489 Hhhhhh1r 489

The Actors Names

Monſieur Nobiliſſimo.

Monſieur Eſperance.

Monſieur Phantaſie.

Monſieur Poverty.

Monſieur Adviſer, and ſeveral other Gentlemen.

Admiration.

Vainglory.

Pride.

Ambition.

Madamoiſelle LaBelles Wooers.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance, Wife to Monſieur Eſperance.

Madamoiſelle La Belle.

Madamoiſelle Amour.

Madamoiſelle Grand Eſprit.

Madamoiſelle Bon.

Madamoiſelle Tell-truth.

Madamoiſelle Spightfull.

Madamoiſelle Detractor.

Madamoiſelle Malicious.

Hhhhhh The 490 Hhhhhh1v 491 Hhhhhh2r 491

The First Part of Natures Three Daughters, Beauty, Love, and Wit.

Act I.

Scene 1.

Enter Madamoiſelle Detractor, Madamoiſelle Spightfull, Madamoiſelle Malicious, and Madamoiſelle Tell-truth.

Tell-truth

The Lady Natures Daughters are the only Ladies that are admired, praiſed, adored, worſhiped, and ſued to; all other women are deſpiſed.

Spightfull

We may go into a Nunnery; for we ſhall never get Servants, nor Husbands, as long as they live.

Tell-truth

Why there are but three of them, and three women cannot ſerve and content all the men in the World.

Detractor

No, but they may diſcontent all the men ſo much, as to make them all to be Male-contented Lovers, who will reject all, becauſe they cannot have what they deſire.

Malicious

Let us make a Faction againſt them.

Spightfull

Alas what Faction againſt them, can hurt and deſtroy Love, Wit, and Beauty?

Detractor

Jealouſy will weaken Love, Diſpraiſe will diſgrace Wit, and Beauty, Time will ſoon bring that to decay.

Tell-truth

But Jealouſy cannot weaken true and virtuous Love, nor Diſpraiſe cannot diſgrace pure Wit, not Time cannot decay the Beauty of the mind; wherefore all the faction you can make againſt them, will do them no hurt; beſides, you will be condemned by all the Maſculine Sex, if not puniſhed with infamy, for your treachery; and ſince you cannot do them harm, your beſt way will be to imitate them for your own good.

Spightfull

So we ſhall be laughed at, and ſtared on as Monkies, and ſcorned; foraſmuch as we offer at that which is beyond our abilities, and whatſoever is forced, and conſtrained, appeareth ridiculous.

Malicious

Come let us leave ſpeaking of them, and thinking of them, if we can.

Exeunt.
Hhhhhh2 Scene 492 Hhhhhh2v 492

Scene 2.

Enter Monſieur Eſperance, and his Wife Madamoiſelle Eſperance.

Monſieur Eſperance

Surely Wife you do not love me, you are not any way kind to me.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

True Love Husband, is not ſo fond as ſerviceable.

Monſieur Eſperance

But true Love will expreſs it ſelf ſometimes: for if you did truly Love me, you would hang about my Neck, as if you meant to dwell there.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

If I thought my kindneſs might not Surfet your affection, I would hang about your Neck, as the Earth to the Center, and as you move ſhould bear me ſtill about you; but I am afraid if overfond, you ſhould be weary of me, and account me a trouble, and I had rather ſtarve all my delights, than make you loath my Company.

Monſieur Eſperance

This is but an excuſe Wife.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

Why are you Jealouſe, that you think my words ſpeak not my thoughts? have I behaved my ſelf ſo indiſcreetly, or have my actions been ſo light, as you believe I ſhall be wanton?

Monſieur Eſperance

No, I do not fear your Virtue.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

Do you fear my Indiſcretion?

Monſieur Eſperance

I hope you will give me no cauſe to fear, although Husbands are oftner diſhonoured by their Wives Indiſcretions, than their Inconſtant affections.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

Pray be confident, that I ſhall have a greater care of your Honour, than of my own Life.

Exeunt.

Scene 3.

Enter two Gentlemen.

1 Gentleman

The Lady Natures three Daughters, namely Wit, Beauty, and Love, are the ſweeteſt, and moſt Virtuous Ladies in the World.

2 Gentleman

I have heard ſo much of their fame, as I have a great deſire to ſee them.

1 Gentleman

You may ſee the Lady Wit, for ſhe doth diſcourſe often in publick; but for the other two Sisſters, they are ſomewhat more retired.

2 Gentleman

How ſhall we know the time, that the Lady Wit diſcourſes in publick?

1 Gentleman

I am going to ſee if I can get a place, where I may hear her.

2 Gentleman. 493 Iiiiii1r 493

2 Gentleman

I will go with you, if you will give me leave.

1 Gentleman

With all my Heart.

Exeunt.

Scene 4.

Enter Monſieur Nobiliſſimo, and Monſieur Poverty.

Monſieur Poverty

My Noble Lord, I am a Gentleman, one that is ruin’d by Fortunes ſpight, and not by my own Careleſneſs, Vanity, Luxury, or Prodigality; for my Poverty is honeſt: but though my Poverty hath an honeſt face, yet it is aſhamed to appear in the open light of publick knowledg, which makes me whiſper my wants to your Lordſhips private Ear.

Monſieur Nobiliſſimo

Sir, if your neceſſities can conceal themſelves, they ſhall never be divulged by me; and what I can honeſtly give you out of my Eſtate, and not very imprudently from my ſelf, I ſhall freely, and ſecretly, diſtribute to you, and ſuch as are in your condition.

Monſieur Poverty

Your Lordſhips Servant.

Exeunt.

Scene 5.

Enter Madamoiſelle Amor alone.

Madamoiſelle Amor

The mind is the beſt Tutor, and ought to inſtruct the Senſes how to chooſe; for the Senſes are but as the working Labourers, to bring Lifes materials in; but O my Senſes have betrayed my mind, in bringing through my Ears, and Eyes, Beauty, and Wit, which like as creeping Serpents, got paſſage to my heart, and winding round about with flattering imbraces, yet ſting the peace, and quiet of my mind, raiſing therein bliſters of diſcontent, cauſing an anguiſh of reſtleſs thoughts, which work, and beat like pulſive pain.

But O had I been born both Deaf and Blind,

Then might I ſcape this Hell tormenting mind;

His Wit like various Muſick pierc’d my Ear,

Some being ſolemn, and ſome pleaſant were:

And when he ſpake, his perſon did appear

Like to the Sun, when no dark Clouds were neer;

Fame of his valour, like a trumpet ſound,

Through Ears from Heart, unto the Eyes rebound;

And then his perſon, like Mars did appear,

Yet ſo, as when fair Venus Queen was neer.

O Love forbear, uſe not this cruelty,

Either bind him, or give me liberty

Iiiiii Enter 494 Iiiiii1v 494 Enter Monſieur Adreſſer.

Monſieur Adreſſer

What are you all alone ſweet Miſtriſs?

Amor

No Sir, I have the Company of thoughts.

Adreſſer

Thoſe are Melancholy Companions.

Amor

Indeed mine are ſo at this time; yet thoughts with thoughts may diſcourſe wittily, and converſe pleaſantly together, without articulate words.

Adreſſer

Certainly your thoughts muſt needs be pleaſant, your words are ſo witty.

Amor

No truly, for my thoughts lie in my brain like a Chaos in a confuſed heap, and my brain being young, hath not enough natural heat to diſgeſt them into a Methodical order; neither hath Time cookt them ready for the Mind to diſh out, or the Tongue to carry to the Ears of the hearers.

Adreſſer

The oftner I hear, and ſee you, the more I wonder at you.

Amor

Why, I hope Sir I am no Monſter?

Adreſſer

No, for you ſeem to me ſomething divine.

Amor

Then you ſhould rather admire me: for Admiration proceeds from things excellent, Wonder from things ſtrange and unuſuall.

Adreſſer

So you are ſtrange, and unuſual: for things divine are not common; and certainly you are a thing illuminated beyond Natures Art, and ate the only delight of Mankind.

Amor

Men take no worldly delight in Cœleſtial Creatures, but with Earthly; wherefore the moſt refined and illuminated, is ofteneſt rejected.

Adreſſer

No Lady, they are not rejected, but as Angels, they will not reſide with us.

Amor

Sir, for fear I ſhould loſe the Angelical opinion you have of me, I will depart ſoon as Angels do.

Exeunt.

Act II.

Scene 6.

Enter Madamoiſelle Detractor, Madamoiſelle Spightfull, Madamoiſelle Malicious, and Madamoiſelle Tell-truth.

Tell-Truth

Come, will you go to hear the Lady Wit diſcourſe?

Spightfull

Not I.

Tell-truth

Will you go?

Detractor

I will not go to hear a prating preaching woman.

Malicious

O that all the Maſculine Sex would ſay as much.

Tell-truth

Let us go to learn Wit.

Spightfull

I had rather be a Dunce all my life.

Detractor 495 Iiiiii2r 495

Detractor

So had I, if I muſt have none but a Woman inſtructor.

Malicious

Indeed women ſhould learn, not teach.

Detractor

It’s a ſign Men want Wit, when they go to hear a Woman preach.

Spightfull

But let us go, if it be but to cenſure; for an hundred to one, but ſhe will ſay ſomething which may be contradicted.

Malicious

Then let us agree to be her contradictors: for whatſoever ſhe ſaith we will confute.

Tell-truth

Nay by your favour, that you cannot do; for though you may contradict any argument, yet not confute it: for though Envy and Spight have bred Sophiſtry, yet Envy and Spight cannot confute the Truth.

Spightfull

Well, let us go howſoever, if it be but to ſee, and be ſeen of thoſe men as will be there to hear her.

All

Content.

Exeunt.

Scene 7.

Enter Madamoiſelle Grand Eſprit, and her Audience. She takes her place, and then ſpeaks.

Grand Eſprit

Great Fortune, I at this time do implore,

That thou wilt open every hearing door,

Which are the Ears: let not my Wit be loſt,

For want of hearing, nor my words be croſt,

Nor yet obſtructed by a buſtling noiſe,

Or gazing, or obſerving ſome light toyes:

But let their Ears be fixt, as if their ſight

Did view my words, till on their Ears they light.

Noble and Right Honourable,

I ſhall take my diſcource at this time out of Ignorance, which diſcource, I ſhall divide into Five Parts, the Gods, Fates, Nature, the World, and Man; for although Ignorance be obſcure, and hard to be diſcovered, yet it is printed in a general Language, being ſpread and communicated over all the World. I begin with the Firſt, and prime Creature, Ignorant Man. Man takes himſelf to be the moſt knowing Creature, for which he hath placed himſelf next to the Gods; yet Man is ignorant: for what Man is, or ever was created, that knows what the Gods are, or how many there are? Or what power they have, or where they reſide? What Man did ever know the Manſions of Glory, the Bowers of bliſs, or the Fields of pleaſure? What Man ever knew whether the Gods were Eternal, or bred out of infinite, or rule, or govern, infinite Eternally?

