Ggggggg1r Ggggggg1v 578

The Actors Names

The Lord General.

Seigneur Valeroso.

Monsieur la Hardy.

Monsieur Compagnion.

Monsieur Comerade.

Monsieur la Gravity.

Captain Ruffell.

Captain Whiffell,

and several other Gentlemen.

Doctor Educature.

Doctor Comfort.

Stewards, Messengers and Servants.

Lady Victoria.

Madam Jantil.

Madam Passionate.

Madam Ruffell.

Madam Whiffell.

Doll Pacify, Madam Passionates Maid.

Nell Careless, Madam Jantils Maid,

other Servants and
Heroickesses.

The
Ggggggg2r 579

The First Part of
Bell in Campo

Act I

Scene 1

Enter two Gentlemen

1 Gent

You hear how this Kingdome of Reformation is prepaparing
for War against the Kingdome of Faction.

2 Gent

Yea, for I hear the Kingdome of Faction resolves
to War with this Kingdome of Reformation.

1 Gent

’Tis true, for there are great preparations of either
side, men are raised of all sorts and ages fit to bear Arms, and of all degrees
to command and obey, and there is one of the gallantest and noblest
persons in this Kingdome, which is made General to command in chief, for
he is a man that is both valiant and well experienced in Wars, temperate and
just in Peace, wise and politick in publick affairs, carefull and prudent in his
own Family, and a most generous person.

2 Gent

Indeed I have heard that he is a most excellent Souldier.

1 Gent

He is so, for he is not one that sets forth to the Wars with
great resolutions and hopes, and returns with maskerd fears, and despairs;
neither is he like those that take more care, and are more industrious to get
gay Clothes, and fine Feathers, to flant in the Field, and vapour in their march,
than to get usefull and necessary provision; but before he will march, he
will have all things ready, and proper for use, as to fit himself with well-
tempered Arms, which are light to be worn, yet musket proof; for he
means not to run away, nor to yield his life upon easy terms unto his Encemy;
for he desires to Conquer, and not vain-gloriously to shew his courage by a
careless neglect or a vain carelessness; also he chooses such Horses as are usefull
in War, such as have been made subject to the hand and heel, that have
been taught to Trot on the Hanches, to change, to Gallop, to stop, and such
Horses as have spirit and strength, yet quiet and sober Natures; he regards
more the goodness of the Horses than the Colours or marks, and more the
fitness of his Saddles than the Imbrodery; also he takes more care that his
Waggons should be easy to follow, and light in their carriage, than to have
them painted and gilded; and he takes greater care that his Tents should
be made, so as to be suddenly put up, and as quickly pull’d down, than
for the setting and Imbrodering his Arms thereupon; also he takes
more care to have usefull Servants than numerous Servants; and as he
is industrious and carefull for his particular affairs, so he is for the general
affairs.

Ggggggg2 2 Gent. Ggggggg2v 580

2 Gent

A good Souldier makes good preparations, and a good General
doth both for himself and Army; and as the General hath showed himself a
good Souldier by the preparations he had made to march, so he hath showen
himself a wise man by the settlement he hath made, in what he hath to
leave behind him; for I hear he hath setled and ordered his House and
Family.

1 Gent

He hath so, and he hath a fair young and virtuous Lady that he
must leave behind him, which cannot choose but trouble him.

2 Gent

The wisest man that is, cannot order or have all things to his own
contentment.

Exeunt

Scene 2

Enter the Lord General, and the Lady Victoria his Wife

General

My dear heart, you know I am commanded to the Wars, and
had I not such Wife as you are, I should have thought Fortune had
done me a favour to imploy my life in Heroical Actions for the service of my
Country, or to give me a honourable Death, but to leave you is such a Cross
as my Nature sinks under; but wheresoever you are there will be my life,
I shall only carry a Body which may fight, but my Soul and all the powers
thereof will remain with thee.

Lady Victoria

Husband, I shall take this expression of love but for feigning
words, if you leave me; for ’tis against Nature to part with that we love
best, unless it be for the beloveds preservation, which cannot be mine, for my
life lives in yours, and the comfort of that life in your Company.

Lord General

I know you love me so well, as you had rather part with
my life than I should part from my honour.

Lady Victoria

’Tis true, my love perswades me so to do, knowing fame
is a double life, as infamy is a double death; nay I should perswade you to
those actions, were they never so dangerous, were you unwilling thereunto,
or could they create a world of honour, fully inhabited with praises; but I
would not willingly part with your life for an imaginary or supposed honour,
which dyes in the womb before it is Born; thus I love you the best,
preferring the best of what is yours; but I am but in the second place in
your affections, for you prefer your honour before me; ’tis true, it is the
better choice, but it shows I am not the best beloved, which makes you follow
and glue to that and leave me.

Lord General

Certainly Wife my honour is your honour, and your honour
will be buried in my disgrace, which Heaven avert; for I prefer yours
before my own, insomuch as I would have your honour to be the Crown of
my glory.

Lady Victoria

Then I must partake of your actions, and go along
with you.

Lord General

What to the Wars?

Lady Victoria

To any place where you are.

Lord General

But Wife you consider not, as that long marches, ill lodgings,
much watching, cold nights, scorching dayes, hunger and danger are ill Hhhhhhh1r 581
ill Companions for Ladyes, their acquaintance displeases; their conversation
is rough and rude, being too boisterous for Ladyes; their tender and
strengthless constitutions cannot encounter nor grapell therewith.

Lady Victoria

’Tis said, that Love overcomes all things: in your Company
long marches will be but as a breathing walk, the hard ground feel as a Feather-bed,
and the starry Sky a spangled Canopy, hot dayes a Stove to cure
cold Agues; hunger as Fasting dayes or an eve to devotion, and danger is
honours triumphant Chariot.

Lord General

But Nature hath made women like China, or Pursleyn,
they must be used gently, and kept warily, or they will break and fall on
Deaths head: besides, the inconveniencies in an Army are so many, as put
patience her self out of humour; besides, there is such inconveniences as modesty
cannot allow of.

Lady Victoria

There is no immodesty in natural effects, but in unnatural
abuses; but contrive it as well as you can, for go I must, or either I shall dye,
or dishonour you; for if I stay behind you, the very imaginations of your
danger will torture me, sad Dreams will affright me, every little noise will
sound as your passing Bell, and my fearfull mind will transform every object
like as your pale Ghost, untill I am smothered in my Sighs, shrouded in my
Tears, and buried in my Griefs; for whatsoever is joyned with true love,
will dye absented, or else their love will dye, for love and life are joyned together;
as for the honour of constancy, or constant fidelity, or the dishonour
of inconstancy, the lovingest and best wife in all story that is recorded to be,
the most perfectest and constantest wife in her Husbands absence was Penelope,
Ulysses wife, yet she did not Barricado her Ears from Loves soft Alarums;
but parled and received Amorous Treaties, and made a Truce untill she and
her Lovers could agree and conclude upon conditions, and questionless
there were Amorous Glances shot from loving Eyes of either party; and
though the Siege of her Chastity held out, yet her Husbands Wealth and
Estate was impoverished, and great Riots committed both in his Family
and Kingdome, and her Suters had absolute power thereof; thus though
she kept the fort of her Chastity, she lost the Kingdome, which was her
Husbands Estate and Government, which was a dishonour both to her and
her Husband; so if you let me stay behind you, it will be a thousand to one
but either you will lose me in Death, or your honour in Life, where if you
let me go you will save both; for if you will consider and reckon all the
married women you have heard or read of, that were absented from their
Husbands, although upon just and necessary occasions, but had some Ink of
aspersions flung upon them, although their wives were old, illfavoured, decrepid
and diseased women, or were they as pure as light, or as innocent as
Heaven; and wheresoever this Ink of aspersion is thrown, it sticks so fast,
that the spots are never rubb’d out, should it fall on Saints, they must wear
the marks as a Badge of misfortunes, and what man had not better be
thought or called an uxorious Husband, than to be despised and laught at, as
being but thought a Cuckold? the first only expresses a tender and noble
Nature, the second sounds as a base, cowardly, poor, dejected, forsaken
Creature; and as for the immodesty you mentioned, there is none, for there
can be no breach of modesty, but in unlawfull actions, or at least unnecessary
ones; but what Law can warrant, and necessity doth inforce, is allowable
amongst men, pure before Angels, Religious before Gods, when unchosing
persons, improper places, unfit times, condemn those actions that Hhhhhhhare Hhhhhhh1v 582
are good in themselves, make them appear base to men, hatefull to Angels,
and wicked to Gods, and what is more lawfull, fitting, and proper, than for
a man and wife to be inseparable together?

Lord General

Well, you have used so much Rhetorick to perswade, as
you have left me none to deny you, wherefore I am resolved you shall try
what your tender Sex can endure; but I believe when you hear the Bullets fly
about you, you will wish yourself at home, and repent your rash adventure.

Lady Victoria

I must prove false first, for love doth give me courage.

Lord General

Then come along, I shall your courage try.

Lady Victoria

Ile follow you, though in Deaths Arms I ly.

Exeunt

Scene 3

Enter the two former Gentlemen

1 Gent

Well met, for I was going to thy lodging to call thee to
make up the Company of good fellows, which hath appointed
a meeting.

2 Gent

Faith you must go with the odd number, or get another in my
room, for I am going about some affairs which the Lord General hath imployed
me in.

1 Gent

I perceive by thee that publick imployments spoil private
meetings.

2 Gent

You say right, for if every one had good imployment, vice would
be out of fashion.

1 Gent

What do you call vice?

2 Gent

Drinking, Wenching, and Gaming.

1 Gent

As for two of them, as Drinking and Wenching, especially
Wenching, no imployment can abolish them, no, not the most severest,
devotest, nor dangerest: for the States-man Divines, and Souldiers, which
are the most and greatest imployed, will leave all other affairs to kiss
a Mistriss.

2 Gent

But you would have me go to a Tavern and not to a Mistriss.

1 Gent

Why, you may have a Mistriss in a Tavern if you please.

2 Gent

Well, if my other affairs will give me any leisure, I will
come to you.

Exeunt

Scene 4

Enter four or five other Gentlemen

1 Gent

The Lord General was accounted a discreet and wise man, but
he shows but little wisdome in this action of carrying his wife along
with him to the Wars, to be a Clog at his heels, a Chain to his hands, an
Incumberance in his march, obstruction in his way; for she will be alwaysways Hhhhhhh2r 583
puling and sick, and whining, and crying, and tir’d, and froward, and
if her Dog should be left in any place, as being forgotten, all the whole Army
must make a halt whilst the Dog is fetcht, and Trooper after Trooper
must be sent to bring intelligence of the Dogs coming, but if there were
such a misfortune that the Dog could not be found, the whole Army must
be dispersed for the search of it, and if it should be lost, then there must
seem to be more lamentation for it than if the Enemy had given us an intire
defeat, or else we shall have frowns instead of preferments.

2 Gent

The truth is, I wonder the General will trouble himself with his
wife, when it is the only time a married man hath to enjoy a Mistriss without
jealousy, a spritely sound wench, that may go along without trouble,
with bag and baggage, to wash his linnen, and make his field Bed, and attend
to his call, when a wife requires more attendance than Centries to
watch the Enemy.

3 Gent

For my part I wonder as much that any man should be so fond of
his wife as to carry her with him; for I am only glad of the Wars, because
I have a good pretence to leave my wife behind me; besides an Army is a
quiet, solitary place, and yields a man a peaceable life compared to that at
home: for what with the faction and mutiny amongst his Servants, and the
noise the women make, for their tongues like as an Alarum beat up quaters
in every Corner of the House, that a man can take no rest; besides every
day he hath a set Battel with his wife, and from the Army of her angry
thoughts, she sends forth such vollies of words with her Gunpowder anger,
and the fire of her fury, as breaks all the ranks and files of content, and puts
happiness to an utter rout, so as for my part I am forced to run away in discontent,
although some Husbands will stay, and fight for the Victory.

4 Gent

Gentlemen, Gentlemen, pray condemn not a man for taking his
lawfull delight, or for ordering his private affairs to his own humour, every
man is free to himself, and to what is his, as long as he disturbs not his Neighbours,
nor breaks the Peace of the Kingdome, nor disorders the Common-
wealth, but submits to the Laws, and obeys the Magistrates without dispute;
besides Gentlemen, ’tis no crime nor wonder, for a man to let his
wife go along with him when he goeth to the Wars, for there hath been
examples; for Pompey had a wife with him, and so had Germanicus, and so
had many great and worthy Heroicks, and as for Alexander the great he had a
wife or two with him; besides, in many Nations men are not only desired,
but commanded by the Chiefs to let their wives go with them, and it hath
been a practice by long Custome, for women to be spectators in their Battels,
to encourage their fights, and so give fire to their Spirits; also to attend
them in their Sicknesses, to clense their wounds, to dress their meat; and who
is fitter than a wife? what other woman will be so lovingly carefull, and industriously
helpfull as a wife? and if the Greekes had not left their wives behind
them, but had carried them along to the Trojan Wars, they would not
have found such disorders as they did at their return, nor had such bad welcome
home, as witness Agamemnons; besides, there have been many women
that have not only been Spectators, but Actors, leading Armies, and directing
Battels with good success, and there have been so many of these Heroicks,
as it would be tedious at this time to recount; besides the examples
of womens courage in Death, as also their wise conduct, and valiant actions
in Wars are many, and pray give me leave to speak without your being
offended thereat, it is not Noble, nor the part of a Gentleman, to censure, Hhhhhhh2 condemn, Hhhhhhh2v 584
condemn, or dispraise another mans private actions, which nothing concerns
him, especially when there is so gallant a subject to discourse of as
the discipline and actions of these Wars we are entring into.

1 Gent

Introth Sir, you have instructed us so well, and have chid
us so handsomely, as we are sorry for our errour, and ask pardon for our
fault, and our repentance shall be known by that we will never censure
so again.

Exeunt

Act II

Scene 5

Enter Captain Whiffell, and Madam Whiffell his Wife

Captain Whiffell

I have heard our Generals Lady goeth with the General
her Husband to the Wars, wherefore I think it fit for the rest of
the Commanders, if it were only for policy, to let our General see that we
approve of his actions so well, as to imitate him in ours, carrying our
Wives along with us, besides the Generals Lady cannot chose but take
it kindly to have our Wives wait upon her, wherefore Wife it is fit
you should go.

Madam Whiffell

Alas Husband I am so tender, that I am apt to catch
cold if the least puff of wind do but blow upon me; wherefore to ly in the
open Fields will kill me the first Night, if not, the very journey will shatter
my small bones to peeces.

Captain Whiffell

Why, our Generals Lady is a very fine young Lady,
and she ventures to go.

Madam Whiffell

There let her venture, for you must excuse me, for I will
stay at home, go you where you please.

Captain Whiffell

Well Wife consider it.

Exeunt

Scene 6

Enter Captain Ruffell, and his Wife Madam Ruffell

Captain Ruffell

Wife prepare your self to follow the Army, for
’tis now the fashion for Wives to march, wherefore pack up
and away.

