, and yet ſo too too ſoon!

Mel.

If your Courage equal but your other Excellencies, and that you will command your Paſſion to obey your Reaſon, I will ſecure you a Revenge ſhall equal his High Perjury, And make him burſt with rage, or elſe return,And in the Hell of his paſt falſhood burn. But you muſt never let him know that you do think him chang’d, for then all that you act, he will ſuppoſe the violence of your Love, and prove his pleaſure, not his torment. Befriend your Sexes Honor, and be not thought to whine, to love, and be deſpis’d: Scorn and neglect him, but give him not a reaſon why; you are ſufficiently convinc’d within; you have a Cauſe, and need not juſitfie the Act by a Demonſtration of it; that may Eclipſe your Glory, and augment his Pride.

Marc.

Oh that my dear Brother Euryalus were return’dturn’d33E1r turn’d from his Travels! But I have ever known you Maſter of ſo much Reaſon, that I can hope no better aſſiſtance In this Extreme, where I will act a part, Your friendſhip counſels, though it break my heart.

Mel.

Come, let’s be gone then, leaſt we are diſcover’d.

Marc.

We need not: See, they are about to leave the Garden by the other gate. Oh my Lotharicus! But why do I ſay my Lothicarus? Th’art falſe Lotharicus, and loſt to me, Unleſs theſe waſh away thy Perjury.

She weeps.

Mel.

Can you ſhed tears for one that you ſhould hate? Such meanneſs ſhews you merit ſuch a Fate. Leave: you have made a Conqueſt much more glorious, the King adores you, whom if you ne’re can love, will make you at leaſt thus far fortunate, that your perfections will with greater ſplendour ſhine in the whole worlds Opinion. My advice is, that you uſe it to your own advantage, and either build your Fortune, or reduce your Servant; for if you fail in both, your judgment will be queſtion’d.

By favouring one, the other may repent;

And all I wiſh is but your high content.

If that your ſeeming change can’t make him burn,

To build your greatneſs, all your Paſſions turn:

Command, as Sov’reign, him you would obey;

Make him your Slave, that did your Love betray.

Marc.

I cannot promiſe I ſhall e’re be free,

But I will colours wear of Victory;

And my ſad thought dreſs up in ſuch diſguize,

As ſhall deceive the moſt informing eyes.

Thus I an inward Martyr muſt become,

And ſeem to triumph, when I’m moſt undone.

Exeunt.
E Scene 7. 34 E1v

Scene 7.

Enter Moriphanus and Graculus.

Mor.

In my mind, Graculus, I am moſt compleatly modified: All the reſt of my Brother Gallants may keep their beds, or put on their riding ſuits to day; I ſhall not leave, I think, an eye of a Lady for one of them: I ſhall have a fling at all their hearts; I am arm’d from head to foot with ſuch an aſſault of bravery, Graculus; ſome will be taken with the Garniture of my ſhoes, others with the ſilk of my Suit; ſome with my Band, others with my Perriwig will be loſt in Love. The Widdow Perilla, and all.

Grac.

But the Devil a one with your perſon, I aſide dare ſwear.―― But you have left out the wonderfull’ſt temptation of all, your Lordſhips Wiſdom.

Mor.

I had forgot it, it was quite out of my head, Graculus: if it had bin much in the mode, I ſhould have remember’d it: but hang’t, ’tis almoſt out of faſhion: not one Gallant of a hundred makes any reckoning of it. To ſay the truth, Graculus, it may well be left off now, for it has bin in uſe ever ſince the creation by report.

Grac.

’Tis very true in troth, and things of much greater value have bin laid aſide for antiquity ſake: for, for ought that I can find, it is all that can be alledg’d againſt Honeſty, that it is old. But I hope that there will be ſome Wardrobes made of theſe caſtaway cloaths of our Anceſtors, that the next Age, if they like it better than ours does, they may bring it into uſe again: for they are now both aſham’d to ſhew their faces.―― But my Lord, you have forgot to buy a Sword.

Mor.

But I remember that it is unlawful to commit Murther, that’s the reaſon, Graculus.

Grac.

The Reaſon, for what?

Mor. 35 E2r

Mor.

For not laying out my money to no purpoſe, on a thing I ſhall never uſe.

Grac.

You know not what occaſion may be offer’d.

Mor.

I know the greateſt that can be, ſhall be none to me: whemn I’m reſolv’d, I’m reſolv’d. Beſides, I have made a ſolemn Oath on my own part to that, never to break it; and that makes it a double obligation.

Grac.

You had as good put it to the hazard in the Natural way of breaking it, if an affront require it; for I doubt you’l hardly live without.

Mor.

I’l warrant thee, Graculus, I’l come into no ſuch Criminaries; I’l not fight for my Religion, I’l ſooner leave it: nor for my Eſtate, I will ſooner let it go. And if it were not High-Treaſon againſt the King, and hanging- Treaſon againſt my own Neck, I would tell thee what I would do for the King too.

Grac.

Never fear my Lord; you know if you ſhould come to be hang’d, the ſooner it is done, the ſooner you are out of the danger of attempting or receiving Manſlaughter, or wilful Murther.

Mor.

I will tell thee, for I cannot hold: why, Graculus, neither more nor leſs, then I will do for my Religion, and my Eſtate; that is as good as to ſay, and the very ſelf-ſame thing that I have ſaid, I will not fight: No, and if nothing elſe can ſerve turn, againſt the World, the Fleſh, and the Devil, they ſhall even take their courſe with me Graculus.

Knock without.

Grac.

My Lord, here’s all your PaGraculus looks out, returns and ſays.Graculus looks returns ſays. ges, Foot-men, Gentleman of the Horſe, Secretary, Valet de Chambre, Steward, Butler; here’s all your whole Family in view.

Mor.

Why, I did not bid thee take me any other ſervants but Foot-men.

Enter all the Boys in Liveries.

Grac.

No more I have not, my Lord, but all theſe E2 ſeveral 36 E2v ſeveral Officers are to be hatch’d out of theſe Eggs.

Mor.

I am much pleas’d: I’le go to a Play firſt, then to the Gardens, come home late, go to bed without a ſupper, for fear of being ſick with a full ſtomack.

Grac.

But what ſhall the Boys and I do, my Lord?

Mor.

Do as I do; I’le have as much care of their healths, as of my own.

Grac.

So, very good; here’s cloathing of the naked, and ſtarving of the hungry: The laſt is to be put for a Spiritual Work of Mercy, for it has much of Air in it.

Mor.

I cannot ſee my way Graculus; Going out he stumbles. I’le turn the hinder part of my head of hair before.

Grac.

Hang theſe Perriwig makers, they have made the Buſh ſo big, the Owl can’t ſee through it:

Exeunt.

Scene 8.

Enter King and Lords.

Alm.

The King is ſtrangely diſcompoſed.

Val.

I, and if I am not much miſtaken, it is ſome Female Beauty cauſes his high diſtemper.

Lucid.

Well, if this be the effects of Love, I hope I ſhall never let my eyes ſacrifice the contentment of my heart to any She alive.

Alm.

Indeed when Women govern there, farther then in Complement, they ſtrangely unhinge mens humors.

The King whiſpers to Valaſco. Valasco goes to them again.

Val.

It is his Majeſties will that we ſhould leave him: Only, if Melynet comes, that happy Favorite of Fortune, he is allow’d admittance.

Exeunt all but the King.

King.

Were Friendſhip half ſo diligent as Love’s impatient, Melynet had e’re this crown’d my deſires with ſome aſſurance of ſucceſs, or left me to the force of my Diſpair; for hopes and fears are the Convulſions of the mind: Fantaſtick Fortune! that madeſt me both at once, a37E3r a King and Captive, fettering my heart when thou didſt Crown my head.

By Acts, like theſe, ’tis Love does make us know,

He in his Slaves does no diſtinction ſhow.

When by a Sov’raigns right I Millions ſway,

That makes me moſt a Womans Power obey.

I, that my Neighb’ring Kingdoms keep in fear,

Can nothing bring to daunt this paſſion here.

Points to his heart.

It braves my Courage, and my Honour too;

Oh Conquering Love, what is’t thou canſt not do!

Thou tumbleſt mighty Empires to the ground;

Nothing beyond thy Circulation’s found.

Enter Melynet.

Mel.

Welcome my deareſt Friend, beyond all wiſhes but Marcelia’s Love.

King.

I dare not ask thee, yet I fain would know,

What I ſhall hear too ſoon, or elſe too ſlow.

Mel.

Sure, Sir, my Looks does not a Sentence wear,

To give your wiſhes reaſon to diſpair:

My Face would ill interpret (then) the joy

I have, and bring you, if it hopes deſtroy.

King.

Does my fair Miſtris then my Love allow?

Tell me Melynet, tell me quickly how?

I am impatient; thou did’ſt never know

What Paſſion was, thy anſwer comes ſo ſlow.

Will ſhe, for me, her lov’d Lotharicus quit?

Mel.

Love is a Child; ſhe’l rule it with her wit.

I find Sir, nothing ſo powerful in her heart, to give your Majeſties hopes diſcouragement: Something has lately hap’ned, by which Lotharicus has loſt ſome ground in her affection; and that which makes me almoſt confident, Sir, of your ſucceſs, is, ſhe ſeems much more to doubt the truth I tell her of your Love, then diſapprove it; and where that is ſtrongly urg’d, the Preſent never is unwelcome.

King. 38 E3v

King.

’Tis true: but their deſires of taking in of heart proceeds not always from their Inclinations; it is the general humor of that Sex to glory in the number of their Sacrifices, yet hardly will allow in their whole lives to pay the intereſt of one Offering back.

Mel.

Were they as cautious in their gifts of Love, as you conclude them, Sir, their Sex had ne’re bin tax’d of ſo much Levity.

King.

My fears are only now, ſhe will not change; and if ſhe does, I then ſhall fear as much ſhe’ll change again.

How can he happy be, whoſe unkind Fate,

Gives in his greateſt joy, a doubting State.

Mel.

Never give way, Sir, to thoughts ſo injurious to your quiet; her Reaſon will ſoon ſhake off her Feveriſh Reliques of Affection to Lotharicus: they will perhaps ſome little time make a weak oppoſition; but the Antidote I have given her of your Majeſties inclinations, will infallibly expel that poyſon.

King.

I’l go and viſit her preſently, Melynet, that from my own experimented hopes, as well as thine, I may ſecure my heart.

Mel.

Sir, if I may without offenſe perſwade your Majeſty, defer it till the ſolemnity of your Birth-day’s paſt: I then will bring her to the Court, and there the particular honor that your Majeſty may do her by a publick Addreſs, giving by that the Lawrel to her beauty from the other fair ones, will infinitely conduce unto the conqueſt. There is no ſurer way, than baiting of their pride to catch their hearts.

King.

I will expect that ſeeming Age of time.

How I ſhall paſs it, none but thoſe can tell,

That heav’n has ſeen, and yet muſt ſtay in hell.

Exeunt.

The End of the Second Act.

Act. III. 39 E4r

Act III. Scene 1.

Enter Lucidore.

Luc.

I muſt go look my longing Lords, and whet up their deſires of ſeeing my Miſtreſs, with a day or two’s expectation longer, the ſight will come too cheap elſe, and leſſen their obligations, if I afford it at their firſt requeſt.

Enter Valaſco, Almeric, Peregrine.

Val.

Oh my Lord, you are well met: we were coming to you for performance of your promiſe: we could hold out no longer, you have raiſ’d our hopes to ſuch a height of expectation.

Alm.

I’faith the fancy of her beauty does ſo hant our imaginations, we cannot ſleep nor eat quietly for conceiting of her, what I dare ſwear ſhall never prove.

Luc.

Well, conceit her what you pleaſe, you are not like to ſee her this two long days, and ſo farewel.

Per.

Nay, we’l go with thee and hant thy ghoſt, till thou let’ſt us ſee the deſired apparition.

Exeunt.

Scene 2.

Enter Lotharicus at one door, and Melinet at another.

Loth.

I do not think but we were both of us upon one deſign, going in purſuit of one another.

Mel.

You have reaſon to believe, my Lord, I carry a paſſion in my heart, ſufficiently impatient till I know my doom, which you ere this had found the effect of, but that Marcelia has kept me ſome hours her Priſoner, to make me promiſe to carry her to Court.

Loth. 40 E4v

Loth.

I then perceive I am diſcarded from that ſervice: and were you any but the perſon that you are, I ſhould grow jealous of you.

Mel.

To divert you from that humor, pray ſatisfie my wiſhes, how do you find Arcaſia’s inclinations? I durſt not come my ſelf, and ſtand the Sentence.

Loth.