Secondly the Fates. What Man is, or ever was, that knows the Fates? As whether they are Gods or Creatures, or whether the Fates are limited, or decree as they pleaſe? Or what Man is, or ever was, that knows the decrees of Fate, the links of Deſtiny, or the chance of Fortune, or the lots of Chance.

Iiiiii2 Thirdly. 496 Iiiiii2v 496

Thirdly. What Man is, or ever was, that knows what Nature is, or from whence her power proceeds? As whether from the Gods, or Eternity, or infinite, or from the Fates? Or whether the Gods, or Fates, proceed from her? Or what firſt ſet her to work? Or whether her work is preſcribed, or limited? Or what ſhe works on? Or what inſtruments ſhe worketh with ? Or to what end ſhe works for? Or whether ſhe ſhall deſiſt from working, or ſhall work Eternally? Or whether ſhe worked from all Eternity? Or whether her work had a beginning, or ſhall have an ending? What Man knows the beginning of Motion, or the Fountain of Knowledge, or the Spring of Life, or Gulph of Death? Or what Life is? Or what Death is? Or whether Life, Motion, and Death, had a beginning, or ſhall have an ending?

Fourthly the World. What Man is, or ever was, that knows how the World was made? Or for what it is made? or by whom is was made? Or whether it had beginning, or ſhall have end?

The Fift and laſt is Man. What Man is, or ever was, that knows how he was formed, or of what compoſition, or what is that he calls a Rational Soul? Whether it is imbodyed, or not imbodyed? Whether it is Divine, or Mortal? Whether it proceeds from the Gods, or was created by Nature? Whether it ſhall live for ever, or ſhall have a period? Whether it ſhall live in Knowledge, or ly in Ignorance? Whether it be capable of pain, or pleaſure? Whether it ſhall have a reſiding place, or no certain place aſſigned? Or if it have none, where it ſhall wander? Or if it have, where that reſiding place is.

As for the Body, who knows the perfect Senſe of each Senſe, or what miſtake, or illuſions, each Senſe is apt to make, or give, or take? What Man knows how the Body diſſolves, or to what is ſhall diſſolve? What Man knows whether there be Senſe in Death, or not? What Man knows the motion of the thoughts, or whether the thoughts belong only to the Soul, or only to the Body, or partly to both, or of neither? What Man is there that knows the ſtrength of paſſion? As what Faith may beget? Or what Doubts may diſſolve? Or what Hopes may unite? Or what Fears may diſorder? Or what Love can ſuffer? Or what Hate can act?

What Man is there that knows the Circumpherence of Admiration, the rigour of Adoration, the hight of Ambition, or the bottom of Covetouſneſs? Or what Man knows the end of Sorrow. or beginning of Joy? And as for the Appetites, what Man knows the length and bredth of deſire? As for the Senſes, what Man is there, that knows the true Senſe of Pleaſure, or the uttermoſt bounds of Pain? Who can number the varieties of Taſt, Sent, Touch, Sound, and Sight? What Man knows the perfect effects of each Senſe? Or what Man is there that knows any thing, truly as it is? Yet certainly there cannot be an Atheſt; for though men may be ſo irrelligious, as to be of no Religion; yet theirthere can be none ſo willfull, and utterly void of all Senſe, and Reaſon, as not to believe there is a God; for though we have not the true light of knowledge, yet we have as it were a perpetual twilight; Man lives as at the poles of knowledge; for though we cannot ſay it is truly day, yet it is not night. Man may perceive an infinite power, by the perfect diſtinctions of all particular varieties, by the orderly production of ſeveral Creatures, and by the fit, and proper ſhapes of every ſeveral kind of Creature; by their orderly Births, by the times and Seaſons, to produce, flouriſh, and decay; by the diſtinct degrees, qualities, properties, places and motions 497 Kkkkkk1r 497 motions of all things, and to, and in every thing, by the exact form of this World; by the prudent ſeperations, and ſituations of the Heavens and Earth; by the Circumferent lines, and poyzing Centers; by their bounds and limits; by their orderly, and timely motions; by their aſſigned tracts, conſtant Journies, convenient diſtances; by their intermixing, and well tempering of the Elements; by the profitable Commerce, betwixt the Heavens and the Earth; by the different kinds, ſeveral ſorts, various Natures, numerous numbers of Creatures; by their paſſions, humours appetites; by their Sympathies, and Antipathies; by their warrs and parties; by the Harmony that is made out of diſcord, ſhews that there is onely one abſolute power, and wiſe diſpoſer, that cannot be oppoſed, having no Copartners, produces all things, being not produced by any thing, wherefore muſt be Eternall, and conſequently infinite; this abſolute, wiſe, and Eternal power Man calls God; but this abſolute power, being infinite, he muſt of neceſſity be incomprehenſible, unknown, yet glimſes of his power is, or may be ſeen; yet not ſo, but that Man is forced to ſet up Candels of Faith, to light them, or direct them to that they cannot perfectly know, and for want of the clear light of knowledge, Man calls all Creations of this mighty power Nature; his wiſe decrees, Man calls Fates; his pointed will, Man calls Deſtiny; his ſeveral Changes, Man calls Fortune; his Intermixing, Man calls Life; his ſeperating, Man calls Death; the Sympathetical, and Antipathetical motions of the Senſes, and their Objects, Humours, and their Subjects, Man calls Pleaſure, and Pain; the interchanging motions in Man, Men call Senſe, and Knowledge; the ſeperating motions, Man calls Ignorance, Stupidity, and Inſenſibility; my application is, that this abſolute Power, wiſe Diſpoſer and decreeing Creator, hath created himſelf Worſhip, in making Creatures to worſhip him; and it is probable, Truth decreed Judgment, Puniſhment, and Bliſs, to ſuch of his Creatures as ſhall omit, or ſubmit thereunto: my exhortation to you is, to bough humbly, to pray conſtantly, to implore fervently, to love truly, to live awfully to the worſhip of this incomprehenſible power; that you may injoy bliſs and avoid torment.

Exeunt.

Act III.

Scene 8.

Enter Monſieur Nobiliſſimo, and three or four Gentlemen.

Nobiliſſimo

I wonder who brought up that careleſs faſhion, to go without their Swords; and I wonder more, how gallant valiant men, came to follow that faſhion; for a Sword is a valiant mans truſty friend, to whoſe protection, he delivers his Honour, his Safety and his Peace; for a Sword is a Mans Guardian, to maintain his Right, to revenge his Wrongs, or Diſgraces, and his Miſtriſs, for whoſe ſervice he wears his life, and ſtudies the worth and uſe thereof, and takes delight in the Honourable, and allowable practices therein.

Kkkkkk 1 Gent. 498 Kkkkkk1v 498

1 Gent

Faith my Lord I believe it was ſome Lover that brought up that faſhion, who was loath to affright his Miſtriſs, with ſo dangerous a weapon.

2 Gent

Some Carpet Knight upon my life my Lord.

Nobiliſſimo

It was no true Lover; for certainly he would be ſure to provide a ſafeguard, leſt his Miſtriſs might be taken from him, or leſt he ſhould be affronted in her ſight, which a Man of Honour, and a true Lover, will rather dy than part or ſuffer; and as for my part, I commend the Man that would neither eat, drink, nor ſleep, without his Sword were by him, and made it his Bedfellow, and Bord Companion; as a friend that held to his ſide, and would fight in his quarrell.

2 Gent

My Lord, if a man ſhould do ſo in theſe times, his Neighbours would ſay it was out of fear, not courage.

Nobiliſſimo

O no, for a Coward is affraid to uſe a Sword, and a Valiant man is affraid to be without the uſe, otherwiſe a ſtrong ſturdy Clown, might cuff him down, and kick him like a Football on the ground, which a Sword, and skill to uſe it, will prevent; for a Clown hath not skill to defend, or aſſault a Sword, having no practice therewith, nor ought they to have; for the uſe of this kind of Arms makes a Clown a Gentleman, and the want of skill makes a Gentleman a Clown; for a Right bred Gentleman, is to know the uſe of the Sword, and it is more manly to aſſault, than to defend; alſo to know how to mannage Horſes, whereby we know how to aſſault our Enemy as well as to defend our ſelves; for it is not playing with a Fidle, and dancing a Meaſure, makes a Gentleman; for then Princes ſhould dub Knighthood with a Fidle, and give the ſtick, and a pair of Pumps, inſteed of a Sword, and a pair of Spurs.

1 Gent

My Lord, we are ſo far from wearing our Swords our ſelves now a dayes, as we give them our Footmen to carry, as if it were a diſgrace to carry a Sword our ſelves.

Nobiliſſimo

Tis true, and we are well beaten for our follies, for diſarming our ſelves, and arming our Slaves; for now a Groom is made a Gentlemand equal, nay his Superiour ſometimes; for if a Groom kills a Gentleman, the Gentleman dyes in diſgrace, and the Groom lives with Honour, and gets the Fame of a gallant Perſon; for that is the phraſe to all thoſe that have fought, although they were forced thereto as Slaves, not diſtinguiſhing true valor, which is voluntary, temperate and juſt.

2 Gent

Why then there ſhould be a Decree, or Law, that none ſhould wear Swords but Gentlemen, nor Arms allowed, but to thoſe of approved merit.

Nobiliſſimo

You ſay right, unleſs in time of Forein Wars, and then there ſhould be a difference in their Arms; for if there be no difference of Arms, no difference of perſons, and if there be no difference of perſons, there will be no Supremacy of Power, if no Supremacy, no Royal Government; for as the Sword maintains the Prerogative of the Crown, ſo it doth the Honour of a Gentleman; and as the Sword keeps up the dignity of the Crown, ſo a Sword keeps up the Heraldry of a Gentleman; and no man ought to be accounted a Gentleman, that knows not how to uſe his Sword, and manage his Horſe; for the one defends himſelf, and kills his Enemies; the other, doth front and charge his Enemy, and purſues him if need require.

Exeunt.
Scene 499 Kkkkkk2r 499

Scene 9.

Enter Monſieur Eſperance, and Madamoiſelle Eſperance his Wife.

Monſieur Eſperance

Lord Wife you are very brave to day.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

I ſtrive to be ſo every day.

Monſieur Eſperance

For whoſe ſake?

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

For yours.

Monſieur Eſperance

For mine? why ſure that is not ſo, for certainly you would not take that pains, and beſtow ſo much coſt, for one you do enjoy allready, for a Husband that is tied to you for life, and cannot quit on Honourable terms; wherefore it is for one is looſe and free, which you do ſtrive by ſetting forth your ſelf with garments rich, for to attract, and draw to your deſires.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

The Circumference of my deſires is only your delight.

Monſieur Eſperance

Why, my delight is in your Virtue, youth, and Beauty, not in your Cloathes.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

But Virtue is beſt acceptable, when Beauty doth preſent it; and Beauty finds moſt favour, when well attired; but were I ſure you would like me better in mean Garments, and careleſs dreſſes, I then ſhould Cloath my ſelf in Freez, ; like a Hermit my looſe courſe Garments ty with ſingle cord about my waſte; but I will go and pull theſe Cloaths off, ſince they are thought a crime, and I thought falſe for wearing them.

Monſieur Eſperance

No, I like them very well, if I were ſure they were worn only for love to me.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

I never gave you cauſe to think I wear them for the love of any other.