Madam Ruffell

What with a Knapsack behind me as your Trull? not I,
for I will not disquiet my rest with inconveniences, nor divert my pleasures
with troubles, nor be affrighted with the roring Cannons, nor indanger
my life with every Potgun, nor be frozen up with Cold, nor stew’d to a
gelly with heat, nor be powdered up with dust, untill I come to be as dry as Iiiiiii1r 585
as a Neats-tongue; besides, I will not venture my Complexion to the wroth
of the Sun, which will tan me like a Sheeps skin.

Captain Ruffell

Faith Wife, if you will not go, I will have a Landery-
Maid to ride in my Waggon, and ly in my Tent.

Madam Ruffell

Prethee Husband take thy Kitching Maid along too, for
she may have as much Grease about her as will serve to make Sope to wash
your Linnen with, and while you ride with your Landery-Maid in your
Waggon, I will ride with my Gentleman-Usher in my Coach.

Captain Ruffell

Why Wife, it is out of love that I would have thee go.

Madam Ruffell

And ’tis out of love that I will stay at home; besides, do
you think I mean to follow your Generals Lady as a common Trooper doth
Commander, to feed upon her reversions, to wait for her favour, to
watch for a smile; no, no, I will be Generalissimo my self at home, and distribute
my Colours to be carried in the Hats of those that will fight in my
quarrel, to keep or gain the Victory of my favour and love.

Captain Ruffell

So I may chance to be a Cuckold before I return home.

Madam Ruffell

You must trust to Fortune for that, and so I wish you a
good Journey.

Exeunt

Scene 7

Enter Seigneur Valeroso and his friend Monsieur la Hardy, to
take their leaves of their Wives, Madam Jantil, and Madam
Passionate
, Madam Jantil young and beautifull, Madam
Passionate
in years

Madam Jantil

I cannot chuse but take it unkindly that you will go without
me, do you mistrust my affection? as that I have not as much love
for you as the Generals Lady hath for her Husband; or do you desire to
leave me? because you would take a Mistriss along with you, one that perchance
hath more Beauty than you think me to have; with whom you may
securely, and freely sit in your Tent, and gaze upon; or one that hath more
wit than I, whose sweet, smooth, and flattering words may charm your
thoughts, and draw your Soul out of your ears to sit upon her Lips, or dancing
with delight upon her Tongue.

Seigneur Valeroso

Prethee Wife be not jealous, I vow to Heaven no
other Beauty can attract my eyes but thine, nor any sound can please my
brain, but what thy charming Tongue sends in; besides, I prise not what thy
Body is, but how thy Soul’s adorn’d, thy virtue would make me think thee
fair, although thou wert deformed, and wittier far than Mercury, hadst thou
Midas’s ears, but thou hast all that man can wish of women kind, and that is
the reason I will leave thee safe at home; for I am loth to venture all my
wealth and happiness in Fortunes unconstant Bark, suffering thy tender
youth and Sex to float on the rough waves of chance, where dangers like
to Northern winds blow high, and who can know but that fatal gusts may
come, and overwhelm thee, and drown all my joys? wherefore for my sake
keep thy self safe at home.

Iiiiiii Madam Iiiiiii1v 586

Madam Jantil

I shall obey you, but yet I think it were not well I should
be a long time from you, and at a great distance.

Seigneur Valeroso

I will promise you, if I perceive the War is like to
be prolonged, and that there be Garrison-Towns so safe as you may securely
live in, I will send for you, placing you so where sometimes I may
visit you.

Madam Jantil

Pray do not forget me so much as to cancell your
promise.

Seigneur Valeroso

Forget the sweet? I should sooner forget life, and if I
do whilst I have memory, Heaven forget me.

Madam Jantil

I must ask you a question, which is to know why you will
take an under command, being so nobly Born, and bearing a high Title of
Honour your self, and being Master of a great Estate.

Seigneur Valeroso

To let the World see my Courage is above my Birth,
Wealth, or Pride, and that I prefer inward worth, before outward Title,
and I had rather give my life to the Enemy on honourable terms, than basely
to stay at home in time of general Wars, out of an ambitious discontent:
for valour had rather have dangers to fight with, than Offices to command
in.

Seigneur Valeroso and his Lady whispers,
while the other two Monsieur la Hardy and
his Lady speaks

Madam Passionate

Why should you go to the Wars now you are in
years, and not so fit for action as those that are young, and have their
strengths about them? besides, we have lived a married pair above these thirty
years, and never parted, and shall we now be seperated when we are old?

She weeps

Monsieur la Hardy

Alas Wife, what would you have me do? when I am
commanded out I must obey; besides, I would not have my Country fight
a Battel whilst I live, and I not make one, for all the World, for when I
cannot fight, my Body shall serve to stop a breach; wherefore leave your
crying Wife, and fall to praying for our safe return, and here my noble
friend is desirous you should stay with his Lady to comfort one another, and
to divert Melancholy and the longing hours of our return.

Madam Passionate

Farewell, I fear I shall never see you again, for your
absence will soon kill me.

She cryes Exeunt

Scene 8

Enter two Gentlemen

1 Gent

O you are welcome from the Army, what news?

2 Gent

Why our Army march’d untill they came unto the frontiers
of the Kingdome, where they found the Army of the Enemy ready to
encounter them, the Lord General seeing they must of necessity fight a Battel,
thought best to call a Council of War, that there might be nothing of ill Iiiiiii2r 587
ill conduct laid to his chardge, but that all might be ordered by a wise and
experienced Council, whereupon he made an election of Counsellors,
joyning together three sorts, as grave, wise, and prudent men, subtill and
politick men, and valiant, skillfull, martiall men, that the cold temper of
the prudent, might allay the hot temper of the valiant, and that the
politick might be as ingenious to serve them together by subtill devises, and
to make traps of Stratagems to catch in the Enemy, and at this Council many
debates there were, but at last they did conclude a Battel must be fought;
but first they did decree that all the women should be sent into one of their
Garrison Towns, some two dayes journey from the Army, the reasons were,
that if they should be overcome by their Enemyes, the women might be
taken by their Enemyes, and made Slaves, using or abusing them as they
pleased; but when the women were sent away, they did not shed tears of
sorrow, but sent such vollies of angry words, as wounded many mens hearts;
but when they were almost at the Town that was to be their aboad, the Generals
Lady, was so extremely incensed against the Counsellers, by reason
they decreed her departure with the others, as she strove to raise up the Spirits
of the rest of her Sex to the height of her own; but what the issue will
be I know not.

1 Gent

Have you been with the King?

2 Gent

Yes, I was sent to give him an account of the Army.

Exeunt

Scene 9

Enter the Lady Victoria and a number of women of all sorts with
her, she takes her stand upon a heap of green Turfs, as being
in the Fields before the Garrison Town, and then speaks
to those women

Lady Victoria

Most Heroical Spirits of most chast and loving Wives, Mistrisses,
Sisters, Children or Friends, I know you came not from your
several Houses and homes into this Army meerly to enjoy your Husbands,
Lovers, Parents and Friends in their safe and secure Garrisons, or only to
share of their troublesome and tedious marches, but to venture also in their
dangerous and cruell Battels, to run their Fortunes, and to force Destiny to
joyn you to their Periods; but the Masculine Sex hath separated us, and cast
us out of their Companyes, either out of their loving care and desire of preserving
our lives and liberties, lest we might be distroyed in their confusions,
or taken Prisoners in their loss, or else it must be out of jealousy we should
Eclipse the fame of their valours with the splendor of our constancy; and if
it be Love, let us never give the preheminence, for then we should lose that
Prerogative that belongs to the Crown of our Sex; and if it be thorough
Jealous mistrust of their Fame, it were poor for us to submit and quit that
unto men, that men will not unto us, for Fame makes us like the Gods, to
live for ever; besides, those women that have staid at home will laugh at
us in our return, and their effeminate Lovers and Carpet Knights, that Cowardly
and Luxuriously Coin excuses to keep and stay them from the Wars, Iiiiiii2 will Iiiiiii2v 588
will make Lampons of us for them to sing of our disgrace, saying, our Husbands,
Lovers, and Friends were so weary of us, as they were forced to take
that pretence of affectionate love to be rid of our Companyes; wherefore
if you will take my advise, let us return, and force those that sent us away to
consent that we shall be partakers with them, and either win them by perswasions,
or lose our selves by breaking their decrees; for it were better we
should dy by their angry frowns, than by the Tongue of Infamy.

All the women call to her

All the women

Let us return, let us return.

Lady Victoria waves her hand to them to keep silence

Lady Victoria

Noble Heroickesses, I am glad to hear you speak all as with
one voice and Tongue, which shows your minds are joyned together, as in one
piece, without seam or rent; but let us not return unfit to do them service,
so we may cause their ruin by obstruction, which will wound us more than
can their anger; wherefore let us strive by our industry to render our selves
usefull to their service.

All the women

Propound the way, and set the Rules, and we will walk in
the one, and keep strictly to the other.

Lady Victoria

Then thus, we have a Body of about five or six thousand
women, which came along with some thirty thousand men, but since we
came, we are not only thought unusefull, but troublesome, which is the reason
we were sent away, for the Masculine Sex is of an opinion we are only fit
to breed and bring forth Children, but otherwise a trouble in a Common-
wealth, for though we encrease the Common-wealth by our breed, we encomber
it by our weakness, as they think, as by our incapacities, as having
no ingenuity for Inventions, nor subtill wit for Politicians; nor prudence
for direction, nor industry for execution; nor patience for opportunity, nor
judgment for Counsellers, nor secrecy for trust; nor method to keep peace,
nor courage to make War, nor strength to defend our selves or Country, or
to assault an Enemy; also that we have not the wisdome to govern a Common-wealth,
and that we are too partial to sit in the Seat of Justice, and too
pittifull to execute rigorous Authority when it is needfull, and the reason of
these erronious opinions of the Masculine Sex to the Effeminate, is, that our
Bodyes seem weak, being delicate and beautifull, and our minds seem
fearfull, being compassionate and gentle natured, but if we were both weak
and fearfull, as they imagine us to be, yet custome which is a second Nature
will encourage the one and strengthen the other, and had our educations
been answerable to theirs, we might have proved as good Souldiers and
Privy Counsellers, Rulers and Commanders, Navigators and Architectors,
and as learned Scholars both in Arts and Sciences, as men are; for Time and
Custome is the Father and Mother of Strength and Knowledge, they make
all things easy and facil, clear and prospitious; they bring acquaintance, and
make friendship of every thing; they make Courage and Fear, Strength
and Weakness, Difficulty and Facility, Dangers and Securities, Labours
and Recreations, Life and Death, all to take and shake as it were hands together;
wherefore if we would but accustome our selves we may do such
actions, as may gain us such a reputation, as men might change their opinions,
insomuch as to believe we are fit to be Copartners in their Governments,ments, Kkkkkkk1r 589
and to help to rule the World, where now we are kept as Slaves forced
to obey; wherefore let us make our selves free, either by force, merit,
or love, and in order, let us practise and endeavour, and take that which
Fortune shall profer unto us, let us practise I say, and make these Fields as
Schools of Martial Arts and Sciences, so shall we become learned in their
disciplines of War, and if you please to make me your Tutoress, and so
your Generalless, I shall take the power and command from your election
and Authority, otherwise I shall most willingly, humbly, and obediently
submit to those whom you shall choose.

All the women

You shall be our Generalless, our Instructeress, Ruler and
Commanderess, and we will every one in particular, swear to obey all your
Commands, to submit and yield to your punishments, to strive and endeavour
to merit your rewards.

Lady Victoria

Then worthy Heroickesses, give me leave to set the Laws
and Rules I would have you keep and observe, in a brass Tablet.

All the women

We agree and consent to whatsoever you please.

Exeunt

Scene 10

Enter the Lady Jantil alone

Madam Jantil

How painfull is true love absented from what is loved, ’tis strange that that which pleaseth most should be the greatest torment.

Enter Madam Passionate

Lady Passionate

What, all times walking by your self alone? when
your Lord returns I will complain, and tell him what dull Company
you are.

Madam Jantil

I hope I shall not be from him so long, for he promised to
send for me.

Madam Passionate

Nay faith, when you go, as old as I am, I will travell
with you to see my Husband too.

Madam Jantil

You will be so much the more welcome, by how much
you were unexpected.

Madam Passionate

You look pale on the sudden, are not yonu well?

Madam Jantil

Yes, onely on a sudden I had a chill of cold that seized
on my Spirits.

Madam Passionate

Beshrew me, their coldness hath nipt the blood out of
your Cheeks and Lips.

Madam Jantil

If they had been painted, they would have kept their
Colour.

Exeunt Kkkkkkk ACT
Kkkkkkk1v 590

Act III:

Scene 11

Enter the Lady Victoria with a great Company of Women, after
a Table of Brass carried before her, she stands upon the heap of
Turfs, and another Woman that carried the Table, wherein the
Laws and Rules are inscribed; she bids her read them

Reader

Noble Heroicks, these are the Laws our Generalless hath caused
to be inscribed and read for every one to observe and keep.

First, Be it known, observed and practised, that no woman that is able to
bear Arms, shall go unarmed, having Arms to wear, but shall wear them
at all times, but when they put them off to change their linnen; they shall
Sleep, Eat and Rest, and march with them on their Bodies.

Lady Victoria

Give me leave Noble Heroicks to declare the reason of
this Law or Command, as to wear an Iron or Steel Habit, and to be so constantly
worn, is, that your Arms should not feel heavy, or be troublesome or
painfull for want of use, as they will be when you shall have an occasion to
put them on; and certainly, for want of practice, more Masculine Souldiers
are overcome by their Arms, than by their Enemies, for the unaccustomedness
makes them so unwieldy, as they can neither defend themselves, nor
assault their Foes, whereas Custome will make them feel as light, as their
Skins on their Flesh, or their Flesh on their Bones, nay Custome hath that
force, as they will feel as if their Bodies were Naked, when as their Arms
are off, and as Custome makes the Cold and peircing Ayr to have no power
over the naked Bodyes of men, for in cold Countreys as well as hot, men
have been accustomed to go naked, and have felt no more harm, nor so much,
by the cold, than those that are warmly Cloathed, so Custome will make your
Arms seem as light as if you had none on, when for want of use their waight
will seem heavy, their several pieces troublesome and incombersome, as
their Gorgets will seem to press down their Shoulders, their Back and
Breast-plates and the rest of the several pieces to cut their waste, to pinch
their Body, to bind their Thighes, to ty their Arms, and their Headpiece to
hinder their breath, to darken their sight, and to stop their hearing, and all
for want of use and Custome; but enough of this, read on.

Reader

Secondly, Be it known, observed and practised, that every Company
must watch by turns, whether they have Enemyes neer or no, and at
all times, and whosoever Drinks any thing but Water, or Eats any thing
but Bread, all the time they are on the watch shall be punished with
fasting.

Lady Victoria

Give me leave to declare the reason of this Law, the reason
is, that stronge Drinks, and nourishing meats send many vapours to the
Brain, which vapours are like several Keys, which lock up the Senses so fast,
as neither loud noises, bright lights, nor strong sents can enter either at the
Ears, Eyes, or Nostrils, insomuch as many times their Enemies send Death
to break them asunder.