I cannot give you hopes as you deſerve; her reſolution ſeems at preſent to be fix’d ſtill to be Miſtreſs of her own freedom; She ſays, the ſervice of no man living ſhall prevail to buy her out: I hope time may change her humor; Womens firſt reſolutions ſeldome ſtand good in Law againſt their ſecond thoughts: This for your ſatiſfaction, you have no Rival that’s more fortunate.

Mel.

If I muſt not poſſeſs her heart, I’le pleaſure take at leaſt to think no other does.

And hope, while ’tis to an Election free,

Fortune at laſt may kindly give it me.

Exeunt.

Scene 3.

Enter Marcelia.

Marc.

How ſhall I force my ſelf to ſhew diſdain,

Since ſtill, in ſpight of me, he here will raign?

Love will not quit this place to rage or ſcorn,

Points to her heart.

But keeps his Int’reſt as the Eldeſt born.

Reaſon and Honor, whither are ye gone?

That I this Childiſh Paſſion find ſo ſtrong.

Will you be ſlaves to Love? reſign the Field?

So many Odds, and yet ſo poorly yield.

But ’tis not much our weak Sex ſhould ſubmit,

Since Man’s couragious Soul can’t Maſter it.

Enter Page.

Page.

My Lord, Lotharicus is come, Madam.

Exit Page.

Marc.

Well. Enter Lotharicus at a diſtance. He comes.

Grief 41 F1r

Grief now retire; act here thy Tragick part,

Points to her heart.

But do not make my eyes betray my heart.

Loth.

I’m come Marcelia.――

Goes to imbrace her.

Marc.

――Whither pray ſo faſt? Puts him back.

They often fall that make too much of haſt.――

Loth.

Has my forc’d abſence made you angry grow?

Marc.

You do miſtake; your coming makes me ſo.

Loth.

Ha! what’s this I hear! I know it cannot be,

Thou art not chang’d thus to thy ſelf, nor me.

This coldneſs comes not, Deareſt, from thy heart;

It is ſome pretty trick of Love and Art.

Yet ſure you do not ſo my paſſion doubt,

You need to take theſe ways to find it out.

Marcelia turns aſide.

Marc.

I ſcorn much Art, but I could rage expreſs,

To ſee he’d fool me with a new Addreſs.

Turns to him.

Indeed I do not; and I muſt confeſs

With the ſame truth, my own is grown much leſs.

Loth.

I am ſurpriz’d; Can you unbluſhing ſay,

You have your Faith and Honor thrown away?

Come, come, no more; you’l make my fears too ſtrong.

Marc.

I care not what they are, ſo you’d be gone.

Loth.

What is’t you mean, Marcelia? what to do?

Marc.

No more, nor leſs, but tell you what is true.

I’m chang’d: Is that ſo great a wonder grown?

There are examples from both Sexes known.

I wiſh you’d leave me now; I fain would be

From Converſation, as from Paſſion free.

This is no Complement I muſt confeſs:

But, without ſtudy, ’tis my humors dreſs.

Loth.

Are you Marcelia that I did adore?

I may be gone, grief lets me ſay no more.

Exit.

Marc.

He’s gone, and does a ſeeming paſſion ſhow, ſighs

Such as none hardly from a true can know.

F It 42 F1v

It is no wonder Women ruin’d be,

If all can counterfeit as well as he.

Sits down. Enter Melynet.

Mel.

What new misfortune does your Soul oppreſs?

Marc.

Lotharicus has bin here; you now may gueſs:

Mel.

For him ſtill ſad! Fie, fie, you are too blame,

To let your Love ſo much your courage ſhame.

Marc.

When Love and Reaſon has a War begun,

Grief can’t be hid, until the Vict’ries won.

Mel.

If he were here, I’m ſure he was ſo wiſe,

With his firſt flame, his ſecond to diſguize:

I know he with great oaths confirm’d his Paſſion,

He did not elſe diſſemble well in faſhion.

Marc.

He did as much as Love could make thoſe do,

That found their Miſtris falſe, when they were true.

Mel.

That ſight, I hope, ſtraight mov’d you to belief.

Marc.

It did not that, but it encreas’d my grief.

No, I have done, what I but ill could do,

I ſcorn’d him much, to keep my word with you.

I hope that time will make it natural grow;

Till then my heart will never quiet know.

Mel.

No more, no more of theſe ſad thoughts; I am come to beg a favor of you; it is to go to Court with me to night, and ſee the Mask; it will divert you much.

Marc.

Such ſights to ſickned joys ſorrows augment,

A Grave can only (now) give me content.

Mel.

I muſt not, nor I will not be deny’d.

Marc.

I’m by my promiſe, to your counſels ty’d.
Exeunt.

Scene 4.

Enter Moriphanus, Graculus, and Footmen.

Mor.

There’s to be ſome doings to day at Court, ’tis the Kings Birth-day; Graculus, thee and I’le go ſee’t.

Grac.

I wiſh we could, my Lord, but they’l not let us in.

Mor. 43 F2r

Mor.

Not let us in! that’s a good one; not let us in! Walks up and down, and looks upon himſelf, pulls out a great deal of money. Not let us in! what think’ſt thou, Graculus, will not good ſtore of theſe tempt? Beſides, I am as gallant as the proudeſt of them, and as impudent as the beſt: And I’le tell thee, Graculus, they ſhall not keep us out: I’le fill my Hat of theſe, and cry, Make room Courtiers.

Grac.

That, I confeſs, my Lord, will be an excellent Orator for us; it is the moſt taking Language to ſpeak in to all perſons; ’tis ſtrangely intelligible!―― But, my Lord, let you and I do a frolick for once: You are infinitely brave, and I am in my worſt Cloaths, and for ſport’s ſake, let us ſee which ſhall get in firſt: Let me carry the full Exchequer in my pocket, and do you carry an Eloquent Oration, which ſhall be pick’d out for your purpoſe from ſome of Cicero’s works.

Mor.

Tell not me of works, as long as I carry a Key ſhall do the work for us both.

Exeunt.

Scene 5.

Enter Lotharicus.

Loth.

How weak is man, to place ſo much of his contentment in a Woman, whoſe change depends on their unconſtant humors, not their Reaſon! Thoſe joys muſt needs be ſtill uncertain of which they are Foundations. Ha! now I think of it, Melynet told me ſhe had ingag’d him to carry her to Court: Sure ſhe does deſign ſome Conqueſt there; perhaps Ambition has ſupplanted Love. Oh Jealouſie! thou Torturer of the heart! I find thou now begin’ſt to ſeize my Soul! I’le be there too.――

By ſtrict observance I’le her thoughts diſcover;

See if I’m ſcorn’d in hopes of ſome new Lover.

Exit.
F2 Scene 6. 44 F2v

Scene 6.

Enter ſeveral Lords and Ladies, and take their Seats: Preſently after the King, Lucidore, Perigrine, Almeric, and other Attendants. The King looks round, and bows to all the Ladies..

King.

Look to your hearts, my Lords, to night; Love is reſolv’d, I find, to ſet them all to work: He has ſent ſo many Beauties hither, I fear I ſhall go off my ſelf a Priſoner.

Per.

If you become ingag’d, Sir, ’tis all our duties to attend your Majeſty.

Luc.

I am gone already.

Alm.

How Lucidore? what’s become of your Miſtris?

Luc.

Faith ev’n crouded up in a corner of my heart, out of civility to make theſe Ladies room.

King.

Which is the Beauty that has charm’d thee, Lucidore?

Luc.

Your Majeſty would laugh, if I ſhould tell you how that devilliſh little blind God has ſerv’d me.

King.

Prethee let me hear then.

Luc.

Faith, Sir, that the Ladies might not fall out about the Conqueſt, he has made me in Love with all; with every one: he has compounded their ſeveral Beauties, and given it me at once in a Pill.

King.

So many Ladies taken in Love-powder at once, I confeſs, is a good large proportion.

Luc.

All my hopes is, they’l prove like Leaden Bullets, one make another paſs.

King.

Well, well, Lucidore; Cupid will find his time to make you love in earneſt, grow tame, and melancholly.

Val.

Sir, he has a Miſtris for all he talks thus madly, and has ingag’d that we ſhall ſee her.

King.

He’s mad indeed then.

Luc. 45 F3r

Luc.

Does your Majeſty think that Love will bring me into my wits?

King.

I think it can hardly put thee farther out.

Luc.

Well, if he turns once a mender of Head-pieces, by my conſent he ſhall be imploy’d firſt among Stateſmen, that ſit at the Stern in Government of Nations: As for my particular, I’le diſpence with my own cure; till he has done his work in that kind; for the general good ought to be prefer’d before private intereſt.

Alm.

He has found him an imployment will hold him tack till the day of Judgment, without having any thing to do with private brains.

The King talks to Almeric: Moriphanus knocks to get in, Valaſco looks out, ſees him, and turns to Lucidore.

Val.

O’my Conſcience here is the ſuppoſed Lord at the door, we have heard ſo much talk of, by his incomparable dreſs.

Luc.

Prethee let him in, he’ll make us very merry: It will be more divertiſement to the King and Ladies, then the Maſque.

Val.

But he has brough a whole Regiment of Footmen with him.

Luc.

Keep them out; but let him in prethee.

Enter Moriphanus and Graculus. Lucidore goes to the King.

Luc.

And pleaſe your Majeſty, here’s a ſuppos’d Lord will make you laugh: He takes himſelf, I believe, for an Ambaſſador; he comes from Yellow-land, a Country adjacent to Green-land; I am confident by his dreſs.

King.

I confeſs, if his in-ſide be like his King ſmiles. out, he will not be wanting to us for ſport: I think you muſt attaque him Lucidore.

Moriphanus looks much upon himſelf, and walks up towards Lucidore. Luc. 46 F3v

Luc.

I ſee he’ll begin with me firſt, and pleaſe your Majeſty.

Mor.

I hear there is to be dancing here to night; ſo I was reſolv’d to come and make one, with the reſt of my fellow Noble-men.

Luc.

You wrong your ſelf, my Lord, if you think here’s any one fit to be your fellow; you are not to be match’d in ne’re a Court in Chriſtendome.

Mor.

No, Sir, I came not with that intention; my heart is diſpos’d of, and therfore you’l looſe your labour, looſe your labour in troth, to ſpeak in the behalf of any of theſe Ladies, if they were in love to death with me; for all that I can do for them, after I have ſaid, Dye they muſt, and dead they were, is, God have mercy of their Souls.

Luc.

’Tis a hard caſe for you all, Ladies; you hear the doleful anſwer before you ask the queſtion. To Graculus. Pray, what’s your inexorable Lords name?

Grac.

He’s of an antient Family, I aſſure you, Sir; he’s ally’d to above three parts of the world; his name, Mor-if-an-aſs, which is by interpretation, turning it backward,――If an Aſs, there’s more.

Luc.

I am inform’d of your Pedigree, my Lord, by your man; I am acquainted with abundance of your houſe, I thank ’em, they have made me very merry.

Mor.

I believe your Lordſhip, they’l let none be ſad of their acquaintance; every one that comes into their companies, or mine, we look upon as one of us.

Enter Melynet and Marcelia at the door, and Lotharicus at another privately. The King looks earneſtly on Marcelia.

King.

Melynet, you are a happy man; and will be no leſs envy’d, whoſe intereſt could bring ſo great a wonder to the Court to night, ſo daz’ling a Sun at mid-night.

Mel. 47 F4r

Mel.

She will be much more envy’d Sir, and if ſhe ſhine ſo in your Sphear.

King.

Bring here that conquering Beauty.

Marc.

I know the diſtance of a Subject, Sir, too well, proudly to take what I have ſo little Title to by Birth or Nature.

King.

By one ’tis leſs then you deſerve; and you already have gain’d that intereſt here, Points to his heart. you eaſily may make the other undiſputed too.

Marc.

Victories ſo much above belief, excuſe thoſe that your Majeſty gives them to for your divertiſement, from a Reply.

King.

But you have no cauſe Madam, to plead that reaſon for your ſilence; you know your power too well, but you decline to own it from other Motives, which in your anſwer, poſſibly, would ſpeak you cruel.

Marc.

I know none, Sir, ſhall ever keep me from the due ſenſe of what your Majeſty is, and what I am; and if I both remember well, I hope my actions never ſhall offend my duty.

King.

But if time, Marcelia, gives me no more of happineſs then that, I ſhall be at as great a loſs as now: Love does require to be anſwer’d with ſomething of the ſame Species of it own.

Marc.

Who wants the one, Sir, in that meaſure as their condition and their obligations ought to have it, never pays the other well.

The King talks to her ſoftly, ſhe ſmiles, and ſeems ſatisfied with what he ſays.

King.

Come fair Marcelia, I wiſh it may prove worthy the honor of thy view.

The King leads her off; all the reſt of the Lords and Ladies follow.――Moriphanus catches one of the Ladies, and ſays: Mor. 48 F4v

Mor.