Exeunt.

Scene 10.

Enter Madamoiſelle Spightfull, Madamoiſelle Detractor, Madamoiſelle Malicious, and Madamoiſelle Tell-truth.

Spightfull.

Madamoiſelle La Belle is cryed up to be the only Beauty in the Kingdome.

Malicious

Lord that is nothing, for ſometimes opinion will carry a black Blowſe up to Fames high Tower.

Spightfull

Yes faith, and moſt commonly they are caſt down in diſgrace.

Detractor

Why ſhould ſhe be cryed up ſo? for ſhe is neither well featured, nor well ſhaped, nor well faſhioned, nor well dreſt, nor well bred, nor good natured; for ſhe is of a brown Complexion, a heavy Eye, a ſad Countenance, a lazy Garb; ſhe dreſſes Phantaſtically, ſpeaks Childiſhly Kkkkkk2 looks 500 Kkkkkk2v 500 Looks ſhamefaſtly; ſhe is proud, reſerved, coy, diſdainfull, and ſelfconceited.

Tell-truth

Let me tell you, it is reported that ſhe hath moſt lovely features, a clear Complexion, a modeſt Countenance, a baſhfull Eye, a pleaſing Speech, a winning behavior, a Majeſticall preſence; beſides it is reported that her diſpoſition is civil, courteous, and obliging, her Nature ſweet and gentle, her Education virtuous, her life temperate and Chaſt, her actions noble and wiſe, her diſcourſe witty and delightful.

Spightfull

Hey day, hey day, good Miſtriſs Tell-truth run not ſo faſt in the wayes of vain Reports, leſt your judgment fall into a Quagmire.

Enter Monſieur Phantaſie.

Malicious

Monſieur Phantaſie, tis ſaid you are one of Madamoiſelle La Belles admirers.

Phantaſie

All the World would admire her, if they ſaw her, ſhe is ſo Heavenly a Creature.

Spightfull

If ſhe be ſo Heavenly a Creature, ſhe would be known to the whole World by the ſplendor of her Beams.

Phantaſie

Heaven is not made known to all; neither can the gloryes be ſuddenly comprehended, by weak Mortals.

Detractor

Good Lord, if ſhe hath ſuch an infinite Beauty, that it cannot be comprehended, it is obſcure.

Phantaſie

But thoſe that comprhend leaſt will be aſtoniſh’d, and ſtruck with deep amaze.

Detractor

I believe you are ſtruck with Love, which maked you Blind, or Mad, that makes you think you ſee your own imaginations: wherefore fare you well, untill you are ſober.

The Ladies goe out. Monſieur Phantaſie alone.

Phantaſie

I am ſtruck indeed, for I am wounded deeper than Swords can pierce, or Bullets ſhoot at

Exit.

Scene 11.

Enter Monſieur Nobiliſſimo, and many Gentlemen with him.

1 Gentleman

Your Lordſhip rid to day beyond Perſeus on his Pegaſus

Nobiliſſimo

No Monſieur, he went (if Poets ſpeak truth) in higher Capreols than ever I ſhall make my Horſe go.

2 Gentleman

He might go higher my Lord, but never keep ſo juſt a time, and place, as to pitch from whence he 1-2 charactersobscuredriſs, his feet in the ſame Circle, his leggs in the ſame lines, and your Lordſhip in the ſame Center.

Nobiliſſimo

The truth is, my Horſes went well to day; they were like Muſical Inſtruments, fitly ſtrung, and juſtly tun’d.

3 Gentleman

And your Lordſhip, like a skilfull Muſician, played rarely thereon

Nobiliſſimo 501 Llllll1r 501

Nobiliſſimo

Come Gentlemen, let us to Dinner, for I have uncivilly tyred your Stomacks with a long faſt.

Exeunt.

Act IV.

Scene 12.

Enter Monſieur Phantaſie as in a muſe, ſometimes Sighing, ſometimes ſtrikes his Breſt, and ſometimes turns up his Eyes; and at theſe poſtures Enters Madamoiſelle Bon, at her approach he ſtarts.

Madamoiſelle Bon

Sir, you may very well ſtart to ſee me here, I do not uſe modeſty, pardon me to be ſo bold to viſit Men; it is the firſt viſit I ever made your Sex, and hope it will be the laſt; but I am come, ſince neither Letter, nor Meſſenger, could have acceſs to be reſolved by your own Confeſſion, whether you have forſaken me or not.

Phantaſie

No, I have not forſaken you.

Bon

But your affection prefers another before me.

Phantaſie

If I ſhould ſay I did not, I ſhould belly Truth, which baſeneſs I abhor.

Bon

I am glad for your own ſake you keep to ſo much Honour, though ſorry that you are no conſtanter, and more ſorry for the Oaths you took, and Vows you made to me, ſince they became the witneſſes of your perjury. I was not ſuddenly, nor eaſily brought to draw a Supreme Love to one; for before ſuch time my Love was placed on you, my affections run equally in purling Brooks of Pitty, and Compaſſion, and clear freſh Rivulets of Chaſtity and Humanity, from the pure Springs of good Nature and Religion; and Hard it will be for me to turn this River to each ſtream again, if not, yet I ſhall be at reſt; ’twill overflow my heart and drown me

The Lady goes out. Monſieur Phantaſie alone.

Phantaſie

O I muſt curſe my Fortune, and my Fate; lament my own condition to love without return, and only pitty what I loved moſt.

Exit.
Llllll Scene 502 Llllll1v 502

Scene 13.

Enter Madamoiſelle Grand Eſprit, and her Audience.

Grand Eſprit

Great Mercury to thee I now addreſs,

Imploy thy favour, help me in diſtreſs;

Thou God of Eloquence, ſo guide my tongue,

Let all my words on even ſenſe be ſtrung,

And let my Speech be tun’d to every Ear,

That every Ear each ſeveral word may hear:

That every paſſion may in meaſure move,

And let the figure of the Dance be Love.

Noble and Right Honourable,

I will diſcourſe at this time of Love, not of the ſuperfluous Branches, or wither’d leaves, or rotten fruits, but of the Root of Love, which is Selflove; It is the Root and the Original Love in Nature; it is the Foundation of Nature, it is the Fountain from when iſſues all the ſeveral Springs; Selflove was the cauſe of the Worlds Creation; for the Gods out of love to themſelves, cauſed Creatures to be Created, to worſhip them: thus all Creatures being created out of ſelf-love, and their chief being proceeding out of ſelf-love, is the cauſe that every particular Creature loves themſelves in the firſt place, and what Love is placed on any other, or to any other, from any particular, is derived from ſelf-love; for we love the Gods but out of ſelf- love, as believing the Gods love us; we adore the Gods but out of ſelf- love, becauſe we think we proceed from them, or were produced by their commands; we pray to the Gods but out of ſelf-love, becauſe we hope the Gods will help us in diſtreſs; we bleſs the Gods but out of ſelf-love, becauſe we do verrily believe the Gods will exalt, and Crown us with everlaſting glory; and to ſhew that we Love the Gods, not as they are Gods, but for our own ſakes, as believing they will or can do us good, is, that we are apt to murmure at the Gods, when we have not our own deſires; we are apt to accuſe the Gods, when any worldly thing croſſes us; we are apt to curſe the Gods at ill Accidents, Mosfortunes, or Natural loſſes; we are apt to forget the Gods in the midſt of pleaſure; we are apt to think our ſelves Gods in the pride of proſperity; we ſtrive to make our ſelves Gods in the hight of worldly power; and we do not only ſtrive to make our ſelves equal with the Gods, but to raiſe our ſelves above the Gods, taking, or commanding to our ſelves more worſhip than we give unto the Gods; nay, thoſe that are accounted the moſt holy and devout Servants of the Gods, belie the Gods, taking the name of the Gods to cover their own follies; as for example, whenſoever any eminent perſon hath had ill ſucceſs, either in, or after their Fooliſh, Ambitious, and Vain-glorious actions, they charge the Gods Decrees and pleaſure, as it was the Gods will it ſhould be ſo; like as ſhe that Vaingloriouſly had her two and only Sons to draw her Chariot, like two Horſes, or Dogs, or Slaves, and being both found Dead the next day, ſhe had prayed to the Gods to reward them with that which was beſt for them, and being both dead, ſhe ſaid the Gods accounted Death as the beſt reward, when they no doubt dyed with over heating themſelves, ſtriving beyond their 503 Llllll2r 503 their natural power and ſtrength; yet theſe two Sonns that drew the vain Mother in a Chariot, drew and died out of ſelf-love; either like as vain Sonns like their vain Mother, vaingloriouſly to get a fame, or believing the Gods would reward them for their Act, either with extraordinary proſperity, power, or bleſſedneſs in the Life to come; and many the like examples may be given; for how ordinary is it in theſe our times, and in former times, for the politicks to perſwade the people, with promiſes from the Gods, or to tell them it is the Gods commands they ſhould do ſuch and ſuch acts, even ſuch act as are unnatural, wicked, and moſt horrid? thus Men bely the Gods to abuſe their fellow Creatures. But moſt Noble and Right Honourable, my explanation of this diſcourſe is, that ſince Self-love is the Fountain of and in Nature from whence iſſue out ſeveral Springs to every ſeveral Creature, wherein Mankind being her chiefeſt and Supreme work, is filled with the fulleſt Springs from that Fountain, which is the cauſe that Mankind is more induſtrious, cruel, and unſatiable, to and for his ſelf ends, than any other Creature, hE ſpares nothing that he hath power to deſtroy, if he fears any hurt, or hopes for any gain, or finds any pleaſure, or can make any ſport, or to imploy his idle time; he melts metalls, diſtills and diſſolves plants, diſſects animals, ſubſtracts and extracts Elements, he digs up the bowels of the Earth, cuts through the Ocean of the Sea, gathers the winds into Sails, freſh waters into Mills, and impriſons the thinner Ayre; he Hunts, he Fowls, he Fiſhes for ſport, with Gunns, Nets, and Hooks; he cruelly cauſeth one Creature to deſtroy another, the whilſt he looks on with delight; he kills not only for to live, but lives for to kill, and takes pleaſure in torturing the life of other Creatures, in prolonging their pains, and lengthning their Deaths; and when Man makes friendſhip of Love, it is for his own ſake, either in humouring his paſſion, or feeding his humour, or to ſtrengthen his party, or for Truſt, or Counſel, or Company, or the like cauſes; if he dies for his friend, it is either for fame, or that he cannot live himſelf happy without his friend, his paſſion, and grief, making him reſtleſs; if Man loves his Children, Wife, or Parents, tis for his own ſake; he loves his Parents, for the honour he receives by them, or for the life he received of them; if he loves his Wife, or the Wife the Husband, it is for their own ſakes, as their own pleaſure, as wither for their Beauties, Wits, Humours, or other Graces, or for their Company, or Friendſhips, or becauſe they think they love them; if they love their Children, it is for their own ſakes, as to keep alive their memory, and to have their duty, and obedience, to bow and do homage to them; If Maſters love their Servants, it is for their own ſakes, becauſe they are truſty faithfull and induſtrious in their affairs, imployments, or for their own profit, or eaſe ; and if Servants love their Maſters, it is for their own ſakes, as either for their power to protect them, or for the regard they have to them, or for the gain they get from them, or for their lives that are nouriſhed, and maintained by them; if Amorous Lovers love, it is for their own ſakes, as to pleaſe the Appetite, and to ſatisfy their deſires; if Subjects love their Soveraigns, it is for their own ſakes, as that they may have Law and Juſtice, Peace and Unity; If Sovereigns love their Subjects, it is for their own ſakes, becauſe they bear up his Throne with their Wealth and Induſtry, and fight to maintain, or get him power. My Application, moſt Noble and Right Honourable, is, that ſince we do all, and in every act for our own ſakes, we ſhould indeavour, and ſtudy, for that which is beſt for our ſelves, and the ground of our indeavour is to learn, and know Llllll2 our 504 Llllll2v 504 our ſelves, every particular perſon muſt learn and know himſelf, not by comparative, as obſerving others, for every man is not alike; but by ſelf ſtudy, reading our own Natures and Diſpoſitions, marking our own Paſſions, Amours, and Appetites, with the Pen of Thought, and Ink of Examination; and let the Truth be the Tutor to inſtruct you in the School of Reaſon, in which you may Commence Maſter of Art, and go out Doctor of Judgment, to practice Temperance; for Temperance keeps in its full ſtrength, prolongs Beauty, quickens Wit, ripens Youth, refeſhes Age, reſtores Decayes, keeps Health, maintains Life, and hinders Times ruines; but Temperance is not only a Doctor of Phyſick, a Phyſician to the Body, but a Doctore of Divinity, a Divine for the Soul; It preaches and teaches good Life, it inſtructs with the Doctrine of Tranquillity, and guides to the Heaven of Happineſs; alſo Temperance is the Doctor of Muſick, it tunes the Senſes, compoſes the Thoughts, it notes the Paſſions, it meaſures the Appetites, and playes a Harmonious Mind. Thus Moſt Noble and Right Honourable, I have proved that Self-love is the Fountain of Nature, and the Original Springs of her Creatures, and that Temperance is the ſtrongeſt Foundation of Self-love, although few build thereupon, but upon Intemperance, which is a hugh Bulk of Exceſs, the ſubſtance of Riot, wormeaten with Surfets, rotten with Pain, and ſinks down to death with Sickneſs and Grief, not being able to bear and uphold Life; wherefore build your Lives upon Temperance, which is a ſtrong and ſure Foundation, which will never fail; but will uphold your Lives as long as Time an Nature permits them, and your Souls will dwell peaceably, and happily therein.

