652 Bbbbbbbb2v 652

The Actors Names.

Two Grave Matrons belonging to the Female Academy.

Two or three Antient Ladies.

Two or three Citizens Wives.

A Company of young Gentlemen and others.

The
653 Cccccccc1r 653

The Female Academy.

Act I.

Scene 1.

Enter two Antient Ladies.

1 Lady

If you would have your Daughter virtuouſly and wiſely educated, you muſt put her into the Female Academy.

2 Lady

The Female Academy, what is that?

1 Lady

Why, a Houſe, wherein a company of young Ladies are inſtructed by old Matrons; as to ſpeak wittily and rationally, and to behave themſelves handſomly, and to live virtuouſly.

2 Lady

Do any men come amongſt them?

1 Lady

O no; only there is a large open Grate, where on the out-ſide men ſtand, which come to hear and ſee them; but no men enter into the Academy, nor women, but thoſe that are put in for Education; for they have another large open Grate at the other end of the Room they diſcourſe in; where on the out-ſide of that Grate ſtand women that come to hear them diſcourſe.

2 Lady

I will put my Daughter therein to be inſtructed.

1 Lady

If your Daughter were not of honourable Birth, they would not receive her; for they take in none but thoſe of antient Deſcent, as alſo rich; for it is a place of charges.

2 Lady

Why then they will not refuſe my Daughter, for ſhe is both honourably born, and alſo rich.

Exeunt.

Scene 2.

Enter a Company of young Ladies, and with them two Grave Matrons; where through the Hanging a company of men look on them, as through a Grate.

1 Matron

Come Lady, ’tis your turn this day to take the Chair.

All ſit, and ſhe that ſpeaks ſits in an adorned Chair. Cccccccc Lady 654 Cccccccc1v 654

Lady Speaker

Deliver your Theam.

1 Matrodn

You ſpeak Lady like a Robber, when he ſayes deliver your Purſe; but you muſt ſay propound your Theam.

Lady Speaker

Why then propound your Theam.

1 Matron

I preſent to your opinion, whether women are capable to have as much Wit or Wiſdome as men.

Lady Speaker

Firſt, I muſt define what Wit and Wiſdome are: as for Wit, it is the Daughter of Nature, and Wiſdome is a Son of the Gods: this Daughter of Nature, the Lady Wit, is very beautifull, and for the moſt part her Countenance is very Amiable, and her Speech delightfull; in her Acouſtrements ſhe is as all other of the Female Sex are, various; as ſometimes in plain Garments, and ſometimes in glittering Garments; and ſometimes ſhe is attired in Garments of as many ſeveral Colours as the Rainbow; and ſhe alters in their Faſhions, as often as in their Subſtances or Trimmings: as for her humour, it is according to the nature of her Sex, which is as various and changing as her Acouſtrements; for that ſometimes ſhe is merry and jeſting, other times pleaſing and delightfull; ſometimes melancholy, ſometimes fantaſtical, other times ſpightfull and cenſorious, and oft times wild and wanton, unleſſe diſcretion rules and leads her, who keeps her within the bounds and pales of Modeſty; alſo her diſcourſes are various, as ſometimes ſhe will flatter groſly, other times ſhe will rail maliciouſly, and ſometimes ſhe will ſpeak ſo eloquently, and demean her ſelf ſo elegantly, as to raviſh the minds of the beholders and hearers: This Lady Wit hath nine Daughters, very beautifull Ladies, namely the Nine Muſes; and every ſeveral Muſe partakes of every ſeveral Humour of the Mother: Theſe nine beautifull Ladies, Natures Grand-children, and Wits Daughters, have vowed ſingle lives, living alwayes in the Court with their Mother, whoſe Court is a very glorious Palace; for it is compoſed of Cœleſtial flame, and Divine Spirits were the Architectures thereof; the Servants and Courtiers of the Lady Wit are Poets, men of all Nations, Qualities, Dignities and Humours; theſe Courtiers the Poets, make love to the Lady Wits Daughters, the nine Muſes, and often receive favours from them; which favours their Servants the Poets braid them into Rimes, and make ſeveral works of Verſe, then tie them into True Lovers Knots, and then as all Lovers uſe to do, with their Miſtreſſes favours, vaingloriouſly ſhew them to the publick view of the world; for though the Lady Muſes will not marry, yet they receive Courtly addreſſes, and take delight to be wooed annd ſued to; the younger ſort of Poets are Amorous Lovers; the Grave and more antient Poets are Platonick Lovers, and ſome are Divine Lovers, and ſome are Heroick Lovers, annd ſome are Satyrical Lovers, which wooe in a crabbid ſtile: but to conclude of Wit, there are good Wits which have fooliſh Judgements; for though Wit and Wiſdome are Siſters and Brothers, both the Children of Nature, yet for the moſt part, the Brother is a meer Fool, and the Siſter hath a great wit; but ſome have Maſculine Wits, and Effeminate Judgements, as if their beams were Hermophrica.

The next I am to define is Wiſdome, who as I ſaid, is a Son of the Gods: this Wiſdome is a perſon of perfect and upright Shape, of well-compoſed Features, of a manly Garb, and an aſſured Countenance; In his ſpeech he is of a readie delivery, and he hath a well-tempered Humour: as for the Acouſtremen rts of his Perſon, he changes them according to the times and occaſions: His conſtant habitation is in the ſtrong Tower of Honeſtie, this Tower 655Cccccccc2r655 Tower is built round, without ends or corners, or by places; and it ſtands upon four Pillars, as Prudence, Fortitude, Juſtice and Temporance; upon every ſeveral Pillar are Letters ingraven, wherein may be read the proper uſes, benefits, and advantages of each Pillar: Theſe Pillars of Support, cauſes this Tower to be inpregnable; for though there are many aſſaults made againſt it, as by Riches, which ſhoots his golden Bullets out of his golden Canons at it, ſtriving to batter it down; and Power brings a mighty Army to aſſault it, and Danger of Death ſtrives to ſtorm it, and Flattery and Inſinuation to undermine it, yet it holds out without any breach therein; for the walls of this Tower, named Honeſty, are of a wonderfull ſtrength, for they are as durable as an intire Diamond, not to be diſſolved, and as tranſparant as a Chriſtal, without the leaſt ſpot, ſtain, or blemiſh: In this Tower as I ſaid, lives Wiſdom, a moſt magnificent Lord he is, and is attended numerouſly and nobly: his chief Favourite is Truth, his chief Counſelors are Reaſon, Underſtanding, Obſervation, Experience, and Judgement; his chief Officers are Patience, Induſtry, and Opportunity; his Domeſtick Servants are the Appetites, which Servants he rules and governs with great moderation; his Nobility are the Paſſions, which he preferrs according to their merit; but thoſe that are apt to be Factious, he ſeverely puniſhes, for he is one that loves peace, and hates brulleries, or any diſſention: he is a perſon of the quickeſt Senſe, for he hath a moſt piercing ſight to foreſee dangers, as to avoid them, and can well diſtinguiſh the right ways from the wrong; likewiſe he hath a moſt cleer hearing, for nothing paſſes by that concerns him, but the ſound gives him an Alarum to ſtand upon his guard, or a charge to take his advantage; but he hath a ſilent tongue, for he never ſpeaks but it is to ſome purpoſe alſo he hath a marvelous quick Scent, to ſmel out a Rebellion or Treaſon, and he will follow it pace by pace, as Hounds do Hares, and never leaves till he hath hunted it out; alſo his Touch is very ſenſible; he ſoon feels a courteſie or injury, the firſt he receives gratefully, and feels tenderly, the other he receives ſtrongly, and gripes hard, when he can take faſt hold, otherwiſe he lets it paſſe or fall, as if his touch were numb’d; he is a perſon which is ſo ſolicited by the weak, ſought to by the wronged, flattered by the ambitious, ſued to by the diſtreſſed; and he often ſits in the Court of Errors, to rectifie the diſorder therein: ſometimes he hath been in great humane Councels, but that is very rare; indeed he is ſo ſeldome in great humane Councels, as he is hardly known, for not one among a thouſand that did ever ſee him, much leſſe to have any acquaintance with him, for he is reſerved, and not company for every one: But there are many that falſly pretend not only to be acquainted with him, but gets falſe Vizards, and pretend to be Wiſdome it ſelf, and the world for the moſt part is cozened and abuſed with theſe Cheats, in not knowing the right ; true Wiſdom; and how ſhould they? when Wiſdom it ſelf appears ſo ſeldome, as he is a ſtranger even in Kings Courts and Princes Palaces, and ſo great a ſtranger he is in many Courts and Councels, that if by chance he ſhould be there, they thruſt him out as a troubleſome Gueſt, and laugh at his advice as fooliſh, or condemn his Counſel as treacherous: but now I have declared unto you whom Wit and Wiſdome are, now I am to give my opinion whether women are capable of their Society; but truly I muſt tell you it is a difficult queſtion, by reaſon the ſeveral Educations, which are the Uſhers that lead humane Creatures to ſeveral Societies, for there are Societies of the Ignorant and fooliſh, aſ well as of the witty and wiſe, and ſeveral Uſhers belongingCccccccc2 ing 656Cccccccc2v656 ing thereto; and indeed theſe latter Societies are numerous, and of all ſorts; the other are Societies of the moſt choiceſt, for though Wit is not an abſolute Goddeſſe, nor humane Wiſdome an abſolute God, yet they are a degree above other earthly mortals, but Fools are produced from the degrees of Mortality, and Ignorance is the Daughter of Obscurity; the Uſhers of theſe are Obſtinacy, Stupidity, and Illiterature, which leads mortals to dangerous and unexceſſible ways; in this laſt Society, for the moſt part women are of, as being bred therein, and having ſuch ill Tutors and Guides, they muſt needs err, for there is an old ſaying, When the Blind leads the Blind, they muſt needs fall into the Ditch, not having ſight to chooſe their way; ſo women breeding up women, the Generations muſt needs be Fools: for the firſt, women had an ill Tutor, the Devil, which neither inſtructed her in the knowledge of Wiſdome nor Wit, but learn’d her hurtful diſſimulation, to which ſhe hath bred all her Female Generations ſucceſſively, as from Female to Female; but your queſtion is, whether women are capable of Wit and Wiſdome: truly in my opinion women are more capable of Wit than Wiſdome, by reaſon they are both of the Female Gender, which may cauſe ſome ſympathy in their Natures; and in ſome things they do plainly ſympathy and agree, for Wit is wild and various, and ſo are women, and Wit is buſie and meddles with every thing, cauſe, or ſubject, ſo do women; Wit is fantaſtical, and ſo are women, Wit is alwayes in extremes, and ſo are women, Wit doth talk much, and ſo do women, Wit is humourſome, and ſo are women, Wit is prodigal, and ſo are women, Wit loves praiſes, and ſo do women, Wit doth ſport and play, dance and ſing the time away, and ſo do women, Wit is many times wanton, and ſo are women; Thus far are women capable of the Society and Converſation of Wit; but I doubt of her ſubtile Invention, quick Apprehenſion, rare Conceptions, elevated Fancy, and ſmooth Eloquution.

