1 A1r 1

A Piece of a Play.

Advertiſement to the Reader.

The Reader is deſir’d to take notice, That the following Fragments are part of a Play which I did intend for my Blazing-World, and had been Printed with it, if I had finiſh’d it; but before I had ended the ſecond Act, finding that my Genius did not tend that way, I left that deſign; and now putting ſome other Comedies to the Preſs, I ſuffer this Piece of One to be publiſh’d with them.

Act I. Scene I.

Enter Sir Puppy Dogman, and Monſieur Aſs.

Sir Puppy Dogman

Monſieur Aſs, you are the only perſon in the whole World, I am ambitious to be acquainted with.

M. Aſs

I am your thrice humble ſervant, Sir Puppy.

Sir Puppy

I am informed you are the beſt drolling, A gulling, 2A1v 2 gulling, and Libel-wit in this Kingdom.

M. Aſs

I confeſs my Genius hath been happy that way.

Sir Puppy

That Genius would I learn, for it is the only Genius that is in faſhion amongſt the Mode-Wits; and it is reported, that you are the friend, and a confident to the Mode-Wits.

M. Aſs

I confeſs that I am not only a friend and a confident, but a head of the Company of the Mode- Wits.

Sir Puppy

They cannot be better headed then by an Aſſe’s head; and therefore I deſire to be one of the Company; but pray you, inform me, Monſieur Aſs, what gulling-Wit is? for I am but newly come out of the Country, and am unacquainted with the Wit of the Town.

M. Aſs

Gulling-Wit is lying Wit; and I will aſſure you, Sir, it expreſſes much fancy to make lies.

Sir Puppy

Are thoſe Poetical Fancies?

M. Aſs

Hang Poetical Fancies, for they are Pictures of Ideas in the Mind; but gulling-lies are to abuſe the Generality, by making of News, and ſeveral reports of Peace, Wars, State-affairs of great Monarchs, and their Councils, and ſo of all things, and of particular perſons.

Sir Puppy

And what is drolling and raillery Wit?

M. Aſs

That ſort of Wit is to rail of, and abuſe particular perſons, under the pretence of Jeſting.

Sir 3 A2r 3

Sir Puppy

Then what is Libel-Wit?

M. Aſs

Libel-Wit is to defame great and Noble Perſons.

Sir Puppy

Monſieur Aſs, you have infinitely obliged me with your informations, for which I ſhall be your eternal Servant.

M. Aſs

I am your Slave, Sir Puppy Dogman.

Exeunt. Enter the Lady Eagle, Lady Sparrow, Lady Titmous, Lady Woodcock, Lady Hornet, Lady Chaffer, the Lady Cricket, and Others.

Eagle

Is the Lady Phœnix come to Town?

Woodcock

No; but it is reported, that ſhe is coming to Town in ſuch ſplendor, as the World never ſaw the like.

Sparrow

Lord! how much ſplendor?

Woodcock

So much as will aſtoniſh all her Spectators.

Titmous

I cannot perceive what ſplendor ſhe can appear in to aſtoniſh all that behold her.

Eagle

I deſire if any one of the Town know her, to deſcribe her to me.

Cricket

There are many that pretend to know her, but I obſerve, they give ſuch different Characters of her, that makes me believe they do not know her?.

Eagle

Who are thoſe that pretend to know her?

Cricket

Sir Blind-Buzzard is one, and the Lady Waſp is another.

Enter 4 A2v 4 Enter Sir Blind-Buzzard and the Lady Waſp.

Eagle

You are welcome; I was ſending for you, for ’tis ſaid you two know the Lady Phœnix.

Buzzard

We never ſaw her, but we have ſeen them that have ſeen her.

Eagle

I am told, that ſhe is coming to this City in ſuch ſplendour, as the World never ſaw.

Buzzard

Your Ladiſhip is truly informed, for ſhe is clothed all with light, and the beams iſſuing from that light, makes her train many miles long, which is held up by the Planets; alſo, ſhe is perfumed with all the Spices in the East-Indies; her Chariot is made of air, in the faſhion of a Ship, and that airy Ship is gilded with the Sun; She hath numerous Attendants; thoſe that uſher her, are Blazing-Stars, and thoſe that follow her, are fiery Meteors.

Eagle

Doth the Ship hold all her Attendants?

Buzzard

Yes; for the Ship is bigger then the Great- Soveraign.

Eagle

But the Great-Soveraign cannot hold all the Planets.

Buzzard

Why, not as well as Noah’s Ark all ſorts of Beaſts?