Exeunt.

Act V.

Scene 14.

Enter Madamoiſelle Amor alone as muſing to her ſelf alone, then ſpeaks.

Madamoiſelle Amor

I will confeſs to him my Love, ſince my deſigns are Noble; but O for a woman to woo a man is againſt Nature, and ſeems too bold, nay impudent, only by a contrary cuſtome; but why ſhould not a woman confeſs ſhe loves before ſhe is wooed, when after a ſeeming coyneſs gives conſent, as being won more by a Treaty than by Love, when her obſcure thoughts know well her heart was his at firſt, bound as his priſoner, and only couterfeits a freedome; beſides, it were unjuſt although an antient cuſtome, if diſſembling ſhould be preferred before a Modern Truth, for length of Time and often practices makes not Falſhood Truth, nor Wrong Right, nor Evill Good; then I will break down Cuſtoms Walls, and honeſt Truth ſhall lead me on.

Love plead my Sute, and if I be deny’d,

My heart will break, and Death my Face will hide.

Exit. Scene 505 Mmmmmm1r 505

Scene 15.

Enter Monſieur Eſperance, and his Wife Madamoiſelle Eſperance.

Monſieur Eſperance

Wife, whither do you go? when I come near you, you always turn to go from me.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

I ſaw you not; for I had rather be fixt as a Statue, than move to your diſlike.

Monſieur Eſperance

Why do you bluſh? ſurely you are guilty of ſome crime.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

’Tis ſaid bluſhing comes unſent for, and departs without leave; and that it oftner viſits Innocency than guilt.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance weeps.

Monſieur Eſperance

What do you weep?

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

How can I otherwiſe chooſe, when my Innocent Life, and true Love is ſuſpected, and all my pure affections are caſt away like droſs, and the beſt of all my actions condemn’d as Traytors, and my unſpotted Chaſtity blemiſh’d with foul Jealouſy, and defamed with ſlandering words?

Monſieur Eſperance

Prethy Wife do not weep, for every tear wounds me to Death, and know it is my extreme Love, which creates my fears; but you might have had a Husband with more faults.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

’Tis true, but not ſo many noble qualities as you have, which makes me weep, doubting you Love me not, you are ſo Jealous.

Monſieur Eſperance

By Heaven I love thee beyond my Soul, wherefore forbear to weep if thou canſt ſtop thy tears.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

Tears may be ſtopt, unleſs they flow from an unrecoverable loſs, which Heaven forbid mine ſhould: yet ſorrow oft doth ſtop the Spring from whence tears riſe, or elſe the Eyes do weep themſelves quite blind.

Pray dry yours.

Exeunt.

Scene 16.

Enter Madamoiſelle Bon alone.

Madamoiſelle Bon.

O Man! O Man! How various and Inconſtant are you all, how cruell to betray our faint and unexperienced Sex, bribing our Judgments with flattering words, obſcure our reaſons with Clouds of Sighs, drawing us into belief with proteſtations, bind us with promiſes and vows, forcing us to yield up our affections; then murther us with ſcorn, and bury us in forgetfullneſs? but O how happy was I, before I was betrayed by Love? my heart was free, my thoughts were pleaſant, and my Mmmmmm humour 506 Mmmmmm1v 506 humour gay; but now my mind is a Garriſon of cares, my thoughts like runaways are wanderers.

Grief on my heart his heavy taxes layes;

Which through my Eyes, my heart thoſe taxes payes.

Exit.

Scene 17.

Enter Madamoiſelle Amor, and at a diſtance ſeeth Monſieur Nobiliſſimo, ſhe ſpeaks firſt, as to her ſelf.

Madamoiſelle Amor

Love and Diſcretion fight duels in my mind, one makes me Mute, the other doth perſwade me to prefer my Sute; but why ſhould I be nice to ſpeak, or be aſhamed to woo with words, when all our Sex doth woo with ſeveral dreſſes and ſmiles? each civil courteſy doth plead Loves Sute; then I will on, Love give me Courage, and Mercury guide my tongue.

She goeth as towards the Lord Nobiliſſimo.

Amor

Noble Sir, impute it rather as a folly to my Sex and Youth, and not any impudence of Nature, if that my Innocency diſcovers my paſſion and affection, not having Craft, or ſubtilty to conceal them; but I muſt plainly tell you, no ſooner did I ſee you, and hear you ſpeak, but loved: but yet miſtake me not, I dote not on your perſon, but your mind; for ſure your Noble Soul ſhot fire through my Eyes into my Heart, there flames with pure affection; but for this confeſſion, perchance you will ſet me as a mark of ſcorn, for all to ſhoot their ſcofs at, and in deriſion pointing, will laugh and ſay, there is the Maid that wooed a Man.

Nobiliſſimo

Is this to me Lady?

Amor

It cannot be to any other, Nature could make but one, and that was you.

Nobiliſſimo

If this be real you do profeſs, the Gods, ſhould they have ſent an Angel down to offer me their Heavenly Manſion, it had not been ſo great a gift as your affection.

Amor

Do you not hate me then?

Nobiliſſimo

Nothing I Love ſo well.

Amor

And will you Love me ever?

Nobiliſſimo

Yes ever; for when my Body is diſſolved, Love ſhall live in my duſt in ſpight of Death.

Amor

And will you love none but me?

Nobiliſſimo

An intire and undivided affection, can be placed but upon one, and that is you.

Amor

May your conſtancy be as firm, as my Love pure.

Exeunt.
Scene 507 Mmmmmm2r 507

Scene 18.

Enter Madamoiſelle La Belle and her four Suters, Admiration, Ambition, Vainglory and Pride.

Admirat

Dear Miſtriſs ſtay, that I may gaze upon you,

Then bow my knee, as to the riſing Sun;

Heave up my hands, as when to Heaven I pray,

But being amaz’d, know not one word I ſay:

Yet ſuperſtitiouſly, I ſhall adore,

As my cheif Goddeſs, ſhall my love implore;

And being worſhip’d, you are deifi’d,

Your Godhead in your Beauty doth recide.

Vainglory

Thou abſolute Beauty, for thy dear ſake,

Of Lovers hearts, a foot-ſtool ſhall be made;

A Cuſhion ſoft, with Hopes fill’d full, then laid,

For thee to ſtand, and triumph on, fair Maid;

And Lovers Souls ſhall from their bodyes fly,

For thee a Couch, when weary on to ly.

Pride.

Thy Lovers tears for to invite thy reſt,

In murmuring ſtreams, fall on thy marble breſt;

And gentle ſighs, like whiſpering winds ſhall blow,

And fan thy Cheeks, that Poets fire may glow:

Loves Melancholy thoughts, like Clouds of night,

Like as thy Curtains, drawn before thy ſight;

For fear the Sun ſhould trouble our of ſpight,

Thy Eyes repoſe, being the greater light.

Ambition

Sweet Beauty, thou in a glorious Throne ſhall ſet,

The ſpangled Heaven, ſeems but thy Counterfeit;

Thy Charriot ſhall be ſtuck with Eyes all gazing,

And oyld with Eloquent tongues, that runs with prayſing:

Drawn by large ſtrong well ſhapt Commendations,

Guided by Fame, about two ſeveral Nations.

La Belle

Admiration, Vainglory, Pride, and Ambition,

Why do you woo Beauty, that is Deaf and Dumb,

That hears no praiſe, nor adoration;

If ſeeth no hands heav’d up, nor tears that fall,

If that no tongue to anſwer Love withall;

It hath no Life, no Soul where Paſſion lies,

It neither gives, not takes inſtructions wiſe:

It is no ſolid Body you admire,

No ſubſtance, but a ſhadow you deſire.

Finis.

508 Mmmmmm2v 508

The Actors Names.

Monſieur Nobiliſſimo.

Monſieur Heroick his Brother.

Monſieur Eſperance.

Monſieur Phantaſie.

Monſieur Amy.

Monſieur Poverty, and other Gentlemen.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance.

Madamoiſelle La Belle.

Madamoiſelle Amour.

Madamoiſelle Grand Eſprit.

Madamoiſelle Bon.

Madamoiſelle Tell-truth.

Madamoiſelle Spightfull.

Madamoiſelle Malicious.

Madamoiſelle Detractor.

The 509 Nnnnnn1r 509

The Second Part of Natures Three Daughters, Beauty, Love, and Wit.

Act 1.

Scene 1.

Enter Madamoiſelle Grand Eſprit, and her Audience.