Reader Kkkkkkk2r 591

Reader

Thirdly, Be it known, observed and practised, that none of the
Troopers march over Corn Fields if it can be avoided, unless the Enemy
should be behind, and then the more spoil the better.

Lady Victoria

The reason of this is, that it were a great imprudence to destroy
through a careless march of Horse and Foot, that which would serve
to feed and nourish us in the Winter time, and in our Winter Quarters,
when it is laid in the Barns and Granaries, by the labour and the industry
of the Farmers.

Reader

Fourthly, Be it known, observed and practised, that none shall
plunder those things which are waighty of carriage, unless it be for safety
or necessity.

Lady Victoria

The reason is of this, that all that is heavy in the carriage
is a hindrance in our march.

Reader

Fiftly, Be it known, observed and practised, that no Souldiers
shall play at any Game for money or drink, but only for meat to eat.

Lady Victoria

The reason of this is, that those that play for drink, the
winners will be drunk, and those that are drunk are unfit for service; besides,
many disorders are caused by drunkenness; and to play for money, the
losers grow Cholerick, and quarrels proceed therefrom, which quarrels
many times cause great mutinies through their side taking, and factious
parties, besides, having lost their money and not their Appetites, they become
weak and faint for want of that nourishing food, their money should
get them, having nothing left to buy them victuals withall; besides, it forces
them to forrage further about, where by straggling far from the body of the
Army, they are subject to be catch’d by the Enemy, but when they play for
meat their winnings nourish their Bodies, making them strong and vigorous,
and when their Appetites are satisfied, and their Stomacks are fill’d,
their humours are pleasant, and their minds couragious; besides, it is the
Nature of most Creatures, either to distribute or at least to leave the remaining
pieces to the next takers, so that the losers may have a share with
the winners, and part of what was their own again.

Reader

Sixtly, Be it known, observed and practised, that no Captains
or Collonels, shall advance beyond their Company, Troop, Regiment or
Brigade, but keep in the middle of the first rank, and the Lieutenant, or
Lieutenant Collonel to come behind in the last rank.

Lady Victoria

The reason of this is, that Collonels and Captains going
a space before their Troops, Companies or Regiments, for to encourage
and lead on their Souldiers, do ill to set themselves as marks for the Enemy
to shoot at, and if the Chief Commanders should be kill’d, the Common
Souldiers would have but faint hearts to fight, but for the most part
they will run away, as being affraid and ashamed to see the Enemy, when
their Chief Commander is kill’d, and if they have no Officer or Commander
behind them, the Common Souldiers will be apt to run away, having no
worthy witnesses or Judges, to view and condemn their base Cowardly actiions,
which otherwise they are ashamed of, chusing rather to fight their Enemies
than to make known their fears.

Reader

Seventhly, Be it known, observed and practised, that none of the
Army ly in Garrison Towns, but be always intrenched abroad.

Lady Victoria

The reason of this is, that Towns breed or beget a tenderness
of Bodies, and laziness of limbs, luxurious Appetites, and soften
the natural dispositions, which tenderness, luxury, effeminacy, and laziness, Kkkkkkk2 corrupts Kkkkkkk2v 592
corrupts and spoils martial discipline, whereas the open Fields, and casting
up trenches makes Souldiers more hardy, laborious and carefull, as being
more watchfull.

Reader

Eightly, Be it known, observed and practised, that none unless visibly
sick to be idle, but imployed in some Masculine action, as when not imployed
against an Enemy, and that they are not imployed about the works,
forts or trenches, but have spare time to imploy themselves, in throwing the
Bar, Tripping, Wrastling, Running, Vaulting, Riding, and the like
exercise.

Reader

Ninthly, Be it known, observed and practised, that every Commander
when free from the Enemies surprizals, shall train their men thrice
a week at least, nay every day if they can spare so much time, as putting
their Souldiers into several ranks, files and figures, in several Bodies apart,
changing into several places, and the like.

Lady Victoria

The reason of this is, that the Souldiers may be expert and
ready, and not be ignorant when they encounter their Enemies, for many a
Battel is lost more through the ignorance of the Souldiers, not being well
and carefully train’d by their Commanders, or having such Commanders
that know not how to train or draw them up, there are more Battels I say
lost thus, than for want of men or courage.

Reader

Tenthly, Be it known, observed and practised, that every Morning
when Incamp’d, that every Commander shall make and offer in the
midst of his Souldiers a Prayer to Mars, another to Pallas, a third to Fortune,
and a fourth to Fame; these Prayers to be presented to these Gods
and Goddesses with great Ceremony, both from the Commander and
Common Souldiers.

Lady Victoria

The reason of this is, that Ceremony strikes a reverence
and respect into every breast, raising up a devotion in every heart, and devotion
makes obedience, and obedience keeps order, and order is the strength
and life to an Army, State, or Common-wealth; and as for the Prayers
presented to these particular Gods and Goddess, is, that Mars would give
us courage and strength, Pallas give us prudent conduct, Fortune give us
Victory, and Fame give us Glory and Renown.

Reader

Eleventhly, Be it known, observed and practised, that the most
experienced, practiz’d, and ingenioust Commanders shall preach twice a
week of Martial Discipline, also those errours that have been committed in
former Wars, and what advantages have been taken, to be cited in their
Sermons, as also what was gain’d or lost by meer Fortune.

Reader

Twelfthly, Be it known, observed and practised, that when the
Army marches, that the Souldiers shall sing in their march the heroical
actions done in former times by heroical women.

Lady Victoria

The reason of this is, that the remembrance of the actions
of gallant persons inflames the Spirit to the like, and begets a courage to a
like action, and the reason of singing of heroical actions only of women, is
that we are women our selves.

Reader

Thirteenthly, Be it known, observed and submitted to, that no
Council shall be call’d, but that all affairs be ordered and judged by the
Generalless her self.

Lady Victoria

The reason of this is, that all great Councils, as of many
persons, confounds judgments, for most being of several opinions, and holding
strongly and stifly, nay obstinately thereunto, as every one thinking themselvesselves Lllllll1r 593
wisest, cause a division, and wheresoever a division is there can be no
finall conclusion.

Reader

Fourteenthly, Be it known, observed and practised, that none of
this Effeminate Army admits of the Company of men, whilst they are in
Arms or Warlike actions, not so much as to exchange words, without the Generalless her leave or privilege thereto.

Lady Victoria

The reason of this is, that men are apt to corrupt the noble
minds of women, and to alter their gallant, worthy, and wise resolutions,
with their flattering words, and pleasing and subtil insinuations, and if
they have any Authority over them, as Husbands, Fathers, Brothers, or the
like, they are apt to fright them with threats into a slavish obedience; yet
there shall be chosen some of the most inferiour of this Female Army, to go
into the Masculine Army, to learn their designs, and give us intelligence of
their removals, that we may order our incampings and removings according
as we shall think best; but these women shall neither be of the Body of our
Army, nor keep amongst the Army, nor come within the Trenches, but
ly without the works in Huts, which shall be set up for that purpose.

Reader

Lastly, Whosoever shall break any of these Laws or Orders,
shall be put to Death, and those that do not keep them strictly, shall be
severely punished.

Lady Victoria

But I am to advise you Noble Heroicks, that though I
would not have a general Council call’d to trouble our designs in War with
tedious disputes, and unnecessary objections, and over cautious doubts, yet in
case of life and death, there shall be a Jury chosen to sit and judge their Causes,
and the whole Army shall give their votes, and the most voices shall either
condemn, or reprieve, or save them, lest I should hereafter be only
call’d in question, and not the rest, as being not accessary thereunto; and now
you have heard these Laws or Orders, you may assent or dissent therefrom
as you please, if you assent, declare it by setting your hands thereto, if you
dissent, declare it by word of mouth, and the Tables shall be broken.

All the women

We assent, and will set our hands thereto.

Exeunt

Scene 12

Enter Doctor Educature the Lady Jantils Chaplin, and
Nell Careless her Maid

Doctor Educature

Nell, how doth your good Lady?

Nell Careless

Faith she seems neither sick nor well, for though her
Body seems in health, her Mind seems to be full of trouble, for she will rise
in the midst of the Night, and walk about her Chamber only with her
Mantle about her.

Doctor Educature

Why doth she so?

Nell Careless

I ask’d her why she broke her sleep so as to walk about,
and she answered me, that it was frightfull Dreams that broke her sleep, and
would not let her rest in quiet.

Doctor Educature

Alas she is Melancholick in the absence of my Lord.

Exeunt Lllllll Scene
Lllllll1v 594

Scene 13

Enter the Lady Victoria and a number of other Women

Lady Victoria

Now we are resolved to put our selves into a Warlike
body, our greatest difficulty will be to get Arms; but if you will take
my advise we may be furnished with those necessaries, as thus, the Garrison
we are to enter is full of Arms and Amunition, and few men to guard them,
for not only most of the Souldiers are drawn out to strengthen the Generals
Army, and to fight in the battel, but as many of the Townsmen as are fit to
bear Arms; wherefore it must of necessity be very slenderly guarded, and
when we are in the Town, we will all agree in one Night, when they shall
think themselves most secure, to rise and surprize those few men that are left,
and not only disarm them and possess our selves of the Town and all the
Arms and Amunition, but we will put those men out of the Town or in safe
places, untill such time as we can carry away whatsoever is usefull or needfull
for us, and then to go forth and intrench, untill such time as we have
made our selves ready to march, and being once Master or Mistriss of the Field
we shall easily Master the Pesants, who are for the most part naked and defenceless,
having not Arms to guard them, by which means we may plunder
all their Horses, and victual our selves out of their Granaries; besides, I make
no question but our Army will increase numerously by those women that
will adhere to our party, either out of private and home discontents, or for
honour and fame, or for the love of change, and as it were a new course of
life; wherefore let us march to the Town and also to our design, but first I
must have you all swear secrecy.

All the women

We are all ready to swear to what you will have us.

Exeunt

Scene 14

Enter Madam Jantil alone as rising out of her Bed, her Mantle
wrapt about her, and in her night linnen

Madam Jantil

I saw his Face pale as a Lilly white,

His wounds fresh bleeding blood like rubies bright;

His Eyes were looking steadfastly on me,

Smiling, as joying in my Company;

He mov’d his lips as willing was to speak,

But had no voice, and all his Spirits weak;

He shak’d his hand as if he bid farewell,

That brought the message which his tongue would tell;

He’s dead, he’s dead, a sunder break my heart,

Let’s meet in Death, though Wars our lives did part.

After she had walkt silently a turn or two about her Chamber her eyes being
fixt on the ground, she return’d as to her Bed
Exit Scene
Lllllll2r 595

Scene 15

Enter a Gentleman, and another meets him as in great haste

1 Gent

What news? what news?

2 Gent

Sad news, for there hath been a Battel fought betwixt
the two Armies, and our Army is beaten, and many of our gallant
men slain.

1 Gent

I am sorry for that.

The second Gentleman goeth out Enter a third Gentleman

1 Gent

Sir I suppose you are come newly from the Army, pray report
the Battel?

3 Gent

Truly I came not now from the Army, but from the Town the
Generals heroical Lady and the rest of the heroicks did surprize, seise
and plunder.

1 Gent

What the Garrison Town they were sent to for safety?

3 Gent

Yes.

1 Gent

And doth their number encrease?

3 Gent

O very much, for after the surprisal of the Town the women in
that Town did so approve of their gallant actions, as every one desired to
be inlisted in the roul, and number of the Amazonian Army, but in the mean
time of the forming of their Army, intelligence was brought of the Battel
which was fought, and that there was such loss of both sides as each Army
retir’d back, being both so weak as neither was able to keep the Field, but
that the loss was greater on the reformed Army, by reason there was so
many of their gallant men slain, but this news made many a sad heart and
weeping eyes in the Female Army; for some have lost their Husbands,
some their Fathers, others their Brothers, Lovers and Friends.

1 Gent

Certainly this will fright them out of the Field of War, and
cause them to lay by their Heroick designs.

3 Gent

I know not what they will do, for they are very secret to their designs,
which is strange, being all women.

Exeunt Lllllll2 ACT
Lllllll2v 596

Act IV

Scene 16

Enter two women like Amazons

1 Woman

Our Generalless seems to be troubled, perceiving how heavily
this Female Army takes their losses.

2 Woman

She hath reason, for it may hinder or at least obstruct her high
designs.

Exeunt

Scene 17

Enter the Lady Victoria and her Amazons, she takes her stand and speaks to them

Lady Victoria

Noble Heroicks, I perceive a mourning veil over the
Face of this Female Army, and it becomes it well; for ’tis both natural
and human to grieve for the Death of our friends; but consider constant
Heroicks, tears nor lamentations cannot call them out of the grave, no
petitions can perswade Death to restore them, nor threats to let them go,
and since you cannot have them alive being Dead, study and be industrious
to revenge their quarrels on their Enemies lives, let your justice give them
Death for Death, offer upon the Tombs of your Friends the lives of their
Foes, and instead of weeping Eyes, let us make them weep through their
Veins; wherefore take courage, cast off your black Veil of Sorrow, and
take up the Firematch of Rage, that you may shoot Revenge into the hearts
of their Enemies, to which I hope Fortune will favour us; for I hear that
as soon as the Masculine Army have recovered strength there will be another
Battel fought, which may be a means to prove our loves to our Friends,
our hate to our Enemies, and an aspiring to our honour and renown;
wherefore let us imploy our care to fit our selves for our march.

All the women

We shall follow and obey you, where, and when, and
how you please.

Exeunt Scene
Mmmmmmm1r 597

Scene 18

Enter Doctor Educature, and Nell Careless; the
Doctor weeps

Dooctor Educature

Doth my Lady hear of my Lords Death?

Nell Careless

The Messenger or Intelligencer of my Lords Death
is now with her.

Exeunt

Scene 19

Enter Madam Jantil, and a Gentleman Intelligencer;
the Lady seems not disturb’d; but appears as usually

Madam Jantil

How died my Lord?

Gentleman

Madam, he fought with so much courage, as his actions
will never dye, and his valour will keep alive the memory of this War: for
though he died, his Death was Crown’d with Victory, he digg’d his Grave
out of his Enemies sides, and built his Pyramid with heaps of their Bodies;
the groans of those he slew did ring his dying Knell.

Madam Jantil

What became of his body?

Gentleman

He gave order before the Armies joined to fight, that if he
were kill’d, his body should be sought out, and delivered to you: for he said
it was yours whilst he lived, and he desired it might be disposed of by you
when he was dead; his desires and commands were obeyed, and his body is
coming in a Litter lapt in Searcloth.

Madam Jantil

Worthy Sir, I give you many thanks for your noble relation,
assuring myself it is true because you report it, and it is my Husband
that is the subject and ground of that honourable relation, whom I always
did believe would out-act all words.

Gentleman

He hath so Madam.

Madam Jantil

Sir, if I can at any time honourably serve you, I shall be
ready whensoever you will command me.

Gentleman

Your Servant Madam.

He was going forth and returns

If your Ladyship hath not heard of Monsieur la Hardy’s Death, give me
leave to tell you he is slain.

Madam Jantil

I am sorry, and for his Lady, for she loved him most
passionably.

