i a1r ii a1v iii A1r

Malice Defeated:

Or a Brief Relation of the Accuſation and Deliverance of
Elizabeth Cellier,

Wherein her Proceedings both before and during
her Confinement, are particularly Related,
and the Myſtery of the Meal-Tub fully
diſcovered.


Together withan Abſtract of her Arraignment
and Tryal, written by her ſelf, for the ſatisfaction
of all Lovers of undiſguiſed Truth.

An oval containing a mound of earth supporting a standing cross with an anchor around it and a bird holding a branch atop. Running laterally through the middle of the oval is the phrase I never chaing with a cross below it. Around the oval forming its border is the Latin dat veniam corvuis vexat censura columbuas.

I never chaing

dat veniam corvuis vexat censura columbuas

Pſal.35.11.12 Falſe witneſſes did riſe up againſt me, they laid to my charge things that I knew not. They rewarded me Evil for Good, to the ſpoiling of my Soul.
Pſal.7.14.16. Behold he Travelleth with Iniquity, and conceived Miſchief, and brought forth Falſehood. His Miſchief ſhall return upon his own Head, and his violent Dealing ſhall come down upon his own Pate.

London, printed for Elizabeth Cellier, and are to be ſold at
her Houſe in Arundel-ſtreet near St.Saint Clements Church, 16801680.

iv A1v
1 A2r 1

Malice Defeated: Or a Brief Relation of the Accuſation and Deliverance Of Elizabeth Cellier.

Ihope it will not ſeem ſtrange to any Honeſt and Loyal Perſon, of what way or Religion ſoever, that I being born and bred up under Proteſtant Parents, ſhould now openly profeſs my ſelf of another Church.

For my Education being in thoſe times, when my own Parents and Relations, for their Conſtant and Faithful Affection to the King and Royal Family, were perſecuted, the King himſelf Murthered, the Biſhops and Church deſtroyed, the whole Loyal Party meerly for being ſo, oppreſt and ruined; and all as was pretended by the Authors of theſe Villanies, for their being Papiſts and Idolaters, the conſtant Character given by them to the King and his Friends to make them odious, they aſſuming to themſelves only the Name of Proteſtants, making that the Glorious Title by which they pretended Right to all things.

Theſe ſort of Proceedings, as I grew in underſtanding, produced in me more and more horrour of the Party that committed them, and put me on Inquiry into that Religion, to which they pretended the greateſt Antipathy, wherein I thank God, I found my Innate Loyalty, not only confirm’d, but encourag’d; and let Calumny ſay what it will, I never heard from any Papiſt, as they call them, Prieſt nor Lay-man, but that they and I, and all true Catholicks, owe our Lives to the defence of our Lawful King, which our preſent Sovereign Charles the Second is, whom God long and happily preſerve ſo.

Theſe ſorts of Doctrines agreeing to my Publick Morals, and no way as ever I was taught, contradicting my Private ones, commending at the ſame time to me, Charity and Devotion, I without any ſcruple, have hitherto followed, glorying to my ſelf to be in Communion with thoſe who were the humble Inſtruments of His Majeſties happy Preſervation, from the fatal Battel at Worceſter, and whom though poor, no Temptation could envite, to betray him to thoſe, who, by a pretended Proteſtant Principle, ſought his Innocent Blood.

Theſe Truths I hope, may ſatisfie any indifferent perſon in my firſt Change, nor can they wonder at my continuance therein, notwithſtanding the Horrid Crimes of Treaſon and Murther laid to the Charge of ſome A2 perſons 2 A2v 2 perſons conſiderable, for their Quality and Fortunes in that Party.

For when I reflected who were the Witneſſes, and what unlikely things they depoſed and obſerved, that many of the chiefeſt Sticklers for the Plot, were thoſe, or the Sons of thoſe, that acted the principal parts in the laſt Tragedy, which Hiſtory told me too, had the Prologue of a pretended Popiſh Plot.

I ſay, theſe things made me doubtful of the whole; and the more I ſearch’d for Truth, the more I doubted that the old Enemies of the Crown were again at work for its deſtruction.

I being fully confirm’d in this, thought it my duty through all ſorts of hazards to relieve the poor impriſon’d Catholicks, who in great numbers were lock’d up in Goals, ſtarving for want of Bread; and this I did ſome Months before I ever ſaw the Counteſs of Powis, or any of thoſe Honourable perſons that were accuſed, or receiving one penny of their money directly or indirectly, till about the latter end of 1678-01January (78.) the Priſoners increaſing very much, and being in great wants, I went at the requeſt of Captain Pugh then in priſon, with his Letter to her Ladyſhip, to make known their condition, and alſo to ſhew her a Letter written by Titus Oats his own hand, being

A Narrative

Of Oates and Beddo’s Acquaintance in Spain, and how Beddo under the Name of the Lord Gerrard, robb’d Oates of ten pieces of Eight, which he ſaid was all he had, and had quite undone him. And alſo, how Beddo cheated Maſter Francklyn the Merchant at Bilbo, of three hundred Doubloons, at 18 s. per Doubloon, and in his way to Bruges, robb’d a poor Prieſt of four Royals, which he ſays, is about Eight pence Engliſh, and cruelly beat him becauſe he had no more money, and after that, the ſame day, robb’d a poor Franciſcan Fryar of his Bread and Cheeſe, and that there were Writs out in the nature of an Hue and Cry to take him; and that the ſaid Oates, though quite ruined by the loſs of his money, yet was not half ſo much griev’d at it, as for the diſhonour that was thereby done to the whole Engliſh Nation.

This Letter was read before the King and Council the laſt time Maſter Medbron was brought thither, and by him delivered to his Grace the Duke of Lautherdale, in whoſe hand it ſtill remains.

I alſo gave her Ladyſhip an account, that the moſt part of the foregoing year, Beddo lay priſoner in the Common ſide in the Marſhalſeas, and was fed out of the Alms-basket, having ſold his Linnen and other neceſſaries to the Sutler for Bread and Drink.

After this her Ladyſhip taking the diſtreſſed condition of the Priſoners into her Conſideration, through her pious and charitable Endeavours, there was a weakly Charity collected, of which I had the diſpoſing, but was ſo far from the diverting any part thereof, that I ſtill went out of Purſe, of which truth, both the Priſoners and others have been very ſenſible ſince my Impriſonment.

About this time I went daily to the Priſons, to perform thoſe Offices of Charity I was obliged to. And on Thurſday, 1678-01-09January the 9th (78.) I Din’d in Newgate, in the Room called the Caſtle on the Maſters Side Debtors, 3 B1r 3 Debtors, and about four in the Afternoon, I came down into the Lodge with five Women, of which, three were Proteſtants, and we all heard Terrible Grones and Squeeks which came out of the Dungeon, call’d the Condemn’d hole. I asked Harris the Turnkey, what doleful Cry it was, he ſaid, it was a Woman in Labour. I bid him put us into the Room to her, and we would help her, but he drove us away very rudely, both out of the Lodge, and from the Door; we went behind the Gate, and there liſſened, and ſoon found that it was the voice of a ſtrong man in Torture, and heard, as we thought, between his Groans, the winding up of ſome Engine: theſe Cries, ſtop’d the Paſſengers under the Gate, and we ſix went to the Turners Shop without the Gate, and ſtood there amazed with the Horror and Dread of what we heard; when one of the Officers of the Priſon came out in great haſte, ſeeming to run from the Noiſe,

One of us catcht hold of him, ſaying, Oh! What are they doing in the Priſon.

Officer.

I dare not tell you.

Miſtris.

It’s a Man upon the Rack, Ile lay my Life on’t.

Officer.

It is ſomething like it.

Cellier.

Who is it Prance?

Officer.

Pray Madam do not ask me, for I dare not tell ye, but it is that I am not able to hear any longer: Pray let me go,

with that he run away toward Holborn as faſt as he could.

We heard theſe Groans perfectly to the end of the Old-Baley, they continued till near ſeven of the Clock, and then a perſon in the Habit of a Miniſter, of middle Stature, gray hair’d, accompanied with two other men, went into the Lodge, the Priſoners were lock’d up, and the outward door of the Lodge alſo, at which I ſet a perſon to ſtand, and obſerve what ſhe could; and a Priſoner loaded with Irons, was brought into the Lodge and examin’d a long time, and the Priſoners that came down as low as they could, heard the perſon examin’d with great Vehemency, ſay often, I know nothing of it, I’m Innocent: he forc’d me to belye my ſelf, What would you have me ſay? Will you murther me becauſe I will not belye my ſelf and others?