Grand Eſprit

Great Fame my Prayers I direct to thee,

That thou wilt keep me in thy memory;

And place my Name in thy large brazen Tower,

That neither Spight, nor Time may it devour;

And write it plain, that every age may ſee,

My Names inſcrib’d to live eternally:

Let not Malice obſtruct my Wit with ſpight,

But let it ſhine in its own clear light.

Noble and Right Honorable,

I divide my diſcourse into three parts, as namely Vanity, Vice, and Wickedneſs; Vanity lives in the Cuſtoms and Manners of men, and Wickedneſs; in the Souls of men, Vices in the Senſes of men, as vain habits, evill appetites, and wicked paſſion; as for Vanity and Vice, they are commodities that are ſold out of the Shops of Idleneſs; Vice is ſold by wholeſale, but Vanities are ſold by retail; the Buyers of theſe Commodities are Youth, the Merchants, are evill Cuſtoms, and ill examples; the Maſculine youth buyes more Vice than Vanity, and the Effeminate youth buyes more Vanity than Vice; but they all buy, as faſt as they can be ſold; they will ſpare for no coſt, and will give any prices, although it be their Healths, Lives, Fortunes, or Reputations; as for Wickedneſs, it is inlayed into the ſoul like as Moſaickwork, and ſo cloſe it is wrought therein, as it makes it appear to be the ſoul it ſelf; but evill Education and Cuſtome, are the Artificers of this work, and not natural Creation, or divine infuſion, or inſpiration, from whence the Soul proceeds, or is produced, for neither the Gods, nor Nature, is the Author of Wickedneſs; but Vanity, Vice, and Wickedneſs, are ſoon catcht, and like the Plague, they infect all they come near, and Vanity, Vice, and Wickedneſs is ſoon leanr’d, when Virtue, Goodneſs, and Piety, are hard Leſſons; for though Divines and natural Philoſophers, Preaches, and ſo teaches them, yet they are ſeldom underſtood; for if they were, the benefit woudl be known, and men would pious and virtuous be, for profits ſake; for Common-wealths that are compoſed, and governed by Virtue, Religion, and good Life, they are ſo ſtrongly united by honeſt love, as they become inpregnable againſt Forein Foes, or home factions, or Nnnnnn temptations, 510 Nnnnnn1v 510 temptations, ſo live in peace and plenty, which breeds both pleaſure and delight; for life doth never truly injoy it ſelf, but in reſt, eaſe, and peace; but to conclude moſt Noble and Right Honourable, the Soul, Senſes, and Education, ſhould be plain with Truth, ſmooth with Virtue, and bright with Piety, or Zeal; that the Body may live Eaſily, the life Peaceably, and that the Soul may be bleſſed with Everlaſting Glory.

Exit.

Scene 2.

Enter Monſieur Nobiliſſimo, and three or four Gentlemen.

1 Gentleman

The Ladies of this Age, are as inconſtant as a fevouriſh pulſe, and their affections have more fainting fits, than thoſe are troubled with Epilepſies.

2 Gentleman

Faith they will hang about ones neck one hour, and ſpit in his Face the next.

3 Gentleman

That is becauſe they would have variety, for they reſpect Strangers more than friends; for they will entertain Strangers with the civilleſt Behaviours, faireſt Faces, and coſtlieſt Garments they have, and make them welcome with their beſt Cheer, when as their beſt Friends, lovingeſt Servants, and oldeſt Acquaintance, they will neglect, deſpiſe, ſcorn, command, and rail againſt, and quarrel with.

Nobiliſſimo

O Gentlemen, brave Cavaliers as you all are, you muſt never complain, diſcommend, nor condemn the Actions of the Effeminate Sex; for that we are apt to call their Cruelty, is their Juſtice, our Sex meriting not their favours; and whenſoever we receive the leaſt favours from that Sex, we ought to give thanks, as proceeding from a compaſſionate Goodneſs, genlte Nature, ſweet Diſpoſitions, and generous Souls, and not as a due, or a debt for our ſervice: for we are bound by Nature, not only to be their Servants, but their Slaves, to be laſht with their frowns, if we be not diligent to their commands, preſent at their calls, induſtrious in their ſervice, and our neglects ought to be ſeverely puniſhed; for we wear our lives only for their ſakes, as to defend their Honours, to protect their Perſons, to obey their Commands, and to pleaſe and delight their humours; alſo the Eſtates we manage is theirs, not ours, we are but their Stuards, to Husband and increaſe their Stores, to receive their Revenues, and lay out their Expences; for we have nothing we call our own, ſince we our ſelves are theirs; wherefore it is enough for us to admire their Beautyes, to applaud their Wit, to worſhip their Virtues, and give thanks for their Favours.

Exeunt.
Scene 511 Nnnnnn2r 511

Scene 3.

Enter Monſieur Eſperance, and his Wife Madamioſelle Eſperance.

Monſieur Eſperance

Wife, why art thou all undreſt to day?

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

The truth is, I am become negligent in dreſſing, ſince you only eſteem my Virtue, not my Habit,.

Monſieur Eſperance

I would have you change into as many ſeveral dreſſes, as Protheus ſhapes; for it is not the dreſs can make me Jealouſ now, for I am confident no Vanity can corrupt thy Virtue, but that thy Virtue can convert Vanity to a pious uſe or end.

Madamoiſelle

Well Husband, I ſhall ſtudy to form my ſelf, and faſhion my dreſs, both to your fancy and deſire.

Monſieur Eſperance

Do ſo Wife.

Monſieur Eſperance goes out. Madamoiſelle Eſperance alone.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

Ha, is my Husband ſo confident of me, it is an ill ſign from extreme Jealouſy, to an extreme Confidence, the next will be a Careleſsneſs, and then a Neglect, and there is nothing my Nature doth more abhor than neglect, for Jealouſy proceeds from Love, but Neglect proceeds from a deſpiſing, if not a hating; beſides, he deſires variety of dreſſes, which ſhows my Beauty is vaded, or he is weary in viewing of one object often; but I find his humour is wandring, and ſeeks for change; if he ſhould prove falſe, O how unhappy ſhould I be? for I am naturally honeſt, alſo my birth and education hath been honeſt; beſides my affections are ſo fixt as not to be removed: thus I am tyed, and cannot take liberty which other women do, for to divert the ſorrows of my heart, or to revenge my wrongs; but I ſhall mourn, and weep my ſelf to Water, an ſigh my ſelf to Ayre.

Exit.

Act II.

Scene 4.

Enter Monſieur Nobiliſſimo, and Madamoiſelle Amor, and Madamoiſelle La Belle comes and peeps through the Hangings, and ſees them.

Nobiliſſimo

The bond of our Love is written in large profeſſions, but not ſealed with the contracting kiſs yet.

Nnnnnn2 Monſieur 512 Nnnnnn2v 512 Monſieur Nobiliſſimo ſalutes his Miſtriſs Madamoiſelle Amor, her Siſter Madamoiſelle La Belle comes forth from behind the Hangings.

Madamoiſelle La Belle

So Siſter, are not you aſham’d?

Madamoiſelle Amor

No truly; for my love is ſo honeſt, and the ſubject of my love ſo worthy, as I am ſo far from being aſhamed to own it, as I glory in my affection.

Madamoiſelle La Belle

I only wonder that with ſo ſmall acquaintaince, ſuch a familiar friendſhip ſhould be made.

Madamoiſelle Amor

You have no cauſe to wonder, for Innocency is eaſily known, tis craft and ſubtilty that is obſcure, and treacherous falſhood with leering Eyes, doth at a diſtance ſtand, when honeſty and truth ſtraight joyns in friendſhip bonds.

Nobiliſſimo

My Sweet, Innocent, Virtuous, Wiſe, Miſtriſs.

Kiſſeth her hand. Exeunt.

Scene 5.

Enter Madamoiſelle Detractor, Madamoiſelle Spightfull, Madamoiſelle Malicious, and Madamoiſelle Tell-truth.

Tell-truth

I pitty poor Madamoiſelle Bon.

Spightfull

Why ſo?

Tell-truth

Becauſe ſhe is forſaken.

Spightfull

I cannot pitty a Fool.

Tell-truth

Why, ſhe is no Fool.

Spightfull

Yes Faith but ſhe is, to be conſtant to an unconſtant man.

Malicious

The truth is, I think that woman wiſeſt that forſakes before ſhe is forſaken.

Tell-truth

But how and if ſhe meets with a conſtant man?

Detractor

That ſhe cannot do, for there is no man conſtant; for they are all falſe, and more changing than women are.

Malicious

If any ſhould prove unconſtant to me, I would Piſtoll him.

Tell-truth

Yes with the Gunpowder breath, the Bullets of words, and the Fire of anger, which will do them no hurt.

Spightfull

The beſt revenge I know againſt an Inconſtant Man is, to deſpiſe him.

Tell-truth

He will not care for your deſpiſements, but Patience, Patience is the beſt remedy, for then a woman will be content, although ſhe hath not her deſires.

Malicious

Can any Creature be content without the fruition of deſire?

Tell-truth

Thoſe that cannot, muſt be unhappy all their Life.

Detractor

Then all Mankind is unhappy, for I dare ſwear, there is not any that can be content without the fruition of deſire; for deſire is ſo reſtleſs, as it gives no time for content.

Spightfull

The truth is, content only lives in words, but never lives in deeds; for I never heard, or ſaw any one truly content in my life.

Tell-truth 513 Oooooo1r 513

Tell-truth

The truth is, Content is like the Shadow of a Subſtance, or the Thought of an Act, and therefore let us leave it, as we would idle, or vain Thoughts, or vading, or vaniſhing Shadows.

Exeunt.

Scene 6.

Enter Monſieur Heroick, and Monſieur Phantaſie.

Phantaſie

Sir, it is reported you are a Servant to my Miſtriſs.

Heroick

I am a Servant to the whole Effeminate Sex, and to her, if ſhe be a woman.

Phantasie

Yes, ſhe is a woman, and the faireſt of her kind.

Heroick

Why then I am her slave.

Phantasie

I deſire you will inſlave your ſelf to ſome other, and not to her.

Heroick

You muſt pardon me if ſhe be the faireſt, for I am bound to the abſoluteſt Beauty.

Phantasie

Draw.

Heroick

Nay, I am not ſo raſh; for by your favour I will view her with mine own Eyes, and take the opinion of my own Judgment, and not venture my life on your bare word.

Phantasie

I ſay draw.

Heroick

I ſhall, but know, I only fight in mine own defence, not for her Beauty, unleſs I ſaw her, and approved her ſuch as you affirm her to be: for though I am Servant to all, yet tis impoſſible all ſhould be an abſolute Beauty.

Phantasie

Know, I account all thoſe my Enemyes that queſtion it; beſides you give me the lye in doubting the truth.

Heroick

I perceive it is your violent paſſion that perſwades you, or rather forces you to fight, and not your Reaſon; and if your paſſion were to be counſelled, I would counſel you to ſtay, untill we chooſe our Seconds, to witneſs how we fought, not in a furious rage, but when our ſpirits are freſh and cool, our Minds as equal temper’d as our Blades, and that our valours are not aſhamed to own the quarrel; ſo ſhall we fight on juſt and honeſt grounds, and honour will be the purchaſe we ſhall gain.