The Gentleman goes out Mmmmmmm Enter Mmmmmmm1v 598 Enter as running and calling out Doll Pacify, Madam
Passionate’s
Maid

Doll Pacify

Help, help, my Lady is dead, my Lady is fallen into a
swound at the report of my Master’s being kill’d.

The Lady goeth out and the Maid, then they enter strait
again with two or three Servants more, bringing in the
Lady Passionate as in a swound

Madam Jantil

Alas poor Lady, her Spirits are drown’d in Sorrow, and
Grief hath stopt her breath; loosen her Garments, for she is swell’d with
troubled Thoughts, her Passions lie on heaps, and so oppress life, it cannot
stir, but makes her senceless.

Upon the loosing of her garments she revives,
and cryes out

Madam Passionate

O my Husband, my Husband!

She swounds again

Madam Jantil

Bow her forward, bow her forward.

Madam Passionate revives again

Madam Passionate

O let me dye, let me dye, and bury, bury me with him.

Swounds again

Madam Jantil

Alas poor Lady, put her to Bed, for her life will find most
ease there.

The Servants goes out with Madam Passionate Madam Jantil alone

Madam Jantil

O life what art thou? and Death where doest thou lead
us, or what dissolv’st thou us into?

Exeunt

Scene 20

Enter two Gentlemen

1 Gent

I wonder there is no news or Messenger come from the Army
yet, when there usually comes one every day.

Enter a Messenger

2 Gent

O Sir, what news?

Messenger

Faith there hath been nothing acted since the last Battel, but it Mmmmmmm2r 599
it is said there will be another Battel very suddenly, for the Enemy provokes
our men to fight, by reason our Lord General lies sick of his wounds, having
had a Feavour, caused by the anguish of his hurts, and by his Sickness the
Enemies hope to gain an advantage of his absence, but he hath put a Deputy
in his place to command in chief untill he recovers.

1 Gent

What is become of the Female Army?

Messenger

I hear they are marched towards the Masculine Army, but
upon what design I cannot understand.

Exeunt

Scene 21

Enter Madam Jantil, and her Maid Nell Careless

Madam Jantil

Call my Steward.

The Maid goes out The Lady walks in a musing posture, her eyes
fixt on the ground
Enter the Steward weeping

Steward

O Madam, that I should live to hear this cursed news of my dear
Lord and Masters Death.

Madam Jantil

Life is a curse, and there’s none happy but those that dye
in the womb before their birth, because they have the least share of misery;
and since you cannot weep out life, bear it with patience; but thy tears have
almost washt out the memory of what I was to say, but this it is, that I
would have you sell all my Jewels, Plate, and Houshold Furniture to the best advantage, and to turn off all my Servants, but just those to attend
my person, but to reward all of them with something more than their wages,
and those Servants that are old, and have spent their youth with my
Lords Predecessors and in his service, but especially those he favoured most,
give them so much during their lives as may keep them from the miseries of
necessity, and vexations of poverty. Thirdly, I would have you hire the best
and curioust Carvers or Cutters of Stones to make a Tomb after my direction;
as First I will have a marble piece raised from the ground about half a
mans height or somthing more, and somthing longer than my Husbands
dead body, and then my Husbands Image Carved out of Marble to be
laid thereupon, his Image to be Carved with his Armor on, and half a
Head-piece on the Head, that the face might be seen, which face I would
have to the life as much as Art can make it; also let there be two Statues,
one for Mercury, and another for Pallas, these two Statues to stand at his
head, and the hands of these Statues to join and to be laid under as carrying
the head of my Husbands figure, or as the head lay thereupon, and their
hands as his Pillow; on the right side of his figure, let there be a Statue
for Mars, and the hand of Mars’s Statue holding the right hand of my Husbands
figure, and on the left hand a statue for Hymen, the hand on the
place of the heart of my Husbands figure, and at the feet of the figure let Mmmmmmm2 there Mmmmmmm2v 600
there be placed a Statue for Fortune also, about a yard distance from the
Tomb; at the four Corners thereof, let there be four Marble Pillars raised of
an indifferent height, and an Arched Marble Cover thereupon, and let all
the ground be paved underneath with Marble, and in the midst on the outside
of the marble roof let the Statute of Fame be placed in a flying posture,
and as blowing a Trumpet; then some two yards distance square from those
Pillars, let the ground be paved also with Marble, and at the four Corners
four other Marble Pillars raised as high as the former, with Capitals at top,
and the body of those Pillars round, and the Statues of the four Cardinal
Virtues placed on those Capitals, sitting as in a weeping posture, and at the
feet of those Pillars the Statues of the Graces imbracing each Pillar; as the
Statue of Charity, the Pillar whereon the Statue of Justice sits, and the Statue
of Patience, the Pillar of Temperance, and the Statute of Hope, the
Pillar of Prudence, and the Statue of Faith, the Pillar of Fortitude; then set
a grove of Trees all about the out-side of them, as Lawrel, Mirtle, Cipress,
and Olive, for in Death is Peace, in which Trees the Birds may sit
and sing his Elegy; this Tomb placed in the midst of a piece of ground of
some ten or twenty Acres, which I would have incompassed about with a
Wall of Brick of a reasonable height, on the inside of the Wall at one end,
I would have built a little house divided into three Rooms, as a Gallery, a
Bed-chamber, and a Closet, on the outside of the Wall a House for some
necessary Servants to live in, to dress my meat, and to be ready at my call,
which will be but seldome, and that by the ring of a Bell, but the three Rooms
I would have furnished after this manner, my Chamber and the bed therein
to be hung with white, to signify the Purity of Chastity, wherein is no Colours
made by false lights; the Gallery with several Colours intermixt, to
signify the varieties, changes, and incombrances of life; my Closet to be
hung with black, to signify the darkness of Death, wherein all things are
forgotten and buried in Oblivion; thus will I live a signification, not as a real
substance but as a shaddow made betwixt life and death; from this House
which shall be my living Tomb, to the Tomb of my dead Husband, I would
have a Cloyster built, through which I may walk freely to my Husbands
Tomb, from the injuries of the weather, and this Cloyster I would have all
the sides thereof hung with my Husbands Pictures drawn to the life by the
best Painters, and all the several accidents, studies and exercise of his life;
thus will I have the story of his life drawn to the life: see this my desire
speedily, carefully, and punctually done, and I shall reward your service as
a carefull and diligent Steward and Servant.

Steward

It shall be done, but why will not your Ladyship have my
Lords figure cast in Brass?

Madam Jantil

Because the Wars ruin Tombs before Time doth, and
metals being usefull therein are often taken away by necessity, and we seldome
find any ancient Monuments but what are made of Stone, for covetousness
is apt to rob Monuments of Metal, committing Sacrileges on the
dead, for metals are soonest melted into profit, but Stone is dull and heavy,
creeping slowly, bringing but a cold advantage, wherein lies more pains
than gains.

Steward

But your Ladyship may do all this without selling your Jewels,
Plate, and Houshold Furniture.

Madam Jantil

It is true, but I would not let so much wealth ly dead
in Vanity, when exchanging them for money, I can imploy it to some
good use.

Steward. Nnnnnnn1r 601

Steward

Your Ladyship hath forgotten to give order for blacks.

Madam Jantil

No I have not, but I will give no mourning untill my Husbands body be carried to the Tomb; wherefore I have nothing more
to imploy you in at this time, but only to send hither my Chaplain Doctor
Educature
.

The Steward goes out Enter Doctor Educature

Madam Jantil

Doctor, although it is not the profession of a Divine to be
an Historian, yet you knowing my Husbands life and natural disposition best,
being in his Childhood under your Tutorage, and one of his Family ever
since, I know none so proper for that work as you; and though you are naturally
an eloquent Orator, yet the bare truth of his worthy Virtues and Heroical
actions will be sufficient to make the story both profitable, delightfull,
and famous; also I must intreat you to choose out a Poet, one that doth
not meerly write for gain, or to express his own wit, so much as to endeavour
to Pencil with the pen Virtue to the life, which in my Lord was so
beautifull as it was beyond all draughts, but the theam will inspire his Muse,
and when both these works are writ, printed and set out, as divulged to the
World as a patern for examples, which few will be able to imitate, then I
would have these books ly by me as Registers of memory, for next unto the
Gods my life shall be spent in Contemplation of him; I know I shall not
need to perswade you to do this, for your affection to his memory is ready
of it self; but love and duty binds me to express my desires for his Fame
leaving nothing which is for my part thereunto.

Doctor Educature

Madam, all the service I can do towards the memory
of my dear Pupil, and noble Lord and Patron, shall be most devoutly observed
and followed; for Heaven knows if I had as many lives to dispose of
as I have lived years, I would have Sacrificed them all for to have redeemed
his life from Death.

Doctor Educature goes out Madam Jantil alone

Madam Jantil

When I have interred my Husbands body, and all my desires
thereunto be finished, I shall be at some rest, and like an Executrix to
my self executing my own will, distributing the Rites and Ceremonies, as
Legacies to the dead, thus the living gives the dead; but O my Spirits are
tired with the heavy burden of Melancholy, and grow faint for want of rest,
yet my senses invite me thereunto, yet I cannot rest in my Bed, for frightfull
Dreams disturb me; wherefore I will ly down on this floor, and try if
I can get a quiet sleep on the ground, for from Earth I came, and to Earth I
would willingly return.

She lays her self down upon the ground, on one side of
her Arm bowing, leaning upon her Elbow, her
Forehead upon the palm of her handbowing forwards,
her face towards the ground; but her
grief elevating her passion, thus speaks

Madam Jantil

Weep cold Earth, through your pores weep,

Or in your bowels my salt tears fast keep;

Nnnnnnn Inurn Nnnnnnn1v 602

Inurn my sighs which from my grief is sent,

With my hard groans build up a Monument;

My Tongue like as a pen shall write his name,

My words as letters to divulge his fame;

My life like to an Arch over his Ashes bend,

And my desires to his grave descend;

I warn thee Life keep me not Company,

I am a friend to Death thy Enemy;

For thou art cruell, and every thing torments,

Wounding with pain all that the World presents;

But Death is generous and sets us free,

Breaks off our Chains, and gives us liberty;

Heals up our wounds of trouble with sweet rest,

Draws our corrupted passions from our breast;

Layes us to sleep on Pillows of soft ease,

Rocks us with silence nothing hears nor sees.

She fetches a great sigh

O that I may here sleep my last.

After a short slumber she wakes

If it were not for Dreams sleep would be a happiness next unto Death;
but I find I cannot sleep a long sleep in Death, I shall not dye so soon as I
would.

Love is so strong and pure it cannot dy,

Lives not in sense, but in the Soul doth lye;

Why do I mourn? his love with mine doth dwell,

His love is pleas’d mine entertains it well;

But mine would be like his one imbodied,

Only an Essence or like a Godhead.

Exeunt

Scene 22

Enter Doctor Comfort, and Doll Pacify

Doctor Comfort

How doth our Lady Doll?

Doll Pacify

To day she began to sit up, but yet she is very weak
and faint.

Doctor Comfort

Heaven help her.

Doll Pacify

You that are Heavens Almner, should distribute Heavens
gifts out of the purse of your mouth, and give her single Godly words instead
of single silver pence, to buy her some Heavenly food to feed her famisht
mind.

Doctor Comfort

Thou are a full-fed wench.

Doll Pacify

If I were no better fed than you feed me, which is but once
a week, as on Sundayes, I should be starved.

Doctor Comfort

You must fast and pray, fast and pray.

Exeunt Act
Nnnnnnn2r 603

Act V

Scene 23

Enter two Gentlemen

1 Gent

All the young Gallants in the Town are preparing themselves
with fine Cloths and Feathers to go a woing to the two rich Widows,
the Lady Jantil, and the Lady Passionate.

2 Gent

Riches are the Loadstone of affection, or at least professions.

1 Gent

The truth is, Riches draw more Suters, than Youth, Beauty, or
Virtue.

Exeunt

Scene 24

Enter two or three Gentlemen, Monsieur Comerade, Monsieur
Compagnion
, and Monsieur la Gravity

Monsieur Comerade

For Heavens sake let us go and address our selves
to the two Rich Widows.

Monsieur Compagnion

For my part I will address my self to none but the
young Widow, the Lady Jantil, and to her let us go without delay.

Monsieur la Gravity

It will be uncivil to go so soon after their Husbands
Death, for their Husbands are not yet laid in their Graves.

Monsieur Compagnion

If they were we should come too late, for I knew a
man which was a great friend of mine, who was resolved to settle himself in a
married course of life, and so he went a wooing to a Widow, for a Widow
he was resolved to marry, and he went a wooing to one whose Husband was
but just cold in his grave, but she told him she was promised before, so he
wooed another whilst she followed her Husbands Corps, but she told him
he came too late, whereat he thought with the third not to be a second in his
Sute, and so expressed his desires in her Husbands sickness, she told him
she was very sorry that she had past her word before to another, for if she
had not, she would have made him her choice, whereat he curst his imprudence,
and wooed the fourth on her wedding day, who gave him a promise
after her Husband was dead to marry him, and withall she told him, that if
she had been married before, it had been ten to one but he had spoke too
late, for said she, when we are Maids we are kept from the free conversation
of men, by our Parents or Guardians, but on our wedding day we are made
free and set at liberty, and like as young Heirs on the day of one and twenty
we make promises like bonds for two or three lives: wherefore I fear we
shall miss of our hopes, for these two Widows will be promised before we
address our Sute.

Monsieur la Gravity

No no, for I am confident all do not so, for some Nnnnnnn2 love Nnnnnnn2v 604
love to have the freedoms of their wills, for every promise is a bondage to
those that make a Conscience to keep their promise, besides, it is not only
variety that pleaseth women, but new Changes, for stale Acquaintance is as
unpleasant as want of change, and the only hopes I have to the end of my
Sute, is, that I am a Stranger and unknown, for women fancy men beyond
what they are when unknown, and prize them less than their merits deserve,
when they are acquainted.

Monsieur Comerade

Well, we will not stay, but we will do our indeavour
to get admittance.

Exeunt

Scene 25

Enter Madam Passionate as very ill, sitting in a Chair groaning,
Enter Madam Jantil as to see her

Madam Jantil

Madam, how do you find your health?

Madam Passionate

Very bad, for I am very ill, but I wonder at your
Fortitude, that you can bear such a Cross as the loss of your Husband so
patiently.

Madam Jantil

O Madam I am like those that are in a Dropsie, their face
seems full and fat, but their liver is consumed, and though my sorrow appears
not outwardly, yet my heart is dead within me.

Madam Passionate

But your young years is a Cordiall to restore it, and a
new love will make it as healthfull as ever it was.

Enter Doll Pacify the Lady Passionate’s Maid, with a Porrenger of Cawdle

Doll Pacify

Pray Madam eat somthing, or otherwise you will kill your
self with fasting, for you have not eaten any thing since the beginning of
your sorrow.

Lady Passionate

O carry that Cawdle away, carry it away, for the very
sight doth overcome my Stomack.

Doll Pacify

Pray Madam eat but a little.

Lady Passionate

I care not for it, I cannot eat it, nor will not eat it: wherefore
carry it away, or I will go away.