Several other ſuch like Expreſſions they heard ſpoken as by one in great Agoney. About four of the Clock the next morning, the Priſoners that lay in a place above the Hole, heard the ſame Cry again two hours, and on Saturday Morning again, and about eight a Clock that morning a perſon I employ’d to ſpy out the Truth of the Affair, did ſee the Turn-keys carrying a Bed into the Hole, ſhe asked who it was for, they told her it was for Prance, who was gone Mad, and had tore his bed in pieces. That Night the Examiners came again, and after an hours Conference, Prance was led away to the Preſs-yard: This, and many things of the like Nature, made me very Inquiſitive to know what paſs’d in the Priſon.

Soon after this, Francis Corral a Coach-man, that had been put into Newgate, upon Suſpition of carrying away Sir Edmund-bury-Godfrey’s body and lay there 13 weeks and three days in great Miſery, got out, I went to ſee him, and found him a ſad Spectacle, having the Fleſh worn away, and great Holes in both his Legs, by the weight of his Irons. And having been Chain’d ſo long double, that he could not ſtand upright; he told me much of his hard and cruel Uſage, as that he had been ſqueez’d and haſped into B a thing 4 B1v 4 a thing like a Trough in a Dungeon under ground; which put him to inexpreſſible Torment, inſomuch tha he ſoonded, and that a perſon in the Habit of a Miniſter, ſtood by all the while. That a Duke beat him, pull’d him by the Hair, and ſet his drawn Sword to his Breaſt three times, and ſwore he would run him through; and another great Lord, laid down a heap of Gold, and told him it was five hundred pounds, and that he ſhould have it all, and be taken into the aforeſaid Duke’s Houſe, if he would confeſs what they would have him; and one F. a Vinter, that lives at the Sign of the half-moon in Ch-ſi, by whoſe Comtrivance he was accus’d, took him aſide, and bid him name ſome Perſon, and ſay, they imploy’d him to take up the dead body in Somerſet-yard, and gave him money for ſo doing; that if he would do this, both F. and he, ſhould have money enough. He alſo told me, that he was kept from Thurſday till Sunday without Victuals or Drink, having his hands every Night chain’d behind him, and being all this time lock’d to a Staple which was driven into the Floor, with a Chain not above a Yard long, that in this great Extremity, was forc’d to drink his own Water; and that the Jaylor beat his Wife, becauſe ſhe brought Victuals, and prayed that he might have it, and threw Milk on the Ground, and bid her be gone, and not look at him, &c. For the Readers further Satiſfaction of his great and cruel Sufferings, I refer to the Party himſelf now living in Gunpowder-alley in Shoe-lane, and well known by his Misfortunes.

After this, hearing that Mary White had been much abus’d, and though big with Child, ſeveral ways tortur’d in the Priſon, and lay only for want of her Fees, I paid them, hoping to find out the Truth by that means, ſhe told me of many Cruelties that were daily uſed in the Goal, and that there was a perſon there that by Misfortune had been catch’d in the Company of Coyners, and though wholly innocent, had been cruelly uſed, becauſe, as ſhe ſaid, he was a Catholick, and for a week together had worn a pair of Sheers that weighed forty pound, becauſe he would not go up to the Chappel. That this perſon had made it his Buſineſs to inſpect the Uſage of the Priſoners, and had drawn up Articles againſt the Keepers.

About the 1679-04-10tenth of April (79) I went to the Grate at Newgate, to ſpeak with him, he was in Irons and Raggs, and ſaid his name was Willoughby, and that he was Nephew to a perſon of Quality I knew of that name; And with great bemoanings told me that being juſt come from Flanders, he was lodg’d by Chance in a houſe where Coiners lodg’d; he was taken among them on Suſpition, and though aquitted at the Seſſions, yet the Diſgrace had ſo diſpleas’d his Uncle, that he would do nothing for him, and he having no Parents nor Friends, was in great Danger of periſhing there, and in very humble and religious words begg’d my Charity, and gave me the following

Articles 5 B2r 5

A Briefe Account of the Tyrannical Barbariſme inflicted on the Kings Priſoners in His Majeſties Goal of Newgate.

Mary Middleton. Suſan Wallice. T.Thomas Willoughby. The detaining of Priſoners for Fees without limitation, and may till Death yield more favour than a ſtupified Jaylor, and all this after they have taken the benefit of his Majeſties Moſt Gracious Free Pardon.

Mary White. Mary Middleton. John Whitehand. Robert Ball. James Douglas. T.Thomas Willoughby. The taking 3 s. 6 d.per week for Lodging when the Statute allows but 2 d. per night or thereabouts, which if not paid, the perſons indebted muſt immediately to the Common-ſide, and there be detained (as many have been) till they are ſtarved, notwithſtanding their being acquitted by Proclamation in open Court.

The ſhackling and lading of all perſons committed with Irons, whoſe John Whitehand. Mary White. John Player. Tho.Thomas Willoughby. weight is without pity (from the Jaylor) to the intent they ſhould give Sums of Money to purchaſe particular eaſe, which all perſons cannot do, and thoſe (of all) are moſt miſerable.

The mercenary Intrigues of the Jaylor, which are beyond the thoughts of Chriſtians, are thus, when any Proſecutor comes to view a priſoner in cuſtody, William Leigh. Anne Sutton. Tho.Thomas Willoughby. and knows him to be the perſon for whom he ſought, the priſoner is by the Jaylor forthwith ſent for, who queſtions his ability, and if he finds ſufficient to ſatisfie his Avarice, he promiſes to ſecure him with Life againſt Juſtice, by vertue of his Intereſt in the Recorder, but if poor, joyns with the Proſecutor to the ſame intent, either to the hazard of the Priſoners life, or at leaſt a tedious Confinement.

Judeth Collinſon. Elizabeth Evans. Mary Porter Tho.Thomas Willoughby. The unlegal deteining of another ſort of perſons which have pleaded His Majeſties Pardon of Tranſportation, and accoring to the form thereof have given in Bail to Tranſport themſelves in 8 months, which is the time limited in the ſaid Pardon, which perſons, notwithſtanding their being bail’d, Mary White, and others. are ſtill deteined, and often till the time be expired, which makes the Jaylors Market with the Merchant, and inſlaves the perſons, or at leaſt creates Vice inſtead of Reformation, and converts the Money to his own Uſe.

Jane Middleton. Mary White. Charles Parker. T.W.Thomas Willoughby The debarring Priſoners liberty of Conſcience, and compelling them to go 3 or 4 pairs of Stairs to Chappel, (as the Jaylor calls it) but as it will otherwiſe appear to be ſeen by Strangers, (through Grates like the Lions at the Tower) who give money to the Jaylor for the ſame, which perſons are ſo ſeverly tortured, that it is not to be thought, and that with ſuch Irons To this part T.W.Thomas Willoughby only. as (in Jaylors language) are called Shears, which are in weight 40 or 50 l.pound and a yard in length, with one Legg fixed at one end, and the other at the other end, which barbarous Engine produces ſuch Torture, that the perſons on ſmooth ground can move but 3 or 4 inches at a time, this is his pretence to ſecure his Priſoners.

Jane Middleton. Magdalen Clench. Joſ.Joseph Mallorey. T.W.Thomas Willoughby The putting of perſons which are Debtors to the Crown, in the place he uſed to ſecure Condemned Priſoners, and that for not writing this following Superſcription on a Letter (To the Worſhipful William Richardſon Eſquire 6 B2v 6 Eſquire) there to be laden with Bolts, and continued without food or ſuſtenance during the worſhipful Jaylors pleaſure.

John Whitehand. Mrs. Whitehand. Elizab.Elizabeth Golding. T.W.Thomas Willoughby The ſeparating a Wife from her Huſband, and all manner of Friends and Relations, as well from ſick perſons as others, which they do to compel ſuch perſons as are deſirous to ſee their Friends, to give money before they be admitted.