As for Wiſdome, women ſeem to all outward appearance to have a natural Antipathy abhorring his ſevere and ſtrict Rules, hating his mediciable Admonitions, his profitable Counſels and Advice, his wary wayes, his prudent forecaſt, his ſerious actions, his temperate life and ſober diſpoſition; all which makes them uncapable of the Society of Wiſdome.

Exeunt.

Act II.

Scene 3.

Enter two Gentlemen.

1 Gentleman

I ſuppoſe you have heard that a companny of young Gentlemen have ſet up an Academy, next to the Ladies Aca demy.

2 Gentleman

We heard nothing of it.

1 Gentleman

Why then I will tell you, the men are very angry that the women657Dddddddd1r657 women ſhould ſpeak ſo much, and they ſo little, I think: for they have made that Room which they ſtood in to ſee and hear the Ladies ſpeak in, ſo a place for themſelves to ſpeak in, that the Ladies may hear what they can ſay.

2 Gentleman

Faith if you will have my opinion, it is, that the men do it out of a mockery to the Ladies.

1 Gent

’Tis likely ſo, for they rail extremely that ſo many fair young Ladies are ſo ſtrictly incloſed, as not to ſuffer men to viſit them in the Academy.

2 Gentleman

Faith if the men ſhould be admitted into their Academy, there would be work enough for the Grave Matrons, were it but to act the part of Midwives.

Exeunt.

Scene 4.

Enter the Academy Ladies, and their Grave Matrons; another of the young Ladies ſits as Lady Speaker in an Armed Chair, the reſt on ſtools about her.

Matron

Lady, at this time let the Theam of your diſcourſe be of diſcourſing.

Lady

As for Diſcourſe it is differently various, ſome diſcourſes are delightfull and pleaſing, others tedious and troubleſome, ſome rude and uncivil, ſome vain and unneceſſary, ſome gracefull and acceptable, ſome wiſe and profitable; but in moſt diſcourſes time is loſt, having nothing that is worthy to be learn’d, practiſed, or obſerved: But there are two ſorts of diſcourſes, or manner of wayes of diſcourſings, as there is a diſcourſing within the mind, and a diſcourſe with words; as for the inward diſcourſe in the mind, it is to diſcourſe to a mans ſelf, as if they were diſcourſing to others, making Queſtions or Propoſitions, Syllogiſms and Concluſions to himſelf, wherein a man may deceive himſelf with his own falſe arguments, for it is an old ſaying, That it is one thing to oppoſe himſelf, and another thing to be oppoſed by others, and it is eaſie to argue without oppoſition; As for diſcourſing with words, it is more difficult than to diſcourſe with thoughts: for though words are as high and ſubſtantial as thoughts, yet the Mouth is not ſo ready in ſpeaking, as the Brain in thinking, and the Brain can preſent more thoughts at one time, than the Mouth can deliver words at one time: but words, or Rhetorick is apt to deceive a man, as his Concepceptions, eſpecially Orators, which draw themſelves with the force of Rhetorick, from the right and the truth, ſo as an Orator is as apt to delude himſelf, as to delude his Auditory, if he make words or eloquence the ground of his Queſtions, Perſwaſions, or Judgement, and not Reaſon, for Reaſon muſt find out the truth, and right, and Truth muſt judge the cauſe; but Rhetorick is for the moſt part a Vizard to right Reaſon, for it ſeems a natural Face, and is not ſo: Rhetorick ſeems right Reaſon, but is not: Alſo there are extemporal diſcourſes, and diſcourſes premeditated, extemporal ſounds beſt to the ears of the hearers, although of leſſe wit than premeditatedDddddddd ted 658Dddddddd1v 658 ted diſcourſes, becauſe they are delivered more naturally, and ſo flow more freely and eaſily, which makes the noiſe not only to ſound more ſweetly, but the diſcourſe to be more delightful both to the ears and the mind of the hearers, and more ready to the underſtanding; but of all diſcourſes the diſputive diſcourſes are harſheſt: Indeed all diſputive diſcourſes are like Chromatick Muſick, wherein is more Skill than Harmony; but all diſcourſes ſhould be fitted, meaſured, or choſen to the time, place, perſons, and occaſions, for that diſcourſe which is proper for one time, place, or perſon, is improper for another time, place, or perſon, as a diſcourſe of mirth in a time of ſadneſſe, a familiar diſcourſe from an Inferior to a Superior, a vain diſcourſe to a ſerious humour, or an Effeminate diſcourſe to a man, or a Maſculine diſcourſe to a woman, and many the like examples might be given: Alſo there are diſcourſes that are ſenſible diſcourſes, rational diſcourſes, and witty diſcourſes: alſo there are other diſcourſes, that have neither Senſe, Reaſon, Wit, nor Fancy in them: Alſo there are Clowniſh diſcourſes and Courtly diſcourſes: Alſo there is a general diſcourſing, and particular diſcourſing, alſo Scholaſtical diſcourſes and Poetical diſcourſes: but of all the ſeveral wayes, manners, or ſorts of diſcourſes and diſcourſings, Let me commend the Poetical diſcourſes and diſcourſings, which are brief and quick, full of variety, curioſity, and newneſſe, being as new as peep of day, as refreſhing as the Zephyrus wind, as modeſt as the bluſhing morning, ſweet as the flowry Spring, as pleaſant as a Summers Evening, as profitable as Autumns Harveſt, as ſplenderous as the mid-day Sun, as flowing as the full Tide Sea, as dilating as the ſpreading Ayre, as fruitfull as the fertile earth, and have as great an influence upon the Natures, Diſpoſitions, and Humours of men, as the Stars, ; Planets in the Heavens have, it takes life from the Cœleſtial flame, and is produced from the Gods on high: and this diſcourſe makes Man reſemble to a Deity.

Exeunt.

Scene 5.

Enter two Gentlemen as meeting each other.

1 Gentleman

Whither ſo haſtily?

2 Gent

I am going to hear them ſpeak in the Academy.

1 Gent

They have done for this time.

2 Gent

And did they ſpaeeak well.

1 Gent

As they uſe to do.

2 Gent

Why they never ſpake before there?

1 Gent

Where?

2 Gent

Why in the Academy.

1 Gent

Why I am ſure I heard one Lady ſpeak yeſterday, and another to day.

2 Gent

Ladies, I mean the Academy of men.

1 Gent

Why do the men intend to ſpeak?

2 Gent

Yes preſently, if they have not done ſpeaking already.

Exeunt. Scene
659 Dddddddd2r 659

Scene 6.

Enter a Company of young men, as in the Room next to the Ladies; one takes the Chair.

Gentleman Speaker

Gentlemen, we need no Learned Scholars, nor Grave Sages to propound the Theam of our diſcourſe in this place, and at this time; for our minds are ſo full of thoughts of the Female Sex, as we have no room for any other Subject or Object; wherefore let the Theam be what it will, our diſcourſes will ſoon run on them: but if we could bring women as eaſily into our arms, as into our brains; and had we as many Miſtreſſes in our poſſeſſions, as we have in our imaginations, we ſhould be much more happy than we are; Nay, had we been blind, deaf, and inſenſible to the Sex, we had been happy, unleſſe that Sex had been more kinder than they are; but they are cruel, which makes men miſerable; but Nature had made Beauty in vain, if not for the uſe of the Maſculine Sex, wherfore Nature forbids reſtraint, and ’tis a ſin againſt Nature for women to be Incloyſtred, Retired, or reſtrained: Nay, it is not only a ſin againſt Nature, but a grievous ſin againſt the Gods, for women to live ſingle lives, or to vow Virginity: for if women live Virgins, there will be no Saints for Heaven, nor worſhip nor Adoration offred to the Gods from Earth; for if all women live Viringgins, s, the Race of Mankind will be utterly extinguiſhed; and if it be a general ſin to live Virgins, no particular can be exempted; and if it be lawfull for one to live a Virgin, it is lawfull for all; ſo if it be unlawfull for one, it is unlawfull for all; but ſurely the Gods would not make any thing lawful that were againſt themſelves: But to conclude, thoſe women which reſtrain themſelves from the company and uſe of men, are damned, being accuſed by Men, judged by Nature, and condemned by the Gods.