By your leave, my Lady, I am reſolv’d to lay hope of you for my ſhare.

She laughs: He leads her out under the arm. Lotharicus ſtays behind, and grows into a rage at the Kings Courting Marcelia.

Loth.

Hell, and its Furies! Oh I muſt be gone!

My Rage will for my Reasſon prove too ſtrong.

Woman! what art thou but mans tempting ſhame,

That did’ſt at firſt his ſoul with weakneſs ſtain:

And ſtill that power keep, and ſtill betray:

Oh that ſome Plague had took you all away!

Falſe Sex! that neither truth nor love does know,

But what ambitious pride can overthrow.

Thou Storm of Jealouſie, thy fury lay,

Or elſe my duty will be caſt away.

Oh Love! how you thoſe raging Billows rowl,

Which whirl-winds of diſpair raiſe in my ſoul!

Hold, hold, Revenge! if thou the Vict’ry gain,

I ſhall my Honor with ſome Murther ſtain.

It is my King that does my Rival grow;

That Name is Sacred: Reaſon, keep it ſo.

Cruel Marcelia! ſince thou falſe would’ſt prove,

Why did you place ſo high your change in Love?

Had any other rob’d me of my reſt,

My Sword ſhould ſearch my quiet in his breſt.

Hence, hence, falſe woman! thou’rt unworthy grown;

Still in this injur’d heart to keep thy Throne.

In vain, Lotharicus, thou hop’ſt relief,

Till death does give it, by the force of grief.

Exit.

Scene 7.

Enter Maſquers, &c. The Maſque ended.

King.

You are ſad, Marcelia, you take no pleaſure in theſe divertiſments.

Marc. 49 G1r

Marc.

I muſt confeſs, Sir, my humor was ever dull, unfit for mirth.

King.

If you continue it, I ſhall become ſo too by Sympathy.

Exeunt Omnes: The King leading out Marcelia.

Scene 8.

Enter Lotharicus.

Loth.

My heart affords my ſoul no reſt.

But I will leave the Kingdom, go and try,

Whether my Love will with her abſence dye:

That is a cure in Infant Paſſions known;

But thine, Lotharicus; too ſtrong is grown:

She in thy Soul her Empire will poſſeſs;

Not all thy Power can make her Power leſs.

Enter Melynet.

Mel.

My Lord, I’m come as much oppreſs’d with trouble from my Friendſhip, as I am ſure you muſt be from your Love, to ſee your ſelf ſo wrong’d by an unconſtant Woman.

Loth.

Her injuries to me, will prove advantages to you; therefore you have no reaſon to ſhare my grief, no more then I can take contentment in thoſe joys her change may bring you, in the increaſing favors of the King.

Mel.

My Soul is not ſo mean, to wiſh to build my riſing Honor on my Friends misfortunes: No, Lotharicus, whatſoe’re you think, my heart is generous enough to be content, that they ſhould ebb to nothing, if that could bring Marcelia back to what ſhe ought to be, and make you happy.

Loth.

No more, dear Melynet, you are too brave, and I too baſe to doubt thee: But I have receiv’d ſuch wrongs from Love, as ſomething may excuſe my queſtioning of Friendſhip.

G Mel. 50 G1v

Mel.

It may, and juſtly does; you’re wrong’d indeed; we both are injur’d; for ſhe unworthily could find no other out, to make an inſtrument to your abuſe, and her deſign, but me: I muſt be choſe out that unhappy man to carry her to Court; as if ſhe thought the trouble would not be great enough, unleſs ſhe made your Friend to help it forward.

Loth.

No, it was not that; ſhe did believe your power there would make her more regarded, that gave you the imployment.

Mel.

Curſe on the Cauſe, if her deſires from that did find ſucceſs; my power there made your affections ruine. What fatal minute was my unhappy intereſt born in! But I’le revenge my ſelf; I’le ſet all the Engines in the Court to work, and blaſt her growing hopes of ever being a Queen: ’Tis thoſe that puff her up to the contempt ſhe does expreſs of your affections.

Loth.

Has ſhe then boaſted to you of her neglects?

Mel.

I, and gloried in her Falſhood; but I hope ſhe ſhall be made repent from her loſt expectations.

Loth.

I muſt confeſs that would allay part of my miſery, to ſee her unſucceſsful in her ambitious wiſhes; the news of that would be acceptable when I am gone.

Mel.

You gone! whither my Lord?

Loth.

I do intend to leave the Kingdom with all the ſpeed I can.

Mel.

I cannot wiſh it; yet I muſt confeſs ’tis wiſely done.

I muſt approve what I would fain prevent;

But I believe you’l then find moſt content.

And, may be, when ſhe knows that you are gone,

Her pride may grow more weak, her love more ſtrong.

Loth.

I know not that; but I muſt beg your pardon, for I muſt go and take ſome Order about my Journey: I will not now bid you my laſt Adieu; but when we meet again51G2r again, I then believe that we ſhall part for ever.

Exit Lotharicus.

Mel.

I ſhall be much deceiv’d elſe: All things happen as I could wiſh; Fortune has plotted for me. She’s a good Aſſiſtant where ſhe is a Friend, Fix her but conſtant ſtars until the end.

Enter Du-Prette.

Du-Pr.

My Lord, the King has ſent for you.

Mel.

I’le go to him preſently; but I muſt give thee inſtructions firſt concerning that I intruſted laſt night to thy fidelity: Lotharicus intends to travel ſpeedily; make it thy buſineſs to know directly when he goes, and follow him; I’le furniſh thee with moneys this night: Do it as ſoon as thou canſt with any ſafety, thy reward ſhall wait thee: Be ſure and ſpeedy, and make thy Maſter thine for ever; and one more powerful then he to pay thy ſervices.

Du-Pr.

I want not courage, Sir; and for my Conſcience, it reaches, I’le aſſure you, from one Pole to the other; he cannot travel out of the compaſs of it.

Exeunt.

Scene 9.

Enter Lucidore, Peregrine, and Valaſco.

Per.

What ail’ſt thou to laugh ſo?

To Lucidore.

Luc.

To think how impatient you are to ſee one of the oldeſt Witches in the world: For, to deal ingenuouſly with you, my Miſtris is neither better nor worſe, but even ſo.

Alm.

Why, thou haſt not brought us hither to put ſuch a trick upon us?

Luc.

Put her upon you: As bad as ſhe is, I love her too well, and have too much uſe for her my ſelf, to complement you ſo far to make you any ſuch offer.

Per.

We ſhall without any oppoſition in our inclinationsG2 tions 52 G2v tions leave you her poſſeſſion: Were ſhe blind, lame, deaf, or dumb, or any thing elſe but Old, ’twere tollerable: But Old do you ſay?

Luc.

I, as the Creation almoſt.

Per.

Why, certainly thou art turn’d Projector, and think’ſt to go to heaven with a new invention by the mortified way of ſinning: you had e’en as good take the old Road, for the Devil will way-lay you in the journey; and where he ſends a Poſt-boy for a Guide, the Paſſengers commonly lodge at his Inns.

Val.

What is ſhe Old does he ſay? O moſt abominable, inſupportable, intollerable, Old! Why art thou ſo mad in all things elſe, and ſo tame in the choice of thy Miſtris? Old! Oh Time! what would women give they had you by the ears, to pull you back again!

Per.

We may let that ſtring alone; for there are ſome of our Sex would be bribing as deep as any of them for that benefit, for many reaſons: Firſt, becauſe they would have the World a little like Heaven, by times going backward and forward, and by that means prevented of coming to an end. Secondly, from a juſt belief, that Ladies doat not of that in us, which we ſo much deſpiſe in them; they are not to marry Methuſalem, no more then we do the Witch of Endor.

Luc.

And yet, before any of your brains are worthy of the place of Privy-Councel, Old Age muſt have lent you ſome of his Experiments, as well as Nature Wit.

Alm.

Then thou took’ſt thy Miſtris to fit thee for a Polititian?

Luc.

If ſhe live ſo long with me till I come to be made uſe of in that kind, I ſhall owe much to her power I dare ſwear.

Val.

Prethee, for laughter-ſake, let us ſee this Wonder-worker.

Luc. 53 G3r

Luc.

Well, keep your diſtance, and you ſhall.

Alm.

Thou haſt given us caution enough in her Character of Antiquity for that.

Per.

I’le be hang’d if ſhe be either Old, or Ugly; ſhe might be her own Guardian then; he need not keep her under Lock and Key.

The Scene opens, and there lies heaps of money up and down; and there stands five perſons about the Table with bags in their hands, dreſs’d in Antick habit: (as others at the door) They come out and dance, and keep time with their Bags and Pockets.

Luc.

What think you, Gentlemen, of her? There ſhe is; and her Attendants: Her ſervants ſhall give you a Dance.

They all laugh. The Dance ended.

You ſee this is the Miſtris of my heart and pleaſure; I purchaſe her by the ſale of my Lands.

Per.

And yet I’le be hang’d if ſhe does not run away from thee.

Luc.

Well, I am of thy mind for that: But do you not all love her? Confeſs, confeſs.

Per.

The truth of it is, we ſhould all lye horribly if we did deny that; we all adore her, and are her moſt humble and faithful ſervants; for without her, there is no ſatsfaction in this World.

Luc.

No, nor hardly a place in the other World, in Hell or Heaven, but what ſhe helps to purchaſe. You may ſend your Venture by her to which you pleaſe.

Val.

That’s true Lucidore; but I believe thou only keep’ſt a Correſpondence in the Lower Region.

Luc.

I do ſo: It was always my fortune to keep company with ſuch as you are, all Merchants of that place: I do not think yet amongſt us all, we have intereſt enough to54G3v to make one Bill of Exchange ſo good as to paſs there.

Per.

There’s not one of a thouſand that goes about to try till fifty or threeſcore, nor ſo much as think of it; the Seas are very rough thither, and troubleſome.

Luc.

I, hang’t; and one ſhall be ſure to be pleaſure-ſick all the way, and muſt be ſtill taking of bitter Portions to expel the groſs humors of our inclinations; not one Cordial allow’d of; live or die, ſink or ſwim, not one ſatisfaction to be had till the Voyage is ended: I am not old enough yet to think of Faſting and Prayer,; when I have ſome years over my head, I ſhall begin to do as other Grave ones have done before me, leave thoſe Vices that will no longer keep me company, and think of Heaven out of neceſſity.

Per.

Nay, I dare ſwear, thou wilt not endeavour to go thither, till thou art a Criple both by diſeaſes and time, if Death will let thee live ſo long.

Luc.

I believe thou would’ſt be as glad as I, that thy life was Copy-hold-Land, that as one were out, thou mighteſt renew another.

I hate ſuch Fools, us cannot be content

With pleaſures which that World to this hath lent.

Exeunt Omnes.

The End of the third Act.

Act IV. Scene 1.

The Scene chang’d to Lyons. Enter Lotharicus paſſing one way, and Euryalus another.

Eury.

Ha! my deareſt Friend Lotharicus! what unexpected accident of Fortune has given me this happineſs at Lyons?

Loth.

Her moſt malicious one to me.

Eury. 55 G4r

Eury.

How? Does our meeting, after ſo long an abſence, prove ſo unwelcome? Time has a changing power over all things then I ſee.

Loth.

Do not injure ſo much that friendſhip I have preſerv’d ſo faithfully, and will continue to my Grave, that little time my griefs will let me live.

Eury.

I fear Marcelia’s dead, and dare not ask: The ſadneſs of thy look confirms it to me.

Loth.

She is indeed; and I, that Death no longer can out-live.

Eury.

Poor Siſter! Poor Marcelia!

Loth.

You need not grieve, my Lord, ſhe’s only dead to me.

Eury.

Can you believe I can be ſo inſenſible of looſing in a Siſter, what you ſo much lament the loſs of in a Miſtris? If ſhe had perfections that rendred her worthy of your ſorrow, they have as juſt a claim to mine.

Loth.

Oh, dear Euryalus, it is not the death ſhe ows to Nature makes me ſad; it is her death to me, and all the Vows ſhe made me.

Eury.

How? do you tell me ſhe’s unworthy grown; ſo loſt to Virtue? Lotharicus, do not ſtrain friendſhip up ſo high, by charging of my Blood with Crimes.

Loth.

I give them not that name; but I, with joy, would empty all my veions, and let life out, ſo that my knowledge gave my words the Lye.

Eury.

Grown falſe without a Cauſe?

Loth.

I ſay not ſo; I will not make her Accuſation more guilty then it is.

Eury.

I underſtand not this myſterious Language; if you have baſely given her reaſon for to change, condemn not the effect of your own Act; but draw, and juſtifie your injuring me in her.

Loth.