Phantasie

Ile hear no more but fight.

Heroick

Nature, I ask thy pardon, I muſt ingage thee to a furious rage, or ſudden fit, or frantick humour, which are for thee to ſcorn, and ſlight, and not to fight.

Exeunt.
Oooooo Scene 514 Oooooo1v 514

Scene 7.

Enter Monſieur Nobiliſſimo, and Monſieur Poverty.

No biliſſimo

Monſieur Poverty, ſhall I never have the honour of your Company?

Poverty

My Poverty will diſgrace you my Noble Lord.

Nobiliſſimo

I were no noble Lord, if virtuous Poverty could diſgrace me.

Poverty

Howſoever, your Servants, Friends, and Acquaintance will forſake you, if I ſhould wait upon your Lordſhip.

Nobiliſſimo

They may be my Acquaintance, but neither my Friends, nor Servants that will forſake me, for the ſake of virtuous Poverty: for though I would not have thee intail’d to my line and poſterity, nor to live conſtantly in my family; yet, I am neither aſhamed, nor afraid to ſhake thee by the hand, as long as thou art an honeſt man; and I deſire to take Plenty in own hand, but to ſerve Poverty with both hands.

Poverty

May Plenty be always your Lordſhips Hand-Maid.

Nobiliſſimo

And your Reliever Sir.

Exeunt.

Scene 8.

Enter Madamoiſelle Amor, and her Siſter Madamoiſelle La Belle.

Madamoiſelle La Belle

Siſter, be not jealous of me, for I have no deſign to rob you of your Servant, I ſtudy not thoſe Amorous allurements; for I would not be otherwiſe known unto the Maſculine Sex, than Angels are to one another; yet I may reſpect honour, and admire without a doteing fondneſs, or a ſurprized affection, or an incaptivated love.

Madamoiſelle Amor

Yes Siſter, when I conſider your Virtue, I cannot be Jealous of you, but when I look on your Beauty, I cannot be Confident of my Servant; for Beauty is victorious, and moſt commonly triumphs in all hearts, binding the Paſſions, and leading the Affections as Priſoners; and the Thoughts run a-long as Slaves, and Conſtancy, if it be not kill’d in the Battell, yet it is ſore wounded, and if it ſhould recover, yet never to the former ſtrength again.

Enter Monſieur Nobiliſſimo.

Madamoiſelle La Belle

My Lord what ſay you, hath your Miſtriſs my Siſter Amor any reaſon to be Jealous?

Nobiliſſimo

Yes, if my Miſtriſs were any other but her ſelf.

Madamoiſelle

I thank you; for I had rather be kill’d with civill although diſſembling words, than live with rude Inconſtancy.

Nobiliſſimo 515 Oooooo2r 515

Nobiliſſimo

Why, do you think I ſpeak not truth?

Madamoiſelle Amor

I hope your words are marks of truth, for all belief to ſhoot at.

Nobiliſſimo

But Hopes are built upon Doubts and Fears, and do you Doubt and Fear my Love?

Madamoiſelle Amor

How can I love without attending Fear, being inſeparable?

Nobiliſſimo

Pray do not fear; for though there is none that ſeeth your Siſter La Belle, but muſt confeſs ſhe is moſt beautifull, yet all fancy not Beauty alike; but were ſhe above what ſhe is, as much as Heaven to Earth, or Gods to Men, yet I am fixt, and not to be remove’d, no more than is Eternity.

Exeunt.

Act III.

Scene 9.

Enter Madamoiſelle Eſperance very fine, and her Couſin Madamoiſelle Tell-truth.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

Am not I very fine to day?

Tell-truth

Yes very fine.

Mademoiſelle Eſperance.

Do I look handſome to Day?

Tell-truth.

Yes very handſome.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

If I were a Stranger, ſhould I attract your Eyes to take notice of me?

Tell-truth.

As you are my Couſin, and intimate Friend, and known acquaintance, and ſee you every day, yet I cannot chooſe but look on you, and take notice of your rich Garments; but why do you ask, for you do not uſe to make ſuch queſtions?

Madamoiſelle Eſperance.

I will tell you, when I was new Married, my Huſband took ſo much notice of my Dreſs, that the leaſt alteration he obſerved; nay he grew jealous at it, and thought each curl a ſnare ſet to catch Lovers in; after I had been Married ſome little ſpace of time, he condemned me for careleſsneſs, and deſired me to various dreſſes; and now dreſt, or undreſt, he never obſerves; for were I dreſt with ſplendrous light, as glorious as the Sun, or Clouded like dark Night, it were all one to him; neither would ſtrike his Senſe; yet I obſerve he doth obſerve my Maids, as that one hath a fine Pettycoat, and another hath handſome made Shooes, and then he pulls up their Pettycoats a little way, to ſee what ſtockings they have, and ſo views them all over, and commends them, ſaying, they are very fine, when all theſe Garments he commends on them, were mine, which I had caſt off, and given to them; when thoſe Garments though freſh and new, when I did wear them, he never took notice of; beſides, when my Maids do come into the Room where he and I are, he ſtrives to talk his beſt, as if he wiſht, and did indea vourOooooo2 vour 516 Oooooo2v 516 vour their good opinion, when only alone with me the rubbiſh of his diſcourſe doth ſerve the turn.

Tell-truth.

Madam, I perceive you do begin to be Jealous.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance.

Have I not reaſon?

Tell-truth.

No truly; for a Man may do ſuch light actions, or ſpeak merrily, or ſolidly, without an evill deſign, only to paſs a way idle time.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance.

Lord how idly you ſpeak Couſin, as to think men might idly paſs away their time, when Nature allows life no idle time; for all things are growing, or decaying, feeding life, or getting food for to nouriſh life, or bearing, or breeding for increaſe; and man which only by his ſhape exceeds all other Creatures in Reaſon, Knowledge, and Underſtanding, and will you have him caſt away theſe ſupreme gifts of Nature with idle time? would you have men follow the Senſe only, like a Beaſt, and not to be guided by reaſon to ſome noble ſtudy, or profitable action? would you have them yield to their ſufeting Appetites, and not indeavour to temper them? is Sickneſs leſs painfull than Health? is Diſorder to be prefer’d before Method, or Inconveniency before Conveniency, Warrs before Peace, Famine before Plenty; Vice before Virtue: all which would be if idle time werye allow’d; for Idleneſs never found out Arts nor Sciences, or rules of Government, nor the eaſe of Temperance, not the profit of Prudence, nor the commands of Fortitude, not the peace of Juſtice, which Induſtry produceth; but Idleneſs brings Confuſion.

Exeunt.

Scene 10.

Enter Monſieur Heroick with his Sword bloody, and meets his friend Monſieur Amy.

Amy

What haſt thou been doing, that thy ſword is bloody?

Heroick

Fighting.

Amy

With whom?

Heroick

I know not.

Amy

For what did you fight?

Heroick

For nothing, or at leaſt as bad as nothing; for that I never ſaw, nor heard of, nor knew where to find.

Amy

This is a ſtrange quarrel, that you neither know the man, nor the cauſe, it was a mad quarrel.

Heroick

You ſay right; for as for my part I had little reaſon to fight, I know not what my oppoſite had: but prithy friend go help him, for he lyes yonder, and I doubt he is deadly wounded, the whilſt I will ſeek a Chirurgion to ſend to him.

Amy

You had need ſeek one for your ſelf, for you bleed I ſee by your ſhirt.

Heroick

Yes ſo I will, but it ſhall be the Lady that was the cauſe of the wounds, and I will try if her Beauty can heal them.

Exeunt.
Scene 517 Pppppp1r 517

Scene 11.

Enter Monſieur Nobiliſſimo, and Madamoiſelle Amor.

No biliſſimo

My ſweet Miſtriſs, what is the cauſe you look ſo pale and Melancholy?

Amor

I hear you have forſaken me, and making love to another; which I no ſooner heard, but ſhook with fear, like to a tender Plant blown by a Northern wind, wherewith my blood congeal’d with cold, my thoughts grew ſad, and gathered like black Clouds, which makes my head hang down, my face all wither’d pale and dry: but did I love, as many do, for Perſon, not for Mind, your Inconſtancy would be a leſs Crime; but were your Body as curious made, as Natures skill could form you, and not a Soul anſwerable, I might Admire you, but not Love you with adoration as I do.

Nobiliſſimo

Fear not: for as thy Tongue unlocks my Ears, ſo it locks up my Heart from all thy Sex but thee, and as a Cabinet doth keep thy Picture there.

Amor

Heaven grant my Tongue may never ruſt, but move with words, as ſmoothed with Oyl, turned by the ſtrength of Wit, eaſy and free.

Nobiliſſimo

Dear Miſtriſs baniſh this Jealouſy, it may in time corrupt pure love, and be you confident of my Affection, as of your own Virtue.

Amor

Your kind words I will take for a ſufficient Seal, and never doubt the Bond that Love hath made.

Exeunt.

Scene 12.

Enter Monſieur Phantaſie wounded, being lead between Madamoiſelle Bon, and Monſieur Amy; he ſeems to be ſo faint, as not to paſs any further, but is forced to ly down, Madamoiſelle ſits by him.

Am y

I will go fetch more help and Chirurgions.

Monſieur Amy goes out. Madamoiſelle Bon ſtayes, and holds her Arm under his head.

Phantaſie

I am wounded more with thoughts of Sorrow, than with my oppoſites Sword, and wiſh that Death would ſtrike me in thy Arms, that I might breath my laſt there, offer up my Soul upon the Altar of the Breaſt, and yield my life a Sacrifice unto thy Conſtancy.

Madamoiſelle Bon

May Death exchange, and take my life that is uſeleſs to the World, and ſpare yours, for noble actions to build a fame thereon.

Phantaſie

Speak not ſo.

Pppppp Madamoiſelle 518 Pppppp1v 518

Madamoiſelle Bon

If my words offend you, my tongue for ever ſhall be Dumb.

Phantaſie

No, it is your Wiſh offends, and not your Words; for they are Muſick to my Ears, or like to drops of Balſom powr’d therein to heal my wounded Soul.

Madamoiſelle Bon

If that my words could cure your wounds that bleed, rather than want, Ile ſpeak till all my breath were ſpent, no life to form words with.

She weeps.

Phantaſie

Why do you weep?

Madamoiſelle Bon

To ſee you bleed; but if you bleed to Death, I will weep to Death; and as life iſſues through your Wounds, ſo ſhall life iſſue through my Eyes, and drown it ſelf in floods of tears.

Phantaſie

Forbear, let not the Earth drink up thoſe tears, thoſe precious tears the Gods thirſt after.

Enter Men and take him up, and lay him forth. Exeunt.

Scene 13.

Enter Madamoiſelle Grand Eſprit, and her Audience.

Gr and Eſprit

Venus thou Godeſs fair, for thy Sons ſake,

Cupid the God of Love, O let me make

A Banquet of ſweet Wit to entertain

This Noble Company, and feaſt each brain;

And let each ſeveral Ear feed with delight,

Not be diſturb’d with foul malicious ſpight.