Exeunt.

Scene. 7.

Enter two Gentlewomen.

1 Gentlewoman

What ſay you, will you go into the Academy?

2 Gent

No faith, I mean not to be damned.

1 Gent

I am of your mind, I will run unto the men to ſave me.

2 Gent

So will I, ſince the wayes of Salvation are ſo eaſie and ſo pleaſant.

Exeunt. Scene
660 Dddddddd2v 660

Scene 8.

Enter the Academy of Ladies, and the Grave Matroneſſe: The Lady that is to ſpeak takes a Chair.

Matron

Lady, let the Theam of your diſcourſe be at this time on the behaviour of our Sex.

Lady Speaker

It is a greater difficulty for a woman to behave her ſelf diſcreetly in private Viſitations, than for a man to ſpeak wiſely in privy Councels: and it is a greater difficulty for a woman to behave her ſelf wel in a publick Aſſembly, than for a man to ſpeak eloquently in a publick Auditory: and it is a greater difficulty for a woman to behave her ſelf well to ſeveral Perſons, and in ſeveral Aſſemblies, than for a man to behave himſelf gallantly in ſeveral Battels, and as much diſhonour comes in the misbehaviour of the one, as the cowardlineſſe of the other: Wherefore there requires as much skill, care, and conduct in a womans behaviour, in viſiting, entertaining, placing, applying, and diſcourſing, as to a Commander in Muſtering, Training, Intrenching, Beſieging, Inbattelling, Fighting, and Retreating; for it is not enough for a woman to behave her ſelf according to her Degree, Quality, Dignity, Birth, and Breeding, Age, Beauty, Wit, and Fortune; But according to Time, Place, and Occaſion, Buſineſſe, and Affairs, as alſo to the Humours, Capacities, Profeſſions, Dignities, Qualities, Births, Breedings, Fortunes, Ages, and Sexes of thoſe perſons ſhe is in Company and Converſation withall: Alſo in mixt Companies ſhe muſt have a mixt behaviour, and mixt diſcourſes, as ſometimes to one, then to another, according as ſhe can handſomely and civilly apply or addreſſe her ſelf; and to thoſe that apply and addreſſe themſelves to her: for a woman muſt not behave her ſelf, or diſcourſe unto a great Lord or Prince, as to a Peaſant, or to a Peaſant as to a great Lord or Prince, nor to a Souldier as to a Divine, nor to a Divine as to a Souldier, nor to a States-man as to a Tradeſman, nor to a Tradeſman as to a States-man, nor to a Flattering Gallant, as to a Grave Senior, nor to a Grave Senior as to a Flattering Gallant, nor to a young man as to an antient man, nor to a Boy as to a man, nor to a woman as to a man, nor to a Poet as to a woman, or as to thoſe men that underſtand not Poetry, nor to learned men, as to ignorant men. Alſo an antient Grave Matron muſt not behave her ſelf like a wanton young Girl, nor a Wife like a Maid, nor a Widow like a Wife, nor a Mother like her Daughter, nor a Miſtriſs like her Servant, nor a Servant like a Miſtriſs, nor a great Lady like a Country wife, nor a Country wife like a great Lady, for that would be ridiculous; Indeed it is eaſier for a middle Rank or Degree, at leaſt it is oftner ſeen, to behave themſelves better than thoſe of high Titles and great Eſtates, or thoſe of a very mean Condition, and of low Birth, for the one is apt to err with exceſſive pride, the other with an exceſſive rudeneſſe, both being bold and ignorantly bred, knowing not how to be civil, nor what belongs to civil Perſons; for the pride of the one ſcorns to be inſtructed, and the poverty of the other hath not means to keep and pay Inſtructers; for the exceſſe of Plenty nuſſles the one in Ignorance, and exceſſe of Poverty blindfolds the other from knowledge: but to conclude of the behaviour of women, firſt as to the generality, they muſt behave themſelvesſelves 661Eeeeeeee1r 661 ſelves civily and circumſpectly, to particulars, modeſtly and friendly; for the chief Principals of behaviour are twelve, ſix good, and ſix bad; the ſix good are, Ceremony, Civility, Modeſty, Humility, Friendſhip, and Obedience: The firſt is Majeſtical and Magnificent, the ſecond Noble, the third Virtuous, the fourth Humane, the fift Generous, the ſixt Pious; The firſt is Gracefull, the ſecond Sociable, the third Delightfull, the fourth Natural, the fift Helpfull, the ſixt Neceſſary; The firſt belongs to Dignity, the ſecond to Breeding, the third to Youth, the fourth to Age, the fift to Wealth, the ſixt to Peace.

As for the ſix bad Principals, is, to be Proud, Bold, Rude, Wanton, Diſobedient, and Cruel; The firſt is, Inſolent, the ſecond Impudent, the third Ignorant, the fourth Brutiſh, the fift Unnatural, the ſixt Wicked: The firſt lives with mean Births, joined with good Fortune, the ſecond lives with ignorant ; doltiſh Spirits, the third with baſe Breeding, the fourth with Beaſts, the fift with uncivil Nations, the ſixt with Atheiſts: The firſt is to be Slighted, the ſecond to be Pityed, the third to be Shunned, the fourth to be Hated, the fift to be Governed, the ſixt to be Puniſhed.

Exeunt.

Scene 9.

Enter two Gentlemen.

1. Gent

What ſay you to theſe young Ladies?

2. Gent

I ſay, that though they be but young Ladies, they diſcourſe like old Women.

Exeunt.

Scene 10.

Enter a Company of young Gentlemen: The Gentlemen Speaker takes the Chair.

Gentleman Speaker

The beauty of the Female Sex hath as great an influence upon the eyes of men, as the ſtars of the Heavens have upon their nature and diſpoſition: but as a cloud of ill Education, covers, changes, or buries the good influence of the Stars; ſo a cloud of Time covers, changes, and buries the beauties of the faireſt Ladies faces, which alters the affections of men, and buries all the delight that was received there-from, in the ruines of age, and the graves of wrinckles: But beauty, whilſt it is freſh and flouriſhing, it is the moſt powerfull Conquereſſe and Triumphs in the Chariot of Youth; and though her Maſculine Subjects forſake her, when time hath diſplaced her, and weakened her power; yet ſhe were unwiſe, not to take pleaſure in her Victories, whilſt ſhe may.

Exeunt. Eeeeeeee Scene
662 Eeeeeeee1v 662

Scene 11.

Enter two Citizens Wives.

1. Wife

Come, come, Neighbour, we ſhall get no room to ſee and hear the young Ladies, if we go not quickly.

2. Wife

Yes, let us go; but ſtay Neighbour, I muſt run home again, for I have left the key in the Celar door.

1. Wife

Let it be there for this time.

2. Wife

By my truth I muſt not, for my maid Joan, and the Prentice, will drink out all my Ale, and ſtrong Beer, and there will be none left to give my Husband a draught when he goeth to bed.

Enter another Citizens Wife.

1. Wife

What, Neighbour, are you come back already?

3 Wife

Why there is no getting in; the Door-keeper beat me back, and ſaid there was no room for Citizens Wives, for the room was only kept for Ladies, and Gentlewomen of Quality.

2. Wife

Well, we may come to be Ladies one day, although not Gentlewomen, and then we ſhall not ſo often be beaten back.

1. Wife

Let us go to the Gentlemens ſide, they will receive us, and uſe us kindly.

Exeunt.

Scene 12.

Enter the Academy of young Ladies, and their Matrons. They all ſit, and the Lady Speaker takes the Chair.

Matron

Ladies, let the Theam of our diſcourſe, at this time, be of Truth.