Both the Ladies goe out Enter Nell Careless Madam Jantils Maid

Nell Careless

Prethee if thy Lady will not eat this Cawdle, give it me,
for I have an Appetite to it; but I wonder you will offer your Lady any
thing to eat, but rather you should give her somthing to drink, for I have
heard sorrow is dry, but never heard it was hungry.

Doll Pacify

You are mistaken, for sorrow is sharp, and bites upon the
Stomack, which causes an eager Appetite.

Nell Careless

I am sure weeping eyes make a dry Throat.

She eats and talks between each spoonfull Doll Ooooooo1r 605

Doll Pacify

But Melancholy Thoughts make a hungry Stomack: but
faith if thou wert a Widow, by thy eating thou wouldst have another Husband
quickly.

Nell Careless

Do you think I would marry again.

Doll Pacify

Heaven forbid that a young woman should live a Widow.

Nell Careless

Why is it a sin for a young woman to live a Widow?

Doll Pacify

I know not what it would be to you, but it would be a case
of Conscience to me if I were a Widow.

Nell Careless

By thy nice Conscience thou seem’st to be a Puritan.

Doll Pacify

Well, I can bring many proofs: but were it not a sin, it is a
disgrace.

Nell Careless

Where lies the disgrace?

Doll Pacify

In the opinion of the World, for old Maids and musty Widows
are like the plague shun’d of by all men, which affrights young women
so much as by running frow it they catch hold on whatsoever man they
meet, without consideration of what or whom they are, by which many
times they fall into poverty and create misery.

Nell Careless

You teach a Doctrine, that to escape one mischief they
fall on another, which is worse than the first; wherefore it were better to
live a musty Widow as you call them, than a miserable Wife; besides,
a man cannot intimately love a Widow, because he will be a Cuckold, as
being made one by her dead Husband, and so live in Adultry, and so she
live in sin herself by Cuckolding both her Husbands, having had two.

Doll Pacify

I believe if you were a Widow you would be tempted to
that sin.

Nell Careless

Faith but I should not, for should I commit that sin, I
should deserve the Hell of discontent.

Doll Pacify

Faith you would marry if you were young, and fair,
and rich.

Nell Careless

Those you mention would keep me from marrying: for if
any would marry me for the love of youth and beauty, they would never
love me long, because time ruins both soon; and if any one should marry me
meerly for my riches, they would love my riches so well and so much as
there would be no love left for me that brought it, and if my Husband be taken
Prisoner by my wealth, I shall be made a Slave.

Doll Pacify

No, not if you be virtuous.

Nell Careless

Faith there is not one in an Age that takes a wife meerly
for virtue, nor valews a wife any thing the more for being so; for poor Virtune
sits mourning unregarded and despised, not any one will so much as cast
an eye towards her, but all shun her as you say they do old Maids or musty
Widows.

Doll Pacify

Although you plead excellently well for not marrying, yet I
make no question but you would willingly marry if there should come a
young Gallant.

Nell Careless

What’s that, a Fool that spends all his wit and money on
his Clothes? or is it a gallant young man which is a man enriched with
worth and merit?

Doll Pacify

I mean a Gallant both for bravery and merit.

Nell Careless

Nay, they seldome go both together.

Doll Pacify

Well, I wish to Heaven that Hyman would give thee a Husband,
and then that Pluto would quietly take him away to see whether you Ooooooo would Ooooooo1v 606
would marry again, O I long for that time.

Nell Careless

Do not long too earnestly, lest you should miscarry of
your desires.

Enter Madam Passionate, whereat Nell Careless hearing her come,
she runs away

Madam Passionate

Who was it that run away?

Doll Pacify

Nell Careless Madam Jantils Maid.

Madam Passionate

Oh that I could contract a bargain for such an indifferent
mind as her young Lady hath, or that the pleasures of the World
could bury my grief.

Doll Pacify

There is no way for that Madam, but to please your self still
with the present times, gathering those fruits of life that are ripe, and next to
your reach, not to indanger a fall by climing too high, nor to stay for that
which is green, nor to let it hang whilst it is rotten with time, nor to murmur
for that which is blowen down by chance, nor to curse the weather of
accidents for blasting the blossoms, nor the Birds and Worms of Death,
which is sickness and pain, for picking and eating the berries, for nature allows
them a part as well as you, for there is nothing in the World we can
absolutely possess to our selves; for Time, Chance, Fortune and Death,
hath a share in all things, life hath the least.

Madam Passionate

I think so, for I am weary of mine.

The Lady goes out Enter a Man

Man

Mistriss Dorothy, there are two or three Gentlemen that desire to
speak with one of the Widows Maids, and you belong to one.

Doll Pacify

Well, what is their business?

Man

I know not, but I suppose they will only declare that to your self.

She goeth out, and enters again as meeting
the Gentlemen

Doll Pacify

Gentlemen, would you speak with me?

Monsieur la Gravity

Yes, for we desire you will help us to the honour of
kissing your Ladyes hands, thereon to offer our service.

Doll Pacify

Sir, you must excuse me, for the Sign of Widowhood is not
as yet hung out, Mourning is not on, nor the Scutcheons are not hung over
the Gate, but if you please to come two or three dayes hence I may do you
some service, but now it will be to no purpose to tell my Lady, for I am sure
she will receive no visits.

Exeunt

Finis.

Ooooooo2r 607

The Actors Names

The Lord General,

and many Commanders

Monsieur la Gravity

Monsieur le Compagnion

Monsieur Comerade

Doctor Educature

Doctor Comfort,

and divers Gentlemen, Messengers, Servants,
Officers and others

Lady Victoria,

and many Heroicks

Lady Jantil

Lady Passionate

Doll Pacify

Nell Careless,

City Wives and others

Ooooooo2 The Ooooooo2v 608

The Second Part of
Bell in Campo

Act I

Scene 1

Enter Doctor Comfort, and Doll Pacify

Doll Pacify

Good Master Priest go comfort my old Lady.

Doctor Comfort

If you will Comfort me, I will strive to Comfort
her.

Doll Pacify

So we shall prove the Crums of Comfort.

Doctor Comfort

But is my Lady so sad still?

Doll Pacify

Faith to day she hath been better than I have seen her, for
she was so patient as to give order for Blacks; but I commend the young
Lady Madam Jantil, who bears out the Siege of Sorrow most Couragiously,
and on my Conscience I believe will beat grief from the fort of her
heart, and become victorious over her misfortunes.

Doctor Comfort

Youth is a good Souldier in the Warfare of Life, and
like a valiant Cornet or Ensign, keeps the Colours up, and the Flag flying,
in despite of the Enemies, and were our Lady as young as Madam Jantil,
she would grieve less, but to lose an old friend after the loss of a young
Beauty is a double, nay a trible affliction, because there is little or no hopes
to get another good Husband, for though an old woman may get a Husband,
yet ten thousand to one but he will prove an Enemy, or a Devill.

Doll Pacify

It were better for my Lady if she would marry again, that
her Husband should prove a Devill than a Mortal Enemy, for you can free
her from the one though not from the other, for at your words, the great
Devil will avoid or vanish, and you can bind the lesser Devils in Chains,
and whip them with holy Rods untill they rore again.

Doctor Comfort

Nay, we are strong enough for the Devil at all times, and
in all places, neither can he deceive us in any shape, unless it be in the shape
of a young Beauty, and then I confess he overcomes us, and torments our
hearts in the fire of love, beyond all expression.

Doll Pacify

If I were a Devil I would be sure to take a most beautifull
shape to torment you, but my Lady will torment me if I stay any longer
here.

Exeunt Scene
Ppppppp1r 609

Scene 2

Enter two Gentlemen

1 Gent

Sir you being newly come from the Army, pray what news?

2 Gent

I suppose you have heard how our Army was forced to
fight by the Enemies provocations, hearing the Lord General lay sick,
whereupon the Generals Lady the Lady Victoria, caused her Amazonians to
march towards the Masculine Army, and to entrench some half a mile distance
therefrom, which when the Masculine Army heard thereof, they
were very much troubled thereat, and sent a command for them to retreat
back, fearing they might be a disturbance, so a destruction unto them by, doing
some untimely or unnecessary action; but the Female Army returned
the Masculine Army an Answer, that they would not retreat unless they
were beaten back, which they did believe the Masculine Sex would not, having
more honour than to fight with the Female Sex; but if the men were so
base, they were resolved to stand upon their own defence; but if they would
let them alone, they would promise them upon the honour of their words
not to advance any nearer unto the Masculine Army, as long as the Masculine
Army could assault their Enemies, or defend themselves, and in this
posture I left them.

Exeunt

Scene 3

Enter the Lady Victoria, and her Heroickesses

Lady Victoria

Noble Heroickesses, I have intelligence that the Army of
Reformations begins to flag, wherefore now or never is the time to
prove the courage of our Sex, to get liberty and freedome from the Female
Slavery, and to make our selves equal with men: for shall Men only sit in
Honours chair, and Women stand as waiters by? shall only Men in Triumphant
Chariots ride, and Women run as Captives by? shall only men be
Conquerors, and women Slaves? shall only men live by Fame, and women
dy in Oblivion? no, no, gallant Heroicks raise your Spirits to a noble pitch,
to a deaticall height, to get an everlasting Renown, and infinite praises, by
honourable, but unusual actions: for honourable Fame is not got only by
contemplating thoughts which lie lasily in the Womb of the Mind, and
prove Abortive, if not brought forth in living deeds; but worthy Heroickesses,
at this time Fortune desires to be the Midwife, and if the Gods and
Goddesses did not intend to favour our proceedings with a safe deliverance,
they would not have offered us so fair and fit an opportunity to be the Mothers
of glorious Actions, and everlasting Fame, which if you be so unnatural
to strangle in the Birth by fearfull Cowardize, may you be blasted
with Infamy, which is worse than to dye and be forgotten; may you be
whipt with the torturing tongues of our own Sex we left behind us, and may
you be scorned and neglected by the Masculine Sex, whilst other women are Ppppppp preferr’d Ppppppp1v 610
preferred and beloved, and may you walk unregarded untill you become a
Plague to your selves; but if you Arm with Courage and fight valiantly, may
men bow down and worship you, birds taught to sing your praises, Kings
offer up their Crowns unto you, and honour inthrone you in a mighty
power.

May time and destiny attend your will,

Fame be your scribe to write your actions still;

And may the Gods each act with praises fill.

All the women

Fear us not, fear us not, we dare and will follow you
wheresoever and to what you dare or will lead us, be it through the jawes
of Death.

The Prayer.

Lady Victoria

Great Mars thou God of War, grant that our Squadrons may
like unbroaken Clouds move with intire Bodyes, let Courage
be the wind to drive us on, and let our thick swell’d Army darken their Sun of hope
with black despair, let us powre down showers of their blood, to quench the firy flames
of our revenge.

And where those showers fall, their Deaths as seeds

Sown in times memory sprout up our deeds;

And may our Acts Triumphant garlands make,

Which Fame may wear for our Heroicks sake.

Exeunt

Scene 4

Enter Doctor Comfort, and Doll Pacify

Doctor Comfort

Doll, how doth our Lady since the burying of my Patron?

Doll Pacify

Faith she begins now to have regard to her health, for she
takes Jackalato every Morning in her Bed fasting, and then she hath a mess of
Gelly broath for her Breakfast, and drinks a Cup of Sack before Dinner, and
eats a Whitewine Cawdle every afternoon, and for her Supper she hath
new laid Eggs, and when she goes to Bed, she drinks a hearty draught of
Muskadine to make her sleep well; besides, if she chances to wake in the
Night, she takes comfortable Spirits, as Angelica, Aniseeds, Besor, aqua mirabilis,
and the like hot waters, to comfort her heart, and to drive away all
Melancholy thoughts.

Doctor Comfort

Those things will do it if it be to be done, but I am sorry
that my Lady hath sold all my Patrons Horses, Saddles, Arms, Cloaths,
and such like things at the Drums head, and by out-cryes, to get a little the
more money for them, I fear the World will condemn her, as believing her
to be covetous.

Doll Pacify

O that’s nothing, for what she loses by being thought covetous,
she will regain by being thought rich, for the World esteems and
respects nothing so much as riches.

Exeunt Act
Ppppppp2r 611

Act II

Scene 5

Enter two Gentlemen

1 Gent

Pray Sir what news from the Army? you are newly come from
thence.