Eagle

Of what diet is ſhe of?

Buzzard

She feeds only upon Thoughts.

Cricket

Pray, Sir Blind-Buzzard, give me leave to tell you one thing, that if her train be many miles long, no Houſe can contain the length.

Waſp. 5 B1r 5

Waſp

But ſhe hath an art to contract her beams when ſhe will.

Eagle

I deſire much to ſee this Lady.

Waſp

When you ſee her, you will all diſlike her.

Eagle

Why ſhall we all diſlike her?

Waſp

By reaſon none of the Female Sex can endure to ſee any thing fairer then themſelves.

Enter the Lady Monkey.

Eagle

Lady Monkey, did you ever ſee the Lady Phœnix?

Monkey

No, Madam, but I hearing of a wonderful Lady coming to this City, whoſe train ſpread ſo far and long, as out of one Kingdom into another, came as ſpeedily as I could to this Company to know the truth.

Buzzard

The truth is, her Train is but ſome few miles long.

Monkey

I cry you mercy, Sir Blind-Buzzard, I did not ſee you; it ſeems you know this Lady.

Buzzard

I do not know her, but I have heard of her.

Monkey

So have I, which made me come hither to know if the report was true, for all reports are not true.

Enter Monſieur Aſs.

Eagle

Monſieur Aſs , did you ever ſee the Lady Phœnix?

M. Aſs

No, but I am credibly informed, that ſhe is as proud as Lucifer, ſhe deſpiſes her Superiors, and ſcorns her Inferiors.

B Enter 6 B1v 6 Enter Sir Puppy Dogman.

M. Aſs

But Sir Puppy Dogman can inform you what ſhe is.

Puppy

What who is?

M. Aſs

The Lady Phœnix.

Sir Puppy

Hang her, for ſhe is not Company for a Dog.

Hornet

Do you know her?

Sir Puppy

No, but I have heard of her.

Enter Mr. Worm-man.

Sir Puppy

But Mr. Worm-man hath ſeen her; did you never ſee the Lady Phœnix, Mr. Worm-man?

Worm-man

No truly, I did never ſee her; but one Mrs. Dormouſe, that ſerves the Lady Leverit, is well acquainted with her, for ſhe did ſerve her.

Enter Madam Leverit, and her Maid Dormouſe.

Eagle

Madam Leverit, we are informed that your Maid Dormouſe hath ſerved the Lady Phœnix.

Dormouſe

Yes, Madam, I ſerved her many years.

Eagle

Of what Nature, Diſpoſition and Converſation is ſhe?

Dormouſe

She is of a ſtudious nature, in a retired life, ever retireing from much Company, and of a careleſs humour, not regarding what the World ſays, or doth; in Company ſhe is of a free Diſpoſition, and an airy Converſation; ſhe is civil to ſtrangers, kind to acquaintances, bountiful to her ſervants, and charitable to the poor; alſo, ſhe is humble to thoſe that are reſpectful,ſpectful, 7B2r 7 ſpectful, but ſevere to thoſe that are rude.

M. Aſs

Surely Mrs. Dormouſe, you ſlept all the time you ſerv’d her; for certainly ſhe is the proudeſt Creature alive.

Dormouſe

She may chance to ſeem proud to an Aſs, and vain to a Buzzard; but otherwiſe, ſhe is as one of her quality ought to be.

Exeunt.

Scene II.

Enter Lord Bearman, and the Lady Monkey.

Lord Bearman

Dear Lady Monkey, I come to preſent

My loving heart, without a Complement;

Let me embrace thee in my Amorous Arms,

Which makes a Circle of all loving Charms.

Monkey

Your firſt encounter is too rude and bold

To offer in your Arms me to infold.

Bearman

Yet give me leave, dear Lady, to admire,

Your agil Motions, Wit, and your Attire.

And wiſh with all my heart you may love me,

For I with heart and ſoul will ſtill love thee.

Monkey

I love a Lord, yet I would have him woo

In Courtly Language, as Lovers uſe to do;

And his Addreſs, Behaviour, Speech and Clothes

All a la mode, not a la mode his Oaths;

And 8 B2v 8

And ſuch a Lover I will entertain,

But Lovers out of faſhion I diſdain.

Bearman

I do confeſs I want thoſe rules and arts

As ſuch Men have that are nam’d Men of Parts.

But ſuch Men as theſe are not natural,

For all Mode-Gallants are artificial;

But for your ſake, I will go to Mode’s School

To learn Mode’s faſhions for to play the Fool.