She has a cauſe from her Ambition; but my Love56G4v Love was never yet ſo Criminal to give her any: You are like to have the King your Brother; that will render you I ſuppoſe contented, though it make your friend ſtill miſerable.

Eury.

How, the King!

Loth.

Yes: I give not this account for fear of fighting; you know I dare, and can, defend my life, though now death would become ſo welcome, I ſhould unwillingly reſiſt it.

Eury.

Ne’re think a Crown can come in competition with my friendſhip; I love my Sov’reign as a Loyal Subject, will give my Life and Fortunes to preſerve his Rights, and him: This is my duties Obligation: But I had rather give Marcelia to thy Arms, then ſee her plac’d upon his Throne; nor ſhall ſhe ſit there and triumph over thy injur’d joys.

Loth.

I cannot wiſh, my generous friend, that you ſhould make your ſenſe of my unhappineſs, an injury to your Fortunes.

Eury.

I’le ſink ’em all, but I’le reſtore thee to thy loſt contentment. I’le teach her ignorant Soul, that Acts of Honor is the Nobleſt greatneſs: I had rather have her live in Fame for Virtue when ſhe’s dead, then in a Title.

Loth.

Pray force not her inclinations: I had rather ſtill be miſerable, then make her ſo from your Power. Gifts of conſtraint, though in themſelves the higheſt bleſſing, are burthenſome: Her perſon, without her heart, can be no happineſs; and both, I know you cannot give me the poſſeſſion of.

Eury.

No more, my friend. How long do you intend to ſtay in theſe parts?

Loth.

But till to morrow: My thoughts are reſtleſs, and I follow them.

Eury.

How far do you intend to travel?

Loth. 57 H1r

Loth.

Till I arrive at my wiſh’d journeys end.

Eury.

What place is that?

Loth.

’Tis Death, ’tis Death, my Friend: till then I’le rove about the World, and give my ſelf no conſtant habitation.

Exeunt. The Scene changes.

Scene 2.

Enter Marcelia and Deſha.

Marc.

My Brother is come to Lyons, I hear; I will go write him word how falſe Lotharicus is proved. Go, ſend the Page where I bid you.

Deſha.

Yes, Madam.

Exit Deſha.

Marc.

What ſtrange effects of Fortune do I prove!

How variouſly ſhe in my life doth move!

A Prince ſo brave, and in his Power ſo great,

Forc’d to beg favors humbly at my feet:

She never for thy glory more could do,

Then ſhe in that, Marcelia, did for you.

Pride could not raiſe, nor ſwell my hopes more high,

Then ſhe has given me Power to ſatisfie:

Nor can ſhe bring my heart to more diſtreſs,

Then ſhe has done in all my happineſs:

Then bribes me with a Crown to be content,

And makes Ambition prove Loves Monument.

But love, if true, did never Power know,

That greater, then it ſelf, could ever grow;

But that of Heaven; when it within the Soul

Does monſtrous prove, and Virtue would controul.

No, no, I ſtill muſt love whilſt I have breath;

Nothing can give my paſſion date, but death.

But that Lotharicus mayn’t pleaſure take,

To think that his doth ſleep, and mine doth wake;

I’le force my courage, give me to thee King,

Though I ſhall be a heartleſs offering:

H And 58 H1v

And on a Throne in ſecret mourn that Fate

Deſtroy’d his Love, and rais’d me to ſuch State.

As Princes ought, I then will act my part,

Not make my face proſpective to my heart;

Nor give the Kings contentment cauſe to doubt,

When his conſin’d, my Love does wander out:

My griefs and paſſions all ſhall inward burn;

The brace, their bodies, makes their troubles Urn.

Exit Scene changes to a Garden.

Scene 3.

Enter Perilla and Arcaſia.

Arcaſ.

This fine Evening, methinks, ſhould fill the Garden full of company.

Enter Moriphanus, Graculus, and Boys.

Ha! what have we here? A Knight of the Sun upon my life.

Per.

You are miſtaken, he goes for an Outlandiſh Lord.

Arc.

Prethee what’s his name?

Per.

Moriphanus.

Arc.

Oh, I know him now, at leasſt in Character: he ſeeks to be your Servant.

Per.

You are much deceiv’d, it is to be my Maſter: The firſt time of his Viſit he ſpeaks all Matrimony, and left the diſcourſe of Love for the ſecond Interview: Marriage is the Captain, I will aſſure you, of this diſcourſe, and Love the Lieutenant.

Arc.

Nay, ’tis well if affection has any office in buſineſs of that kind; for there is nothing ſpeaks a Gallant now ſo ill-bred, as Marrying and Loving both in a place. But prethee let’s make towards him, for I long to be cenſuring your Servant: Perhaps I may find more Merit in him then report ſpeaks, for that ſeldome knows any mean in59H2r in diſparagement or praiſe.

Laughs.

Per.

If your curioſity be ſo great, you ſhall go by your ſelf, for I’m reſolv’d he ſhall not ſee me.

Arc.

If his company be ſo troubleſome, the moſt certain way to be rid of it, is to marry him; and at the preſent put on your Mask, and that will ſecure you: for I muſt go that way and meet him.

Laughs extrememly.

Per.

Prethee what’s the matter you laugh ſo exceedingly?

Arc.

I am conceited you us’d your Servant very roughly when he waited on you laſt: Confeſs, did not you make your ſervants beat him?

Per.

Why ſhould you think ſo prethee?

Arc.

By the trimming of his Suit with that deep Blew and Black: upon my Conſcience it is an Embleme of ſome favours of yours in that kind; for he looks like one that would be cudgell’d, put off his hat, and give thanks.

Per.

Nay, for that matter, I dare ſwear for him, he would, as ſubmiſſively as any man, take a beating, if any one would beſtow the pains to give it him.

Arc.

Well, I am moſt ſtrangely taken with the Mounſieur, as I live; I’d give a hundred Piſtols he were in love with me: My Doctor tells me I am going into a Conſumption; but I dare ſwear his company but one two moneths would cure me. O moſt incomparable Don Quixot! what faces and poſtures he has!

Per.

Prethee let us go, thou haſt laugh’d enough; and if thou hold’ſt thy humor any longer, thou wilt put me into the ſame vein, and that will make me be look’d on as a mad Widdow.

Arc.

The more mad, the more faſhionable; as long as thou art ſure thy Husband is ſafe enough, for ever coming back again to uſe thee worſe by taking of it ill, thou need’ſt not care,

H2 Per. 60 H2v

Per.

What would I give now that my Year of Mourning were as much worn out as my Melancholly?

Mor.

Have I not ſeen you before, Ladies?

Comes to them.

Arc.

That Queſtion you muſt anſwer your ſelf; examine your memory, and give account to your knowledg: But if you have ſeen me before, and have forgot me, I ſhall take it inconceiveably ill, that you ſhould have turn’d me out of your head as long as the room was empty.

Mor.

What fine expreſſions theſe Ladies have for any thing they ſpeak of, Graculus?

Aſide to his man.

Grac.

O yes, my Lord, they are ſo us’d to good Language, they can call you a Fool in a Complement, and you ſhall never the wiſer for it.

Mor.

Not the wiſer for it, ſayeſt thou?

Grac.

No, not one jot I’faith.

Arc.

Do you remember as yet?

Mor.

No, upon my Honor, I can’t call to mind neither your face, nor hers in the Mask.

Arc.

Then your Lordſhip knows a face no better in a Vizard, then out of it. Are you not acquainted with our names neither?

Mor.

No, I ſwear upon the Title of a Lord: But pray Ladies, do me that high favour to tell me what I may call you.

Arc.

Why, we will give you leave to be our God-father; call us what you pleaſe; but we dare not truſt you with our Names, you are ſo great a Gallant: Shall we Perilla?

Mor.

What is ſhe my dearly beloved Miſtris Perilla?

Arc.

I thought as much; no ſooner know her name, but taking away her reputation: You are gotten into the perfect Road of the Town I ſee.

Per.

I am Perilla, ſince I am diſcover’d, but not your Miſtris.

Mor. 61 H3r

Mor.

By my Honor, I’le ſwear before all the Judges in the Kingdome, you are, and ſhall be.

Per.

What, whether I will or no? Pray how many Miſtriſſes more has your deſerving Lordſhip?

Mor.

Not one more in the world.

Per.

Not in poſſeſſion, but in report; for a right Gallant never keeps account in that kind upon truth, but as his humor ſerves him for boaſting, and his memory to repeat over a good long Catalogue of Ladies names.

Arc.

Be ſure to reckon, my Lord, that none of the reſt of the Modes of the Town may give in a larger Bill of Ladies favors; for if you do, you are loſt if you think of Marriage with her; for ſhe has ſworn whoſoever ſhe makes her Husband, ſhall have bin as much, if not more, the Favorite of her Sex, then any.

Mor.

Why, I can be as much as the beſt then in their eſteem.

Arc.

Can be? that’s not enough, there’s no glory to be had in that by talking upon ſuppoſition: You muſt ſay you have bin.

Per.

Well, you will not confeſs then how many Miſtriſſes you have had, my Lord?

Mor.

If you examine me upon Oath, I muſt; for my Conſcience is very tender.

Per.

Upon Oath? you may be confident I do.

Mor.

Why then truly I muſt needs ſay, I have had all the Ladies almoſt in the Suburbs, and City, from the Bib to the Furr’d Gown, lay aſide all thoughts of their Honor and Virtue for my ſake.

Per.

Well, your Lordſhip has gained much upon my affection, by this acknowledgment of the general favor you have had amongſt us: I’le have your Miſtriſſes poll’d, and if no young Blade bring me a larger Bill of Fare out of the Country, ’tis ten to one but you ſhall know my mind in a week or two.

Enter 62 H3v Enter Peregrine and Lucidore.

Per.

That’s the Widdow I told thee of; Moriphanus is her Servant.

Luc.

He ſhall be hang’d before he ſhall have her; I could almoſt love her enough to Marry her my ſelf.

Per.

Nay, ſhe’s very rich too.

Luc.

Double temptations! I am reſolv’d I’le get acquainted with her; and if ſhe and I can agree, ’tis odds but I ſhall have a fling at Matrimony before I die.

Per.

Well, Arcaſia, let us leave the Garden now, the Air is ſharp, and if I ſtay longer, I am afraid my Love will catch cold.

Arc.

What, when the Fire’s by?

Mor.

It cannot indeed, Madam; if you mean me, I’le ſtay as long as you pleaſe.

Per.

I wont venture it longer; I find it not well already.

Exeunt omnes, præter Lucid. and Peregrine.

Luc.

Come, Peregrine, let us follow that day-ſtar.

Exeunt. Scene changes to Marſeills.

Scene 4.

Enter Du-Prette and 3 Villains.

Du-Pr.

I am mad that Philampras is not to be found.

1 Vill.

Why, you know it was not to be done till to morrow.

Du-Pr.

That’s true; but the wind may ſerve before that time, and then he’s gone: Now we may be ſure of him; he muſt come this way from the place he sups.―― Be ſure that you diſpatch him.

2 Vill.

Fear not; we’ll make him ſafe enough for ever riſing in judgment againſt you in this world, what e’re he does in the next.

Enter Lotharicus, and two lighting him with Torches.

Du-Pr.

Here he comes.

The 63 H4r The Villains aſſault him, and the men with Torches run away: Lotharicus draws to defend himſelf.

Loth.

I would willingly die, but not by the hands of Villains.

He fights bravely, kills one of the Villains; they wound him in many places, and he falls.

3 Vill.

He’s gone to Heaven or Hell, and has took one of us with him for his Attendance.

Du-Pr.

Are you ſure he’s dead?

3.Vill.

I, ſure enough, unleſs he has more lives then one.

Du-Pr.

For fear he ſhould not, I’le give him my laſt bleſſing.

1 Vill.

Hold; he’s dead I’le warrant Pulls out a Piſtol. you; and the noiſe of that going off, will bring in company, and betray us: If you are not ſatisfied, we’ll open two or three Caſements more to let his Soul paſs out by; but ’tis unneceſſary.

Hark; I hear a noiſe; let’s They go back to wound him again, and hear a noiſe. fly; we ſhall be taken.

3 Vill.

What ſhall we do with our dead companion?

1 Vill.

Leave him, he is not known here.

Exeunt omnes. Enter Meraſpas and Philampras, and two other men with Torches.

Phil.

Pray let us make all the haſt we can: I have bin all this Evening to find you or your Lord out.

Meraſ.

Had not your buſineſs bin of ſuch high importance to my Lord, as you ſay, I would have borrow’d an hours time longer to have drank with my friends here.

1 Man.

Another time will do as well: we will go with you as far as the houſe, and there take our leaves; to morrow we’ll meet again.

Meraſ.

I wonder what it is a clock?

Phil. 64 H4v

Phil.