Lady Speaker

Truth, although ſhe hath but one face, which is a natural face, yet ſhe hath many ſeveral countenances; for ſomtimes her countenance is ſevere, other times kind and familiar, ſometimes it is ſad, ſometimes merry, other times pleaſing and delightfull: alſo ſhe hath as different humours, as ſhe hath countenances, according to the Cauſe, or Occaſion; likewiſe, her preſence, or approach, ſhews the different Effects, and ſeveral Cauſes; or from one Cauſe on ſeveral Objects, or Subjects: As for Example, ſometimes her Approach ſhews man to be Miſerable, or Happy; as when ſhe comes to inform him of good Fortune, or bad; or when ſhe preſents him with right Underſtanding of the condition he is in: But in Truth, in whatſoever countenance, or humour ſhe puts on, ſhe is a moſt beautifull Lady: for although ſhe do not ſhine as the Sun, which dazles and obſcures the ſight with his ſplendrous beams, yet ſhe doth appear like a bright, clear day, wherein, and whereby, all things are ſeen perfectly; and although ſhe have various Humours, yet her Actions are juſt, for the alteration of her Countenance, and Humours, are not to deceive men, nor ſhe takes no delightlight 663Eeeeeeee2r 663 light in her own ſad Approach, to grieve men, but ſhe doth bear a-part, both of their Grief and Joy: ſhe makes neither the Chances, Fortunes, Accidents nor Actions, but only declares them: ſhe is neither the Cauſe, nor Effects, but only ſhews the ſeveral Effects of Cauſes, or what cauſes thoſe Effects: She is of a ſweet Nature, and an humble Diſpoſition, ſhe doth as freely, and commonly accompany the Poor, as the Rich, the Mean as the Great: Indeed, her conſtant Habitation and dwelling, is among the Learned and Induſtrious men; but ſhe hath an oppoſite or rival, namely Falſhood, which often obſcures her, and is often preferr’d before her: this Falſhood, her Rival, is of the nature of a Curtezan, as all Curtezans are, as to flatter, and inſinuate her ſelf and company, to all mens good liking, and good opinion: ſhe is full of deceit and diſſembling, and although ſhe hates Truth, yet ſhe imitates her as much as ſhe can; I do not ſay ſhe imitates the Juſtice, Severity, and Plaineſſe of Truth; for thoſe, of all things, or actions, ſhe ſhuns; but ſhe imitates her Behaviour and Countenance; for although Falſhood is fowl, and filthy of her ſelf, yet by artificial Paint, ſhe makes herſelf appear as fair, and pure as Truth; but the deſervingly Wiſe can ſoon ſee the difference between the artificial fair of Falſhood, and the true, natural, fair complexion of Truth, although fools do admire, and are ſooner catch’d, ſo, for the moſt part deceived with the deceiving Arts of Falſhood, than the natural Verity of Truth: for Falſhood makes a glaring ſhew at the firſt ſight, but the more ſhe is viewed, the worſe ſhe appears; whereas Truth, the more ſhe is viewed, the better ſhe appears: alſo Falſhood uſes Rhetorick, to allure and deceive with her Eloquent Tongue, whereas Truth ſpeaks little her ſelf, but brings alwaies, and at all times, and in all places, and to all things, Right Reaſon, and plain Proof to ſpeak for her, who ſpeak without flouriſhing Phraſes, or decking Sentences, or Scholaſtical Rules, Methods or Tenſes, but ſpeak to the purpoſe, deliver the matter briefly, and keep to the ſenſe of Truth, or true ſenſe, which is both the beſt and natural way of ſpeaking, and the honeſt Practice of Truth, whereas Eloquence is one of the moſt cozening and abuſing Arts as is; for as Paint is a Vizard on the face, ſo is Eloquence a Vizard on the mind, and the Tongue is the Pencil of Deceit, drawing the Pictures of Diſcourſe; thus Falſhood ſtrives to reſemble Truth, as much as artificially ſhe can.

Exeunt. Eeeeeeee2 Act
664 Eeeeeeee2v 664

Act III.

Scene 13.

Enter two Gentlemen.

1 Gent

How do you like the Ladies and their diſcourſings?

2 Gent

I like ſome of the Ladies cdiſcourſes better than others; and I like ſome of the Ladies bettetr than the other; but let us go hear the men.

Exeunt.

Scene 14.

Enter a Company of Gentlemen, he that is to ſpeak takes the Chair.

Gentleman Speaker

Thoſe women that retire themſelves from the Company of men, are very ungratefull; as, firſt to Nature, becauſe ſhe made them only for breed; next to men who are their Defenders, Protectors, their Nouriſhers, their Maintainers, their Inſtructers, their Delighters, their Admirers, their Lovers and Deifiers; as men defend them from the raging bluſtring Elements, by building them Houſes, and not only build them Houſes for ſhelter, but Houſes for pleaſure and magnificency: Alſo men protect them from wild ravenous and cruel Beaſts, that otherwiſe would devour them; for as women have not natural ſtrength to build, ſo have they not natural courage to fight, being for the moſt part as fearfull as weak: Likewiſe men nouriſh them, for men Fiſh Fowl, and hunt to get them Food to feed them, for which women would neither take the pains, nor indure the labour, nor have the heart to kill their food; for women by nature are ſo pittifull, and have ſuch tender diſpoſitions, as they would rather ſuffer death themſelves, than deſtroy life in other Creatures; Alſo men maintain them by compoſing themſelves into Commonwealths, wherein is Traffique and Commerce, that each Family may live by each other; Alſo Laws to keep them in peace, to rule them in order, to defend them with Arms, wbhich women could never do, by reaſon they know not what Government to ſettle in or to, nor what Laws to make, or how to execute thoſe Laws that were made; neither could they plead Sutes, decide Cauſes, Judge Controverſies, deal out right, or puniſh Injuries, or condemn Criminals: Alſo men are the Inſtructers to inform them of Arts and Sciences, which women would nere have had the patience to ſtudy, for they would never have allowed ſo much time and ſolitary muſing, for the perfecting or devering thoſe Conceptions, as thoſe that firſt invented or found them out; beſides if women were not inſtructed by men of the natural cauſe of Effects, how 665Ffffffff1r 665 how often would they have been affrighted almoſt to death, with the loud and terrifying Thunders, the flaſhing Lightenings, the dark Eclipſes, the unſteady Earthquakes, the overflowing Tides, and many the like natural Effects from hidden Cauſes? beſides, women would want all thoſe conveniencies that Art affords them, and furniſhes them with: Alſo men inſtruct women with the Myſtery of the Gods, whereas for want of which knowledge, they would have been damned through ignorance: Alſo men are their Delighters, they traffique on the Sea, all over the world, to every ſeveral Climate and Country, to find and to bring the Female Sex Curioſities, hazarding their lives for the ſame; whereas women could neither build their Ships, nor guide them on the Seas when they were built; they have not ſtrength to pull and tug great Cable Ropes, to ſet and ſpread large Sails, to caſt and weigh Maſſy Anchors, no, not in a calm, much leſſe in furious ſtorms, with which men often fight, though not with Arms, with Subtility and Skill, by which the Elements are conquered ſtill, whereas women are conquered, and not only being ſtrengthleſſe and heartleſſe, but healthleſſe; for not only the roaring Seas, and whiſtling winds, and ratling ſhowres, and rumbling Thunders, and fiery Lightenings, Rocks, Shelves, and Sands unknown, or not to be avoided, beſides Mountains of Ice, if to the Northern Pole, all which would terrifie them, yet their weak bodies, ſick ſtomacks, and nice Appetites, could never endure long Voyages; they would vomit out their life before they could ſayl to their aſſigned Port, or Haven: Alſo men are womens admirers, they gaze on their Beauties, and praiſe their ſweet Graces, whereas women through envy detract from each other; Alſo men are womens only True Lovers, they flatter, kiſſe and pleaſe them, whereas women are apt to quarrel, rail and fight with each other: And laſtly, men Deifie women, making them Goddeſſes by their Poetical Deſcriptions ; Elevations, whereas Nature made them meer Mortals, Human creatures; wherefore it is a great ingratitude, nay a horid ingratitude in thoſe women, that denye men their Company, Converſation, and Communication; wherefore men have not only Reaſon to take it ill, but to be angry with thoſe women that ſhun or reſtrain their Company from them; but good Counſel ought to go before Anger, for the difference betwixt good Counſel and Anger, is, that good Counſel goes before a fault is committed, and Anger followeth when a fault is committed, for as good Counſel or Admoniſhment is to prevent a fault, ſo Anger is a Puniſhment for a fault paſt.

Exeunt.

Scene 15.

Enter three Antient Ladies.

1 Lady

Is your Daughter put into the Academy?

2 Lady

Yes.

3 Lady

How long Madam hath your Daughter been in the Academy?

2 Lady

This week, but ſhe hath not profited much, for I do not hear her diſcourſe.

Ffffffff 1 La- 666 Ffffffff1v 666

1 Lady

Firſt it is to be conſidered, whether your Daughter be capable of diſcourſing, for ſhe muſt have a natural ingenuity to the Art of Rhetorick.

3 Lady

My Daughter was alwayes a pretty talking Girl, as any in all the Country and Town I lived in.

2 Lady

Yes, Children may talk prettily for Children, but when they come to be women, it is a queſtion whether they will talk wiſely or no; but let us go hear which of the Ladies diſcourſes to day.

Exeunt.

Scene 16.

Enter the Academical Ladies and their Matrons; The Lady Speaker takes the Chair.

Matron

Lady, for this time let the Theam of your diſcourſe be of Diſcourſe.

Lady Speaker

Reverend Matron, this Theam hath been diſcourſed of before by one of our Academy; but yet by reaſon one and the ſame Theam may be diſcourſed of after different manners or wayes, I ſhall obey you.

As for Diſcourſe, there is of four ſorts; the firſt is diſcourſing in the mind, which is reaſoning.

The ſecond is diſcourſing with words, which is ſpeaking.

The third is diſcourſing by ſigns, which is action or acting.

The laſt is diſcourſing by Figures, which is by Letters and Hieroglyphicks, which is by Printing, Writing, Painting, and the like.

As for the firſt, which is a diſcourſe in the mind, which is Reaſoning, which reaſoning is a diſcourſe with things, and not with words, as ſuch a thing is not ſuch a thing, and what ſuch things are, and what they are not, or in what ſuch things agreee or diſagree, ſympathy, or antipathy, or ſuch things reſemble, or not reſemble, or on the cauſe of things, or their effects, or the like: This diſcourſe is in the mind, which is diſtinguiſhing, and diſtinguiſhing belongs to Judgement.