Noble and Right Honourable,

I ſhall take my diſcourſe at this time out of Beauty, the ground of which diſcourſe is Eyes; Eyes are the Beauty of Beauty; for if the Eyes be not good, the Face though ne’r ſo fair, or otherwiſe well featur’d, cannot be pleaſing; the truth is, Eyes are the moſt Curious, Ingenious, Delightfull, and Profitable work in Nature; Curious in the Aſpect an Splendor; Ingenious in the form and faſhion, Delightfull in the Society, and Profitable in their Commerce, Trade, and Traffick, that they have with all the reſt of Natures works: for had not Nature made Eyes, all her works had been loſt, as being buryed in everlaſting darkneſs; for it is not only Light that ſhews her works, but Eyes that ſee her works: wherefore if Nature had not made Eyes ſhe had loſt the glory of Admiration and Adoration, which all her Animal Creatures give her, begot, raiſed, or proceeding from what they ſee; beſides, not only Light the preſenter of objects would have been loſt, but Life would have been but only a dull Melancholy Motion for want of ſight, and for want of ſight life would have wanted knowledge, and ſo would have been ignorant both of its ſelf and Nature; but now life takes delight by the ſight, through the Eyes, and is inamor’d with the Beauties it views; 519 Pppppp2r 519 views; and the Eyes do not only delight themſelves and life with what they receive, but with what they ſend forth; for Eyes are not only paſſages to let Light, Coulours, Forms, and Figures in, but to let Paſſions, Affections, Opinions out; beſides, the Eyes are not only as Navigable Seas, for the Animal Spirits to Traffick on, and Ports to Anchor in; but they are the Gardens of the Soul, wherein the Soul ſits and refreſhes it ſelf, and Love the Sun of the Soul, ſends forth more glorious Rayes than that Sun in the Sky, and on thoſe objects they do ſhine, they both comfort and give a nouriſhing delight; but yet when the light of love doth reflect, the heat doth increaſe by double lines, and quickneſs of motion, which cauſes many times a Diſtemper of the Thoughts, which turns to a Feavor in the Mind; but to conclude moſt Noble and Right Honourable, Eyes are the Starrs which appear only in the Animal Globe, to direct the life in its Voyage, not only to places that life knows, but to new diſcoveryes; and theſe Animal Starrs do not only guide the Animal life, but have an influence and various effects on the Soul, and are not only to view the Beauties of all the other works of Nature, but are the chiefeſt Beauties themſelves; and if that Reaſon that is the Educator of the Life, and chief Ruler and Commander of the Soul, did not croſs and hinder the influence of theſe Animal Starrs, they would prove very fatal to many a one: Wherefore Right Honourable, my Application is, that you obey Reaſon, and pray unto it as to a Deity, that it may divert the Malignant influences, and cauſe them to point to a Happy Effect.

For which my good wiſhes ſhall attend you,

That the Gods of theſe Starrs may defend you.

Exeunt.

Act IV.

Scene 14.

Enter Monſieur Nobiliſſimo, and Monſieur Heroick.

No biliſſimo

Brother, I may bid you welcome home, for I have not ſeen you theſe two years; methinks between Brothers as you and I are ſhould never be abſence.

Heroick

No faith Brother; for we never have good fortune when we are aſunder; for ſince I parted I hear you are to be Marryed, and I muſt tell you, I am like to be Hanged.

Nobiliſſimo

Heaven forbid you ſhould be hanged.

Heroick

And do not you make the ſame Prayer againſt your Mariage?

Nobiliſſimo

No, for that prayer would prove a Curſe, if Heaven ſhould grant it; but I hope Brother you ſpeak of this but merrily, and not as a truth to believed that you are to be hanged.

Heroick

Yes faith, I met with a man that was reſolv’d to fight with the next he met, I think, for he forced a quarrel, and we fought, and I fear I have killed him.

Pppppp2 Nobiliſſimo 520 Pppppp2v 520

Nobiliſſimo

What was the cauſe of the quarrel?

Heroick

Why about a Beauty, that none muſt admire but himſelf, and yet they muſt maintain ſhe is the abſoluteſt Beauty of her Sex, and ſuch a Beauty, I hear of every where, but I cannot ſee her any where.

Nobiliſſimo

Let me tell you Brother ſhe is worth the ſeeing.

Heroick

And is ſhe worth the blood and life that is loſt and ſpilt for her?

Nobiliſſimo

Yes, if it had been to maintain her Beauty againſt rude Deſpiſers, or her Virtue againſt baſe Detractors, or her Honour againſt wicked Violators; for her Soul hath as many beautifull graces and Virtues, and her mind as many noble qualities, as her body hath beautifull Parts, Lineaments, gracefull Motions, pleaſing Countenances, lovely Behaviour, and courteous Demeanors.

Heroick

Certainly Brother you are very well acquainted with her, that you know her ſo well, as to ſpeak ſo confident of her.

Nobiliſſimo

Yes Brother, I do know her very well, for ſhe is Siſter to my Miſtriſs.

Heroick

So, I thought ſhe had ſome relation to you, that you ſpake ſo much in her praiſe; this Self-love bribes all our Tongues; but Brother, you have ſo fired my Spirits, as I am almoſt as mad as the Gentleman I fought with, before I ſee her, meerly with the report, and ſince I muſt loſe my Wits with the reſt of Mankind, for I find all are mad that come within the liſt of her Name, pray let me part with my Wits on Honourable terms, as at the view of her Beauty.

Nobiliſſimo

I ſhall make it a requeſt to her that you may ſee her, and ſhe being a perſon who is very obliging, I make no queſtion but ſhe will receive your civil and humble reſpects.

Exeunt.

Scene 15.

Enter Monſieur Eſperance, and his Wife Madamoiſelle Eſperance.

Ma damoiſelle Eſperance

Husband do you love me?

Monſieur Eſperance

Yes.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

Better than any other Woman?

Monſieur Eſperance

I can make no compariſon.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

Why do you them neglect me ſo much, as to take no notice whether I be fine and brave, or ragged, or patcht, or ilfavoured, or handſom, and yet you take notice of every other woman, from the ſtranger abroad, to the Kitchin-Maid at home?

Monſieur Eſperance

By my troth Wife I do ſo juſt as I would do of a Tree, or a Buſh, or a Stone, or a Brake, or a Fox, or an Aſs, and no otherwiſe.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

Yet it is a ſign you have them in your mind, and I had rather be hated than forgotten; wherefore pray let me be ſometimes in your thoughts, although as a Bryar, and not to be flung out Root and Branch.

Monſieur 521 Qqqqqq1r 521

Monſieur Eſperance

Heaven forbid Wife you ſhould become a Thorn in my Mind, but thou art there as my Soul, nor do I love you at a common rate: for were thy perſon more deformed than ever Nature made, either by Sickneſs or Caſualty, I ſtill ſhould love thee for thy Virtuous Soul; and though your perſon is very handſom, yet I conſider not your Beauty but your Health, ſo you be well, I care not how you look; for my love is at that height as it is beyond the body grown; for ſhould I only love you for your Beauty, when that is decayed, my love muſt of neceſſity dy, if Beauty were the life.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

So then I am only your ſpiritual love, and you will chuſe a temporal one elſewhere.

Monſieur Eſperance

Prethee be not Jealous of me, becauſe I am become aſſured of your Chaſtity; for know. I could ſooner hate my ſelf, than love, or amorouſly affect any other woman but thy ſelf; and when I prove falſe to you, may Jupiter caſt me to Plutoes Court, there to be tormented Eternally.

Madamoiſelle Eſperance

Well, pardon this fit of Jealouſy, for I ſhall never queſtion your affection more, nor doubt your Conſtancy.

Exeunt.

Scene 16.

Enter Madamoiſelle La Belle, and her Siſter Madamoiſelle Amor.

Ma damoiſelle La Belle

To quarrel and fight for me is ſtrange, for as for the one I never ſaw, and the other I have no acquaintance with; but had I favoured the one, or affronted the other, or had favoured them both, it might have raiſed a diſpute, from a diſpute to a quarrel, from a quarrel to a duell; but many times men make a ſeeming love the occaſion to ſhew their courage, to get a fame; but what fame ſoever men get, the woman loſes, as being though either too kind, or cruell.

Madamoiſelle Amor

Siſter, this Gentleman never ſaw you, only fought in his own defence; he deſires you would give him leave to come an kiſs your hands, he is a very gallant man, and an experienced Souldier.

Madamoiſelle La Belle

A Souldier? why he never lead an Army, nor pitcht a Field, nor fought a Battel; he never Intrencht, nor Incampt; he never guarded, kept, nor took Fort, Town, or City; perchance he hath ſtudied as moſt Gentlemen do, ſo much of Fortification, as to talk of Trenches, Lines, Ramparts, Bullworks, Curtains, Wings, Faces, Forts, Centries; And of Amunition, Cannon, Muskets, Carabines, Piſtols, Slings, Bowes, Arrows, Darts, Pikes, Bills, Halbards, Bolts, Poleaxes, Swords, Cimeters, Shot, Bullets, Powder, Drums, Trumpets, Waggons, Tents and the like; and for Arms, Pot, Back, Breaſt, Gantlets, Corſelets, Gorgets and the like, thus they learn the Names, but ſeldome practice the uſe.

Madamoiſelle Amor

Yes, this Gentleman hath lead Armies, pitcht Fields, fought Battels, where thoſe he won were won by his Prudence and Conduct, and thoſe he loſt were by Fortunes ſpight, whoſe changing power, and inconſtant humour, no Mortal can withſtand.

Qqqqqq Mada- 522 Qqqqqq1v 522

Madamoiſelle La Belle

Nay Siſter, if he be ſo gallant a perſon, I ſhall not refuſe his viſits, nor deny my ſelf his Company, but entertain him as civilly as he may deſerve.

Exeunt.

Act V.

Scene 17.

Enter two Gentlemen.

1 Ge nt.

Well met, I was going to your Lodging.

2 Gent.

Faith if you had gone to my Lodging you had miſt of my Company.

1 Gent.

But howſoever, I ſhould have been entertained by thy old Landlady, for ſhe makes me welcome in thy abſence.

2 Gent.

The truth of it is, that my Landlady as old as ſhe is, loves the Company of men, eſpecially of young men; for if a young man will trouble himſelf to ſtay in her Company, and talk to her ſhe is ſo pleaſed, as ſhe makes more wrinckles with her ſmiles, than time hath made, and ſhe will ſimperingly put in her Chin, as if ſhe were but fifteen.

1 Gent.

Faith I commend women, for they will never yield to ages humours. though they are forced to yield to ages infirmities; for their minds are always young, though their bodyes be old.

2 Gent.

Indeed their minds are Girls all their life time; but leaving old women will you go ſee Monſieur Phantaſie?

1 Gent.

Is he ſo well as to admit of Viſiters?

2 Gent.

Yes, for he is in a recovering condition, and ſtate of Health.

1 Gent.

Come let us go then.

Exeunt.

Scene 18.

Enter Monſieur Heroick, and Madamoiſelle La Belle.

Monſieur Heroick

Madam, the fame of your Beauty and Virtue hath drawn me hither, to offer my ſervice on the altar of his commands.