Exit the Lord Bearman. Enter Sir Puppy Dogman.

Sir Puppy

Dear Lady Monkey, I am come here to play

An hour or two to paſs the time away;

To run, to skip, to dance, and ſo to woo

In lively paſtimes, as Lovers us’d to do.

Monkey

You are deceived, Mode-Lovers woo not ſo,

But cringe and creep, being afraid to go,

Or ſtir, or ſpeak, but only with eye-glances,

He to his Miſtreſs love, his heart advances;

Beſides, your Garments are to mean and baſe,

And ſuch a Lover would be a diſgrace

To a fair Lady; wherefore, come not neer,

Unleſs you like a Gallant do appear.

Sir Puppy

I will go to a Taylor for to make

Me a rich Suit for my dear Ladies ſake.

Act
9 C1r 9

Act II. Scene I.

Enter Sir Politick Fox-man, Solus.

The Lady Leverit is a rich Widow, but a dull Melancholy Lady; which humour is beſt befitting, and moſt agreeable to a ſtudious Politician; but let her humour be merry or ſad, I care not, for ’tis her Riches that I covet.

Enter Mr. Worm-man.

Fox

O dear friend, Mr. Worm-man! have you made any enquiry about the rich Widow, the Lady Leverit?

Worm-man

I have not only enquired, but I have ſpied out another Lover of hers, which is Monſieur Satyr.

Foxman

A Pox on Monſieur Satyr; but ſurely ſhe will never entertain a Satyr.

Worm-man

That may be a queſtion; for though Satyrs for the moſt part wooes in a crabed, and harſh ſtile; yet for the moſt part they are well beloved of Ladies.

Fox-man

But do you think ſhe will marry him?

Worm-man

I cannot judge, becauſe many Women, eſpecially Widows, marry, as you would marry, for Intereſt, not for Love; beſides, many Women have Lovers for their uſe, and marry Husbands for their abuſe.

Fox-man

But when I am married, I will keep her from abuſing me.

C Worm- 10 C1v 10

Worm-man

If you have that Art, it is an Art that only you, and no other man, hath as yet found out; but the beſt way is to woo her, and then wed her if you can.

Fox-man

I ſhall take your Counſel; but pray you adviſe me whether I ſhould woo her in Verſe, or in Proſe?

Worm-man

Certainly the beſt way is to woo her in Proſe; for I never heard that ever a ſubtle Politician was ever a good Poet.

Fox-man

Well, your advice, dear friend, I will follow: But let me ask your advice once more, which is, Whether I ſhall firſt preſent my affection in a Letter, before I ſpeak to her in perſon.

Worm-man

Truly, my advice is, That you ſhall ſend her a Letter; for Ladies take great delight to read Love-Letters; beſides, it proves you will be conſtant, when your affections are declared under your hand and ſeal: But why do you, a Politician, ask advice?

Fox-man

Becauſe Politicians require information; But how ſhall my Letter be delivered?

Worm-man

I am well acquainted with Mrs. Dormouſe her Maid, and I will deliver the Letter to her, and ſhe’l preſent it to her Lady.

Exit Mr. Worm-man. Enter 11 C2r 11 Enter the Lord Bear-man, all Accoutred in the mode, and all in the mode, careleſs, and with Congies.

Bear-man

Sir Politick Fox-man, my dear and obliging friend, how do I love thee! for thou art the moſt meritorious perſon in the whole World.

Fox-man

I am your Lordſhips most humble ſervant; and I wiſh it was in my power to ſerve ſo great a perſon as you are; I perceive your Lordſhip is for the Court to day, you are ſo accoutred.

Bear-man

Although I am not for the Court, yet I am for Courtſhip.

Fox-man

I perceive your Lordſhip is a Lover.

Bear-man

I ſhould be otherwiſe out of the mode; but the Ladies do ſo flock about me, ſince I have put my ſelf into the mode, and do ſo Court me, as I cannot have time to make a particular Courtſhip.

Fox-man

Your Lordſhip is a happy man.

Bear-man

Faith, if happineſs be to have the love of many Ladies, I am happy; but I have one Lady that I value and love above all the reſt, and I hope ſhe will love me now I am in the mode.

Fox-man

Surely your Lordſhip cannot be more modified then you are.

Bear-man

Not for Clothes; but I fear I have not the right Mode in behaviour and ſpeech; but I will go and viſit my Miſtreſs, and ſee if ſhe approves of me.