The ſecond diſcourſing is with words, which is Speech, and words are not things or notches, but only marks of things, or nicks, or notches to know things by; and the Tongue is the Tally on which they are ſcored: for Speech is a number of words, which words are made and joyned together by the Breath, Tongue, Teeth, and Lips; and the continuance make a diſcourſe; for a diſcourſe is like a line or thread; whereon are a number of words ſtrung, like as a Chain of Beads, if the words be well ſorted, and fitly and properly matched, as alſo evenly ſtrung, the diſcourſe is pleaſant and delightfull; this Chain of diſcourſe is longer or ſhorter, according as the Speaker pleaſes. The third diſcourſe, is a diſcourſe by Signes, which is in Actions, as ſome can diſcourſe by the Motion of their Faces, Countenances, Hands, Fingers, Paces, or Meaſures, or by the caſt of the Eyes, and many ſuch like Poſtures, Looks, Actions, and ſeveral ſuch wayes of Motion as have been invented to be underſtood. This and the firſt kind of diſcourſe, as by things 667Ffffffff2r 667 things and motions, beaſts may have, for ought we can know to the contrary. The laſt is by Figures, or Letters, Prints, Hieroglyphicks, and painted Stories, or ingraven in Metal, or cut, or carved in Stone, or molded, or formed in Earth, as clay, or the like; in this kind of diſcourſe, the Pencil hath ſometimes out-done the Pen, as the Painter hath out-done the Hiſtorian and Poet: This diſcourſing by Signs, or Figures, are diſcourſes to the eye, and not to the ear. There is alſo another kind, or ſort of diſcourſing, which is hardly learn’d as yet, becauſe newly invented, or at leſt, to what I have heard, which is by Notes, and ſeveral Strains in Muſick. I only mention it, becauſe I never heard it but once, and then I did not underſtand it: but yet it was by a skilfull and ingenious Muſician, which diſcourſed a ſtory of his Travels, in his playing on a Muſical Inſtrument, namely, the Harpſical. But certainly, to my underſtanding, or reaſon, it did ſeem a much eaſier way of diſcourſing, than diſcourſing by actions, or poſture. But to end my diſcourſe of Diſcourſing, which diſcourſing may be by ſeveral waies, ſeveral actions and poſtures, by ſeveral creatures, and in ſeveral Languages: but reaſoning is the Souls Language, words the Language of the Senſes, action the Lifes Language, Writing, Printing, Painting, Carving and Molding, are Arts ſeveral Languages, but Muſick is the Language of the Gods.

Exeunt.

Scene 17.

Enter two Gentlemen.

1. Gent

How do you like the Ladies diſcourſe?

2. Gent

As I like diſcourſe.

1. Gent

How is that?

2. Gent

Why I had rather hear a number of words, than ſpeak a number of words.

1. Gent

Then thou art not of the nature of Mankind; for there is no man that had not rather ſpeak than hear.

2. Gent

No, it is a ſign I am not of the nature of Woman-kind, that will hear nothing, but will ſpeak all; indeed, for the moſt part, they ſtop their Ears with their Tongues, at leſt, with the ſound of their Voices.

Exeunt.

Scene 18.

Enter a company of Gentlemen; The Speaker takes the Chair.

Gentleman Speaker

It were too tedious to recite the ſeveral humours of the female Sex; their ſcornfull Pride, their obſtinate Retiredneſſe, their reſerved Coyneſſe, their facil Inconſtancy, by which they become the moſt uſeleſs, and moſt unprofitable Creatures that nature hath made; but when they are joined to men; they are the moſt uſefull, and moſt profitable Creatures nature hath made; wherefore, all thoſe women that have common reaſon, or ſenſe of ſhame, will never retire themſelves from the company of Ffffffff2 men: 668Ffffffff2v 668 men: for what women that have any conſideration of Honouur, Truth, or touch of Goodneſs, will be the worſt of all Creatures, when they may be the beſt? but the truth of it is, women are ſpoyled by the over-fond dotage of men; for being flattered, they become ſo ſelf-conceited, as they think they were only made for the Gods, and not for men; and being Miſtriſſes of mens affections, they uſurp their Maſculine Power and Authority, and inſtead of being dutifull, humble and obedient to men, as they ought to be, they are Tyrannical Tyrannizers.

Exeunt.

Scene 19.

Enter two Gentlemen.

1. Gent

The young Gallants methinks begin to be whetted with Anger.

2. Gent

They have reaſon, when the women have ſuch dull, blunt Appetites.

Exeunt.

Scene 20.

Enter the Ladies of the Academy: The Lady Speaker takes the Chair.

Matron

Ladies, let the Theam of your diſcourſe be, at this time, of Friendſhip.

Lady Speaker

This Theam may more eaſily be diſcourſed of, than Friendſhip made; by reaſon it is very difficult to make a right Friendſhip, for hard it is to match men in agreeable Humours, Appetites, Paſſions, Capacities, Converſations, Cuſtoms, Actions, Natures and Diſpoſitions, all which muſt be to make a true and laſting Friendſhip, otherwiſe, two Friends will be like two Horſes that draw contrary waies, whereas Souls, Bodies, Education and Lives, muſt equally agree in Friendſhip; for a worthy honeſt man cannot be a friend to a baſe and unworthy man, by reaſon Friendſhip is both an offenſive and defenſive League between two Souls and Bodies; and no actions, either of the Souls or Bodies, or any outward thing, or fortune belonging thereunto, are to be denyed; wherefore Knaves with Knaves, and unworthy Perſons with unworthy Perſons, may make a Friendſhip, ; Honeſt men with Honeſt men, and worthy Perſons with worthy Perſons, may do the like: but an Honeſt man with a Knave, or a worthy Perſon with a baſe man, or an Honourable Perſon with a mean Fellow, a noble Soul with a baſe Nature, a Coward with a Valiant man, can make no true Friendſhip. For, put the caſe, in ſuch friendſhips, my Friend ſhould deſire me to do a baſe Action for his ſake, I muſt either break Friendſhip, or do unworthily, but as all worthy Perſons make Truth their Godeſſe, which they ſeek and worſhip, Honour the Saint which they pray too, Vertue,tue 669Gggggggg1r 669 tue, the Lady which they ſerve, ſo Honeſty is the only Friend they truſt and rely on, and all the World is obliged to Honeſty, for upright and juſt dealing.

Exeunt.

Act IV.

Scene 21.

Enter two Gentlemen.

1 Gent

Methinks the womens Lectural diſcourſe is better than the mens; for in my opinion, the mens diſcourſes are ſimple, childiſh, and fooliſh, in compariſon of the womens,.

2 Gent

Why, the ſubject of the diſcourſe is of women, which are ſimple, fooliſh, and childiſh.

1 Gent

There is no ſign of their ſimplicity or folly, in their diſcourſe or Speeches, I know not what may be in their Actions.

2 Gent

Now you come to the point, for the weakneſſe of women lyes in their Actions, not in their Words; for they have sharp Wits and blunt Judgements.

Exeunt.

Scene 22.

Enter the Ladies and Grave Matroneſs; The Lady Speaker takes the Chair.

Matroneſſe

Lady, let the Theam of your diſcourſe to day be of a Theatre.

Lady Speaker

A Theatre is a publick place for publick Actions, Orations, Diſputations, Preſentations, whereunto is a publick reſort; but there are only two Theatres, which are the chief, and the moſt frequented; the one is of War, the other of Peace; the Theatre of Warr is the Field, and the Battels they fight, are the Plays they Act, and the Souldiers are the Traged aniians, and the Theatre of Peace is the ſtage, and the Plays there Acted are the Humours, Manners, Diſpoſitions, Natures, Cuſtomes of men thereon deſcribed and acted, whereby the Theatres are as Schools to teach Youth good Principles, and inſtruct them in the Nature and Cuſtomes of the World and Mankind, and learn men to know themſelves better than by any other way of inſtruction; and upon theſe Theatres, they may learn what is noble and good, what baſe and wicked, what is ridiculous and miſbecoming; what gracefull and beſt becoming, what to avoid and what to imitate; the Genius that belongs to the Theatre of Warr is Valour, and the Genius that Gggggggg be- 670Gggggggg1v 670 belongs to the Theatre of Peace is Wit; the deſigner of the rough Plays of Warr, is a General or Councel; the deſigner of the ſmooth Plays of Peace is a Poet, or a chief Magiſtrate; but the difference of theſe Plays Acted on each Theatre, is, the one is real, the other feigned, the one in earneſt, the other in jeſt; for a Poet only feigns Tragedies, but the Souldiers do truly act Tragedies; on the Poetical Theatre I will only inſiſt, for this Theatre belongs more to our perſons, and is a more fitter Subject for the diſcourſe of our Sex, than Warr is; for we delight more in Scenes than in Battels: I will begin firſt with Poets, who are the Authors and makers of theſe kind of Plays; Fame hath ſpoke loud, both of antient and modern Poets; as for the antient Poets, they are a length out of the reach of my Judgement, ſo as my opinion will hardly reach ſo far; but as for our Modern Poets, that have made Plays in our Modern times, although they deſerve praiſe, yet not ſo much nor ſo high Applauſe as is given them; for moſt of their Plorts, or Foundations of their Plays, were taken out of old Authors, as from the Greeks and Romans, Hiſtorians and Poets, alſo all the Modern Romances are taken out of theſe Stories, and many Playes out of theſe Romances.