2 Gent

I suppose you have heard how the Effeminate Army was some
half a mile from the Masculine Armies; but the Masculine Army being
very earnest to fight, not only to get Victory and power, but to revenge each
others losses, as their Friends slain in the former Battel, which thoughts of
revenge did so fire their minds and inflame their Spirits, that if their Eyes had
been as much illuminated as their flaming Spirits were, there might have
been seen two blazing Armies thus joining their Forces against each other;
at last began a cruell fight, where both the Armies fought with such equal
Courages and active Limbs, as for a long time neither side could get the better,
but at the last the Army of Faction broak the Ranks and Files of the
Army of Reformation, whereupon every Squadron began to fall into a
Confusion, no order was kept, no chardge was heard, no command
obey’d, terror and fear ran maskerd about, which helpt to rout our Army,
whereupon the Enemy kill’d many of our men, and wounded many more,
and took numbers of Prisoners; but upon this defeat came in the Female
Army, in the time that some of the Enemy was busy in gathering up the
Conquered spoils, others in pursute of the remainders of our men, others
were binding up the Prisoners, other driving them to their Quarters like a
Company of Sheep to a Market there to be sold; but when as some of the
Commanders perceived a fresh Army coming towards them, their General
commanded the Trumpets to sound a Retreat to gather them together, and
also made haste to order and settle his men in Battel Array, and desirous
their General was to have all the Prisoners slain; but the Female Army
came up so fast and so close to prevent that mischief, as they had not time
to execute that design; but their General encouraged his Souldiers, and bid
them not to be disheartened, perswading them not to lose what they had got
from an Army of men to an Army of boys, for said he they seem to be no
other by the appearance of their shapes and statures; but when the Female
Army came to encounter them, they found their charge so hot and furious
as made them give place, which advantage they took with that prudence
and dexterity, as they did not only rout this Army of Faction, killing and
wounding many, and set their own Countrymen at liberty, and recovered
their losses, and gained many spoils, and took numbers of Prisoners of their
Enemies with Bag and Baggage, but they pursued those that fled into their
Trenches, and beat them out of their works, and took possession thereof,
where they found much riches; these Trenches being taken, the Lady Victoria
took possession, and made them her Quarters, calling all her Female Souldiers
to enter therein by the sound of Flutes, which they always used instead
of Trumpets, and their Drums were Kettel-Drums; but upon this Victory Ppppppp2 the Ppppppp2v 612
the Masculine Sex of the Army of Reformation was much out of Countenance,
being doubly or trebly overcome, twice by their Enemy, and then
by the gallant actions of the Females which out-did them, yet they thought
it best to take their advantage whilst the Victory was fresh and flourishing
and their Enemies weak and fearfull, to lay siege to the next Towns in the Enemies Country; whereupon the Lady Victoria and her Female Souldiers
hearing of the Army of Reformations designs, for they had sent the men to
their own Quatrters as soon as the Battle was won and Victory got; Also
the Masculine Prisoners they sent to the mens Quarters, not intermixing
themselves with the men, but as I said they hearing the design they had to
besiege the Towns were much inraged for not making them of their Councils,
whereupon they sent a Messenger like as an Embassadour to tell the
Masculine Army they did wonder at their ingratitude, that they should forget
so much their relievers as to go upon any Warlike design without making
them acquainted therewith, striving as it were to steal the Victory out
of their hands, but said they, since we are become victorious over our Enemies,
and Masters, and Mistresses of the Field, by our own valiant actions
and prudent conducts, we will maintain our power by our own strengths,
for our Army is become now numerous, full and flourishing, formed, and
conformable by our Discipline, skillfull by our practice, valiant by our resolutions,
powerfull by our victory, terrible to our Enemies, honourable to
our Friends, and a subject of Envy to the Masculine Sex; but your Army is
weak and decrepid, fitter for an Hospital than for a Field of War, your
power is lost, your courage is cold, your discipline disorderous, and your
command sleighted, despised by your Enemies, pittied by your Friends,
forsaken of good Fortune, and made suubject unto our Effeminate Sex, which
we will use by our power like Slaves”
. But when our Lord General who was
recovered out of sickness, and all his Commanders about him heard this
message, which was delivered in a full assembly, according as the Lady Victoria
had commanded the message should be, the men could not chose but
smile at the womens high and mighty words, knowing they had all sweet and
gentle dispositions and complying Natures, yet they were at a stand which
to be pleased at most, as in hearing them disparage their Masculine Sex, or
in advancing their own Female Sex by their self Commendations, but howsoever
so well pleased the men were with the womens gallant actions, that
every man was proud that had but a Female acquaintance in the Female
Army; but our Lord General was mightily taken with their bravadoes, and
much mirth amongst the Commanders was about it; but when they were
to advise what to do in the affairs of War, and the warring women, the
General told them he made no question but that most men knew by experience
that women were won by gentle perswasions and fair promises, and not
by rigid actions or angry frowns, besides said he, “all noble natures strive to
assist the weakest in all lawfull actions, and that he was no gallant man that
submits not to a woman in all things that are honourable, and when he doth
dissent it must be in a Courtly manner, and a Complemental behaviour
and expression, for that women were Creatures made by nature, for men to
love and admire, to protect and defend, to cherish and maintain, to seek and
to sue to, and especially such women which have out-done all their Sex,
which nature ever made before them; wherefore said he, ’tis fit to these women
above all others we should yield our selves Prisoners, not only in love but
in Arms; wherefore let us treat fairly with them, and give them their own conditions, Qqqqqqq1r 613
conditions”
. But in the mean time the Lady Victoria thought it best not to lose
any opportunity with talking out the time, wherefore she besieged a considerable
Fort, a place which was ats it were the Key that unlockt the passage
into the heart of the Enemies Kingdome, and at this siege they were when
I came away, but the General and his Council had sent a Messenger unto
them, but what his message was I cannot give you an account.

Exeunt

Scene 6

Enter two men in Mourning

1 Man

Now my Lord is Intombed, our Lady will enanchor her self by
his Ashe.

2 Man

’Tis strange so young and beautifull a Lady should bury her self
from the World, and quit all the pleasures thereof, to live with dead Ashes.

1 Man

A grieved Mind, Melancholy Thoughts, and an Oppressed Heart,
considers not the Body, nor the World.

2 Man

But yet I think ’tis an example that few of her Sex will
imitate.

1 Man

Because few of the Female Sex can truly Grieve or be Melancholy.

2 Man

No, it is that few of the Female Sex can truly and constantly
Love.

Exeunt

Scene 7

The Tomb being thrust on the Stage, enter Madam Jantil and a
Company of Mourners, but the Lady Jantil was attired in a
Garment of rich Cloth of gold girt loosly about her, and a Mantle
of Crimson Velvet lined with powdered Ermins over that, her
woman bearing up the Train thereof being long, her Hair all unbound
hung loose upon her Shoulders and Back, upon her Head a
rich Crown of Jewels, as also Pendant Jewels in her Ears, and
on her Wrists costly Bracelets; when she came in she goeth towards
the Tomb, and bows with great respect and devotion thereto,
then speaks, directing her speech to every several Figure
These following Verses or Speeches were written by my Lord Marquiss of Newcastle.

Lady Jantil

Pallas and Mercury at thy Death mourned,

So as to marble Statues here th’are turned;

Mars sheaths his Sword, and begs of thee a room,

To bury all his courage in thy Tomb;

Qqqqqqq Hymen Qqqqqqq1v 614

Hymen amazed stands, and is in doubt,

Thy Death his holy fier hath put out;

What various shapes of Fortune thou didst meet,

Thou scorn’st her frowns and kicks he with thy feet,

Now sound aloud the Trumpet of good Fame,

And blow abroad his everlasting name.

After this she directs her speech to the outward
figures about the Tomb

The Cardinal Virtues Pillars of thy fame,

Weep to see now each but an empty name

Only for Painters and for Carvers be,

When thy life sustain’d them more than they Thee;

Each Capital a sadder Virtue bears,

But for the Graces would be drowned in tears;

Faith strengthens Fortitude lest she should faint,

Hope comforts Prudence as her only Saint;

And Charity to Justice doth advance

To Counsel her, as Patience Temperance;

But wofull Counsellors they are each one,

Since grief for thy Death turn’d them all to stone.

Then putting off her rich Garments and Ornaments
before mentioned, as she was undressing she spake thus

Now I depose my self, and here lay down,

Titles, not Honour, with my richer Crown;

This Crimson Velvet Mantle I throw by,

There ease and plenty in rich Ermins lie;

Off with this glittring Gown which once did bear

Ambition and fond pride ly you all there;

Bracelets and Pendants which I now do wear,

Here I devest my Arms and so each Ear;

Cut off these dangling Tresses once a crime,

Urging my Glass to look away my time;

Thus all these Worldly vanities I wave,

And bury them all in my Husbands grave.

After this she calls for her other Garments, which
was a pure white light silk loose Garment, girt
about her with a white silk Cord, and then puts
on a thin black Veil over it, and then takes a
Book in her hand, but speaks as they were a putting
on those latter Garments.
More of my Lord Marquesses, are these.

Lady Janteil

Put on that pure and spotless garment white,

To shew my chaster thoughts, my Souls delight;

Cord Qqqqqqq2r 615

Cord of Humility about my waste,

A Veil of obscure Mourning about me cast;

Here by this sadder Tomb shall be my Station,

And in this Book my holy Contemplation.

She turns her self to her Servants

Farewell my Servants, farewell every one,

As you all love me pray leave me alone.

They all go forth weeping When they were all gone and she alone, she turns
her self to the Tomb

No dust shall on thy marble ever stay,

But with my sadder sighs ile blow’t away;

And the least spot that any Pillar bears,

Ile wash it clean with grief of dropping tears;

Sun fly this Hemisphær, and feast my Eyes,

With Melancholy night, and never rise,

Nor by reflection, for all light I hate,

Therefore no Planet do illuminate;

The twinkling Stars that in cold nights are seen,

Clouds muster up and hide them as a Screen,

The Centrick fire raise vapours from the Earth,

Get and be Midwife for those fogs their birth;

Then chilling colds freeze up thy pores without,

That trembling Earth-quakes no where may get out;

And that our Mother Earth may nothing wear,

But Snow and Icicles to curl her hair;

And so Dame Nature Barren nothing bring,

Wishing a Chaos, since despairs a Spring;

Since all my joys are gone, what shall I do,

But wish the whole World ruined with me too?

Here ends my Lord Marquesses Verses. Exeunt Qqqqqqq2 ACT
Qqqqqqq2v 616

Act III

Scene 8

Enter the Lady Victoria, and many of her Amazons, then
enters a Messenger from the Masculine Army

Messenger

May it please your Excellence, our Lord General and the
rest of the Commanders have sent you and your Heroicks a Letter,
desiring it may be read in a full Assembly.

Lady Victoria

One of you take the Letter and read it.

One of the women takes the Letter and reads it
to all the Company

Woman[Speaker label not present in original source]

“The Letter. To the most Excellent of her Sex, and her most
worthy Heroickesses.
You Goddesses on Earth, who have the power and dominion over men, ’tis you
we worship and adore, we pray and implore your better opinions of us, than to
believe we are so unjust as to take the Victory out of your fair hands, or so vain- glorious
as to attribute it to our selves, or so ungratefull as not to acknowledg our lives
and liberties from your valours, wisdoms, and good fortune, or so imprudent as to
neglect your power, or so ill-bred as to pass by you without making our addresses, or
so foolish as to go about any action without your knowledge, or so unmannerly as to do
any thing without your leave; wherefore we entreat you and pray you to believe that
we have so much honour in us, as to admire your beauties, to be attentive to your discourses,
to dote on your persons, to honour your virtues, to divulge your sweet graces,
to praise your behaviours, to wait your commands, to obey your directions, to be
proud of your favours, and we wear our lives only for your service, and believe we
are not only taken Captives by your Beauties, but that we acknowledge we are bound
as your Slaves by your valours; wherefore we all pray that you may not misinterpret
our affections and care to your persons, in believing we sent you away because we
were weary of you, which if so, it had been a sin unpardonable, but we sent you away
for your safety, for Heaven knows your Departure was our Hell, and your Absence
our Torments; but we confess our errours, and do humbly beg our pardons, for if you
had accompanied us in our Battels, you had kept us safe, for had we fought in your
presence, our Enemies had never overcome us, since we take courage from your Eyes,
life from your smiles, and victory from your good wishes, and had become Conquerours
by your incouragements, and so we might have triumpht in your favours, but
hereafter your rules shall be our methods, by which we will govern all our actions,
attending only wholy your directions, yet give us leave humbly to offer our advise as
Subjects to their Princess if you think fit, we think it best to follow close the victory,
lest that our Enemies recruit their forces, with a sufficient strength to beat us out of what Rrrrrrr1r 617
what we have gained, or at least to hinder and oppose our entrance, and hopes of
Conquering them, where if you will give us leave we will besiege and enter their
Towns, and rase their Walls down to the ground, which harbour their disorders, offending
their Neighbours Kingdoms; yet we are not so ambitous as to desire to be
Commanders, but to join our forces to yours, and to be your assistants, and as your
Common Souldiers; but leaving all these affairs of War to your discretion, offering
our selves to your service,
We kiss your hands; and take our
leaves for this time.”

All the women fall into a great laughter, “ha, ha, ha, ha”

Lady Victoria

Noble Heroickesses, by your valours, and constant, and resolute
proceedings, you have brought your Tyrants to be your Slaves; those
that Commanded your absence, now humbly sue your presence, those that
thought you a hindrance have felt your assistance, the time is well altered
since we were sent to retreat back from the Masculine Army; and now nothing
to be done in that Army without our advise, with an humble desire
they may join their forces with ours: but gallant Heroickesses, by this you
may perceive we were as ignorant of our selves as men were of us, thinking
our selves shiftless, weak, and unprofitable Creatures, but by our actions
of War we have proved our selves to be every way equal with men; for what
we want of strength, we have supplied by industry, and had we not done
what we have done, we should have lived in ignorance and slavery.

All the Female Commanders

All the knowledge of our selves, the honour
of renown, the freedome from slavery, and the submission of men, we acknowledge
from you; for you advised us, counselled us, instructed us, and
encouraged us to those actions of War: wherefore to you we owe our
thanks, and to you we give our thanks.

Lady Victoria

What answer will you return to the Masculine Army?

All the Commanders

What answer you will think best.

Lady Victoria

We shall not need to write back an answer, for this Messenger
may deliver it by word of mouth; wherefore Sir pray remember us
to your General and his Commanders, and tell them, that we are willing
upon their submissions to be friends, and that we have not neglected our
good Fortune, for we have laid siege to so considerable a Fort, which if taken,
may give an easy passage into the Kingdome, which Fort we will deliver
to their forces when they come, that they may have the honour of taking
it; for tell them, we have got honour enough in the Battel we fought,
and victory we did win.

Exeunt Rrrrrrr Scene
Rrrrrrr1v 618

Scene 9

Enter Monsieur la Gravity, Monsieur Compagnion, and
Monsieur Comerade

Monsieur Compagnion

We are bound to curse you Monsieur Gravity, for
retarding our visits to the Widows, for I told you we should come
too late if we did not go before their Husbands were buried.

Monsieur la Gravity

But I do not hear they have made a promise to
marry any as yet.

Monsieur Compagnion

That’s all one unto us, but the noblest, youngest,
richest, and fairest Widow is gone; for though she is not promised or
married, yet she is incloistered, and that is worse than marriage; for if she
had been married there might have been some hopes her Husband would
have died, or been kill’d, or some wayes or other Death would have found
to have taken him away.

Monsieur Comerade

Let us comfort our selves with hopes, that it is but
a Ladies humour, which she will be soon weary of, for when her Melancholy
fit is over, she will come forth of her Cloister, and be fonder to marry
than if she had never gone in.

Monsieur la Gravity

Well, since she is gone, let us assault the other.

Monsieur Compagnion

What, the old woman that hath never a Tooth in
her head?

Monsieur Comerade

Why, she is rich, and she will kiss the softer for having
no Bones in her mouth.

Monsieur Compagnion

The Devill shall kiss her before I will; besides, an
old woman is thought a Witch.

Monsieur la Gravity

Pish, that is because they are grown ill-favoured
with Age, and all young people think whatsoever is ill-favoured belongs
to the Devill.

Monsieur Compagnion

An antient man is a comely sight, being grave and
wise by experience, and what he hath lost in his person, he hath gained in
his understanding; besides, beauty in men looks as unhandsome as age in women,
as being effeminate; but an old woman looks like the picture of Envy,
with hollow Eyes, fallen Cheeks, lank Sides, black pale Complexion,
and more Wrinkles than time hath Minutes.

Monsieur Comerade

Nay by your favour, some old women look like the
full Moon, with a red, swell’d, great, broad face, and their Bodies like as a
spungy Cloud, thick and gross, like our fat Hostess.

Monsieur la Gravity

Gentlemen, why do you rail against antient women
so much, since those that are wise will never marry such Boyes as you?

Monsieur Compagnion

It is to be observed, that alwayes old Girls match
themselves with young Boyes.

Monsieur la Gravity

None but Fools will do so.

Monsieur Compagnion

Why did you or any man else ever know a wise old
woman, or a chast young woman in their lives? for the one dotes with Age,
the other is corrupted with Flattery, which is a Bawd to self-conceit.

Monsieur la Gravity

Grant it be so, yet it is better to marry an old doting
Fool, than a wanton young Fille.

Monsieur Rrrrrrr2r 619

Monsieur Compagnion

For my part, I think now it is the best way to marry
none, since Madam Jantil is gone, but to live like the Lacedemonians, all
in Common.

Monsieur la Gravity

I am of another opinion, wherefore if you will go
along with me to the old Widow Madam Passionate, and help to Countenance
my Sute, I shall take it as an act of Friendship.

Monsieur Comerade

Come, we will be thy Pillars to support thee.