Between eleven and twelve.

2 Man.

What’s that lies yonder?

1 Man steps forth.

1 Man.

Ha! a Gentleman kill’d.

Meraſ.

Heaven bleſs my Lord. Goes to him and looks. O, it is my Lord! It is my Lord that’s murthered! Oh curſed Villains that have done this, and curſed I that was not with him to have hope to defend his life, or loſt my own in endeavouring of it! What ſhall I do?

2 Man.

There is no remedy now, poor Gentleman.

Meraſ.

Pray help me take up his Body, and carry it home.

Exeunt with Body of Lotharicus. Scene changes to a Garden.

Scene 5.

Enter Calinda and Ericina.

Eric.

Are you reſolv’d ſtill to give up your ſelf to ſo much ſadneſs? Is it ſo great a wonder to find men falſe, that you no better are prepar’d, from reaſonable expectation, to meet this change and common trouble?

Cal.

It is true, Ericina, our afflictions do uſually receive abatement from not being ſingle Sufferers; but love admits not of allays, like other ills; nor is that humor (in my mind) ſo generally to be boaſted of: Beſides, Love, when it firſt takes poſſeſſion of our hearts, deprives us of our Reaſon; and that’s the chief reſiſting ſtrength, by which we oppoſition make againſt all other accidents of Fortunes malice.

Eric.

I cannot think a Paſſion by Gods and Men ſo Deified, can carry in it ſo much deſtructive danger; for if it robs our Souls of Reaſon, it makes us like to Beaſts: And certainly Heaven ne’re deſign’d that Metamorphoſis, from whence we have receiv’d the higheſt proof of that All-conquering Paſſion: Beſides, ſome with their Reaſon make their Choice, and what it does approve, it may ſubſiſt65I1r ſubſiſt with, or baniſh it, if it too far intrude: That Reaſon is very weak and ſluggisſh, that ſuffers any Paſſion to grow ſo ſtrong as to ſupplant it.

Cal.

I do not wiſh thee ſo much ill as ’tis unhappily to Love, or elſe I ſhould be glad to ſee how you would rule your inclinations, which I confeſs you mannage well in ſuppoſition.

――Would mine were governed by fancy too;

I, Player-like, could raign as well as you.

We can, unmov’d, hear others ſufferings tell,

Which, if our own, we ſhould not bear it well.

Eric.

You can no trouble have but what is mine;

My love does make my ſhare as great as thine.

Unkind Calinda, what is’t you intend?

To puniſh your falſe Lover in your Friend

Can his inconſtancy make you deſpiſe,

That friendſhip which you once ſo much did prize?

If you ſo great injuſtice will allow,

Ne’re cenſure him; he did not break his Vow:

And who the ſelf-ſame Errors will commit,

In prudence ought in others pardon it.

Cal.

You of injuſtice talk, whilſt only I

Find from you both ſo much you fain would die.

Friendſhip and Love to me are cruel grown;

I wiſh to Heav’n that I had neither known.

Were yours true, you would not mine ſuſpect,

Our doubt grows ſtrongeſt from our own defect.

You on my Love a blemiſh fain would throw,

That in your change you might leſs guilty ſhow.

Thoſe that are wiſe do ſetting Suns forſake,

And with the riſing ones their friendſhips make.

You know who ’tis has ſet his heart on fire;

Improve your int’reſt e’re the flame expire.

I Love 66 I1v

Love that plays Truant once without a cauſe,

Will ſtill an Out-law be to Honor’s Laws:

And days, whoſe mornings do appear moſt bright,

Are often over-caſt before ’tis night.

If ſhe his ſeeming paſſion entertain,

His half-made vows will coſt his eyes ſome rain.

Eric.

She cannot greater ſhow’rs for Love let fall,

Then I ſhall do for friendſhips Funeral.

Calinda, by my death you ſoon will know,

Whither to that I have bin true or no:

Then I am ſure that you will grow more juſt,

And ſhed ſome tears for your unkind miſtruſt.

Cal.

If that can cure thy griefs my doubts have bred,

I’le make my eyes another Deluge ſhed,

Dear Ericina, can y’a pardon give,

To an offence makes me unfit to live?

Eric.

I can forgive much more then you can do:

Love, in that kind, ne’re yet a limit knew.

Cal.

I grieve to think I ſhould a debt contract,

Of which I cannot pay the Int’reſt back.

Eric.

And I am ſad to ſee your heart poſſeſt

Still with that Love, which gives your thoughts no reſt.

Cal.

Thy charming voice would make them calmer grow.

Eric.

I’d ſing, and ne’re give off, if I thought ſo.

Cal.

Sing then that Song my humor ſuits and mind,

I’le ſit down here, if thou wilt be ſo kind.

She ſits down, and leans melancholly upon her arm.

Song.

1

Eric.

Oh, you powerful Gods, if I muſt be,

An injur’d Off’ring to Love’s Deity,

Grant my revenge, this Plague on men,

That Women ne’re may love agen:

Then 67 I2r

Then I’le with joy ſubmit unto my Fate,

Which by your Juſtice gives their Empire date.

2

Depoſe that proud inſulting Boy,

Who moſt is pleas’d when he can moſt deſtroy:

O! let the World no longer govern’d be,

By ſuch a Blind and Childiſh Deity;

For if you Gods be in your Power ſevere,

We ſhall adore you not from love, but fear.

3

But if you’l his Divinity maintain

O’re men, falſe men, confine his rost’ring raign:

And when their Hearts Love’s greateſt torments prove,

Let that not pity; but our laughter move.

Thus ſcorn’d and loſt to all their wiſhes aim,

Let Rage, Deſpair, and Death, then end their flame.

’Tis very late, my dear Calinda, and we had beſt be gone.

Cal.

It may be ſo, for time does ſlowly paſs,

That runs by high Afflictions Hour-glaſs.

Exeunt.

Scene 6.

Enter Euryalus reading a Letter.

Eur.

If thou had’ſt ſuch reaſon for thy change, I do not blame thee then, Marcelia; I would I had receiv’d thy Letter ſooner, e’re Lotharicus and I had parted, I would have juſtified thou Nobly did’ſt to ſlight him, and entertain the Kings Addreſs, ſince he ſo baſely left thee for another; nor ſhall he ſcape the puniſhment of his Perjuries, for I will follow him to give him death.

Enter Du-Prette, and two Villains fighting.

1 Vill.

Did’ſt thou think to make us do thy work, and cheat us of our wages? we purſu’d thee hither to Lyons to give thee death for thy deceit.

They wound him, he falls. I2 Enter 68 I2v Enter Euryalus paſſing, and two Footmen.

Du-Pr.

Oh Lotharicus, Lotharicus! thy murder is reveng’d. Oh Heaven! how conſtantly you ſtill purſue.

Eur.

Ha! what art thou that talk’ſt of Lotharicus murder? Tell me, or I will take that remnant of thy life away, and by thy words, haſt that black guilt upon it? Speak quickly.

Du-Pr.

Sir, ’tis not the threat of Death can force me to confeſs, ſince I ſhall make my life, by doing it, a forfeiture to Juſtice: But from repentance and remorſe I tell―― my name’s Du-Prette, and I know you to be my Lord Euryalus: I’le ſay no more whilſt Witneſſes are by; now take my life, and if you think it fit; or if you let me longer live, I will inform you all I know; that which ſhall give your Courage and your Sword new edge, and Noble work.

Eur.

Help carry him off.

The footmen take him up.

Look that thou do it, as promis’d, then diſcover;

I’le ſpare one Villain to betray another.

Exeunt. Scene changes.

Scene 7.

Enter Lucidore and Peregrine.

Luc.

That little Trumpeter, Cupid; has ſo perpetually ſounded in my thoughts the Widdows Perfections; her Wit, her Beauty, and her Wealth, as he has caus’d an uproar in my heart, and ſome of my own Subjects has liſted themſelves Souldiers under her Command.

Per.

Which prethee are turn’d Rebels?

Luc.

My Will, my Inclinations, my Covetouſneſs, and my Vanity, to take her from the reſt of my Servants; and they ſo ſtoutly fight my former reſolutions, and my reaſon, that, hang me, I believe they’l get the day, and tumble me head long into a Married Life, and make me grow grey,69I3r grey, and grave, with a Whither-go-ye, ſqualling Kitlings, and Curtain Lectures.

Per.

Certainly thou art a ſtrange lover of Hell, that thou wilt be running into it before thy time.

Luc.

No, you miſtake; Marriage is a preparative for another place, both by the mortification of it, and the honeſty.

Enter Moriphanus, Graculus, and Footmen.

Per.

Your Rival has bin to ſee the Widdow.

Luc.

I’le Rival his Coxcomb if he comes any more there. Do you hear Sir? Turns to Moriphanus. I am inform’d you are the Widdow Perilla’s ſervant.

Mor.

I ſcorn your words; I her ſervant! I’d have you to know I think to make her my Wife, and ſhe thinks to make me her Husband. I her ſervant!

Luc.

Well, whatſoe’re ſhe thinks, you had beſt think of her no more, or win her now by your Sword.

Mor.

Win her? did not I tell you juſt now, I have won her already? and I am not ſuch a Fool to fight for any thing that’s my own: Stake another Lady to her, and have at you who ſhall have both.

Luc.

But then you ſhall fight.

Mor.

Shall fight?

Luc.

I, ſhall fight, or be beaten.

Mor.

Oh, I thought you had bin a man of that Authority, to have made me fight whither I would or no. I tell you then, Sir, I love her ſo well, I’d ſooner be beaten for her ſake, then fight for any woman in the world beſides.

Per.

This is a rare Coward; we’ll have excellent ſport with him.

Luc.

Why, you may take your own Election, either fight, be beaten, or forbear coming there.

Mor.

Well, Sir, ſince I may take my own choice, I’le take time to conſider of it; I won’t reſolve on any thing too haſtily.

Grac. 70 I3v

Grac.

My Lord, you know your own certain mind already, and had as good tell it before you go.

Moriphanus offers to go off, and Lucidore takes him by the ſleeve.

Luc.

Nay, you are not like to ſtir till you have, Sir.

Mor.

Why, Sir, then I will, becauſe I don’t much care if I do.

Studies.

And now, Sir, I have conſider’d of it, I’le neither fight nor be beaten for any woman, as long as there’s God’s plenty of them in the world. Here’s a quarter and a do about a woman indeed!

Luc.

Why then you’l come no more there?

Mor.

No that I won’t: But what if ſhe comes to me? I warrant you’l go and challenge her too, and fight with her: you think ſhe’s to be won by fighting; but, alas, you are deceiv’d, ſhe is not to be won by the Blade; there’s a Bill in the caſe which you know not of, which will prevail before the Sword.

Luc.

But it ſhan’t be long before I know the Bill, and the buſineſs.

Mor.

But what if I will not tell you? am I bound to tell you all I know.

Luc.

No, not if you’l fight; but you muſt otherwiſe, I tell you that.

Mor.

You ſhould not need to preſs me thus to fight, had I not made a vow, the laſt man I kill’d in ſeven years, never to anſwer nor make a challenge to any man living: no, you ſhould have no cauſe to call upon me twice.

Grac.

To run away.

Aſide.

Mor.

You’d find I would not be abus’d. O that the time were expir’d: you put me into ſuch a rage, that my paſſion muſt vent it ſelf ſome way. Falls a crying, and turns to Grac. Graculus, did’ſt never hear that fighting was Phyſical?

Grac. 71 I4r

Grac.

Not I, upon my life, my Lord.

Mor.

Why then, if thou dar’ſt take my word for it, it is.

Grac.

But Sir, what makes you weep?

Mor.

My vow, Graculus, my vow!

Wipes his eyes.

Per.

Your pretence of a vow, is but an excuſe for your Cowardice.

Grac.

Why, in troth, my Lord, if I were as you, I would fight, and for once break a vow made in cold blood, now your courage is ſo ſpur’d and chaf’d with theſe quarrelling Lords.

Mor.

Let me ſee, let me ſee. Hum; no way Studies. left to break this rotten Engagement, and fight?

Grac.

Yes, my Lord, you may eaſily break it where ’tis rotten.

Luc.

If you can find none in your Conſcience, ſend but for half a dozen Advocates, give ’em double fees, and they’l find you one in theirs, and a point in Law to make it good.

Mor.

If it can be done by them; I’le make my own Conſcience do’t as well, and ſave me that charges: And ſuppoſe I am reſolv’d to fight, there’s more to be conſider’d of then juſt that; there’s time, weapon, and place.

Per.

That you ſhall have the liberty to Elect.

Mor.

Well then, let me conſider; as to the time I can’t do it this ſeven years, I am ſure, I have buſineſs for every particular day; and if I appoint ten or twenty years hence, and am call’d to take my place of Honor in the other world before, then you’l ſay, I am not a man of my word; a Knave, a Cheat, a Raſcal, or ſome ſuch thing: Therefore it ſhall be a Duel in the other world.