That all perſons whatſoever are carefully ſearched, as they come in, leſt they ſhould bring in ſuch goods or proviſions, as are by his Worſhip T.W.Thomas Willoughby only to this. prohibited. And that he takes care with his Subbs, to be very diligent in ſuch ſearch, for the better creating a Vend for his own Goods, which are ſo bad, that it oftentimes breeds Diſtempers, and ſo ſmall a quantity for money, that unleſs Priſoners are more than well ſtored with money, poverty ſtrikes in, to their great detriment.

Mary White. Jane Middleton. Joſeph Mallorey. John Whitehand. T.W.Thomas Willoughby That about the 8th. of March laſt, a perſon whoſe name was Robert Thompſon died, and is to be apparently made out, that it was for want of Food, as his Corps alſo ſignifies, which was an abſolute Skeleton, and that within the ſpace of 24 hours Contr. for. Stat. the Jaylor diſpoſes of him as he thought moſt fit, and that without any Coroner to enquire of his Death, and to give an account of the ſaid Subject to our Sovereign Lord the King, ;c.

That the Jaylor ordered his Subbs to Puniſh or privately Torture with Dorothy Ramſey. Thumb-ſcrues, the perſon of Dorothy Ramſey, to the intent ſhe ſhould diſcover the manner of Owen Hurſts eſcape, who was her Huſband.

William Leigh. Jane Middleton. John Zeal. T.W.Thomas Willoughby The Jaylors Extortion on the Kings Priſoners, after his Majeſty has of his Bounty and Goodneſs extended his gracious free Pardon, comes to the Priſoners inſerted therein (the ſaid Pardon Signed and Sealed) and tells, if they, or as many as can, will raiſe ſuch a certain Sum, he will aſſure them a Pardon, others which cannot, are by his baſe jugling left only as Convicts for Tranſportation, and that for want of Money; thus are the Laws of the Realm, and his Majeſties pleaſure to his poor Subjects, violated, and to make the Jaylors Market, which is as uſual with him, as with our moſt Clement Prince to extend his Mercy.

The cloſe Confinement of Priſoners without Relief or Suſtenance, as Mary White the Midwife. Several Priſoners. and others. particularly one Mary White, who for the ſpace of ſeven weeks, was cloſe confined from all Converſation, as well of Huſband, as other near Relations; and not only burthened with exceſſive Irons on both Leggs, but for two days together, kept from any Victuals or other Suſtenance; and after this, was by the Jaylors order, removed to a Room called the Condemn’d Room, and there for ſix weeks more kept with the Irons on her Leggs, and though big with Child to the Jaylors certain knowledge, yet did he cauſe her to be put in the Bilboes, and bolted her hands down to the Ground with Staples of a great bigneſs; by which inhumane and immoderate torments, ſhe was ſo afflicted, that her Child died ſoon after it was born, occaſioned, as Oath will be made by the uſage aforeſaid; and this done meerly to enforce her to accuſe her ſelf and others of Crimes they imagined her and them guilty of.

That about a year ſince was in cuſtody, as a Convict for Tranſportation, one Elizabeth Evans, who had given in Bail to the Recorder to Tranſport her ſelf, according to the form of the Pardon, but was ſo indebted to the Jaylor, 7 C1r 7 Gaol, as he pretended, that ſhe could not raiſe moneys for the ſame, where upon Richardſon ſends for the ſaid Evans, and often requeſted her to refer her ſelf to him, (to the end he might make good his Market with the Merchant) which ſhe did, but when he brought a Maſter of a Veſſel to take the ſaid Evans away, ſhe refuſed to go, and told the Gaoler, he promiſed to give her the Fees and turn her out; but that now ſhe did perceive ’twas only to expoſe her to Sale, which ſhe would not conſent to, upon which refuſal, the Jaylor forthwith ordered her to the Condemn’d Room, there to be double Iron’d, and kept without ſuſtenance, or any converſe, till his farther Order, which came not in two days, then he himſelf examined her again, whether ſhe would conſent, but ſhe refuſed, and then the Jaylor thought fit to employ ſome other Engines of his Tyranny, amongſt which, was a certain thing (by him called a Cap of Maintenance,) which was fixed to her head with a thing like the Rowel of a Spur, being put into her Mouth, cleaves to the Roof with ſuch extream Torture, that is not to be expreſt; this the Woman endured ſeveral times, till at laſt, by making her Addreſs to ſome good people, and telling the manner of her uſage, they did contribute to the Gaolers demands, and ſo ſhe with great difficulty obtained her Liberty.

Jane Voſs. That the Jaylor has ſuffer’d perſons after a Commitment, to go forth with The Jaylors own Entries in his Book of Commitments for the 7th Month in the year 16671667. a Keeper and Steal, to the intent of ſatisfying his Avarice: upon which the ſaid Priſoner was taken, and the ſecond time committed without any diſcharge from the firſt Commitment.

The Perſons whoſe Names are on the Margent, either are or have been Sufferers in this, or ſome part of this kind, which may be eaſily produced to give Teſtimony according to the Truth, and no more.

These Articles were put into Parliament that April, and they with the Priſoners Caſe, were referr’d to the Judges, where they ſtill remain; and the poor Priſoners are yet in hopes, that their Honours will find a time to Examine both, ſome there affirming, that there have been many more cruel things acted in that Manſion of Horror, as the Story they tell of one Captain Clarke, who being Priſoner only for Debt, was lock’d up in a little dark hole two days and two Nights, having no other company but the Quarters of two Executed perſons, the extream ſtench of which had perhaps kill’d him, had he not took the miſerable relief of holding a foul Chamber-Pot to his Noſe.

Upon my receipt of the Articles, I gave Willoughby two ſhillings ſix pence, for which he was very thankful, ſaying, He had eaten nothing in two dayes; and upon his frequent ſolicitations for Relief, I did ſend him at ſeveral times, whilſt he was in Newgate, ſixteen ſhillings, and no more, till the day he went out, and then I ſent him money to pay his Fees by my Maid Margaret Jenkins, and did pay ſixteen ſhillings by her hand to fetch his Coat out of Pawn.

And about that time, having been told by Mr. Kemiſh, then Priſoner in the Kings-Bench, that William Stroud there Priſoner, pretended to know much of the Plot, and had Papers in his Cuſtody, that would proved Beddo’s actions to be Villany, and a Letter of Beddo’s own hand-writing, expreſſing he knew no more of the Plot, but what he had from his old acquaintanceC tance 8C1v 8 tance Mr. Oates; nor did he ever ſee Sir Edmundbury Godfrey alive or dead, and that it was very eaſie for him the ſaid Stroud, to be inſtructed, and become the Kings Evidence, if he were willing.

A Copy of this Letter Stroud gave to Mr. Keymiſh, and I received it from him, he ſaying moreover, That Stroud told him, that the Earl of S. was inſtructing of him, and ſetting him up for a new Evidence, and in order to it, did daily ſend one Johnſon a Servant of his Lordſhips, to meet him in the Lodge, as many perſons are ready to teſtifie upon Oath; and that the ſaid Johnson frequently brought him money, with promiſes of Pardon for the Murther he was then Condemn’d for, and promiſed him Great Preferments if he would ſwear ſtoutly what he ſhould be inſtructed in; but that the ſaid Stroud ſaid, he would not Forſwear himſelf for all the world, but when he was Sworn for a Witneſs, he would tell the Truth, and diſcover all Beddo’s Villany.

I believing this to be meer Roguery, invented to inſnare Mr. Keymiſh and Mr. Anderſon, did pay Willoughbys alias Dangerfields Fees in Newgate, intending to ſet him upon the diſcovery of it, and he being at that Inſtant arreſted, I removed him by Habeas-Corpus to the Kings Bench, and ſent my Maid Margaret to him to bid him get acquainted with Stroud, and uſe his utmoſt Endeavour to obtain a ſight of the Papers, and find out the truth of the tranſactions betwen the Earl of S――; and Stroud. Willoughby then acknowledged that he had been a Criminal, but expreſt much ſorrow for his paſt Crimes, and made great proteſtations of future Amendment, ſaying, that Stroud and he had been long acquainted, and that they often had been a Robbing together, and he doubted not to Effect what I deſired. And in order to it, would keep him company, and every day ſet down what he could get out of him.

On the 12th of May he was carried to the Bench, and on the 20th ſent me this following account of that affair by Margaret Jenkins.