Exit the Lord Bear-man Enter 12 C2v 12 Enter Sir Puppy Dogman all in Mode-Accoutrements

Puppy

O Sir Politick Fox! I have a quarrel with you.

Fox-man

With me, Sir Puppy! it cannot be, for I am your vaſſal, your ſlave, and do ſtudy all the ways to ſerve you; and aſſure your ſelf you ſhall find me as faithful in all your employments, or concerns, as any friend you have.

Puppy

I cannot but believe you, if I be in the Mode, which is to be a ſelf-conceited Puppy: But prithee tell me, am I not a Mode-Gallant?

Fox-man

No doubt but you out-mode all the Gallants in the Town, as far as I ſee, in behaviour and accoutrements.

Puppy

Yes, but I am more modified then ſo; for I have been at a Coffee-houſe, and a Tavern, and have entertained a Miſtreſs, and in a ſhort time I hope I ſhall be able to brag, not only of ſeveral Lady-Miſtreſſes, but that I have the Pox.

Fox-man

Theſe modes I fear will be both chargable and unhealthful.

Puppy

They are no Moders that regard health, or expences; but I will tell you, that there is another Mode that I muſt learn, which is to defame great Ladies, not only in private diſcourſe, but in publick Lampoons, or elſe I ſhall not, when I am poor, get young Puppys like my ſelf to pay my ſcore, or for my lodging; nor ſhall I borrow one peny, neither ſhall I be cry’d up for a Wit.

Fox- 13 D1r 13

Fox-man

But theſe Modes are Modes for inferior perſons, not ſuch perſons of quality as you are.

Puppy

Nay faith, in this age there is no difference between the noble and baſe; but if there be, ’tis to the advantage of the mean and baſe perſons; but fare you well, for I muſt go to a Miſtreſs and diſſemble in Complements, and then I ſhall be an abſolute Mode-gallant; for there is no art ſo much practiſed in this age, amongſt all ſorts and degrees of men, as diſſembling.

Exit Sir Puppy Dogman.

Fox-man

Lord! Lord! what an age is this for Fools!

Enter Worm-man.

Fox-man

What makes your quick return?

Worm-man

A quick diſpatch.

Fox-man

Have you deliver’d my Letter?

Worm-man

Yes, and have brought you an anſwer. Letter.Sir Politick,I have received your affectionate Letter, and I ſhall willingly hear your Suit, and if it be reaſonable, grant your requeſt, being more then an ordinary friend and your humble Servant,S. Leverit.

Fox-man

Dear friend, this Letter is more then I could hope for, in ſo ſhort a time.

Worm-man

Now ſhe is in a wiſe humour, towards a wiſe Politician, go immediately and woo her.

Fox-man

I will take your Counſel, dear friend.

Exeunt. D Scene
14 D1v 14

Scene II.

Enter Sir Puppy Dogman to the Lady Monkey, dreſt in the Mode, and as he is coming into the Room, trims and dreſſes himſelf; then ſtands a little time, and leers about, and then creeps, cringes, and riggles his breech, and then ſpeaks.

Sir Puyppy Dogman

Lady, I ſhould have come ſooner to have ſacrificed my ſelf and all my fortunes to your ſervice; but that I had lent my Coach and ſix Horſes to a Friend.

Monkey

He was not your Friend if he kept you from your Miſtreſs.

Puppy

I confeſs I was infinitely diſpleaſed, in being hindred from the Cœleſtial proſpect of your beauty.

Enter the Lord Bear-man all dreſt in the mode, and comes boldly up to the Lady, and kiſſes her hand; Dogman frowns and grins.

Bear-man

Madam, are you for a Play? or Court? or High-Park to day? if you be, I, as the humbleſt of your Servants, will attend upon you.

Puppy

I have offer’d the Lady Monkey my Coach and ſix Horſes before you came.

Bear-man

It was your duty ſo to do; but yet my Coach and ſix Horſes is to be prefer’d before yours, being 15D2r 15 being a Lords Coach, and ſix Horſes; neither ought ſuch as you to have a Coach and ſix Horſes.

Puppy

A Gentleman is as good as a Lord; and ſo I am as good as you.

Bear-man

Go, go, and enquire of the Herauld of our Pedigrees.

Puppy

No, a Herauld cannot decide our quarrel, but this Sword ſhall maintain my honour, and decide the diſpute.

Monkey

Pray do not fight here in my houſe, to fright me with your quarrels.

Bear-man

Do not fear our fighting; but if we did not quarrel in the preſence of our Miſtreſs, we ſhould not be right in the Mode.