Grac.

O brave, my Lord, that will do rarely: But who ſhall be your Seconds?

Mor.

Hold thy prating: I’le nominate my ſelf who ſhall be both our Seconds: He ſhall have Alexander the Great, 72 I4v Great, and the Maid of Orleance, and I’le have Sampſon, and William the Conquerour.

Grac.

I, my Lord, do ſo; ſtand to your hold; for you may lend Sampſon, if you liſt, one of your Jaw-bones, and then he ſhall fight with Alexander the Great.

Luc.

If you will fight, or dare fight, fight now for your Miſtris: we’ll find another quarrel to exerciſe your courage in th’other world.

Mor.

I tell you I will not fight a ſtroak till the time appointed; ſo I may have ſome cowardly dog-trick or other put upon me: I’le have all that ever liv’d from the Creation, to that day, ſtand by when I Duel, to ſee that there is fair play. And ſo no more of that: I’m in great haſt, and muſt leave your angry Honors.

Luc.

Hold, hold.

Mor.

I’le neither hold, nor ſtay: I am going to the Cutlers to beſpeak weapons againſt the time appointed; and d’ye hear, be ſure you meet me there.

Exeunt.

Scene 8.

Enter Melynet reading a Letter.

Mel.

Lotharicus dead! thou haſt bravely done,

And juſtly the reward of Death haſt won;

Which thou ſhalt have; but e’re thou com’ſt at it,

Thou muſt another Tragedy commit.

My Fortune now is almoſt made ſecure,

There is but one blow more it can endure:

Euryalus, thou muſt not live to be

And interpoſing Cloud ’twixt that and me:

For e’re my greatneſs ſhall be ſo withſtood,

I’le make my paſſage through a Sea of Blood.

My Soul is with too towring hopes poſſeſt:

To be by thoughts of Conſcience now ſuppreſt:

Nor ſhall Euryalus prolong the date,

Which I have given for his dying Fate.

Exit.
Scene 9. 73 K1r

Scene 9.

Enter Euryalus in diſguize; and Deſha.

Eur.

Pray go tell your Lady here is a Gentleman has buſineſs of importance with her, and deſires to tell it her in private.

Deſh.

I ſhall acquaint her, Sir.

Exit Deſha.

Eur.

All things are in this Kingdome as plentiful and

proſperous, as if that none but Saints inhabited it,

But ſurely Sin’s infection is grown high,

When Monarchs once their Souls with Murders Dye:

For they are Suns on which the Subjects gaze,

To gather rules for mannaging their ways.

How ſtrictly then are they to Virtue ty’d,

Who, by Example, are a Nations Guide?

Enter Marcelia.

Marc.

Oh, my dear Brother! dear Euryalus, how――
He puts her back.

Eur.

Thou’rt grown unworthy of ſuch kindneſs now.

It is not love has brought me back, but hate.

Marc.

Oh Heaven, what have I done to make you ſay’t!

Eur.

What have you not, could baſe and barb’rous be?

Murder Lotharicus, diſhonour me.

Marc.

I kill Lotharicus! Heaven knows that I,

Falſe as he is, to ſave his life would die.

For worlds I would not live that grief to know.

Eur.

What Devil helps thee to diſſemble ſo?

Has that black Favorite of Hell’s deſign,

Taught thee this virtue with the reſt to joyn?

Was’t not enough you did his life betray,

To ſerve your pride made that be took away;

But with your curs’d malicious blaſting breath,

Strive, in his Fame, to give him ſecond death?

Or, did your Soul ſuch ſharp reprovements give

To your falſe heart, that fear’d to let him live?

K Could 74 K1v

Could bubling Greatneſs thy ambition ſwell

To ſuch a height, to ſend thee Poſt to Hell.

Marc.

I have no guilt, I hope, can bring me there,

But in my Grave you’l throw me by diſpair;

For nothing’s left to make me wiſh to ſtay,

If my Lotharicus be took away.

Where he in aſhes is, I’d rather be,

Then here poſſeſs the whole worlds Monarchy.

Thy deadlieſt ſtroak thou now haſt given, Fate;

Marcelia’s ſtrength cannot ſupport the weight.

In life I nothing now but horrors ſee,

Since earth is rob’d (Lotharicus) of thee.

All it poſſeſs’d of great and brave, now lies

Gluttonous Death, thy malice Sacrifice:

Since thou his Noble life refus’d to ſpare,

No longer this unhappy one forbear.

I court thy cold imbraces to this breaſt,

For till my ſoul’s with his, I ne’re ſhall reſt:

And ſure it can’t be long before it be,

Since grief and love both ſtrive to ſet it free.

Eur.

What’s this I ſee? certain I’m in a dream;

Falſhood cannot pretend ſuch high extream.

Marcelia, what to judge I do not know,

Since for his death you ſo much paſſion ſhow.

Marc.

Judge what you will, my Innocence you’l prove,

By that which quickly will your doubts remove.

Eur.

Then ’tis that dev’liſh Melynet has laid

That plot, which both his Love and Life betraid.

Treacherous Serpent! Monſter of Mankind!

How could thy Noble Blood ſuch tincture find?

Or thy falſe Soul permit thee to divide,

Two hearts which thou did’ſt find ſo ſtrongly ty’d?

For he did for thy change ſuch trouble ſhow,

As nothing but the higheſt flame could know:

His 75 K2r

His daily wiſhes were, he might expire,

Becauſe he had out-liv’d Marcelia’s fire.

Points to her head.

Marc.

Add, add no more, leaſt reaſon quit this place,

And after that, then this be left by Grace.

Her heart.

I am a Mortal, and no more can ſhow

Of power, in my paſſions overthrow.

Eur.

To raiſe thy miſeries I do not deſign,

But I would have thee th’top of Honor climb:

Refuſe the King, then do thy Honor right,

To ſhew that greatneſs dazles not thy ſight;

For his conſent was given to the fact;

And marrying him thou wilt his guilt contract.

Marc.

I’le ſooner be to a dead body joyn’d,

Then ever in his guilty Arms confin’d:

No, no, Euryalus, his Crown can’t take,

That Love away, his Virtues could not ſhake:

From one revenge I gave him my conſent,

And from this ſecond I’le his hopes prevent.

Eur.

Dear, dear Marcelia, my moſt Noble part,

Thou mak’ſt me jealous of thy generous heart.

Lotharicus will ſurely in his Grave,

Rejoyce to ſee thou art ſo true and brave.

For Melynet, wh’has rais’d him ſelf ſo great,

By ſtrangling Virtue in it’s proper Seat;

I’le truſt this Arm to find me out the way,

The price of Murder in his heart to pay.

The King is by that awful name ſecure;

Subjects are bound what they do to endure.

Heav’n reſerves it ſelf the puniſhing them:

They are not here to give account to men.

Who ſtrikes at them, Divinity gives a blow;

Whoſe Vice-Roys Monarchs all are here below.

Exeunt.

The End of the Fourth Act.

K2 Act V. 76 K2v

Act V. Scene 1.

Enter Moriphanus and Graculus.

Mor.

A very likely matter indeed, that ſhe ſhould refuſe to marry me becauſe I would not fight for her: No, no, ſhe is not ſo ungodly, and loves me better then to deſire I ſhould venture my life: Beſides, I never told her, or ſaid ſuch a word, that I would kill my ſelf for her, or kill any man for her, nor go to the Devil for her; and thou mayſt be ſure ſhe does not look that I ſhould do more then my bargain.

Grac.

Why, my Lord, are you ſo ignorant, I mean unknowing, to ſet any bounds to your promiſe to a Miſtris? Why, you ſhould run full ſpeed unto all you thought ſhe would have, or could poſſibly deſire, to make her think you were one mad, and dying for her; and when y’ have won her, and are married, then you may do as moſt married men does, pace them in the performance, or quite bed-rid them; or if you will keep in the rank of the beſt Husbands, why then you muſt make your Wife Parſon of your Courtings, Vows, and Promiſes, and give her the Tyths; for when they have run out of their wits ſo far, that it cannot keep’em from going to Service, ’tis fit they know they have a Maſter.

Enter Perilla and Arcaſia.

Per.

Your Servant, my Lord.

Mor.

No, Madam, I am not ſo happy to have it ſo yet. Was not that well anſwer’d, Graculus?

To his man.

Grac.

It was anſwer’d like you ſelf, my Lord.

Per.

Do you obſerve, Arcaſia? The verieſt Fool that is, can expect Government if he marries.

Arc. 77 K3r

Arc.

And well they may: It is but reaſonable, that thoſe Fools that can get into that Authority, ſhould govern thoſe Fools that gave it: Don’t you think it fit in judgment, that the leaſt Fool ſhould rule the greater?

Per.

I’le not ſpeak my Opinion to the prejudice of my intention. But, my Lord, pray what gives me the honor of this early viſit? for I had hardly din’d when you came.

Mor.

I’le tell you a thing, but I would not have you trouble your ſelf about it.

Per.

Truly, that high affliction that put me into this habit, was ſo great, that it muſt be ſomething extraordinary can move me now to any ſenſe of ſorrow.―― But let me know it.

Mor.

I am very much afraid this will; and for all I came on purpoſe to tell it you, and ’tis very fit you ſhould know it, yet you ſhall not know it, unleſs you ſwear, and give me your hand, you will not grieve about it.

Per.

I cannot promiſe you it ſhall not trouble my heart, if it ſhould concern you; but I will not make the leaſt ſign of it.

Mor.

Why that’s it now; it does concern me.

Per.

Well, if it does concern you never ſo much, I will keep my word, ſince you have ingag’d me.

Mor.

Then to tell you the truth, the ſhort and the long is, it was ten thouſand to one you had never ſeen me again: I was ſet upon, and like to bin kill’d about you; my Man can tell here; I brought him on purpoſe to juſtifie it, if you ſhould not believe it.

Perilla and Arcaſia laugh.

Per.

In troth I cannot but be extremely merry to hear the danger is over. Lord, I do but think what a pickle I ſhould have bin in, if I had known it when it was, by the joy I find now for the eſcape.

Grac. 78 K3v

Grac.

He was in a pickle enough for himſelf and you too, I’le ſwear for him, Madam: the thoughts of never ſeeing you again wrought ſtrangely upon him, to my knowledge, in that little time; that fear made him go lighter from the Gentlemen in perſonal weight, then he met them.

They laugh extremely.

Arc.

It ſeems there was very fowl play; two againſt one.

Per.

Pray, my Lord, who were thoſe Cowards?

Mor.

My Lord Lucidore, and Peregrine.

Per.

’Tis one of the humors; I ever knew, to forbid other Suitors, and not offer to come a woing himſelf.

aſide.

Mor.

Nay, I ſhall always be in danger of my life till we are married; every one will have a fling at it, thinking you love me beſt.

Per.

Alas, my Lord, I would not marry you now you have told me this, for all the world: for hitherto they have only intended to kill you, becauſe as yet you have only intended to marry: but if you ſhould marry in earneſt, they’l kill you ſo too, for they’l grow deſperate when they’re out of all hopes: So I ſee plainly I ſhall be a Widdow preſently; my Vail will be no ſooner off, but on again; and to looſe you ſo ſoon, would quite break my heart.

Mor.

Truly I believe it would; for the thoughts of it almoſt breaks mine already.

Per.

Nay, now I think of it, it was told for certain by my Nativity, that my ſecond Husband ſhould be kill’d.

Mor.

But are you to have no more?

Per.

O, yes, yes!

Mor.

Why then I’le be the third; I’le tarry with all my heart for you, till the danger be over, that is to come upon the second.

Per.

There’s a far worſe, and more un-gentleman-like death threatens my third and fourth, then all the reſt; for the one will be hang’d, and the other――

Mor. 79 K4r

Mor.

What will become of him?

Per.

Why, without any ceremony, he is to hang himſelf.

Mor.

I had rather be him then any of the others, becauſe I know mine own natural averſion againſt death, and ſhould have this comfort, at leaſt, that I ſhould not be forc’d to die againſt my mind, as long as I was to be my own Executioner.

Arc.

That’s a thing indeed, my Lord, would make the danger much leſs; but if I may adviſe you, run not the hazard, you know not what a good Wife may tempt you to.

Per.

I am reſolv’d, I love him ſo well, he ſhall never while I live get my conſent, to put him into the danger of it, nor my ſelf into the poſſibility of ſo much grief.

Mor.

Well, meer love of one another I ſee makes us both reſolve never to marry together: Now there’s not one of a hundred does ſo I believe:―― Exeunt Perilla and Arcaſia. For all that, Graculus, I ſhall never put her out of my mind.

Grac.