Madamoiſelle la Belle

You are ſo great a favourite to Nature and Fortune, and are ſo ſplenderous with their gifts, as you are able to put the confidence of our Sex out of Countenance, eſpecially I, that am by Nature baſhfull; wherefore it is unlikely I ſhould command you.

Monſieur Heroick

I had rather be commanded by you Lady, than to command the whole World, and ſhould be prouder to be your Slave, than to be that ſole Monarch.

Madamoiſelle la Belle

I ſhould be ſorry ſo gallant a man as fame reports you 523 Qqqqqq2r 523 you to be, ſhould have ſo ſick a Judgment, and ſo ungoverned a Paſſion, as to yield up your liberty to a woman, and to ty your life to her vain fooliſh humours.

Monſieur Heroick

It is impoſſible that in ſo heavenly a form, a fooliſh Soul ſhould be; for I perceive by your beautifull perſon, Nature hath outwrought her ſelf, having not Art or skill to make a Second, and what man would not be proud to ſerve the only ſhe?

Madamoiſelle la Belle

O Sir, take heed you wrong not your noble worth and merit, in being over civill; for complements are all diſſembling, and diſſembling runs in the ways of perjury.

Monſieur Heroick

Pray Madam conſter not my love-ſervice and admiration to an idle Viſit, a vain Diſcourſe, and falſe Profeſſion; for if you appear not ſo beautifull to all the World, as you appear to me, yet I dare boldly tell the world, I think you ſo, and will maintain it with my life.

Madamoiſelle la Belle

I believe then I am more beholding to your Eyes that have contracted me into a beautifull form, than unto Nature that hath made me of a vulgar ſhape.

Monſieur Heroick

Your Tongue Lady hath the power of Circes wand, to charm the Senſes, and transform the ſhape, making all men it ſpeaks to, either to appear Monſters or Gods.

Madamoiſelle la Belle

You have Inthroned me you Favours, and Crowned me with your Commendations.

Monſieur Heroick

My deſire is, that you will Crown me with your Love.

Exeunt.

Scene 19.

Enter Madamoiſelle Detractor, Madamoiſelle Malicious, and Madamoiſelle Tell-truth.

Tell-truth

I hear that Madamoiſelle Bon ſhall marry her unconſtant Servant, Monſieur Phantaſie.

Detractor

Faith that is a comfort, that any woman can get a Husband, whilſt the graces are young and in being.

Tell-truth

The graces never grow old.

Detractor

Let me tell you, time decays and withers all things.

Tell-truth

No, not the Gods.

Detractor

But time doth waſte Devotion, wears out Religion, burns up the Sacrifice of Praiſe, puts out the Lamp of Charity, and quenches out the Veſtal fire of Zeal.

Malicious

But then there are new Religions brought in the place or room of the old.

Detractor

Yes, and new Gods with new Religions, and new Religions and Opinions are like young beautifull Ladyes when they appear firſt to the view of the World; they are followed, admired, worſhiped, ſought, ſued, and prayed to; but when they grow old, all their Servants and followers forſake them, and ſeek out thoſe that are younger, ſo the laſt and neweſt Opinions and Religions, are accounted the beſt, and ſtuck to for a time the Qqqqqq2 cloſeſt, 524 Qqqqqq2v 524 cloſeſt, and followed by the greateſt numbers, and have moſt zealous ſupplicants; thus the Gods dy in effect.

Tell-truth

The truth is, that all things that are young, are Strong, Vigorous, Active and Flouriſhing; and whatſoever is old, is Weak, Faint, Sick, and witheringly dyes.

Enter Madamoiſelle Spightfull.

Spightfull

I can tell you news.

Tell-truth

What news?

Spightfull

Why Monſieur Nobiliſſimo to isis to marry Madamoiſelle Amor, and his Brother Monſieur Heroick is to marry her Siſter Madamoiſelle La Belle.

Tell-truth

And who is to marry the third Siſter Madamoiſelle Grand Eſprit.

Spightfull

She is reſolved to live a ſingle life.

Detractor

I am glad they have choſe Husbands out of the numbers of there Suters; for when they are married, I hope out of the number of there remainders, we may have ſome offers for Husbands.

Malicious

For my part I ſhall deſpair, unleſs the third Siſter Madamoiſelle Grand Eſprit would marry alſo; for the whole bulk of Mankind will ſue to her, and never think of any other woman, whilſt ſhe is undiſpoſed of.

Tell-truth

But ſhe it ſeems hath declared ſhe will never marry.

Malicious

That is all one, for men will purſue their deſires, and live of Hopes ſo long, as there is any left.

Spightfull

Well, the worſt come to the worſt, we ſhall only live old Maids.

Tell-truth

But not old Virgins.

Exeunt.

Scene 20.

Enter Madamoiſelle Grand Eſprit, her two Siſters Madamoiſelle Amor, and Madamoiſelle La Belle as Brides, and Monſieur Nobiliſſimo, and Monſieur Heroick his Brother, as Bridegrooms, and a Company of Bridal gueſts all as her Audience.

Grand Eſprit

Great Hymen, I do now petition thee,

To bleſs my Siſters, not to favour me;

Unleſs I were thy ſubject to obey,

But I am Diana’s and to her do pray;

But give me leave for to decide the cauſe,

And for to ſpeak the truth of marriage laws;

Or elſe through ignorance each man and wife,

May rebels prove by Matrimonial ſtrife.

Noble and Right Honourable,

From the root of Self-love grows many ſeveral Branches; as Divine Love, Moral Love, Natural and Sympathetical Love, Neighbourly and Matrimonial Love; Divine Love is the Love to the Gods, Moral Love is the Love 525 Rrrrrr1r 525 Love to Virtue, Natural Love is the Love to Parents and Children, Sympathetical Love is of Lovers, or Friendſhips, Neighbourly Love is the Love of Acquaintance, and true Matrimonial Love is the Love of United Souls, and Bodyes; but I ſhall only inſiſt or diſcourſe at this time for my Siſters ſakes, of Matrimonial Love; this Matrimonial Love, is the firſt imbodyed Love that Nature created; for as for Divine Love, and Moral Love, they are as incorporeal as the Soul, and Sympathetical and Matrimonial Love, which I will joyn as Soul and Body, were before Natural, or Neighbourly Love; for Marriage begets Acquaintance, and none lives ſo neer nor converſes ſo much as man and wife; and there was a Sympathy and Conjunction of each Sex, before there were Children, and there could be no Parents before there were Children; thus Matrimonial Love was the firſt ſubſtantial Love, and being the Original and producing Love, ought to be honoured and preferr’d as the moſt perfect and greateſt Love in Nature; but miſtake me not Noble and Right Honourable, when I ſay the greateſt Love in Nature; I mean not the Supernatural Love, as Divine Love as to the Gods; but this Matrimonial Love, I ſay is to be the moſt reſpected, as the Original Love, like as Nature is to be honoured and preferred before the Creatures ſhe makes; ſo Matrimonial Love ought to be reſpected firſt, as being the cauſe of Friendly, Sociable, Neighbourly, and Fatherly Love; wherefore man and wife ought to forſake all the world, in reſpect of each other, and to prefer no other delight before each others good or content; for the Love of Parents and Children, or any other Love proceeding from Nature, ought to be waved when as they come in Competition with the Love man and wife; for though Matrimonial Love is not ſuch a Divine Love as from man to the Gods, yet it is as the Love of Soul and Body, alſo it is as a Divine Society, as being a Union; but Right Honourable, to tell you, my opinion is, that I belive very few are truly married; for it is not altogether the Ceremony of the Church nor State that makes a true marriage; but a Union and indiſſoluble Conjunction of Souls and Bodyes of each Sex; wherefore all thoſe that are allowed of as man and wife, by the Church, State, and Laws, yet they are but Adulterers, unleſs their Souls, Bodyes, and affections, are united as one; for its not the joyning of hands, ſpeaking ſuch words by Authentical perſons, nor making of vows, and having Witeſſes thereof, that makes a true marriage, no more than an Abſolution without a Contrition makes a holy man: wherefore dear Siſters, and you two Heroick Worthies, marry as you ought to do, or else live ſingle lives, otherwiſe your Children will be of a Baſtard kind, and you aſſociating but as Beaſts, which are worſe than Birds, for they orderly chuſe their Mates, and lovingly fly and live together, and equally labour to build their neſt, to feed their young, and Sympathetically live, and love each other, which order and love few married perſons obſerve, nor practice; but after all this, even thoſe marriages that are the perfecteſt, pureſt, lovingeſt, and moſt equalleſt, and Sympathetically joyned, yet at the beſt marriage is but the womb of trouble, which cannot be avoided, alſo marriage is the grave or tomb of Wit; for which I am reſolved for my part to live a ſingle life, aſſociating my ſelf with my own Thoughts, marrying my ſelf to my own Contemplations, which I hope to conceive and bring forth a Child of Fame, that may live to poſterity, and to keep a-live my Memory; not that I condemn thoſe that marry, for I do worſhip married perſons, as accounting them Saints, as being Martyrs for the good cauſe of the Common-wealth, Sacrificing their own Happineſs and Tranquility, Rrrrrr for 526 Rrrrrr1v 526 for the weal publick; for there is none that marries that doth not increſe their Cares and Pains; but marriage Unites into Familyes, Familyes into Villages, Villages into Cities, Cities into Corporations, Corporations into Common-wealths; this increaſe keeps up the race of Mankind, and cauſes Commerce, Trade, and Traffick, all which aſſociates men into an Agreement, and by an Agreement men are bound to Laws, by Laws they are bound to Puniſhments, by Puniſhments to Magiſtrates, and by Magiſtrates and Puniſhments to Obedience, by Obedience to Peace and Defence, in which Center of Peace my dear Siſters, I wiſh you may live, and be guarded with the Circumference of Defence, that nothing may diſturb or indanger you or yours; and that you may live in true marriage, and increaſe with united love, bleſt with Virtuous Children, and inrich’d with prudent Care, and Induſtry: alſo I wiſh and pray that Jealouſy may be baniſhed from your Thoughts, Pains and Sickneſs from your Bodyes, Poverty from your Familyes, evill Servants from your Imployments, Diſobedience from your Children.

And that Death may not rob you of your breed,

But after your life your Children may ſucceed.

Finis.

527 Rrrrrr2r 527

An epilogue ſpoken by the Lady True-Love.

O How my heart doth ake when think I do,

How I a modeſt Maid a man did woo!

To be ſo confident to woo him here,

Upon the publick Stage to every Ear;

Men ſure will cenſure me for mad, if not

To be in ſome unlucky Planet got,

Or elſe will tax me of diſhoneſty,

As ſeeming like a bold immodeſty;

Well, I have woo’d, yet am I not deſpis’d,

But am by Virtuous honour highly priz’d;

Becauſe my Love was ſpotleſs, pure, and Chaſt,

And on a noble worthy man was plac’d;

Then why ſhould I bluſh, weep, or yet repent,

Of ſhun the wooing part to repreſent,

But rather joy and glory in my choice?

If you approve my Act pray giv’t a voice!

Rrrrrr2 The