May the 13th, Stroud did acquaint me, that about 15 years ſince he knew Bedlow, who was then ſervant to Alderman Blackwel of Briſtol, and was ſo Poor, he had ſcarce Shooes and Stockings to his Feet; but Strode denyes he ever ſee Bedlow ſince, till he and Oates came to the Kings- Bench to view the Priſoners, and once ſince that Mr. Bedlow came with his Brother, who was the night after wounded. He denies the holding of any correſpondence with Mr. Bedlow either by Letter or otherwiſe, but ſayes that one Philip Marſh (who is either a friend or Servant to Mr. Bedlow (is his friend) that is to ſay, Strodes friend) and that they ſaid Philip Marſh had often ſent Letters to Strode, in which Letters it has been deſired that the anſwers thereto ſhould be left at Bedlows lodging; but the Contents of the ſaid Letters either were not worth while to repeat, or he was unwilling ſo to do.

1679-05-14May the 14. 1679. Strode told me this day, that Bedlows occaſion of giving him Money was to the intent he ſhould conceal ſomething he knew of Bedlow, which if diſcovered, would be of conſequence enough to hang him, if proſecuted on the ſame; and the ſums which Bedlow ſent him were the greater, for that Strode ſhould take particular notice of the behaviour of the Prieſts which are here, and who they did correſpond with; which Strode has done, and has ſent ſome to follow divers perſons which hav 9 C2r 9 have come to Mr. Anderſon, which perſons and their abodes, are as Strode ſayes, well enough known, and hereupon ſwore Damn his ſoul, if they ſhould not be better known if ever he could obtain his liberty.

May the 15. Strode acquainted me, that either his buſineſs was either paſt, or in great probability ſo to be; and when he could get his enlargement, there were ſome in the world ſhould ſoon feel the effects of his fury: But amongſt the reſt, Mr. Anderſon, who as Strode ſaid, was very uncertain of ever being ſo near his liberty; but if there be ever any probability for Anderſons liberty, Strode makes no doubt but to prevent the ſame. By this I find Strodes thoughts to be laden with venome (as having been thwarted in his temper by ſome of the Catholicks) and to his power he deſigns a Revenge on them, but for what I know not.

May the 16. Strode did this day acquaint me, that his wife had in a Cabinet at home in the Country, the original papers which concerned Mr. Bedlow, and when he can be at liberty to go home, he will be very brisk in expoſing the ſaid matters contained in the ſaid papers to a publick view; but whileſt he remains in cuſtody, he will not impart the ſaid matters to any perſon whatſoever, for that he will not bring himſelf under Mr. Bedlows Laſh.

May the 17. Strode did tell me, that one Mr. Johnson (a Servant to the Right Honourable Earl of Shaftsbury) did often come to viſit him, and bring him Guinneyes, in order to the prevailing with him for to joyn Evidence with Bedlow: but Strodes anſwer was (as he informed me) that he would not perjure himſelf for Ten thouſand worlds.

May the 18. Jones (Strodes Bedfellow) did inform me, that he had this day ſeen in Strodes hands ſome papers which did contain the whole matter of the Popiſh Plott, in a more plain manner than either Oats or Bedlow could make out.

And that the Earl of Shafsbury’s ſervant (whoſe Name was Mr. Johnson) came often to Strode, to Court him to give his Teſtimony againſt the Lords in the Tower, and had offered Strode moſt conſiderable ſums of money if he would do the ſame.

May the 19. Jones did tell me, Strode had in ſome diſcourſe informed him, that Bedlow in the time of his Padding was entertained at Strodes houſe, and particularly when there had been a Robbery committed but a day before, and at the ſame time a Hue and Cry was all over the Country to apprehend him: And that is not long ſince that Strode ſent to his wife at Shepton Mallet in the County of Somerſet, for the Copies of ſome Writings which were in her Cuſtody, which ſaid writings are the original of thoſe he ſhewed Jones.

May the 20. Jones ſayes, Strode had often prayed his advice what to do in a matter of ſuch weighty Conſqeuence as was to be made out from the aforeſaid papers: Jones anſwered him, that in regard he was in Reverſion of a good Eſtate, and had divers good and honourable Relations to ſupport him, it would perhaps be much more both for his Credit and advantage to be ſilent in things of ſuch a nature than to ſtir, unleſs he could made every particular thereof viſible by a lively Teſtimony. Upon which Advice Strode did promiſe to let it fall, rather than run the hazard of diſobliging his Relations and Friends, and become altogether obnoxious.

C2 The 10 C2v 10

The foregoing informations, written by Willoughby’s own hand, were found between the Pewter in my Kitchin by Sir William Waller, when he ſearch’d my Houſe, and by him Carry’d before the Lords of the Council; and as the Father of Lyes did once tell truth, ſo he had inſerted this one truth in his lying Narative. But ſince it is the reward of Lyers, not to be believ’d when they do tell truth: That he may be Credited this once, I Print the Copies of the four following Depoſitions, which with many more I have to the ſame purpoſe, do all confirm it.

Thomas Hill Gentleman maketh Oath, That William Stroud, Confederate with Thomas Dangerfield, did about June or July 1679(79) very much Importune this Deponent to Joyne with him, the ſaid Stroud, Oates and Bedlow, to be the Kings Evidence, and to ſwear that the Queen and their Royal Highneſſes, the Duke and Ducheſs of York, and the Lords in the Tower, were Traytors, and Guilty of the Plot; and the ſaid Stroud told this Deponent, that it ſhould be worth two or three Thouſand Pound to him, and his Liberty for ſo doing; and the ſaid Stroud told this Deponent and ſeveral others, that the Earl of Shaftsbury ſent him what money he would ſpend for the Carrying on of the Plot againſt the Duke and Lords in the Tower: And that his Lordſhip ſent a ſervant of his, called Mr. Johnſon, to the ſaid Stroud very often to Incourage and Drink with the ſaid Stroud in the Lodge, and gave him money, as the ſaid Stroud told me. There alſo came a Steward of his Lordſhips, called Mr. Stringer and Mr. Edward Stroud, to hear what the ſaid Stroud would ſwear againſt the Duke and the Lords in the Tower before his Lordſhip would procure the ſaid Strouds Pardon: Since then, the ſaid Stroud hath made Affidavit to the ſame purpoſe, where he nameth his Royal Highneſs and the Dutcheſs; and his Confederate Dangerfield got an order to bring this Deponent before Stephen Harvy and Thomas Foſter EſqEsquire; his Majeſties Juſtices of the Peace, about the 1679-12-099th of December (79) to come and take an Affidavit of this Deponent, ſaying, the ſame would much corroborate the Evidence the ſaid Dangerfield had given concerning the Plot, and what the ſaid Stroud had Depoſed alſo, and that the ſaid Dangerfield in purſuance thereof, did urge and perſwade this Deponent to ſwear to the ſaid Strouds Affadavit, and would not let this Deponent read the ſaid Strouds Affidavit; but the ſaid Dangerfield did both read the ſaid Strouds Affadavit, and alſo write what this Deponent ſaid, but he omitted reading that which concern’d the Duke and Dutcheſs of York, and ſo thought to put a trick upon this Deponent, and bring him in as an Evidence againſt them, but that Juſtice Foſter did eſpie it, and ask’d this Deponent concerning the particulars relating to the Duke and Dutcheſs, and then this Deponent truly ſwore he never heard their Names ſo much as mentioned concerning the Plot. Since that, the ſaid Dangerfield hath ſet out a Narrative where he mentions this Deponents Name in ſeveral particulars, which is very falſe; he hath alſo ſworn againſt Mr. Anderſon in his tryal, where he mentions this Deponents Name to that which is very falſe. The 30th of January or thereabouts, William Stroud came to the Kings-Bench and told this Deponent before another Gentleman, that if he had joyn’d with him, Dangerfield, Oates and Bedlow, in giving in his Evidence againſt the Queen, Duke and Dutcheſs, and Lords in the Tower, he had been free from all his Troubles, and His Debts paid; but ſince he did not do it, he ſhould 11 D1r 11 ſhould ſuffer Impriſonment all his life, and in a worſe Place; and that very night this Deponent was lock’d up in a little hole under Ground, and hath ever ſince been much oppreſt; and further this Deponent ſaith, he hath been very much perſwaded not to appear at Mrs. Celliers tryal, and ſeveral have uſed means to the contrary, but this Deponent being Subpoena’d thereunto, is obliged to ſatisfie the truth therein, and will ſwear this Affidavit before a Judge, and carry it into Court, it being a Brief of what he hath already ſworn before Sir George Jeffreys. Signed by Tho.Thomas Hill.