No, my Lord, if you ſtay here; no man can forget a dead Wife but by change of Air; therefore you muſt needs go and travel, to get you a freſh appetite to a new affection.

Mor.

Will that do it, Graculus?

Grac.

I marry will it Sir, I warrant you; ’tis a receipt Probatum.――

Exeunt.

Scene 2.

Enter Almeric and Lucidore.

Alm.

’Tis true as I tell thee; Peregrine is taken with Arcaſia, and has made an invitation to thy Widdow, and her, to the Gardens; he intends to give them an entertainment there.

Luc. 80 K4v

Luc.

Prethee let us be his unbidden Gueſts for once, we’ll not be in his debt, I am reſolv’d I will ſend in my diſh.

Alm.

A match, a match.

Exeunt.

Scene 3.

Enter King and Melynet.

Mel.

Lotharicus death, Sir, gives an abſolute ſecurity to your love.――

King.

It does inlarge my hopes of having now the full poſſeſſion of Marcelia’s heart; but ſtill a gallant man muſt be lamented; I, and my Kingdome both, may juſtly mourn his death.

Mel.

No doubt, Sir, he does deſerve it; and did not your Majeſties concern ballance my ſorrow, the loſs of ſuch a friend would cauſe much greater trouble in my Soul. But all things, Sir, does and ſhall ſtill give place unto my duty.

King.

I doubt thee not in any thing, my Melynet. But does Marcelia know yet of Lotharicus death?

Mel.

No, Sir; but intend ſhe ſhall.

King.

Prethee do; for I ſhall long to know how ſhe does take it. ’Tis natural in Lovers to be curious in the ſearch of that which gives them the higheſt troubles: and when there is a real wanting cauſe, our jealouſies do commonly create us ſome ſuppoſitions; and mine does ſtrongly work in doubts, for all her ſeeming kindneſſes and promiſes, they’re all but empty nothings to that paſſion her heart once had; and I fear ſtill conceals for dead Lotharicus.

Mel.

I cannot think it Sir: but I will ſoon inform my ſelf, and give your Majeſty ſatisfaction.

Exeunt.
Scene 4. 81 L1r

Scene 4.

Enter Peregrine, Perilla, and Arcaſia, in a Garden. A table ſet out with ſeveral Meats and Wine: with Attendance.

Pereg.

I could wiſh I had given my Lord Lucidore an invitation.

Peril.

I wiſh you had, for he is moſt excellent company.

Per.

And much your ſervant, I am ſure, Madam; he is one of your ſecret Lovers that has not yet made diſcovery of his flame; but it will not be long before the fire break out, I am confident.

Arc.

I do not think he is conſtant enough, to think and ſay all at one time, he loves.

Peril.

Indeed, he does not ſeem to be of a humor, that his heart ſhould be in any danger of ever being made a womans priſoner.

Per.

Would he were here to anſwer for himſelf: I could find of my heart to ſend one of my Boys to find him out.

Arc.

You’l put him upon 24 hours ſearch then: When he goes out in a morning, by report, he is commonly loſt all that day to any Enquirers. But perhaps his uſual curioſity of ſeeing the Beauties, may bring him hither anone.

Peril.

Why, does he take ſuch pains to be rid of his liberty, to come here to ſeek for a Conqueror?

Pereg.

No, Madam; it was his Opinion of his own invincible ſtrength made him ſo bold to attempt the danger: He us’d to ſwear, as long as Cupid was a Child, he fear’d him not; he had not ſo poor a ſpirit to be worſted by a Boy: If he liv’d ſo long till he came to be a man, which he had bin theſe two thouſand years a coming to, L and 82 L1v and not one jot the forwarder yet, he would then ſtand upon his guard againſt him.

Enter Muſick.

Muſ.

My Lord Lucidore ſent us hither to give your Lordſhip a new Leſſon.

Per.

I thank him: I wiſh his Lordſhip had come himſelf too.

They all laugh. The Muſick (eſpying the Boys coming at the other end of the Stage with a diſh) begin to play.

Boy.

’Tis very hot, it burns my fingers; and ’tis very heavy too: we’ll ſet it down and dance a little frisk.

They dance. Enter a Mercury with a great Chafin-diſh of Coals; reaches up the diſh, ſets it thereon.

Mercury.

Why, what have you done Boys? the diſh is quite cold: you forget you carry’d your Lords Love, which is a Native of Freezland.

Boy.

Why, can it be cold already?

Merc.

Cold already? I, hot and cold, and cold and hot, a hundred times over, to a hundred ſeveral Ladies.

Takes up Coals, and blows under it.

Boy.

Pray ſtay a little, and we’ll go fetch ſome Bellows, and make it boil.

Merc.

Be quick.

Exeunt Boys. Enter preſently again with two more Boys, each with Bellows. They dance with Mercury in the middle, with the diſh and fire in his hand, every one by turns blowing under the Diſh: The dance ended, Exeunt Boys. Mercury comes up with the diſh to the Table.

Merc.

My Lord Lucidore preſents this to you, Madam.

Exit. Perilla opens the diſh, there is the form of a Hart made with wings; in it a Copy of verſes directed to the Incomparable Widow. They all laugh extremely. Pereg. 83 L2r

Pereg.

What is in it, Madam?

Peril.

Nothing but a copy of Verſes.

Arc.

But I am much taken with the Caſe they came in; I have a great conceit all mens hearts are thus provided, they are ſo ſoon here, and there, and every where.

Pereg.

All mens are not, Madam; ſome are fix’d.

Arc.

That is then where the Ladies get to them by ſome more then common device, and clip their wings. But Perilla, the Verſes; we will participate as far forth as the hearing the Courtſhip.

Perilla reads the Verſes.

Perilla.

Widdow, Faith I will tell thee true.

My heart’s inflam’d, and ’tis by you:

But my passion will decay,

If you make too long delay.

Flames that with moſt vigor burn,

Sooneſt into aſhes turn:

Then reſolve, and quickly too,

Shall I ſtay, or bid adieu?

Fooliſh Lovers that do place

All their pleaſures in one face;

Let them for favors long expect,

I ſoon will have, or ſoon neglect:

This is not common Courtſhips way,

But ſince I lov’d you, ’tis a day:

And if you cannot pay the ſcore,

Y’are poor, and I will truſt no more.

I’ve ways my flawed-reproduction2 words to undo,

Without the help of lending you:

I can both drink, and game, and ſwear,

Does this not tempt you? tell me fair.

Yet I’l a kinder Husband be,

Than thoſe that ſin more ſecretly.

But if you proudly now deny

To love me, Faith I will not dy.

L2 Enter 84 L2v Enter Lucidore with Three Trumpeters, Almeric ſtanding at a diſtance as not to be ſeen.

Luc.

Sound a Charge.

Trumpeters ſound.

Perilla.

Why you make Love in open court, my Lord.

Luc.

I do ſo, Madam, to prevent the ſcandal of the world, which would go near elſe to ſay, I ſtole your conſent, if you and I ſhould marry.

Perilla.

But why did you make your Trumpeters ſound a Charge?

Luc.

It is the aſſault of my Love againſt your Liberty, unleſs you will come preſently to parly, and give me ſome hopes of an honorable peace betwixt us: nay, I have began my war in perfect form, I have ſent two or three Heralds to proclaim it in the Market-place.

Perilla.

Yet, for all that; you have not done like a fair Enemy, to ſurprize me without any knowledg of ſuch an intention.

Luc.

All ſtratagems are allow’d of, Madam. Could you expect I would give you notice to fortifie your ſelf againſt my ſiege? Faith I’ad bin an ignorant Souldier then indeed.

Arc.

No, my Lord, ſhe could not in juſtice; for if you had, ſhe would have ſo ſtrengthen’d her ſelf with an Army of Reaſons of her own and from her Friends, that her heart would have prov’d another Candy, impregnable.

Per.

And quite tire out the Turkiſh Emperors Conſtancy.

Luc.

But, I hope my fair Widow will not be ſo cruel to wrack my expectations ſo long; for if ſhe ſhould, I have no more to confeſs than I will confeſs now, that is, that I love her infinitely, paſſionately, unexpreſſibly, as much as ever any man did or will love any of the Sex: I do indeed, Dear Widow! but now if you ſhould heep me in a great deal of pain by making a Chancery-ſuit of our Affections,fections, 85 L3r fections, ’tis ten to one but I ſhall rather deny all this truth again, than endure ſuch an endleſs torment.

Per.

Faith, Widow, you muſt now reſolve: this new faſhion’d ſuiter will have his alms or his anſwer quickly.

Arc.

I, Madam, you muſt needs tell my Lord what you’l do, you don’t know what an injury you may do him, by keeping him long in ſuſpenſe; for if his heart ſhould have taken poſt to any other place, how do you think his body ſhould know where to find it?

Perilla.

We’l petition the King to introduce here the English Law, that is, if he loſes it between ſun and ſun, the County muſt make it good.

Per.

That is if it were ſtollen, Madam.

Perilla.

Well, if it has run away, or loſt it ſelf, then he muſt have it cry’d.

Luc.

Never think of theſe ways to baffle me out of my Heart, Madam, in plain terms you have ſtoln it; and if you ſtir out of this Garden without reſtitution, or my conſent to keep it, hang me if I ſend not a Hue and Cry after you.

Perilla.

It ſeems, my Lord, you are very ſharp ſet to my Eſtate; if you poſſeſt that, I believe you would eaſily bequeath my perſon for a Legacy to my next Heir.

Luc.

Lord, Madam, that you ſhould think ſo! As if a Rich Miſtris were to be prefer’d before a Miſtris Rich. Do you think I am ſo ill bred to diſplace your Title ſo, to put money before it? No, it ſhall never take the precedency. It is as much as I deſire that I am certain it is one of your attendants: for where Marriage is made, and that a ſervant to neither party, there is always to be ſure but beggarly houſe keeping, and I love good company as my life.

Perilla.

Well, I will not injure my wit ſo much to take ſeven years conſideration to make up at laſt a bad bargain: as if a great deal of time were requiſite to undo ones ſelf in,86L3v in, when a quarter of an hour will ſerve turn as well; and precipitated indiſcretions always will admit of more excuſe, than premeditated follies. This gives you my conſent ſo ſoon, my Lord.

Luc.

I care not from whence the line come; ſo long as it draws to my Center: I’l accept it good or bad, according to the old Rule of Marriage.

Perilla.

Well, once within this month we ſhall both repent it, after the Parſon has ty’d us together.

Luc.

If we do, and the worſt come to the worſt, ’tis but one of us making a journey into the other world, and unmarrying our ſelves: and when it comes, we’l have fair play, draw who ſhall go.

Perilla.

A very juſt bargain.

Per.

Nothing will break your agreement then I ſee.

Luc.

But firſt we’l try to break each others heart.

Exeunt.

Scene 5.

Enter Lotharicus in a Diſguiſe.

Loth.

It is ſome pleasſure ſince I could not dy, at leaſt to think that I ſhall now revenge my wrongs my ſelf, on my intended Murtherer: and by giving him his merited Death, puniſh the falſe Marcelia too.

And in the bud of her wiſh’d Queenſhips honor,

Nip her ſupport, that treacherous Favorite from her.

She little thinks Lotharicus doth live,

So great a ruine to her hopes to give.

Here he muſt paſs, and in this place I’l ſtay,

And make Death complement him in the way.

Enter Melynet with two boys, Lotharicus meets him.

Mel.

Boys, go where I bid you.――Ha! what’s that comes there?

Loth.

An injur’d Lover brought by his deſpair.―― Lotharicus.

Mel. 87 L4r

Mel.

That’s falſe I’m ſure, I know thou ſayſt not true.

Loth.

His Ghoſtis riſe to give thy crimes their due: Villain! I live and with this ſword will ſhow, In my revenge, whether’t be true or no: I all my wrongs upon thy heart will write.

Mel.

No more of words, but let us to’t, and fight.

Boaſt not before we do the vict’ry try,

Perhaps it may prove your own lot to dy.

Loth.

I could have made my ſelf of that ſecure,

But that my Courage Treach’ry can’t endure.

Mel.

I’l thank thy Courage and the debt will pay,

By taking thy unhappy life away.

Loth.

Fall on then.

They fight, Melynet gives back.

――Ha! methinks you back do ſtart,

As if my kindneſs touch’d you to the heart.

Mel.

What it has done I ſoon will make thee find:

What think you now Sir, are you paid in kind?

They fight still. Enter Valaſco, Peregrine, they draw and come between them.

Per.

Hold this is no good exerciſe.

Loth.

The beſt that can be, Sir, to us.

Per.

How, Lotharicus?

Loth.

The ſame, Sir.

Per.

What wonder’s this? and fighting with his ſo beloved friend my Lord Melynet?

Loth.