Matron

Lady, give me leave a little while to inſtruct you, as to tell you, that all Romances ſhould be ſo; for the ground of a right Romance is a true ſtory, only falſhood is intermixt therein, ſo that a Romance is a compound of Truth and Falſhood.

Lady Speaker

Give me leave to anſwer you, that in my opinion, a right Romance is Poetical Fictions put into a Hiſtorical Stile; but for Plays, the true Comedy is pure Love and Humours, alſo the Cuſtomes, Manners, and the Habits, and inbred qualities of mankind; And right Tragi-Comedies are the deſcriptions of the Paſſions which are created in the Soul; And a right Tragedy is intermixt with the Paſſions, Appetites, and Humours of men, with the influence of outward actions, accidents, and miſfortunes: but as I ſaid, ſome Poets take the Plots out of true Hiſtory, others out of feigned Hiſtorie, which are Romances, ſo as their Plots (for the moſt part) are meer Tranſlations, and oft times the Wit is alſo but a tranſlated Wit, only metamorphoſed after their own way; but the truth is, that ſome of them their Wit is their own, and their Plots were ſtoln, or plainly taken, and ſome their Plots are their own, but the Wit ſtoln; but of all theft, Wit is never confeſt; and ſome neither the Plot nor Wit is their own, and others both Plots and Wit are truly their own; Theſe laſt Poets (although but very few) are the true Sons of Nature, the other but as adulterate iſſues; But for the moſt part, our Modern Plays, both Plots and Wit, are meer tranſlations, and yet come out as boldly upon the Stage, as if the Tranſlators were the Original Authors, thinking, or at leaſt hoping that the alteration of the Language conceals the theft, which to the unlearnned it doth, but the learned ſoon find them out, and ſee all their Bodies, Wings, Leggs, Tail, and Feathers, although they hide their head in the Buſh of Ignorance. I ſpeak not in diſcommendation of theſe Tranſlations, nor Tranſlators, for Tranſlations are ſo far from being condemned, as they ought to be much, nay very much commended, and highly praiſed, if it be ſuch as is praiſe worthy, for old Authors may in ſome expreſſions be more profitable and good, both for Wit and Examples, than the modern; and the Tranſlators may be commended both for their Judgement and Learning; beſides, very good Tranſlators muſt have a ſympathetical Genius, with the Original Au- 671Gggggggg2r 671 Author, but their Condemnation proceeds from the Tranſlators unjuſt owning of it, upon themſelves, or in tranſlating it to the Authors prejudice.

Matron

Lady, let me interrupt you once again, to aſk your opinion how you like the Italian and French Plays.

Lady Speaker

As well as I can like any thing that is a ſtrain beyond Nature, or as I may ſay, Natures Conſtraint: for the truth is, in their diſcourſe or rehearſals, they do not only raiſe their Voice a Note or two too high; but many Notes too high, and in their actions they are ſo forced, as the Spectators might very eaſily believe the Actors would break their Sinew- ſtrings; and in their Speech they fetch their breath ſo ſhort and thick, and in ſuch painfull fetches and throws, as thoſe Spectators that are Strangers, might verily believe that they were gaſping for life.

Matron

But Lady, all know Love, which is the Theam or Subject of Plays, is a violent paſſion, which forces the Players to an Elevation of Action and Speech.

Lady Speaker

Moſt Reverend Matron, my opinion is, that though it be commendable and admirable for the Poet to be elevated with a Poetical Divine Inſpiration to outdo Nature; yet for the Actors, their beſt grace is to Play or Act in the Tracts or Paths of Nature, and to keep within Natures bounds; and whenſoever they go awry, or tranſgreſſe therefrom, they are to be condemned, and to be accounted ill Actors; and as for the Paſſions of Love, certainly the ſtrongeſt Love is like the deepeſt Water, which is moſt ſilent, and leaſt unneceſſarily active; they may ſometimes murmur, with winds of ſighs, but never roar; they neither foam nor froth with violence, but are compoſed into a heavy body, with a ſetled ſadneſſe: But in ſhort, the Italian and French Players act more Romantical than Natural, which is feign’d and conſtrain’d: but to conclude with the Poet, he delights the Ear and the Underſtanding with the variety of every thing that Nature, hath made, or Art invented; for a Poet is like a Bee, that gathers the ſweet of every Flower, and brings the Hony to his Hive, which are the Ears and Memory of the Hearers, or Readers, in whoſe Head his Wit ſwarms; but as Painters Draw to the life, ſo Poets ſhould Write to the life, and Players Act to rthe life.

Exeunt.

Scene 1323.

Enter three Gentlemen.

1 Gent

The Academy of Ladies take no notice of the Academy of Men, nor ſeem to conſider what the men ſay, for they go on thier own ſerious way, and edifying diſcourſes.

2 Gent

At which the men are ſo angry, as they have ſworn to leave off talking, and inſtead thereof, they will ſound Trumpets ſo loud, when the Ladys are in their diſcourſings, as they ſhall not hear themſelves ſpeak; by which means they hope to draw them out of their Cloyſter, as they ſwarm Bees; for as Bees gather together at the ſound of a Baſin, Kettle, or ſuch like metledGggggggg2 led 672Gggggggg2v 672 led thing: ſo they will diſperſe that ſwarm of Academical Ladies, with the ſound of brazen Trumpets.

3. Gent

Why the Ladies look through their Grate, upon the men, whilſt the men are ſpeaking, and ſeem to liſten to what they ſpeak, as the men do on and to the Ladies.

2. Gent

That is true, but they take no notice of them in their literal Diſcourſes, as what the men have ſaid; for they neither mention the men, nor their Diſcourſings, or Arguments, or Academy, as if there were no ſuch men.

Exeunt.

Scene 24.

Enter the Ladies, and their Matrons: The Lady Speaker takes the Chair.

Matron

Lady, let the Theam of your diſcourſe be, at this time, of Vanity, Vice, and Wickedneſs.

Lady Speaker

There is a difference betwixt Vanity, Vice, and Wickedneſſe: Wickedneſſe is in the will, Vice in the deſires, and Vanity in the actions. Will proceeds from the Soul, Vice from the Appetites, and Action from Cuſtom, or Practice; the Soul is produced from the Gods, the Appetites created by Nature, and Cuſtom is derived from Time: As for Deſires, we may deſire, and not will, and we may will, and not act, and we may act, and neither will, nor deſire, and we may deſire, will, and act all at once; and to ſome particulars, we may neither deſire, will nor act; but the Will makes Vice Wickedneſſe, and Vanity Vice; the willing of good, procceeds from the Gods, the willing of evil proceeds from the Devils: ſo that Sin is to will evil, in deſpight of good, and Piety is to will good, in deſpight of evil, as neither the perſwaſions, nor temptations of the one, or the other, ſhall draw our wills; for ſin, or wickedneſſe, is neither in the Knowledg, nor Appetites: for if our Great Grandmother Eve, had not wilfully eat of that which was ſtrictly forbidden her, ſhe had not ſinned, for if that ſhe had only heard of the effects of that Fruit, or had deſired it, yet had not wilfully eaten thereof, ſhe had never damned her Poſterity: Thus, to will againſt the Gods command, is Wickedneſſe: but there is no ſuch thing as Wickedneſs, in Nature, but as I ſaid Wickedneſſe proceeds from the Soul, Vice from the Appetites, and Vanity from the Actions: as for Wickedneſs, it is like a dead Palſie, it hath no ſenſe, or feeling of the Grace or Goodneſs of the Gods, and Vice is like an unwholſome Meat, cut out by the Appetites, for the Appetites are like knives, whereas ſome are blunt, others are ſharp, and as it were, too much edged, but they are either blunt, or ſharp, according as Nature whets them: but if they be very ſharp, as to be keen, they wound the body, and make the life bleed. As for Vanity, it is as the froath of life, it is llight, and ſwims a-top, which bubbles out into extravagant and unprofitable actions, falſe opinions, and idle, and impoſſible Imaginations. But as I ſaid, it is not the knowledg of Vanity, Vice and Wickedneſſe, that makes a creature guilty thereof, but the Will, and wilfull Practice thereof, for Wickedneſs, Vice, and Vannity, muſt be known as much as Piety, Virtue, and Diſcretion, otherwiſe men may run into evil, through 673Hhhhhhhh1r 673 through ignorance; wherefore it is as great a ſhame to Education, not to be inſtructed in the bad, as it is a glory to be inſtructed in the good: but the Queſtion will be, whether Knowledg can be without a partaking thereof? I Anſwer, not a perfect Knowledg, but a ſuppoſitive Knowledg: for there are many things which cannot be perfectly known, but ſuppoſitively known: ſo we muſt only know Wickedneſs, Vice, and Vanity, as we do know the Gods and Devils, which is by a lively Faith; ſo as we muſt be inſtructed in all that is Pious, Virtuous, and Judicious, as we are inſtructed of the Power and Goodneſſe of the Gods; and we muſt be inſtructed in all that is Wicked, Vicious, and Idle, as we are of the Evil, and Power of the Devils. Now I muſt inform you, that there are three ſorts of Knowledge, as a knowledge of Poſſeſſion, a knowledge of Action, and a knowledge of Declaration; the knowledge of Action lies in the Appetites, the knowledge of Declaration lies in the Senſes, the knowledge of Poſſeſſion in the Will, Action and Declarations. As for example, we may hear, and ſee, Drunkeneſſe, Adultery, Murther, Theft, and the like, and have no appetite to the ſame Actions; alſo we may have an appetite to the ſame Actions, yet not a will to act the ſame; but if we have a deſire, and will act the ſame, we have, and are poſſeſſ’d with the moſt perfect Knowledge thereof; but this laſt Knowledge is utterly unlawfull in things that are evil, but not in things that are good: But to conclude, we muſt be inſtructed by a Narrative way, and by the intelligence of our ears, and eyes, in that which is evil, as well, and as plainly, as in things that are good, not to be ignorant in any thing that can be declared unto us, not ſtaying untill we be Old, but to be thus inſtructed whilſt we are young; for many that are young Novices, commit many evils through ignorance, not being inſtructed, and informed plainly and clearly, but darkly, and obſcurely, cauſed by their fooliſh, cautionary, formal Tutors, or Educators, who hold that erronious opinion, that Youth ought not to know ſuch, or ſuch Things, or Acts; which if they had known, evil might have been prevented, and not left untill their evil be known by Practice; ſo that more evil is rather known by Practice, than Declaration, or inſtruction of Information: but if our Senses are a guide to our Reaſon, and our Reaſon a guide to our Underſtanding, and that the Reaſon and Underſtanding governs our Appetites, then tis probable, our Senſe, Reaſon, and Underſtanding, may govern our Will.