1680-06-10June the 10th (80) The above named Thomas Hill further Depoſeth, that upon a Sunday in the Afternoon, a Steward of the Earl of Shaftsburys, who did then live in Alderſgate-ſtreet (as William Stroud told me) and one Mr. Edward Stroud an Attorney in Lincolns Inn, came to the Kings-Bench to take the examination of Mr. William Stroud then a Priſoner, and after they had been lock’d in a Chamber about two hours, they ſent for me, to ask me ſome Queſtions relating to what the Priſoner had been Examin’d to, but I not anſwering their expectation, we parted. And after my Lords Steward and Mr. Edward Stroud was gone, I asked the Priſoner Mr. William Stroud, how he could carry it ſo fairly with Mr. Anderſon, when I knew he had given in Articles againſt him; he told me, he durſt do no otherwiſe than what he did, becauſe if he did not do it, the Earl of Shaftsbury would not get him his Pardon out, he being under a Reprieve for Murther at that time. Tho.Thomas Hill

The 1679-07-1414th of July (79) I Ann Moſely do teſtifie, that I have heard William Stroud often ſay, that he could hang Bedlow if he would, and that he was maintained by my Lord Shaftsbury, to come and Evidence againſt the Lords in the Tower: That Johnſon my Lord Shaftsburys Man, threatned him from my Lord Shaftsbury, that his Pardon ſhould be obſtructed, if he did not joyn evidence with Bedlow againſt the Lords, although he ſaid, if he were ſubpoena’d in, as infallibly he ſhould, he would then declare my Lord Shaftsburys proceedings with him. Other times I have heard him ſwear, that being ſo importuned from my Lord Shaftsbury, by his man Johnſon, he was now reſolved to ſtick at nothing, nay for an hundred Pound, he would ſacrifice his own Father and Mother. As for Mr. Anderſon, I do believe that what he alledges againſt him, as offering him five hundred Guinneys, is falſe, for to my knowledge, he always ſhunned him as a Devil, knowing him from his firſt Impriſonment to be a great Rogue; but Mr. Anderſon being an abſtimous melancholy man, drank nothing but ſmall Beer, which Strode after a Debauch always Coveted, threatning, that he would hang him if he denied him; this I have often heard Strode ſwear: I have often ſeen Johnſon, and been in his Company with Strode, as alſo ſeen monys which Johnſon and Bedlow gave him, to all this I am ready to ſwear, which I gave Mr. Bedlow notice D of 12 D1v 12 of ſix or ſeven Months ſince by letter, though perhaps he never receiv’d it by being out of Town, the Coppy of the Letter which I have by me will Evidence this that I affirm to be true. Ann Moſeley.

I John Adderly do teſtifie, That Mr.Anderſon was never much concern’d in Mr. Strodes acquaintance, and the more reaſon I have to believe it, is, for that as he from the beginning of his Impriſonment had notice of Strodes being a great Rogue; ſo was he not backward of adviſing me and all he had a kindneſs for, to ſhun Strouds Company; ſo that I look upon that ſtory of Mr. Anderſons offering him 500 Guinneys to take off Bedlows Evidence, to be a meer fiction and revenge for diſpoſſeſſing him of his Chamber, and indeed, Stroud is ſo great an abſtract of Debauchery and Villany, and hath always been reputed for ſuch, that no Man of any tolerable reputation ever valued his word or his oath, and that this is the truth, I willingly ſubſcribe, being ready to atteſt the ſame upon Oath. John Adderley.

1679-01-14January 14. 1679.

I being often in the company of William Strode, amongſt other Diſcourſes, hapning to talk of the riſe of ſome men, he the ſaid William Strode did often ſay, that they were beholden to their own Induſtry, and that if he were out of Priſon, he would not make any ſcruple for an hundred Pounds to Sacrifice any Perſon, nay his Father for a conſiderable Reward; and that he was kept here for a Spie, as he ſaid himſelf; and hath ſhewed me Silver and Gold, which he ſaid he received from one Mr. Johnſon the Earl of Shaftsbury’s man, and of one Mr. Bedloe, for ſuch Service. Likewiſe the Marſhal finding it fit to remove Strode out of his Chamber, and place Mr. Anderſon in it, he was ſo tranſported with Rage, that he came into the Gallery to me, and ſwore that he would be Revenged: Nay, that he would ruin Mr. Anderſon with the firſt opportunity. And this I took the more notice of, becauſe he hath ſwore to me, that nothing Sacred ſhould tie him to Truth or Lie, farther than to gratifie his Gain or Revenge, and gloried in other Murthers he ſaid he had Committed beſides that he had his Pardon for, which is the averment of a Perſon of unſpotted Reputation, that is not willing to be expoſ’d in Print, but is ready to make Oath of it when thereto required.

Theſe Teſtimonies I hope may ſatisfie an indifferent perſon, that Dangerfield once writ Truth.

After this, he frequently by Margaret and others, ſent his humble Requeſt to beg the Charity of his Inlargement, proteſting that he never would attempt an ill thing again, but would get a Service, and take any pains for an honeſt Livelihood: and upon his reiterated Intreaties, I collected ſome monys for him, and did pay five Pounds to buy off the Debts he lay under, and not a Penny more, as appears by the General Releaſes from his Creditors, which were taken among his Papers, and carried before the Council.

And the day he came out of Priſon, I did give him, not five Pounds as he ſays, but 10 ſhillings, that he might not ſteal for want of bread, and at the Jeſuits Tryal, did employ him as a Meſſenger to go up and down to fetch 13 D2r 13 fetch Victuals and Drink for the Witneſſes, to wait on them, and to help them into Court, call Coaches, and other ſuch like Services, which he performed ſo well, that ſeveral perſons asked me, whoſe diligent Footman he was, for indeed, being in an old Frize-Coat lin’d with Blew, Blew Stockings and Breeches, and a Grey Hat tuckt up, to prevent flapping about his Ears, he could not well be taken for any other than an ill clad Footman, though now he be Dubb’d Knight of the Poſt, and wear a Pearl in his Ear, to ſhew that the Executioners were kind to him, and did not Nail his Ears to the Pillory, neither at Salisbury, Wilton, Winborne, nor any of the other places where he was Mounted upon the Wooden Engine, and peep’d through it like Don Quickſot through his Helmet, when he was mounted upon Roſinant, and going to encounter with the Windmil.

About that time I ſent for him to Powis Houſe, and there told him in the preſence of Mr. Henry Nevil alias Paine, that now I would put it into his power to be an honeſt man, if he had a will to be ſo; and would get him either an Enſigns place under the Duke of Monmouth, who was then preparing to go to Scotland, or elſe an Imployment to go to Sea: he made choice of the later, which while they would enquire; for my Husband having ſome Thouſands of Pounds due to him, which was ſo deſperate, that I could never make any thing of them; he told me he underſtood ſuch buſineſs, and doubted not to get in many of them if he had but a Suit of Cloaths, a Hat, and ſome few neceſſaries, that he might be in a condition to follow them, which he promiſed to do very diligently. I conſidering he could not wrong me, for that no perſon would pay mony without my Husbands diſcharge: And that he having no other buſineſs but to perſue the Debtors, it was poſſible he might get in ſome of them; I agreed with him, that he ſhould have ſix ſhillings in the Pound for what he received, and did give him a Stuff Suit, a Hat, Shooes and Stockings, and a little Linnen, all which coſt about 3 l. 10 s. and accordingly he proceeded, and did get in ſome mony, and Bail’d out ſeveral Priſoners, and very often would bring me News of the great Deſigns of the Factious, and that they talked Treaſon publickly in the Coffee-houſes. I encouraged him to keep them company, and learn what he could of their Practices, in order to diſcover them to his Majeſty; and I having heard by ſome very Eminent among them, that herded with them, only to break their Meaſures, that they had drawn Forces into the City whilſt His Majeſty was ſick at Windſor, with intention to ſubvert the Government; and that if His Majeſty had died, which at that time was the fears of the Loyal, and hopes of the Factious, they would have knock’d the Lord Mayor o’th’head, with ſuch Aldermen as would not Conform; and that by the help of their Partizans in thoſe places, they doubted not but to have been Maſters of the Tower, Portſmouth, Dover and Hull, and moſt places of ſtrength within the Kingdom, and that the Scots would advance to their help, with much more to the ſame effect, which I gave in my Depoſitions before the Lords of His Majeſties Privy Council.