Puppy

But I ſhall call your Lordſhip to a ſtrict account.

Monkey

Pray be friends; for it is the Mode for many Lovers to agree, and be dear and loving friends.

Bear-man

That Mode of many Lovers is a Matrimonial Mode, as the Lovers of a Married Wife; but not the lovers of a young and virtuous Virgin.

Puppy

My Lord Bear-man tells you true; wherefore, we muſt fight.

Monkey

I deſire you, as you love me, not to fight.

Puppy

’Tis againſt the Laws of Nature, for a Bearman and a Dogman to be friends.

Monkey

Bears ſeldom aſſault the Dogs, but Dogs aſſault the Bears; and for the moſt part have the worſt; for 16D2v 16 for many Dogs are kill’d by one Bear, but ſeldom a Bear is kill’d, although aſſaulted by many Dogs at once; wherefore, I pray Sir Puppy do not fight.

Puppy

I ſhall obey you, dear Madam; and being ſo infinitely obliged, give me leave to kiſs your hand.

Kiſſes her Hand. Exit.

Bear-man

Madam, you have given a juſt cauſe both to quarrel and fight.

Monkey

Pray have patience; for ’tis the Mode amongſt Ladies to give their hand to one man, and their heart to another man.

Exeunt. Enter Mr. Worm-man, and Sir Politick Fox-man.

Worm-man

Now you have been with the rich Widow, pray tell us the ſucceſs of your Wooing, or Courtſhip?

Fox-man

Faith, I have had as good ſucceſs as I could deſire; for ſhe hath entertained me civilly, and hath promiſed me kindly to grant all my reaſonable deſires.

Worm-man

But reaſon is ſeldom regular in Lovers.

Bear-man

Yes, when in caſes of Intereſt, but not in caſes of Appetite.

Worm-man

But Appetite is for the moſt part prevalent with ignorant Virgins, but not with experienced Widows.

Enter 17 E1r 17 Enter Monſieur Satyr, leading Madam Leverit, upon which ſight Sir Politick Fox-man runs into a hole behind the Hangings, and the while Monſieur Satyr is whiſpering in the ear of Madam Leverit, and kiſſing her hand, the Fox-man peeps out, and ſhakes his head; but after theſe Lovers were out of ſight, the Fox-man comes out of his hole, and ſpeaks to the Worm-man.

Fox-man

Are they gone?

Worm-man

Yes.

Fox-man

Ill luck go with them.

Worm-man

They might have had ſome misfortune, for it was in your power to have diſturbed their Courtſhip.

Fox-man

How could have I diſturbed them?

Worm-man

Why, you might have fought with him, and have ſhew’d your valour to your Miſtreſs, and perchance have been revenged of your Rival, by killing him.

Fox-man

So I ſhould have proved my ſelf a Fool, inſtead of a Politician, for there is hazard in fight, whether to kill or be kill’d; and if I be kill’d, I ſhall be ſoon forgotten, and my enemy will have the reputation to be the more skilful, and valianter Dueller; and if I kill my oppoſite, I may loſe my eſtate; beſides, it was never heard nor known, that great and ſubtil Politicians were valiant, and ſeldom that ever any Politician did fight, were it upon neceſſity, which the greateſt Cowards will do.

E Worm-man. 18 E1v 18

Worm-man

Then Politicians will never get a Miſtreſs from a Heroick Cavalier.

Fox-man

I confeſs it were a difficult buſineſs if Politicians had not more ſubtilty to get, then valour to fight: But give me leave to tell you, That Politicians undermine Valour, as you do a tall and magnificent Tree, or a ſweet flower; wherefore, I make no queſtion but to undermine that ſweet Lady and her Cavalier.

Worm-man

I wiſh you may; but if your policy fails, you will loſe the rich Widow.

Fox-man

Never fear.

Exeunt. Enter Lady Monkey, and Squirrel her Maid, as in a viſit to the Lady Leverit.

Leverit

Lady Monkey, you have prevented me, for I was going to viſit your Ladiſhip, I only ſtay’d for Monſieur Satyr to uſher me.

Monkey

I hear Monſieur Satyr is your Servant, and that there is an intended match between you.

Lever

I deſire your advice in the choice of a Husband, for I have many Suiters, but the number confounds my Choice; wherefore I deſire your aſſiſtance, to help me in my Choice.

Monkey

I ſhall give the beſt advice I can, if you declare to me, who are your Suiters.