Exeunt

Scene 10

Enter Nell Careless, and Doll Pacify

Doll Pacify

What, doth thy Lady resolve to live an Anchoret?

Nell Careless

I think so.

Doll Pacify

How doth she pass away her time in her solitary Sell?

Nell Careless

Why, as soon as she rises she goeth to my Lords Tomb, and
sayes her Prayers, then she returns and eats some little Breakfast, as a Crust
of Bread and a Draught of Water, then she goeth to her Gallery and walks
and Contemplates all the Forenoon, then about twelve a Clock at Noon she
goeth to the Tomb again and sayes more Prayers, then returns and eats a
small Dinner of some Spoon-meats, and most of the Afternoon she sits by
the Tomb and reads, or walks in the Cloyster, and views the Pictures of my
Lord that are placed upon the Walls, then in the Evening she sayes her
Evening Prayers at the Tomb, and eats some light Supper, and then prayes
at the Tomb before she goeth to Bed, and at Midnight she rises and takes a
white waxen Torch lighted in her hand, and goeth to the Tomb to pray,
and then returns to Bed.

Doll Pacify

Faith she prayes often enough in the day, she shall not need
to pray at Midnight; but why doth she rise just at Midnight?

Nell Careless

I know not, unless she is of that opinion which some have
been of, which is that the Souls or Spirits of the dead rise at that hour out
of their Graves and Tombs, to visit the face of the Earth, and perhaps my
Lady watches or hopes to converse by that means with my Lords Ghost:
for since she cannot converse with him living, she desires to converse with
him dead, or otherwise she would not spend most of her time at this Tomb
as she doth; but how doth thy Lady spend her time now?

Doll Pacify

Faith as a Lady should do, with nourishing her Body with
good hearty meats and drink. And though my Lady doth not pray at Midnight,
yet she converses with Spirits at that time of Night.

Nell Careless

What Spirits?

Doll Pacify

Marry Spirits distilled from WineBeer and other Cordials, which
she drinks when she wakes, which is at Midnight; but do you watch fast and
pray as thy Lady doth?

Nell Careless

No truly, for I feed with the rest of my Ladies Servants,
which live within the House without the Cloyster, and they eat and drink
more liberally.

Exeunt Rrrrrrr2 Scene
Rrrrrrr2v 620

Scene 11

Enter Monsieur la Gravity, Monsieur Compagnion, and
Monsieur
Comerade
, as to Madam Passionates House; enter Madam
Passionates
Gentleman Usher

Monsieur la Gravity

Sir, we come to kiss the hands of the Lady Passionate,
if you please to inform your Lady of us.

Gentleman Usher

I shall, if’t please you to enter into another Room.

Exeunt

Scene 12

Enter Doll Pacify, as to her Lady Madam Passionate in her
Chamber where her Cabinets were

Doll Pacify

Madam, there are three Gentlemen come to visit you, desiring
you would give them leave to kiss your hands.

Madam Passionate

Shut down the lid of the Seller of Strong-waters, and
rid away the loose things that lie about, that my Chamber may appear in
some order.

The Maid sets things in order, whilst the old
Lady is trimming her self in the Looking
-glass

Madam Passionate

Bring in those Gentlemen?.

The Maid goes out, then enters with the Gentlemen;
the two young men speak to each other
the time that Monsieur la Gravity is saluting

Monsieur Compagnion

I marry Sir, here is a comfortable smell indeed.

Monsieur Comerade

Faith the smell of these Spirits overcomes my Spirits,
for I am ready to swound.

Then they go and salute the Lady

Madam Passionate

Pray Gentlemen sit down.

They sit

Truly I have had so great a wind in my Stomack as it hath troubled me
very much.

Compagnion speaks softly to Comerade

Monsieur Compagnion

Which to express the better, she rasps at every
word to make a full stop.

Monsieur la Gravity

Perchance Madam you have eaten some meat that
disgests not well.

Speaks Sssssss1r 621 Speaks aside

Monsieur Compagnion

A Toad.

Lady Passionate

No, truly I cannot gess what should cause it, unless it
be an old piping, and that is accounted a great restorative.

She fetches a great sigh

But I believe it is the drugs of my Sorrow which stick in my Stomack:
for I have grieved mightily for my dead Husband rest his Soul; he was a
good Man, and as kind a Husband as ever woman had.

Monsieur la Gravity

But the destinies Madam are not to be controuled,
Death seizes on all, be it early or late; wherefore every one is to make their
life as happy as they can, since life is so short; and in order to that, you
should chuse a new Companion to live withall; wherefore you must
marry again.

Lady Passionate

’Tis true, the Destinies are not to be controuled as you
say, wherefore if my Destiny be to marry, I shall marry, or else I shall dye
a Widow.

Monsieur Compagnion aside softly, as in the
ear of Monsieur Comerade

Monsieur Compagnion

She will lay the fault of her second Marriage on
Destiny, as many the like foolish actions are laid to Destinies charge, which
she was never guilty of.

Monsieur la Gravity

If I should gess at your destiny, I should judge you
will marry again, by the quickness of your Eyes which are fair and lovely.

She simpers

Lady Passionate

O Sir you flatter me.

Monsieur Compagnion

Ile be sworn that he doth.

Aside

Lady Passionate

But my Eyes were good, as I have been told, both by my
Glass and Friends, when I was young, but now my face is in the Autumnal.

Softly to Comerade aside

Monsieur Compagnion

Nay faith, it is in the midst of Winter.

Lady Passionate

But now you talk of Eyes, that young Gentlemans Eyes
Points to Compagnion do so resemble my Husbands as I can scarce look off
from them, they have a good Aspect.

Monsieur Compagnion

I am glad they have an influence upon your
Ladiship.

She speaks as softly to her self

La. Passion.

By my faith wittily answered, I dare say he is a notable youth.
Sir, for resemblance of him which is dead, I shall desire your continued
Acquaintance.

Compagnion softly to Comerade

Monsieur Compagnion

She wooes me with her Husbands dead skull.
I shall render my Service to your Ladyship.

Sssssss She Sssssss1v 622 She bowes him thanks with simpring and smiling
Countenance, and a bridled head
Monsieur la Gravity softly to himself

Monsieur la Gravity

Those young youths I perceive will be my ruin if not
prevented. Madam, will your Ladyship honour me so much as to give me
the private hearing of a few words.

Lady Passionate

Yes Sir.

She removes with him a little space

Monsieur la Gravity

Madam, although I am not such a one as I could wish
my self for your sake, yet I am a Gentleman, and what I want in person or
estate, my affection, respect, and tender regard to your person, worth, and
merit shall make good; besides Madam, my years suiting to your Ladyships
will make the better agreement in marriage.

Lady Passionate

Sir you must excuse me; for though you merit a better
wife than I, yet I cannot answer your affections; wherefore I desire
you will desist in your Sute, for I am resolved, if I do marry, to please
my fancy.

Monsieur la Gravity

If your Ladyship cannot love me, Heaven forbid I
should marry you; wherefore I wish your Ladysip such a Husband as you
can fancy best, and love most.

They return to the two other Gentlemen,
they all take their leaves

Madam your most humble Servant.

They go through the Stage, and come upon it
again, as it were at the Street Door

Monsieur la Gravity

Where is our Coach? Enter a Footman
Call the Coach to the Door?.

Enter Doll Pacify as from her Lady to Monsieur Compagnion

Doll Pacify

Sir, pray give me leave to speak a word or two with you.

Monsieur Compagnion

As many as you please.

Doll Pacify

Sir, my Lady desires your Company to morrow to Dinner,
but she desires you will come alone.

Monsieur Compagnion

Pray give your Lady thanks for her favours, and tell
her if I can possibly I will wait on her Ladyship.

Doll Pacify goes out

Monsieur Comerade

Now what encouragement have you from the
old Lady?

Monsieur Compagnion

Faith so much as I am ashamed of it, for she invites
me to come alone.

Monsieur Sssssss2r 623

Monsieur Comerade

On my life if thou wilt not woo her, she will
woo thee.

Monsieur Compagnion

Like enough; for there is nothing so impudent as
an old woman, they will put a young man be he never so deboist out of
Countenance.

Monsieur Comerade

But faith consider of it, for she is rich.

Monsieur Compagnion

So is the Devill, as Poets say, Pluto the God
of riches.

Monsieur Comerade

I grant it, and is not he best served? for every one bows
with respect, nay worships and adores riches, and they have reason so to do,
since all are miserable that have it not, for Poverty is a torment beyōond all sufferance,
which causes many to hang themselves, either in the Chain of Infamy,
or in a Hempen rope, or to do acts against the strict Laws of a Common-
wealth which is to commit self-murther; besides, Poverty is the Slave and
druge, the scorn and reproach of the World, & it makes all younger Brothers
Sherks, and meer Cheats, whereas this old Ladies riches will not only
give you an honest mind, and create noble thoughts, but will give you an
honourable reputation in the World: for every one will think you Wise
although you were a Fool, Valiant although you were a Coward, and you
shall have the first offers of all Offices, and all Officers will be at your devotion,
they will attend you as Slaves, the Lawyers will plead on your side, and
Judges will give sentence according as you desire, Courtiers will flatter you,
and Divines will pray for you in their Pulpits, and if your old Lady dy, and
leave you her wealth, you shall have all the young beautifull Virgins in the
Kingdome gather to that City, Town, or Village where you live, omitting
no Art that may prefer them to your affection.

Monsieur Compagnion

You say well, and I could approve of your Counsel,
if she would dy soon after I had married her.

Monsieur Comerade

Why, put the case she should live a great while, as
the truth is old women are tough, and indure long, yet you will have her
Estate to please your self withall, which Estate will buy you fine Horses,
great Coaches, maintain Servants and great Retinues to follow you.

Monsieur Compagnion

But she is so divellish old.

Monsieur Comerade

Why, let her keep her Age to her self, whilst you keep
a young Mistress to your self, and it is better to have an old Wife that will
look after your Family, and be carefull and watchfull therein, and a young
Mistriss, than a young Wife, which will be a Tyrannical Mistriss, which will
look after nothing but Vanities, and love Servants, whilst you poor wretch
look like a contented Cuckold, and so out of Countenance as you dare
not shew your face, whilst she spends your Estate running about with every
vain idle fellow to Playes, Masks, Balls, Exchanges, Taverns, or meets at a private
Friends private Lodging, also making great Feasts and Entertainments,
where after Dinner and Supper, there must be gaming at Cards and Dice;
where for her honour, or at least seeming so, to lose five hundred or a thousand
pounds away, and when they rise with or from their losses, singing
with a feigned voice, as if it were a trifle not to be considered or considerable,
thus if you marry an old and rich Lady you may live and spend her
Estate, but if you marry for youth and beauty, your wife will live and spend
your Estate; besides, the Husband of an old Lady lives like the great Turk,
having a Seraglio; but marrying a young wife you live like a Prisoner never
durst show your head.

Sssssss2 Monsieur Sssssss2v 624

Monsieur la Gravity

He gives you good Counsel, and let me advise you to
go to this Lady as she hath invited you, for I perceive she hath a young
Tooth in her old head by refusing me, and there is none so fit to pull it out
as you are, wherefore go.

Monsieur Compagnion

Well Gentlemen, I will try if my Reason and your
Counsel can prevail in my choice.

Exeunt

Act IV

Scene 13

Enter Madam Jantil in her habit with a white Taper lighted in her
hand, the Tomb being thrust upon the Stage she goeth to the Tomb,
then kneels down and seems as praying, after that she rises, holding
out the Torch with the other hand speaks as follow
These Verses being writ by my Lord, the Marquess of Newcastle.

Madam Jantil

Welcome sad thoughts that’s heapt up without measure,

They’re joys to me and wealthy Sons of treasure;

Were all my breath turn’d into lights ’twould ease me,

And showrs of tears to bath my griefs would please me;

Then every groan so kind to take my part,

To vent some sorrows still thus from my heart;

But there’s no Vacuum, O my heart is full,

As it vents sorrows new griefs in doth pull;

Is there no comfort left upon the Earth?

Let me consider Vegitable birth;

The new born virgin Lilly of the day,

In a few hours dyes, withers away;

And all the odoriferous flow’rs that’s sweet,

Breath but a while, and then with Death do meet;

The stouter Oak at last doth yield, and must

Cast his rough skin and crumble all to dust;

But what do Sensitives? alas they be,

Beasts, Birds and flesh to dy as well as we;

And harder minerals though longer stay

Here for a time, yet at the last decay,

And dye as all things else that’s in this World,

For into Deaths Arms every thing is hurll’d;

Alass poor man thou’rt in the worst Estate,

Thou diest as these, yet an unhappier fate;

Thy life’s but trouble still of numerous passions,

Torments thy self in many various fashions;

Con- Ttttttt1r 625

Condemn’d thou art to vexing thoughts within;

When Beasts both live and dye without a sin;

O happy Beasts than grasing look no higher,

Or are tormented with thoughts flaming fire;

Thus by thy self and others still annoid,

And made a purpose but to be destroyed

Poor Man.

Here ends my Lord Marquesses Verses. Muses some short time, then kneels to the Tomb
again and prayes as to her self, then rises
and bows to the Tomb, so
Exit

Scene 14

Enter two Gentlemen

1 Gent

What news Sir of our Armies abroad?

2 Gent

Why Sir thus, in the time of our Masculine Armies recruiting,
the Female Army had taken the Fort they besieged, where upon the
taking of that Fort, many considerable Towns and strong holds surrendred,
and submitted to the Female Army; whereupon the Lady Victoria sent to
her Husband to bring his Army, when the General and all the Masculine
Army came to the Female Army, much mirth and jesting there was betwixt
the Heroicks and Heroickesses, and so well they did agree, as the Female
Army feasted the Masculine Army, and then gave the possession of
the surrendred Towns to the Lord General, and the Lady Victoria, and all
her Army kept themselves in and about the Fort, laying all their victorious
spoils therein, and whilst the Masculine Army is gone to conquer the Kingdome
of Faction, they stay there upon the Frontiers, passing their time in
Heroick sports, as hunting the Stags, wild Boars, and the like, and those
that have the good Fortune to kill the Chase, is brought to the Fort and
Trenches in Triumph, and is Queen untill another Chase is kill’d; but
we hear the Masculine Army goeth on with victorious success.

1 Gent

I am very glad to hear it.

Exeunt

Scene 15

Enter Doll Pacify, and Nell Careless

Nell Careless

O Doll, I hear thy Lady is married, and not only married,
but she hath married a very young man, one that might be her GrandSon,
or Son at least.

Ttttttt Doll Ttttttt1v 626

Doll Pacify

Yes, yes, my Lady doth not intend to live with the dead as
your Lady doth, but to have the Company and pleasure of that which hath
most life, which is a young man.

Nell Careless

Her marriage was very sudden.

Doll Pacify

So are all inconsiderated marriages, but happy is the wooing
that is not long a doing.

Nell Careless

If I had been your Lady, I would have prolonged the time
of my wooing, for the wooing time is the happiest time.

Doll Pacify

Yes, if she had been as young as you or your Lady, but time
bids my Lady make haste.

Exeunt

Scene 16

Enter two Gentlemen

1 Gent

Do you hear the news.?