And having been inform’d by perſons to whom they had been proffer’d, that Manſel and Waller, did both offer Commiſſions to disbanded Officers, with promiſes that they ſhould enter into preſent Pay, and adviſed them, and all honeſt fellows, to linger about the Town, for there would ſoon D2 be 14 D2v 14 be hot ſervice; and having alſo heard that Sir William Waller ſaid Publickly in Southwark, before perſons of conſiderable quality, That there would be a Rebellion before Michaelmas.

Theſe diſcourſes being then almoſt General, made me the eaſier Credit him in particulars, as that in order to this deſign, many of the Old Rump Officers were new rigg’d, and had Penſions paid them by the Gentlemen of the Kings head Club, and that Commiſſions were given out by the Relicts of the Rump, under the names of the Keepers of the Liberties of England; and that he was promiſed one among them, and had ſeen ſeveral, and that they were made of Parchment with thirteen Label Seals: I incouraged him to go on, and gave him money to defray his Charge, and bid him obſerve their Actions and Deſigns, and write down his obſervations, that they might be made known to His Majeſty; and be ſure to write nothing but the Truth, for one Lie would diſcredit all the Truths he told.

After that, he writ down at ſeveral times, that which was afterwards found by Sir William Waller in my Meal-tub, and as what I did was truly in Zeal for His Majeſties Service, ſo that very night he came to Town from Windſor, I went to the Earl of Peterborough, and acquainted him with it, and he preſently handed us to his Royal Highneſs, to whom Willoughby delivered the foreſaid Paper, to be given to His Majeſty, and His Majeſty was pleaſed to give it to Mr. Secretary Coventry, and commanded Willoughby to attend upon Collonel Halſal with what further diſcoveries he could make, and ordered him forty Pounds, the better to enable him to proceed therein.

About this time, the tranſactions concerning Sir Robert Peyton happened, and I believing then, as I ſtill hope, that Sir Robert abhorring the diſloyal Practices of thoſe he called Friends, was willing to come into the Kings Intereſt, and help the Government againſt thoſe that ſo ſubtilly ſought to deſtroy it: I then made the meeting between the Earl of Peterborough and Sir Robert Peyton at Mr. Gadburies houſe, and did afterwards go with Sir Robert to the Duke, and his Royal Highneſs received him kindly, and Sir Robert made Proteſtations to ſerve His Majeſty faithfully for the future, as I hope he will.

For my part it was no motive but my Loyalty and Duty to His Majeſty, and Love to Truth and Juſtice, that ingaged me in this affair, believing I ſhould do His Majeſty good ſervice, by bringing back as many as I could of the Incenſed or Miſled, to their Duty; and I cannot yet think I erred in ſo doing. About the later end of September, Dangerfield daily brought me Stories of the great preparations of the Factious, and that they publickly owned their Treaſonable deſigns, and that the Parſons, Goodwin and Alſop, and the reſt of that Gang, made great Collections amongſt the Brethren, in order to the carrying on their Rebellious Deſigns; and that Sir William Waller had three hundred Horſemen privately quartered in Town, that would be ready for Action in an hours warning; and was the Party that ſhould lead up the Rabble of Weſtminſter to ſeize White-hall: That the City was ready to Riſe, and expected only the word from the Confederate Lords. About this time Willoughby got drunk, and pick’d a quarrel at the Rainbow-Coffee-Houſe with one Keyniſton, about Sir Thomas Player, and thereby 15 E1r 15 thereby made himſelf obnoxious to the Republicans; and having loſt the hopes of obtaining a Commiſſion for himſelf, he then ſought to get one by means of other perſons, and then ſwore, God Dam him, now the Papiſts will give him no money, he would go to the Presbyterians, and they would give him enough; but of this I then knew nothing, and he ſtrictly charged thoſe he treated with in this affair, not to tell me any thing of their Proceedings, as appears by the Oath of Thomas Curtis, taken before Juſtice Warcup, vide, the ſaid Affadavit in Dangerfields firſt Narrative, Pag. 72,73.

In the beginning of October, he pretended, that by Information from a Perſon that by his order haunted Sir William Wallers Club at Weſtminſter Market-place, he underſtood that ſeveral Treaſonable Papers importing the whole deſign of the Factious, were kept in a houſe at Weſtminſter, and that if he could get a Warrant, and ſearch that Houſe, he doubted not but that he ſhould lay open the whole Conſpiracy, and in order to it, he went to his Majeſty to pray a Warrant, and was by his Majeſty referr’d to Mr. Secretary Coventry, but Mr. Secretaries great wiſdom made him ſuſpect him and his Shallow contrivance, inſomuch that he would not give him a Warrant, but I, as I ſaid before, being induc’d to Credit him in thoſe things which related to the ſame ends, others not inconſiderable among them had diſcours’d with me, and being zealous to have the danger plainly Diſcovered, that it might be prevented, did upon his complaining that he was deny’d a Warrant, adviſe him to go by the Cuſtom-houſe-way, which he did, and then ſeiz’d the Papers, which I ſuppoſe were eaſie to be found, being in all likelihood put there by himſelf, in order to his being dignify’d with the Magnificent Title of the Kings Evidence.

Upon Wedneſday the 1679-10-2222 of October (79) Willoughby was taken Examined, and went upon Bail till October the 24, which day I having been abroad, and heard much talk of him and his Plot, came home and found him at my Houſe, he came to me, and pray’d to ſpeak with me, for that he was going before the Councel after Dinner, and did believe he ſhould be Committed. I then going into the next Room, the following diſcourſe paſs’d between us.

Cellier.

In the Name of God, what is it you have done, that here is ſuch a Buſle in the Town about you?

Willoughby.

Pray Madam do not ask me, for it is beſt for you to be Ignorant of it: I hope your Innocence will defend you, and your ignorance will be your beſt Plea, and therefore I will not do you ſo much wrong, as to tell you anything of it: I have done ſomething I ſhould not have done, but I hope God will bring me off, and that I may be the better able to make my Defence, pray do me the favour to lay up this Paper ſafely for me; and by the help of this and Truth, I hope to defend my ſelf.

Cellier.

Is it nothing that will bring me in danger?

Willoughby.

If it were, I would not be ſuch a Villain to give it you; it is the ſame Paper that lay before Mr. Secretary Coventry , and he returned it to me the laſt week.

I opened it, and finding it the ſame, gave it to my Maid Anne Blake, and ſhe put it into the Meal-Tub, where Sir William Waller found it.

E Munday 16 E1v

Munday October the 27. he was committed to Newgate with the following Commitment.

Theſe are in His Majeſties Name, to require you to take into Cuſtody the Perſon of Thomas Willoughby herewith ſent you, for forgeing of Letters Importing High Treaſon, and fixing the ſame privately at Mr. Manſels Chamber, to render him guilty thereof without Cauſe: And you are to keep him ſafe till he ſhall be delivered by due courſe of Law; for which, this ſhall be your Warrant. Councel-Chamber, White-Hall Worceſter Bridgwater Faulconbridge Francis North Henry Coventry Henry Capel Henry Powel John Nichols To the Keeper of Newgate, or his Deputy.

That Night I was not at home, but the next Morning hearing Sir William Waller intended to be at my Houſe, I made haſt home to meet him, and about Noon he came and made a diligent ſearch among my Papers, and told me, I muſt go along with him to the Earl of Shaftsbury, I replyed,

Cellier.

I have no buſineſs with the Earl of Shaftsbury, and if his Lordſhip have any with me, he might have ſent one of his Servants to tell me ſo, and I would have waited on him, as I am ſtill ready to do, without being had before a Juſtice of Peace.――But what Authority have you to carry me thither?

Sir William Waller.

His Majeſties Commiſſion of the Peace.

Cellier.