Exeunt.

Act V.

Scene 25.

Enter the Academical Gentlemen.

1. Gent

This is not to be ſuffered: for if we ſhould let theſe Ladies reſt in peace and quiet, in their incloſed Habitation, we ſhall have none but Old Women; for all thoſe young Ladies, that are not in the Academy, talk of nothing but of going into a Female Academy.

2 Gent

You ſay true, inſomuch as it begins to be a Mode, and a Faſhion, Hhhhhhhh for 674Hhhhhhhh1v 674 for all the Youngeſt, Faireſt, Richeſt, and Nobleſt Ladies, to incloſe themſelves into an Academy.

3. Gent

Nay, we muſt ſeek ſome way, and deviſe ſome means to unrooſt them.

4. Gent

There is nothing can do it, but noiſe; for they take ſuch pleaſure in the exerciſe of their Tongues, that unleſs we can put them to ſilence, there is no hopes to get them out.

1. Gent

Trumpets, I doubt, will not be loud enough.

6. Gent

Let us try.

All the Gentlemen.

Content, Content, &c.

Exeunt.

Scene 26.

Enter the Ladies, and the Grave Matrons; The Lady Speaker takes the Chair.

Matron

Lady, let the Theam of your diſcourſe be, at this time, of Boldneſs, and Baſhfulneſſe.

Lady Speaker

There are three ſorts of Boldneſs, or Confidence, the one proceeds from Cuſtom, or Practice, as it may be obſerved by Preachers, Pleaders, and Players, that can preſent themſelves, ſpeak, and act freely, in a publick Aſſembly.

The ſecond ſort of Boldneſſe, or Confidence, proceeds from Ignorance, not foreſeeing what errors, or follies, may be committed, or chance to fall out, or what is fitteſt to be done, or ſaid; like as poor mean Countrey people, who have neither Birth nor Breeding, have ſo much Confidence, as they can more confidently preſent themſelves, or preſence, to thoſe of Noble Birth and Breeding, and can more freely, and boldly, talk to any Perſon, or Perſons, of what Quality, or Dignity ſoever, than thoſe Noble Perſons can talk to them.

The third, and laſt ſort of Confidence, or Boldneſſe, proceeds from an extraordinary Opinionatedneſs, or ſelf-conceitedneſſe; for thoſe that think, or believe themſelves to be above others, in Wit, Perſon, Parts, or Power, although they have neither, will be moſt haughtily, and proudly confident, ſcorning, and undervaluing all others, as inferiour. Thus bold Confidence, or confident Boldneſſe, is produced from Practice, Ignorance, and Pride.

Alſo there are three ſorts of Baſhfulneſſe.

The one proceeds from too great an Apprehenſion.

The other from a poetical Fiction.

The third from an aſpiring Ambition.

Firſt, from too great an Apprehenſion, as ſome are afraid that their Obſervers, or Friends, ſhould make an evil Conſtruction of their good Intentions. Others will be Baſhfull, and out of Countenance, upon a poetical Fiction, as imagining of ſome impoſſible, or at leaſt ſome improbable accident, which may fall out to their diſgrace. The third and laſt is, through an aſpiring Ambition, deſiring to out-act all others in Excellencies, and fearing 675Hhhhhhhh2r 675 fearing to fail therein, is apt to be out of Countenance, as if they had received a foyl; thus we may perceive that the Stream of good Nature, the peircing Beams of Wit, and the Throne of Noble Ambition is the true cauſe of baſhfulneſs, I mean not ſhamefaſtneſs, but ſweet baſhfulneſſe: but although baſhfulneſſe is a ſweet, tender, noble, and peircing Effect, of and from the Soul; yet baſhfulneſſe is apt to unſtring the Nerves, to weaken the Sinews, to dull the Senſes, to quench the Spirits, to blunt the eyes or points of Wit, and to obſtruct the Speech, inſomuch as to cauſe the words to run ſtumblingly out of the mouth, or to ſuffer none to paſſe forth: but a little Anger in the Mind will take off the extreme baſhfulneſſe of the Behaviour, although much Anger doth obſtruct the Senſes, Spirits and Speech, as much as extreme Baſhfulneſſe doth: for extreme anger, and extreme baſhfulneſſe, have often one and the ſame Effects to outward Appearance.

Exeunt.

Scene 27.

Enter two Gentlemen.

1 Gent

The Gentlemen will turn Trumpeters, for a Regiment of Gentlemen have bought every one of them a Trumpet, to ſound a March to the Academy of Ladies.

12 Gent

Faith if the Ladies would anſwer their Trumpets with blowing of Horns, they would ſerve them but as they ought to be ſetrved.

1 Gentleman

Women will ſooner make Hornes, than blow Horns.

Exeunt.

Scene 28.

Enter the Lady and their Matroneſs; The Lady Speaker takes the Chair.

Matron

Lady, let the Theam of your diſcourſe at this time be of Virtuous Courtſhips, and wooing Suters.

Lady Speaker

Some Poetical and Romantical Writers make valiant gallant Heroicks wooe poorly, ſneakingly, and pedlingly.

Matron

Lady, let me interrupt you; would you have gallant Heroicks in their Courtſhips to Fair young Ladies, as Commanding as in the Field, or as Furious as in a Battel.

Lady Speaker

No, I would have them wooe with a Confident Behaviour, a Noble Demeanor, a Generous Civility, and not to be amazed or to tremble for fear, to weep for pitty, to kneel for mercy, to ſigh and be dejected Hhhhhhhh2 with 676Hhhhhhhh2v 676 with a Miſtreſſes frown; for though ſorrow, ſighs, tears and Humility become all Heroick Spirits very well, and expreſſe a Noble and Generous Soul, yet not in ſuch a cauſe: for tears become all Heroick Spirits, for the Death or Torments of Friends, or for the ſufferances of Innocents, or Virtue, yet not if only themſelves were tormented, or to dye, or for any obſtructions to their own pleaſures or delights, but it becomes all Heroick Spirits, to tremble for fear of their Honour, or loſſe of their Fame, and expreſſes a generous Soul to grieve and to mourn in a general Calamity, and to humble themſelves to the Gods for thoſe in diſtreſſe, and to implore and kneel to them for mercy, both for themſelves and others, as for to divert the wrath of the Gods; but not to weep, ſigh, tremble, kneel, pray, for their Effeminate pleaſures, delights, or Societies; nor to grieve or ſorrow for the loſſe of the ſame.

Alſo ſome Writers, when they are to deſcribe a Baſhfull and Modeſt Lady, ſuch as are Nobly and Honourably bred, deſcribe them as if they were ſimply ſhame-faced; which deſcription makes ſuch appear, as if they came meerly from the Milk-boul, and had been bred only with ſilly Huſwives, and that their practice was, to pick Worms from Roots of Flowers, and their paſtimes to carry and fling crumbs of Bread to Birds, or little Chickens that were hatched by their Hens rtheir Mothers gave them, or to gather a lapfull of ſweet Flowers, to Diſtill a little ſweet Water to dip their Hankerchiefs in, or to waſh their Faces in a little Roſe-water; and indeed, this harmleſſe and innocent Breeding, may be Modeſt and Baſhfull, or rather ſhame-faced, for want of other Converſation, which Cuſtome and Company will ſoon caſt off, or wear out, and then print Boldneſſe on their brow; but true modeſt Souls, which have for the moſt part Baſhfull Countenances, proceed from a deep Apprehenſion, a clear Underſtanding, an ingenuous Wit, a thinking Brain, a pure Mind, a refined Spirit, a Noble Education, and not from an ignorant obſcure Breeding; for it is not Ignorance that makes Modeſty, but Knowledge, nor is it Guiltineſſe that makes Baſhfulneſſe, but fear of thoſe that are guilty; but as I ſaid, many Writers that would make a deſcription of Modeſt and Baſhfull women, miſtake and expreſſe a ſhame-faced Ignorance and obſcure Breeding: and inſtead of expreſſing a young Lady to be innocent of Faults, they expreſſe her to be one that is ignorant of Knowledge, ſo as when they would deſcribe a Modeſt, Baſhfull, Innocent Virgin, they miſtake and deſcribe a ſimple ignorant ſhame fac’d Maid, that either wants Breeding or Capacity.