2 Gent

What news?

1 Gent

Why the news is that all the Kingdome of Faction hath submitted
to the Kingdome of Reformation, and that the Armies are returning
home.

2 Gent

I am glad of it.

Exeunt

Scene 17

Enter Madam Passionate alone

Madam Passionate

O unfortunate woman that I am, I was rich, and lived
in plenty, none to control me, I was Mistriss of my self, Estate and
Family, all my Servants obeyed me, none durst contradict me, but all flattered
me, filling my Ears with praises, my Eyes with their humble bows
and respectfull behaviours, devising delightfull sports to entertain my time,
making delicious meats to please my palat, sought out the most comfortable
drinks to strengthen and increase my Spirits, thus did I live luxuriously,
but now I am made a Slave, and in my old Age which requires rest and
peace, which now Heaven knows I have but little of, for the minstrels keep
me waking, which play whilst my Husband and his Whores dance, and
he is not only contented to live riotously with my Estate, but sits amongst his
Wenches and rails on me, or else comes and scoffs at me to my face; besides,
all my Servants slight and neglect me, following those that command
the purse, for this idle young fellow which I have married first siezed
on all my goods, then let Leases for many lives out of my Lands, for which
he had great fines, and now he cuts down all my Woods, and fells all my
Lands of Inheritance, which I foolishly and fondly delivered by deed of
gift, the first day I married, devesting my self of all power, which power
had I kept in my own hands I might have been used better, whereas now when Ttttttt2r 627
when he comes home drunk, he swears and storms, and kiks me out of my
warm Bed, and makes me sit shivering and shaking in the Cold, whilst my
Maid takes my place; but I find I cannot live long, for age and disorders
bring weakness and sickness, and weakness and sickness bring Death,
wherefore my marriage Bed is like to prove my grave, whilst my Husbands
Curses are my passing Bell, hay ho.

Exit

Scene 18

Enter two Gentlemen

1 Gent

I hear the Army is returning home.

2 Gent

Yes, for they are returned as far back as to the Effeminate
Army, and all the Masculine Commanders have presented all the Female
Commanders with their spoils got in the Kingdome of Faction, as a
tribute to their heroical acts, and due for their assistance, and safety of their
lives and Country.

1 Gent

And do not you hear what privileges and honours the King and
his Counsel hath resolved and agreed upon to be given to the Female Army,
and the honours particularly to be given the Lady Victoria?

2 Gent

No.

1 Gent

Why then I will tell you some, the Lady Victoria shall be
brought through the City in triumph, which is a great honour, for never
any one makes triumphs in a Monarchy but the King himself; then that there
shall be a blank for the Female Army to write their desires and demands;
also there is an Armour of gold and a Sword a making, the hilt being set
with Diamonds, and a Chariot all gilt and imbrodered to be presented to
the Lady Victoria, and the City is making great preparation against her
arrival.

2 Gent

Certainly she is a Lady that deserves as much as can be given
either from Kings, States, or Poets.

Exeunt

Scene 19

Enter the Lady Jantil as being sick brought by two men in a Chair,
and set by the Tomb of her dead Lord, and many Servants and
Friends about her weeping

Madam Jantil

Where is my Secretary?

Secretary

Here Madam.

Madam Jantil

Read the Will I caus’d you to write down.

Ttttttt2 The Ttttttt2v 628 The Will read

Secretary[Speaker label not present in original source]

“I Jantil the Widow of Seigneur Valeroso, do here make a free gift of all
these following.

  • Item, All my Husbands Horses and Saddels and whatsoever belongs to those
    Horses, with all his Arms, Pikes, Guns, Drums, Trumpets, Colours, Waggons,
    Coaches, Tents, and all he had belonging to the War, to be distributed amongst his
    Officers of War, according to each degree, I freely give.
  • Item, All his Library of Books I give to that College he was a Pupill in when he
    was at the University.
  • Item, To all his Servants I give the sum of their yearly wages to be yearly paid
    them during their lives.
  • Item, I give two hundred pounds a year pension to his Chaplin Doctor Educature
    during his life.
  • Item, I give a hundred pound a year pension to his Steward during his life.
  • Item, I give fifty pound a year pension to his Secretary during his life.
  • Item, I give a hundred pound per annum, for the use and repair of this Tomb
    of my dead Husbands.
  • Item, I give a thousand pounds a year to maintain ten religious persons to live
    in this place or House by this Tomb.
  • Item, I give three thousand pounds to enlarge the House, and three thousand
    pounds more to build a Chapell by my Husbands Tomb.
  • Item, Two hundred pounds a year I give for the use and repair of the House
    and Chapell.
  • Item, I give my Maid Nell Careless a thousand pound to live a single life.
  • Item, I give the rest of my Estate which was left me by my Husband Seigneur
    Valeroso
    to the next of his name.”

These following Speeches and Songs of hers, my Lord the
Marquess of Newcastle
writ.

Jantil

So ’tis well

O Death hath shakt me kindly by the hand,

To bid me welcome to the silent grave;

’Tis dead and num sweet Death how thou doest court me,

O let me clap thy fallen Cheeks with joy,

And kiss the Emblem of what once was lips,

Thy hollow Eyes I am in love withall,

And thy ball’d head beyond youths best curl’d hair,

Prethee imbrace me in thy colder Arms,

And hug me there to fit me for thy Mansion;

Then bid our neighbour worms to feast with us,

Thus to rejoyce upon my holy day;

But thou art slow, I prethee hasten Death,

And linger not my hopes thus with thy stay,

’Tis not thy fault thou sayest, but fearfull nature

That hinders thus Deaths progress in his way;

Oh foolish nature thinks thou canst withstand,

Deaths Conquering and inevitable hand;

Let me have Musick for divertisement,

This Vvvvvvv1r 629

This is my Mask, Deaths Ball, my Soul to dance

Out of her frail and fleshly prison here;

Oh could I now dissolve and melt, I long

To free my Soul in Slumbers with a Song;

In soft and quiet sleep here as I ly,

Steal gently out O Soul, and let me dy.

Lies as a-sleep

Song.

O you Gods pure Angels send her,

Here about her to attend her;

Let them wait and here condoul,

Till receive her spotless Soul;

So Serene it is and fair,

It will sweeten all the Air;

You this holy wonder bears,

With the Musick of the spheres;

Her Souls journey in a trice,

You’l bring safe to Paradice;

And rejoice the Saints that say,

She makes Heavens Holy-day.

The Song ended she opens her Eyes,
then speaks

Death hath not finish’d yet his work, h’is slow,

But he is sure, for he will do’t at last;

Turn me to my dear Lord, that I may breath

My last words unto him, my dear,

Our marriage join’d our flesh and bone,

Contracted by those holy words made one;

But by our Loves we join’d each others heart,

And vow’d that death should never us depart;

Now death doth marry us, since now we must,

Ashes to ashes be mingling our dust,

And our joy’d Souls in Heaven married then,

When our frail bodyes rise, wee’l wed again;

And now I am joy’d to lie by thy lov’d side,

My Soul with thy Soul shall in Heaven reside.

For that is all my

In this last word she dies, which when her Servants
saw, they cryed out she is dead, she
is dead”
Here ends my Lord Marquesses writing. Vvvvvvv Doctor Vvvvvvv1v 630 Doctor Educature sayes thus

Doctor Educature

She is dead, she is dead, the body hence convey,

And to our Mistriss our last rights wee’l pay.

So they laid her by her Husband upon
the Tomb, and drawing off the Tomb
goe out
Exeunt

Act V

Scene 20

Enter Citizens Wives and their Apprentices

1 Citizens Wife

Where shall we stand to see this triumphing?

2 Citizens Wife

I think Neighbour this is the best place.

3 Citizens Wife

We shall be mightily crouded there.

2 Citizens Wife

For my part I will stand here, and my Apprentice Nathaniel
shall stand by me, and keep off the croud from crouding me.

Nathaniel

Truly Mistriss that is more than I am able to do.

3 Citizens Wife

Well Neighbour if you be resolved to stand here, we
will keep you Company. Timothy stand by me.

Timothy

If you stand here Mistriss the Squibs will run under your
Clothes.

3 Citizens Wife

No matter Timothy, let them run where they will.

They take their stand

1 Citizens Wife

I hope Neighbour none will stand before us, for I would
not but see this Lady Victoria for any thing, for they say she hath brought
Articles for all women to have as many Husbands as they will, and all
Trades-mens Wives shall have as many Apprentices as they will.

2 Citizens Wife

The Gods bless her for it.

Enter a Croud of people

She is coming, she is coming.

Officers come

Stand up close, make way.

Enter Vvvvvvv2r 631 Enter many Prisoners which march by two and two, then enter many that carry
the Conquered spoils, then enters the Lady Victoria in a gilt Chariot drawn with
eight white Horses, four on a breast, the Horses covered with Cloth of gold, and
great plumes of feathers on their heads
The Lady Victoria was adorned after this manner; she had a Coat on all
imbrodered with silver and gold, which Coat reach’d no further than the
Calfs of her leggs, and on her leggs and feet she had Buskins and Sandals
imbroidered suitable to her Coat; on her head she had a Wreath or Garland
of Lawrel, and her hair curl’d and loosely flowing; in her hand a Crystall
Bolt headed with gold at each end, and after the Chariot marched all her
Female Officers with Lawrel Branches in their hands, and after them the
inferiour she Souldiers, then going through the Stage, as through the City,
and so entring again, where on the midst of the Stage as if it were the midst
of the City, the Magistrates meet her, so her Chariot makes a stand, and
one as the Recorder speaks a Speech to her

Recorder[Speaker label not present in original source]

Victorious Lady, you have brought Peace Safety and Conquest to this
Kingdome by your prudent conduct and valiant actions, which never
any of your Sex in this Kingdome did before you. Wherefore our Gracious
King is pleased to give you that which was never granted nor given to
any before, which is to make you Triumphant, for no triumph is ever
made in Monarchies, but by the Kings thereof; besides our Gracious King
hath caused an act to be made and granted to all your Sex, which Act I
have order to declare, as

  • “First, That all women shall hereafter in this Kingdome be Mistriss in their
    own Houses and Families.
  • Secondly, They shall sit at the upper end of the Table above their
    Husbands.
  • Thirdly, That they shall keep the purse.
  • Fourthly, They shall order their Servants, turning from, or taking into
    their service what number they will, placing them how they will, and
    ordering them how they will, and giving them what wages they will or
    think fit.
  • Fiftly, That they shall buy in what Provisions they will.
  • Sixtly, All the Jewels, Plate, and Houshold Furniture they shall claim
    as their own, and order them as they think good.
  • Seventhly, They shall wear what fashioned Clothes they will.
  • Eightly, They shall go abroad when they will, without controul, or giving
    of any account thereof.
  • Ninthly, They shall eat when they will, and of what they will, and as
    much as they will, and as often as they will.
  • Tenthly, They shall go to Playes, Masks, Balls, Churchings, Christenings,
    Preachings, whensoever they will, and as fine and bravely attired as
    they will.
  • Lastly, That they shall be of their Husbands Counsel.”

When those were read, all the women cryed out,
“God save the King, God save the King, and
Heaven reward the Lady Victoria”
Vvvvvvv2 Then Vvvvvvv2v 632 Then an Act was read concerning the Lady Victoria

Recorder[Speaker label not present in original source]

As for you most gallant Lady, the King hath caused to be enacted, that

  • “First, All Poets shall strive to set forth your praise.
  • Secondly, That all your gallant acts shall be recorded in story, and put in the
    chief Library of the Kingdome.
  • Thirdly, That your Arms you fought in, shall be set in the Kings Armory.
  • Fourthly, That you shall alwayes wear a Lawrel Garland.
  • Fiftly, You shall have place next to the Kings Children.
  • Sixtly, That all those women that have commited such faults as is a dishonour to
    the Female Sex, shall be more severely punished than heretofore, in not following
    your exemplary virtues, and all those that have followed your example shall have
    respective honour done to them by the State.
  • Seventhly and lastly, Your figure shall be cast in Brass, and then set in the midst
    of the City armed as it was in the day of Battel.”

The Lady Victoria rises up in her Chariot,
and then bowes her self to the Magistrates

Lady Victoria

Worthy Sir, the honour and privileges my Gracious King
and Soveraign hath bestowed upon me, is beyond my merit.

Then was read the Acts concerning the rest of the Female Army

Recorder[Speaker label not present in original source]

Our gracious King hath caused to be enacted, as

First, All the Chief Female Commanders shall have place, as every Lords
Wife shall take place of an Earls Wife that hath not been a Souldier in the Army;
every Knights Wife before a Barons Wife that hath not been a Souldier in the Army;
an Esquires Wife before a Knights Wife; a Doctor’s Wife before an Esquires
Wife that hath not been Souldiers in the Army; a Citizens wife before a Doctors
Wife; a Yeomans Wife before a Citizens Wife that hath not been a Souldier in the
Army; and all Trades-mens Wives that have been Souldiers in the Army shall be
free in all the Corporations in this Kingdome, these Acts during their lives, and all
the Chief Commanders shall be presented according to their quality and merit.

All the Female Souldiers cryed out, “God
save the King, God save the King”
After this the Lady Victoria is drawn on her
Chariot, and the rest walk after all
Exeunt
Scene
Xxxxxxx1r 630

Scene 21

Enter Doll Pacify and Nell Careless

Doll Pacify

O Nell, I hear thy Lady is dead, and hath left thee a thousand
pound.

Nell weeps

Nell Careless Doll Pacify

What doest thou weep for joy of thy thousand pound, or
for grief of thy Ladies Death?

Nell Careless

I wish my Lady had liv’d, although I had begg’d all
my life.

Doll Pacify

I am not of your mind, I had rather live well myself, as to
live in plenty, than to live poor for the life of any body, and if upon that
condition my Lady would leave me a thousand pound, I care not if she
died to morrow; but my young Master hath robbed me of all: but Nell, for
all thou art left a thousand pound, it is upon such a condition, as for my part,
had it been to me, I should not thank the giver, for they say it is given thee
upon condition to live a single life.

Nell Careless

Truly I have seen so much sorrow in my Lady, and so
much folly in your Lady concerning Husbands, that had not my Lady injoyned
me to live a single life, I would never have married; wherefore my
Ladies generosity did not only provide for my bodily life, and for my plentifull
living, but provided for the tranquillity of my mind, for which I am
trebly obliged to reverence her memory.

Exeunt

Scene 22

Enter two Gentlemen

1 Gent

The Lady Victoria hath been at Court, and hath had publick
Audience.

2 Gent

Yes, and the Lady Victoria and her she Officers and Commanders
have distributed all their spoils got in these Wars amongst the Common
she Souldiers.

1 Gent

All the Ladies that went not with the Army look most pittifully
out of Countenance.

2 Gent

Yes, and they are much troubled that the Heroicks shall take
place.

1 Gent

The Lord General seems to be very proud of his Lady, methinks
he looks upon her with a most pleased Eye.

2 Gent

He hath reason, for never man had so gallant and noble a Lady,
nor more virtuous and loving a Wife than the Lord General hath.

Exeunt

Finis.

Xxxxxxx1v