Though that doth impower you to ſend me to Priſon, if I be accuſed of any Crime, yet it doth not give you power to carry me any whither elſe.

Sir William Waller.

You are a dangerous Woman, and keep correſpondence with Traytors, and harboured the St.Saint Omars Youths――;I took them out of your Houſe.

Cellier. 17 E2r 17

Cellier.

What if I did? they came over at His Majeſties command, and therefore I preſume it was no Crime to Lodge them.――;And none can be properly call’d Traytors, but thoſe that are Convict of Treaſon; And do you know any ſuch I keep correſpondence with? I am ſure I know none.

Sir Will. Waller.

Will you take the Oaths of Supremacy and Allegience?

Cellier.

Have you any Authority to offer them to me? I ſuppoſe you have none except here were another Juſtice preſent; but if there were. I am a Forreign Merchants Wife, and my Husband, both by the General Law of Nations, and thoſe of this kingdom, ought to remain unmoleſted both in his Liberty and Property, till a breach happen betwen the two Crowns, and the King hath declared as much in his Royal Proclamation, and if you violate the Priviledges my Husband ought to have as a Merchant-ſtranger, the King of France, whoſe Subject my Husband is, has an Ambaſſador here, by whom we will complain to His Majeſty, and I hope we ſhall obtain Redreſs.

If your Husband and any other perſon will paſs their word for your forth-coming, I’le leave you here till I come back from my Lord Shaftsbury.

They paſs’d their words for me, and he went away and left me, preſently after Willoughby ſent for Suſan Edwards my Servant to the Priſon, and he Howled and Lamented to her, and ſent me a long Epiſtle; I have forgot the words now, but the Effect was, that he had been Tortured that Night, yet would be Torn in pieces rather than bely me, or any other Innocent Perſon, and deſired to know what I was accuſed of, or by whom, and what Waller ſaid to me: Then I ſent her to him again with the following Note.

I have ſaid you were taken into my house to get in deſperate Debts――;They bring me to L.S.Lord Shaftsbury They will ask me who encouraged me to go to him, I will ſay it was you, it cannot worſt you.

This I ſaid, becauſe it was Truth, which I always thought the beſt way to defend my Life and Fame. Upon the Receipt of this Note he made great Lamentations to her, expreſſing his fears of being Hang’d or Starv’d there, but told her, though he had been proffer’d great Advantages, yet he would Periſh rather than do any ill thing; and pray’d her to ſpeak to me, that he might have Victuals ſent him from my Houſe daily, And that I would ſend him a promiſe of it by her of my own writing.

By this I perceiv’d he was already a Rogue, and endeavouring to get ſomething of my writing, to make ill uſe of, I then Conſidered, that if I refus’d to promiſe him Victuals, I gave him an occaſion to commit Villany for want of Bread; and therefore bid her tell him, that I would take order at my houſe that he ſhould have Victuals ſent him every day, as he had when he was under the Meſſengers hands. And to aſſure him of it ſent him the following words under my hand. It being a Motto my Parents had uſed, and I my ſelf alſo, I Never Change. Knowing that if he were honeſt, that was enough to ſatisfie him: If a Rogue, not enough to do me any miſchief.

About nine a Clock at Night Sir William came again, and found me at Supper with ſome Friends, but was very Civil, and would not diſturb us; and about Ten he ſent me to the Gate-houſe, with a Note to Church to E2 Lodge 18 E2v18Lodg me in his own houſe; the Cauſe expreſt in my Commitment, being for Harbouring and Correſponding with Traytors; though he could not tell me who they were, nor when Convicted of Treaſon; and for refuſing the Oaths of Supremacy and Allegiance, which were never tender’d me. All that night he and his Crue kept their Rendevouz in my houſe, tearing and pulling down the Goods, and filling his own and his Footmans Pockets and Breeches with Papers of Private concern, which he never carry’d before the Councel nor as yet reſtor’d, though ſome of them be of Conſiderable value.

Next morning his Worſhip ſent to know how I did, and to tell me, if I thought he could do me any ſervice, he would come and viſit me. I reply’d, if he could, I knew he would not, and therefore deſired him to ſpare his pains and my trouble.

Friday the laſt of October, I brought my ſelf to the Kings-bench Barr, in hope to be Bail’d; but then at the Barr, Church oppoſed it, ſaying, His Worſhip had ſent in an accuſation of high Treaſon againſt me, though I had as yet no Accuſer; And by the Law, no perſon ought to be committed for Treaſon, till accuſed by two honeſt, ſufficient, lawful, and credible Witneſſes, witneſſing one and the ſame Individual Fact.

November the firſt, I was examin’d before his Majeſty and the Lords of the Councel, where the Fable of the Husband-man, and the ſtarved Snake, was proved a Truth; for Willoughby accuſed me of all the Forged Stories he tells in his Lying Narrative; and I unfeignedly told the Truth, and the whole Truth, and nothing but the Truth. But the Lord Chancellor told me, no body would believe a word I ſaid, and that I would Dye.――; To which I replyed, I know that my Lord, for I never ſaw an Immortal woman in my life; And then kneeling down, ſaid

Cellier.

I beſeech your Majeſty that I may not be Tortur’d.

The King.

The Law will not ſuffer it.

Cellier.

Such things are frequently done in Newgate; and I have more reaſon to fear it than any other perſon, becauſe of what I have done againſt the Keeper, and therefore I beg your Majeſty, If at any time I ſhould ſay any thing contrary to what I have now ſaid, that you will not believe me, for it will be nothing but lies forc’d from me by barbarous uſage, what I have now told you, being the truth, and the whole truth, to the utmoſt of my knowledge.

Then I was ſent away to Newgate, and the next day was brought again before the Councel, and then a Lord ſaid, Turn up your hoods, Mrs. Cellier, I did ſo; The Lord Chancellor ask’d me, if I had not been at the Tower to tell of Willoughby’s Commitment, and bring inſtructions for him.

Cellier.

I proteſt I have not been at the Tower Since.――;

Then the Lord Chancellor Interrupted me, ſaying, She cannot ſpeak three words of Truth.

Cellier.

Pray my Lord be pleaſed to hear me out, and do not Judge me till then,――; I have not been at the Tower ſince Thurſday was ſeven-night.

Lord Chan.

That was the Time, what did you there?

Cellier.

I Din’d there.

Lord Chan.

Had you no talk concerning Willoughby? tell us the Truth, for the Counteſs of Powis hath told us all.

Cellier.

My Lord, nothing of Truth can do me any harm, and I am ſure 19 F1r 19 ſure her Ladiſhip will tell nothing elſe:

I told her that Juſtice Warcup and Manſel had been at my Houſe to demand him, and my Husband had paſt his word for his forth-coming. Then I was commanded to withdraw.

And underſtanding, ſoon after, that I ſhould be Cloſe Confin’d, the dread of being lock’d up on the top of Newgate, and attended on by Fellons, as Mrs. Preſcick had been, though big with Child, and ſo troubled with Fits, that they came upon her every hour, which cauſed Captain Richardſon to Pitty her, and take her into his own Houſe; but ſome had been Locked up there a full year, and kept in Irons above Six months of the time, the fear of this, or worſe uſage, did ſo oppreſs my ſpirits, that though I be not the moſt timorous of my Sex, and never had any kind of Fit before, I fell into ſuch Convulſions, that I had like to have died at White-Hall Gate. Then I was carried to the Keepers Houſe, and laid upon a Couch, and being a little come to my ſtrength and ſenſes, I told Captain Richardſon, that if I ſhould die in that deſolate place, as it was like I might that very Night, moſt perſons would believe that he had caus’d me to be Murthered, in revenge of the Articles I put into Parliament againſt him; whereupon he bid me be of good Comfort, for I ſhould be not be carry’d to the top of the Goal, but lye in his own Houſe, which promiſe ſo revived me, that within an hour, I was able to go up into the Garret, where I had a very Good Bed, and a Maid ordered to lye in the Room by me; ſhe tended me very diligently, and ſeem’d very much to Commiſerate my Condition, being, I ſuppoſe, ſet on to do ſo, that ſhe might the more eaſily betray me: I had brought Pen, Ink, and Paper from the Gate-houſe, and eaſily prevail’d with her for money, to carry a Note home to my Houſe, in a Bottom of Thred, ſhe carried and recarried three or four, ſhewing them firſt to the Jaylors Wife and Siſter, and they took Copies of them, and ſent them to the Councel, perſwading themſelves they ſhould make ſtrange Diſcoveries, but I had Committed no Crime, and therefore nothing but Innocence could be found in my Letters.