Matron

But Lady, let me aſk you one queſtion, would you have a young Virgin as confident and knowing as a Married Wife?

Lady Speaker

Yes, although not in their Behaviour or Condition of life, but in her Virtue and Conſtancy; for a chaſt Married wife is as Modeſt and Baſhfull as a Virgin, though not ſo ſimple, ignorant, and ſhame-faced as a plain bred Maid; but as I ſaid, Writers ſhould deſcribe the wooing of gallant Heroicks, or Great and Noble Perſons, to woo with a Generous Confidence, or Manly Garb, a Civil Demeanor, a Rational Diſcourſe, to an honeſt Deſign, and to a Virtuous end, and not with a whining Voice, in pittifull words, and fawning Language; and if it be only for a Miſtriſs, as for a Courtezan, Bribes are the beſt Advocates, or to imploy others to treat with them, and not to be the Pimp, although for themſelves.

Alſo Writers ſhould when they deſcribe Noble Virgins, to receive Nobleble 677Iiiiiiii1r 677 ble Addreſſes of Love, and to receive thoſe Noble Addreſſes or Courtſhips with an attentive Modeſty in a baſhfull Countenance; and if to tremble for fear, to deſcribe the fear, as being the Nature of the Sex; alſo to deſcribe their Behaviour after a Noble Garb, and their anſwers to theitr Suters, to be full of Reaſon, Senſe, and Truth, and thoſe anſwers to be delivered in as ſhort diſcourſes, and as few words as Civility will allow of, and not like an ignorant innocent, a childiſh ſimplicity, an unbred Behaviour, expreſſing themſelves, or anſwering their Suters with mincing words that have neither Senſe nor Reaſon in them.

Alſo Poetical and Romantical Writers ſhould not make great Princes that have been bred in great and populous Cities, glorious Camps, and ſplendrous Courts, to woo and make Love like private bred men, or like rude bred Clowns, or like mean bred Servants, or like Scholars, that woo by the Book in Scholaſtical Terms or Phraſes, or to woo like flanting, ranting, ſwearing, bragging Swaggerers, or Ruſters; or to woo a Country wench, like as a Noble Lady, or great Princeſſe.

Alſo not to make ſuch women as have been bred and born Nobly and Honourably, to receive the Courtſhip of great Perſons, like a Dairy-maid, Kitchin-maid, or like ſuch as have been bred in mean Cottages, as to behave themſelves ſimply, or rudely, as to the anſwer and ſpeak Croſſingly, or Thwartingly, as contradicting every word that is ſpoken unto them, as if they did believe what they ſaid was not truth; for Civil and Honourable bred women, who have Noble and Generous Souls, will rather ſeem to believe all their Superlative Praiſes, than make Doubts, as if they knew they lyed; for to make Doubts, is in the mid-way to give the Lye.

Matron

Lady, how approve you of thoſe Lovers that kiſſe the Letters, Tokens, Pledges, and the like, that are ſent unto them from their Lovers? or ſuch as wear Letters, Tokens, or Pledges in their Boſomes, and next their Heart, and take them and view them a hundred times a day?

Lady Speaker

Approve it ſay you? you mean diſapprove it; but let me tell you, moſt Reverend Matron, that the very hearing of it makes me ſick, and the ſeeing of it would make me die.

I have ſo great an Averſion againſt ſuch actions, for thoſe actions: like as whining Speeches, proceed from filthy Amorous Love, and Mean Lovers; for true Love in Noble Perſons, receives gifts as an expreſſion of their Suters, or Lovers Loves, and will carefully keep them as an acknowledgment of the receipt, and accept of them as a great Seal to their affections; yet they keep ſuch Preſents, but as Treaſurers, not as Owners, untill they be man and wife; neither do they make Idols of ſuch gifts, nor do they adore the Owner the more for the gift, nor the gift for the Owner; nor do they think fit they ought to give ſuch outward expreſſions of Love, by ſuch uſeleſſe actions, when as htthey have a high eſteem of their Suters Love, a perfect belief of their Merit, and a conſtant return of their affection, and a reſolution to dye, or ſuffer any miſery for their ſakes if need required; beſides, true Lovers have ever the Idea of their beloved in their Thoughts, by which they cannot forget their Memory, indeed Love-letters they may read often, becauſe Letters are an injoyment of their diſcourſe, although their perſons be at a diſtance, and are alſo a recreation and delight in their Wits, if there be any Wit theerein; but to kiſſe the Paper; they neither find pleaſure, delight, nor Iiiiiiii pro- 678Iiiiiiii1v 678 profit, neither to themſelves, nor to their Beloved; the truth is, not one Writer amongſt a thouſand make Lovers woo either wiſely, wittily, nobly, eloquently, or naturally; but either fooliſhly, meanly, unmanly, unhandſomely, or amorouſly, which is corruptly.

Matron

Lady, you ſay very true, and ſome Romantical Writers, make long and tedious Orations, or long and tedious and fruitleſs diſcourſe, in ſuch times as requires ſudden action.

Lady Speaker

You ſay right, as to ſpeak when they are to fight; but for my part I hate to read Romances, or ſome Scenes in Plays, whoſe ground or Foundation is Amorous Love.

Matron

When you read ſuch Books, you muſt never conſider the Subject that the Writer writes on, but conſider the Wit, Language, Fancy, or Deſcription.

2 Matron

Moſt Reverend Siſter, I ſuppoſe few read Romances, or the like Books, but for the Wit, Fancy, Judgement, and lively Deſcriptions; for they do not read ſuch Books, as they do read Chronicles, wherein is only to be conſidered the true Relation of the Hiſtory.

Lady Speaker

Moſt Grave and Wiſe Matroneſſe, I believe though none read Romances, or ſuch like Books, whoſe ground is feigned Love, and Lovers, as they read Chronicles, whoſe ground ſhould be unfeigned Truth; yet certainly, few read Romances or the like Books, either for the Wit, Fancy, Judgement or Deſcriptions, but to feed their Amorous Humours on their Amorous Diſcourſes, and to tune their Voice to their Amorous Strains of Amorous Love; for it is to be obſerved, that thoſe Books that are moſt Amorouſly penned, are moſt often read.

Exeunt.

Scene the laſt.

Enter the Academical Gentlemen; to them enters a Servant.

Man Servant

May it pleaſe your Worſhips, there is an Antient Gentlewoman that deſires to ſpeak with your Worſhips.

1 Gent

I lay my life it is one of the Matrons of the Academy.

2 Gent

Faith if the Humble Bee is flown out, the reſt of the Bees will follow.

3 Gent

I fear if they do, they will ſwarm about our Ears.

4 Gent

Yes, and ſting us with their Tongues.

5 Gent

Let us ſend for her in.

6 Gent

I will go and Uſher her in.

He goes out. Enters with the Matron; All the Gentlemen pull off their Hats.

Matron

Gentlemen, the Ladies of the Academy have ſent me unto you to know the Reaſon or Cauſe that you will not let them reſt in quiet, or suffer them to live in peace, but diſturb them in both, by a confuſed noiſe of Trum- 679Iiiiiiii2r 679 Trumpets, which you uncivilly and diſcourteouſly blow at their Grate and Gates.

1 Gent

The cauſe is, that they will not permit us to come into their Company, but have barricadoed their Gats againſt us, and have incloyſtred themſelves from us; beſides, it is a dangerous example for all the reſt of their Sex; for if all women ſhould take a toy in their heads to incloyſter themſelves, there would be none left out to breed on.

Matron

Surely it is very fit and proper that young Virgins ſhould live a retired life, both for their Education and Reputation.

2 Gent

As for their Education, it is but to learn to talk, and women can do that without teaching, for on my Conſcience, a woman was the firſt inventer of Speech; and as for their Retirement, Nature did never make them for that purpoſe, but to aſſociate themſelves with men: and ſince men are the chief Head of their kind, it were a ſign they had but very little Brain, if they would ſuffer the youngeſt and faireſt women to incloyſter themſelves.

Matron

Gentlemen pray give me leave to inform you, for I perceive you are in great Error of miſtake, for theſe Ladies have not vowed Virginity, or are they incloyſtred; for an Academy is not a Cloyſter, but a School, wherein are taught how to be good Wives when they are married.

3 Gent

But no man can come to woo them to be Wives.

Matron

No, but if they can win their Parents, or thoſe they are left in truſt with, and get their good liking and conſent, the young Ladies have learn’d ſo much Duty and Obedience, as to obey to what they ſhall think fit.

4 Gent

But we deſire the Ladies good liking, we care not for their Friends; for the approvment and good liking of their Friends, without the Love of the Ladies, will not make us happy, for there is no ſatisfaction in a ſecondary Love, as to be beloved for anothers ſake, and not for their own.

Matron

If you be Worthy Gentlemen, as I believe you all are, their Love will be due to your Merits, and your Merits will perſwade them to love you.

All the Gentlemen

Well, if you will be our Mediator, we will ſurceaſe our Clamour, otherwiſe we will increaſe our noiſe.

Matron

If you can get leave of their Parents, and Friends, I will endeavour to ſerve you, and ſhall be proud of the imployment that you ſhall be pleaſed to impoſe to my truſt and management.

Gentlemen

And we ſhall be your Servants, for your favours.

They all go out, with the Gentlemen waiting on her, with their Hats in their hands, Scraping and Congying to her.

Finis.