Lever

My Suiters are Sir Politick Fox, Monſieur Satyr, Monſieur Aſs, and Sir Puppy Dogman.

Monkey

Is Sir Puppy Dogman your Suiter?

Lever

Yes, and ſo earneſt a Suiter he is, that he will not let me reſt in quiet.

Monkey. 19 E2r 19

Monkey

It ſeems Sir Puppy Dogman is a falſe diſſembling man, for he Courts me with as many profeſſions of love, as any man in the World can do.

Squirrel

If it pleaſe your Honour, that is uſual with Mode-Gallants to Court all the Ladies they diſcourſe with, and not only the Ladies, but the Ladie’s Maids.

Monkey

Did he ever Court you?

Squirrel

As much as your Ladiſhip, for when you are out of the way, he hunts me from room to room.

Lever

I do believe Mrs. Squirrel, for I have heard my Maid Dormouſe ſay, That Monſieur Satyr would not let her ſleep in quiet.

Monkey

If Mode-Gallants be of ſuch a various humour, I will never marry a Mode-Gallant.

Squ

Then your Honour will not have a Mode-Husband.

Monkey

Why, do Mode-Husbands love Variety?

Squirrel

I know not whether they love Variety, but they Court many Women; for Mode-Husbands are for the most part Wittals, and they Court many Women to hide their diſgrace.

Lever

Mrs. Squirrel speaks true, for my Husband Sir Horn-buck, was a Wittal, and he would court all the heard of Females he met with; and the truth is, that Mode- Husbands are the beſt Husbands, by reaſon they ſuffer their Wives to be Courted.

Squ

Then ſurely Mr. Aſs will be an excellent Husband.

Monkey

I am of your opinion, Squirrel.

Lever

Then I will leave the Satyr,Foxman, and Dogman, and chuſe Monſieur Aſs.

Squir- 20 E2v 20

Squirrel

In truth Monſieur Aſs is a fine Gentleman, and is the greateſt Wit in the Town.

Enter Monſieur Aſs.

Leverit

You are welcome Monſieur Aſs, we were ſpeaking of you.

Aſs

It is an honour for me to be mentioned by fair Ladies; and if you pleaſe ſweet Ladies to let me uſher your ſplendorous Beauties to a Play, I ſhall account my ſelf the happieſt Man alive.

Monkey

Can you uſher our Beauties without our Perſons, Monſieur Aſs.

Aſs

No Madam, for your Beauties and Perſons are inſeperably joyn’d together.

Monkey

The Fates forbid that my Perſon ſhould laſt no longer then my Beauty, for then I am ſure to have but a ſhort life: But what Play is it that you would uſher us to?

Aſs

To a Mode-Play.

Monkey

Mode-Plays are all Rhime, and no reaſon, or all Action and no Wit.

Aſs

To tell you the truth Lady, I am the Author of the Play that is acted to day.

Monkey

If you be the Author, Monſieur Aſs, ſurely the Play is an excellent Play; wherefore, Lady Leverit let us go and ſee this Play, that is of Monſieur Aſs’s making.

Leverit

Content.

Exeunt.
21 E3r

The Names of the Actors of the foregoing Piece of a Play.

Lord Bear-man,

Sir Puppy Dog-man,

Both Suiters to the Lady Monkey.

Sir Politick Fox,

Monſieur Satyr,

Both Suiters to the Lady Levireerit.

Mr. Worm-man, A Friend to Sir Politick Fox.

Monſieur Aſs, A Libel-maker.

Sir Blind-Buzzard A Gamſter, and a Servant to Ladies.

The Lady Eagle, and many other Ladies;

as Lady Woodcock,

Sparrow,

Titmouſe,

Chaffer, and others;

The Lady Monkey,

Mrs. Squirrelher Maid.

Lady Levireerit.

Mrs. Dormouſeher Maid.

The following Names were fitted for a Farſe, intended to have been after the Play in the Blazing-World; But the Play being never finiſh’d, for the Reaſons mention’d in the Front of the Piece of that Play; The Farſe was not ſo much as begun.

Cobweb Spider, A Weaver.

Eagle Flyman, A Piper, a Lover to Spider’s Wife.

Dig Worm-man, A Miner for Mettal.

Fiſh Glide-man, A Diver.

Gib Cat-man, One of the Watch.

Mode Owle, A night Reveller.

Goodwife Silkworm, A Spinſtreſs.

Goodwife Spider. Cobweb Spider’s Wife.

Madam Bat. Mode Owle’s Curtizan.