The wonder is far greater that occaſion’d it.

Val.

My Lord Melynet, I am glad we have prevented the hazard of your life to farther Revenge.

Mel.

You have obſtructed me in a Revenge, Which I could curſe you for:――for by preventing Of his Death, I am undone.

aſide.

Loth.

We’l not take our leaves one of another, we ſhall have opportunity to meet in ſome other place.

Exeunt ſeverally.
Scene 88 L4v

Scene 36.

Enter King and Almeric.

King.

I have not ſeen Melynet to day: I wonder much he is not come.

Alm.

Doubtleſs it will not be long before he does attend your Majeſty.

Enter Valaſco.

King.

Have you not ſeen Melynet, my Lord?

Val.

Yes, and it pleaſe your Majeſty: I came from him: he is wounded.

King.

How? by what means?

Val.

My Lord Lotharicus is return’d in diſguiſe, and has ſet upon him as he was going to Marcelia.

King.

Thou doſt miſtake, Lotharicus is dead I’le aſſure you.

Val.

And pleaſe your Majeſty he has got ſuch favor in the other world to come and live again; for I am ſure it is not half an hour ſince Peregrine and I parted them.

King.

Are you ſure ’tis he?

Val.

As ſure as my name is Valaſco.

King.

What ſhould the meaning of this be? Go and cauſe him to be brought before me; I’l hear the motion of this bold attempt upon the life of Melynet my ſelf. Are his wounds dangerous?

Val.

No, Sir, very ſlight: they have both ſome little hurt.

King.

Sure Lotharicus’s jealouſie has cauſ’d this quarrel with Melynet, becauſe he knows I have a value for him, and by that concludes that he has injur’d him to Marcelia.

Alm.

And pleaſe your Majeſty, Love from ſo ſtrong an argument may be excuſ’d to grow ſuſpicious.

Exeunt.

Scene 7.

Enter Marcelia meeting Euryalus.

Eur.

I am come to tell thee ſtrange news, Marcelia; Lotharicus is alive in the Town: he has wounded Melynet, and89M1r and is a Priſoner for it by the Kings command, and is to be brought before him to the Court: the buſineſs is made very foul, as if he had ſurpriz’d him cowardly.

Mar.

What a compound of joy and ſorrow have you given me? Poor Lotharicus! thou wilt find a cruel Judg: I fear they muſt, by heightning thy guilt, help to abate their own. I’l go to the Court my ſelf and hear his ſentence, and ſhare his ſufferings, if my intereſt cannot take him off; I’l try my power firſt, then ſhow my reſolution.

Eur.

Thou mak’ſt a generous and brave Reſolve, we both will go together: I’l there diſcover my ſelf, and help to juſtifie my Friend, and if there be occaſion againſt his guilty adverſary: It will be time to go, Marcelia.

Marc.

My dear Lotharicus, thou now ſhalt find,

When moſt diſtreſt, Marcelia is moſt kind.

Exeunt.

Scene 8.

Enter King, Melynet, and all the Lords, Guards and Attendants. King talks to Melinet.

King.

I am ſorry having ever had ſo great an eſteem of Lotharicus, he ſhould give me cauſe to condemn him for his Raſhneſs: but Reaſon is deſtroy’d in the wiſeſt men, when paſſion does command!――Bring in Lotharicus.

Enter Lotharicus with a Guard at one door, and Euryalus and Marcelia at another.

King.

What makes me happy in thy preſence now, Marcelia?

Marc.

Though ’tis not fit Sir, Women hither come: Yet I moſt humbly beg to hear his doom.

King.

Nothing’s unfit Marcelia does deſire,

Or of her King, or Servant can require.

Loth.

There ſtands my torture, greater than I can

Receive from the command or power of man.

aſide.

She comes to feaſt her pride onely to ſee

M How 90 M1v

How much my Paſſion ſtill does fetter me.

Inhuman Woman! loſt to all that ſenſe

Which thy ſoft Sex to ſuff’rers do diſpenſe.

King.

What was the cauſe, Lotharicus, that arm’d your malilce againſt the life of Melynet?

Loth.

My injuries, Sir.

King.

In your opinion. Were every man a fitting and allow’d of Judg in’s own cauſe, we need not then have Miniſters of Juſtice.

Loth.

I queſtion not the prudence of conſider’d and allow’d of Laws, Sir; though now I ſought not their aſſiſtance. But, Sir, in my own defence, I humbly do preſent your Majeſty this Paper, which renders me incapable their benefit, and made me ſtrive, by my own hand to take what I can never expect to have by any other means.

King.

How have you forfeited your right in that kind, more than your other fellow ſubjects?

Loth.

You’l in that Paper find, Sir.

The King reads and changes countenance, grows into fury: turns to Melynet.

King.

Traytor! what haſt thou done? is this thy hand? is it? I know it is: wherewith th’haſt ſet the ſeal of my diſhonor; charge me with the conſent of Murther, and mountain up my promiſes their recompence!―― Here, Read it publickly; my brow wears not a guilt ſo dark to keep it in obſcurity, although I ow that intended kindneſs to brave Lotharicus’s Loyalty.

Peregrine reads.

Per.

Du-Prette, be ſure and ſpeedy in the death of Lotharicus, the King is impatient till he hears it, he will double thy rewards as I promiſed.

King.

There’s enough. Turns to Melynet. How durſt thou aſſume the injuring thy Soveraign ſo? Though I Marcelia lov’d, I never did deſign to buy her favors at the price of all my Honors. By noble ways I bid thee91M2r thee ſeek to gain me her affection, but not by guilt and treacherous baſeneſs, Villain. The ſhare thy veins has in her blood, gives thee thy life: but never after this day ſee thy incenſed Monarch’s face again! But how came you by this Letter, Lotharicus?

Loth.

Sir, one Philampras, which was hir’d amongſt others, by Du-prette, Melynet’s man to aſſaſin me underſtanding by Du-prette’s Diſcourſe that he had moneys in his Portmantue, watch’d his opportunity to take it away; and finding this Letter there, thought he ſhould make more advantage by that from my Reward, than his promiſ’d recompence for my Murther: ſo left the money to prevent Duprette’s ſudden miſſing of his Paper; and coming with my man to diſcover it, found me as they then ſuppoſed kill’d; but after, on my Recovery, deliver’d it into my hands.

King.

Oh! how ſeriouſly ought Princes firſt to weigh the lives and ſouls of men, before they draw them to their boſoms! for Favorites that are vitious, are the Cankers of Kings Courts, and eat in their Soveraigns boſoms.

Mel.

Sir!――

King.

Hold, ſay no more, thy breath’s infectious grown

And on my Fame has Killing poyſon thrown.

Guard, take him away.

Mel.

Vain joys of mortal Life! you fly ſo faſt,

Man hardly knows you are, before y’ are paſt:

Yet we on you do our affections lay,

As if we here eternally ſhould ſtay.

Honor, thou now doſt give my ſoul a view

Of what I left when firſt I baniſh’d you.

O Virtue! how have I bin led aſtray,

From thy fair paths, into this Lab’rinth way?

I thought my Fortune on a Rock did ſtand,

But Guilts foundation ſtill proves fooliſh ſand.

M2 When 92 M2v

When man by Crimes does plots for greatneſs lay,

Heav’n juſtly frowns and takes his hopes away.

But though my Life bears characters of ſhame:

My Death ſhall leave behind a better Fame.

They that won’t fall, muſt not on danger ſtand;

We carry not our Fates in our own hand.

Exit.

King.

Though Love, Lotharicus, did make me be

Thy Rival, I was ne’er thy Enemy:

At leſt to take thy life by ways obſcure,

My ſoul ſuch abject thoughts ſcorn to endure.

To witneſs it, I this for thee will do:

Marcelia freely ſhall chuſe me or you.

Loth.

Marcelia, Sir, cannot diſpute the choice!

Againſt my ſelf your Goodneſs has my voice.

And ſhe long ſince has learn’d to be ſo wiſe,

To leave Lotharicus for ſuch a prize.

Pardon me, Sir, that I am ſad, that ſhe

Found not ſuch motives for her love in me.

Mar.

I never more deſir’d than what in you

I did enjoy, when I believ’d you true:

But when by Melynet I was inform’d,

I and my love was for Arcaſia ſcorn’d:

I then ſuch Reaſon had to entertain

So great a Monarch, and ſo high a Flame:

That all I for his Paſſion ſince I did do,

Can no condemning cenſure find for you:

Honor and Virtue ſtill have bin my guid,

My Life has ſtrictly to their Rules bin ty’d.

Loth.

Since Melynet made me ſo falſe appear,

You need not more your actions for to clear:

But ſtill as they juſtly more ſplendid grow,

My heart does more deſpairing ſorrow know.

King.

Which of us two, Madam, ſhall happy be?

Mar.

Heav’n leaves me not to an Election free. Both 93 M3r

Both ſo deſerve, Sir, that if I ſhould chuſe,

I’d be unjuſt to him I did refuſe.

Oh Gods! what puniſhment do you deſign

Marcelia, that neither muſt be mine!

Love will not let me my Lotharicus leave,

Nor Honor won’t permit I him receive.

The King whiſpers to Peregrine. Exit Pereg.

King.

To ſhew that I will ſtill be here within, points to his breſt.

What I am by my birth, my paſſions King:

My Empire there, by Reaſons power maintain,

As well as to my Crown, new Crowns to gain:

I out of Honor will this Juſtice do,

Againſt my Love, Marcelia give to you:

Thou art already of her Heart poſſeſt;

And with her Perſon now I’l make thee bleſt.

Loth.

Sir,――

King.

No more oppoſe thy bliſs with gen’rous ſtrife,

May you be happy in each others life:

My heart to my Calinda I’l reſtore,

Whoſe due it was by faith and love before.

Marcelia and Lotharicus kneel.

Loth.

May Fortune ſhowr ſuch Bleſſings on your head,

That over all the World your power be ſpread;

That every Monarch that enjoys a Throne,

May that poſſeſſion from your bounty own.

Eur.

Now take the Bleſſing which I, Sir, do give,

When you are call’d from hence to Heav’n to live:

And may my Friend prove joys ſo high refin’d,

he embraces Loth.

To equal the vaſt compaſs of his mind.

Enter Calinda and Peregrine.

Cal.

Sir, I am come my Duty to expreſs.

King.

To me Calinda can ow nothing leſs;

In publick I my heart away did take:

And I’l in publick Reſtitution make.

M3 Cal. 94 M3v

Cal.

Your Will can ſtrangely of your Heart diſpoſe,

My Will, as yet, o’r mine no Empire knows.

King.

Yet it may yours perſwade, and command mine.

KingCalinda.

You ſhould not then Marceliaes Love decline.

King.

Madam, you have all Reaſon to expreſs,

As much as you can ſay in ſcorns exceſs:

But Heav’n the greateſt faults that are forgive,

’Tis noble, when we may kill, to let live.

Cal.

Had you bin ſtill, Sir, to that Maxim true,

I had not then bin ſcorn’d, not left by you:

When you the life did take of all my joy,

You ſhow’d not the leſt pity to deſtroy.

But you would have, I find, a Womans breaſt

With more Compaſſion and more Love poſſeſt.

King.

I’d have thy Heart again thy Love renew,

Since mine does burn with a freſh Flame to you.

Calinda, with my Life I would redeem

What I have done, to call back thy eſteem.

Cal.

Your Majeſty can ſtrangely overcome,

Scarce wiſh a Victory before ’tis won:

That price my Heart will never let you pay,

Love’s Gen’ral there, and yields you up the day.

King.

And if I e’er again that gift abuſe,

May Heav’n all prayers that I make refuſe:

I much admir’d thy Excellence heretofore;

But now Idolater ſhall turn, and thee adore.

I did not think this would have bin the cloſe:

Man may deſign, but Heav’n will ſtill diſpoſe.

Exeunt Omnes.

Epilogue.

Now I am ſure, all look that I ſhould ſay

Something like asking pardon for the Play:

With low-ſubmiſſion, and I can’t tell what:

Excuſe her Writing, Language, and her Plot!

As crafty Poets Guilty cry their Wit,

To make you leſs ſevere in taſting it.

But, faith, ſhe ſcorns ſuch undermining ways,

Of blowing up your pity into praiſe;

Nor will ſhe do her ſpirit ſo much wrong,

To beg what does not to her brow belong.

She ſays, they’re fools force Fate, before they be

Reſolv’d to meet with any Destiny.

But, this revenge ſhe’s ſure to have on thoſe,

They’l Cowards be esteem’d that give her blows.

Which ſtrangely takes her! knowing that ye muſt

Be to your Honor, or your Wit unjuſt.

Mark how maliciouſly her ſnare ſh’as laid:

Praiſe or Condemn, you’re equally betray’d.

Finis.