When they ſaw this ſnare would not take, then they laid another for my Life, and brought Willoughby over to a Window againſt mine, to talk with me, having (as I then thought, and now know) ſet another Rogue behind me, to hear what I ſaid.

Dangerfield.

Madam, Madam, Madam, Pray Madam ſpeak to me, and tell me how you do.

Cellier.

I am Sick, very Sick of the Bloody Barbarous Villain.

Dangerfield.

Pray Madam ſpeak low, and do not diſcompoſe your ſelf.

Cellier.

Nothing you do, can diſcompoſe me: I deſpiſe you ſo much, I am not Angry.

Dangerfield.

I am very glad of it, for then I hope you will have patience to hear me ſpeak. Pray how do they uſe you.

Cellier.

Well, much better than I expected.

Dangerfield.

Is any body ſuffered to come to you.

Cellier.

No body.

Dangerfield

I am very ſorry for your Confinement, but I could not poſſibly help what I have done.

Cellier.

Bloody Villain, I am not confin’d, for Stone Walls and Iron Bars, do not make a Priſon, but a Guilty Conſcience: I am Innocent, and F gain 20 F1v20 gaine that here, which my Enemies do not intend me for; I have now nothing to do but to ſerve God, but you are Confin’d, and one of the Devils Slaves. Ah Villain; for which of my Good deeds do you ſeek my Life?

Dangerfield

Crying,‐you ſhall not dye, nor receive any other hurt.

Cellier.

Wicked Wretch! I do not fear, but deſire to dye.

Dangerfield

ſtill Crying,――;but you ſhall not; look here how I have been uſed,

and then ſhewed his Arms, and Howl’d, ſaying, he had been ſo miſerably Tormented, that he was not able to bear it, but was forced to accuſe me and others, to ſave his own life.

Cellier.

Ah Villain, will you bely the Innocent, to ſave an Infamous Life?

Dangerfield.

I have told the King more than I could make out, and was forc’d to joyn with the Confederates to get my Pardon, for I have liv’d ſo ill, I am not fit to dye yet.

Cellier.

Do you think to wipe off your other ſins, by committing Perjuries and Murthers?

Dangerfield.

No, but God is merciful, and if I live, I may repent; I was diſſerted by every Body, and if I had not been Hang’d, I ſhould have been Starv’d――It is a ſad thing to depend upon an ungrateful and diſunited People‐If any care had been taken of me, to remove me to the Bench, they could only have Pillored Me, and I would never done this, nor any other Villany; But ſince no body took any care of me, I had reaſon to take ſome of my ſelf, which I will do. Thoſe I belong to now are very kind to me, and ſend me great Incouragements, I ſhall have a Pardon within two or three days, and be ſet at Liberty, but before I go, I ſhould be very glad you would consider your own Condition, and not ruin your Family, your Maid Suſan will Swear againſt you, and there are two Perſons found, that will lay worſer things to your Charge, than I have done.

Cellier.

Villain, you know it is all Lyes, Did I ever do any of thoſe things?

Dangerfield.

Though you did not, they will be Sworn againſt you, therefore come in now whilſt it is time, and joyn with the moſt powerful, you may make your own Conditions;

then he ſhewed me Gold, and told me what great Advantages were to be made by becoming the Kings Evidence. That the King was Bought and Sold, and here would be Republick, and the Duke would be deſtroyed in Scotland: And that if I would ſay His Royal Highneſs gave me the Original of thoſe Papers that were found in my Meal Tub, and bid me cauſe him to put them into Manſels Chamber, and Kill the Earl of Shaftsbury, then I ſhould have a Pardon, and more Mony than all the Witneſſes had had together, for the Earl of Shaftsbury and the reſt of the Confederate Lords would raiſe Ten Thouſand Pounds among them, which I ſhould paſs over by Bills of Exchange whither I would, as ſoon as I had Signed and Sworn the Depoſitions; and I ſhould have Twenty Pounds per Week ſetled on me by Act of Parliament as long as I liv’d: And if I would do it, ſome Perſons of Honour ſhould come and treat with me; for though I were confin’d, there was Lords that were Privy to all, that would come on pretence to Examine me, and ſettle things to my ſatisfaction.

But I laugh’d at all this, and receiv’d his proffers as they deſerv’d, and ſaid, Cowardly Wretch, you are worſe than your Elder Brother Judas, for he having betray’d one Innocent, left thoſe that hired him, to ſeek falſe Witneſſesneſſes 21F2r 21 neſſes for themſelves, and repented, and brought again the Thirty pieces of Silver, and had Courage enough to hang himſelf: But you have betray’d and belyed many Innocents, and yet are ſuch a Coward to waite for the Hangman, for hang’d you will be. He that digs a Pit for another, ſhall fall therein himſelf: Therefore Repent you Rogue, and tell the King who ſet you on, for you will certainly be Damn’d if you do not.

And then by the fit Application of other places of Scripture, I ſhook him ſo, that he Howl’d like a Dog that had the Tooth-Ach. And again ſhewed his Arms, where the Irons or Cords had worn off the Skin, telling me, he had been Rackt, and otherwiſe cruelly uſed to force him to accuſe me.

Cellier.

Ah Cowardly wretch! would you ſhed the blood of ſo many Innocents, to ſave your life? I had rather dye ten thouſand deaths, then belye my ſelf or others: And can there be any Rogues beſides your ſelf ſo wicked, as to endeavor to ſuborn Witneſſes to belye the beſt of Men? Look there, do you ſee the Devil ſtand at your Elbow, aſſure your ſelf he’l tear you to pieces alive;

Then he howl’d again, and wrung his hands, pretending Repentance, and told me, that againſt to morrow he would write down all the Intrigue, with the Names of thoſe Lords and others, that ſet him on, and give it me, if I would give him any hopes of a Pardon for my ſelf and others he had wrong’d.

Cellier.

It is not poſſible for you, nor any other Devil Incarnate, to wrong me more than I can forgive, if you Repent and leave your Villany; but do not diſſemble, for diſſembled Piety is double Iniquity.

Dangerfield.

Do you think other Perſons I have accuſed will forgive me?

Cellier.

Yes, if you truly Repent, I doubt not but their Charity and Prudence will oblige them to that.

Then he told me a long Story, how kind the Earl of Shaftsbury and ſome greater men were to him, and what great things they had promiſed to do for him; yet he ſaid he would Repent, and tell the Truth, and hop’d God would have Mercy on him. Then I went from the Window‐

Next Morning he was waiting at his Window by Day-break, and throwing little Coals at mine――;About Nine or Ten a Clock I went to the Window, hoping to perſwade him to tell the Truth, But like the Dog, was returned to his Vomit, and propoſed to me, if I would not belye the Duke, to ſay the Earl of Peterborough gave me thoſe Papers, and that I had received a Thouſand pounds in Gold of Sir Allen Apſley to pay him for the Murthering the Earl of Shaftsbury, and to raiſe Souldiers againſt the King: But I received this Propoſition like the former, and Anſwered:

Cellier.

Now I plainly ſee you are poſſeſt with the Devil, he ſpeaks through your Mouth‐You worſt of Rogues, how dare you talk thus to me?

Dangerfield.

Pray Madam ſpeak low, and do not diſcompoſe your ſelf, whatſoever happens, there ſhall no harm come to you.

Cellier.

Wretched Villain! Innocence fears nothing; I have done no Evil, nor I fear none.――

And ſhut to the Window, and would ſpeak no more to him. All that day at times he hancred about the Window, ſhedding Crokadils tears, holding up his hands, and making beſeeching ſigns to me to come to my Window. About four in the Afternoon I went, ſaying, Blood-thirſty ingrateful Villain, what have you to ſay to me? Then he wrung his hands and Lamented, ſaying, Now he was fully reſolved to tell F2 ’the 22 F2v 22 the Truth, and if I would promiſe he ſhould be Pardoned, would ſhow me how to turn the Devices of the Malicious upon their own Heads, and had writ it all out for me, and would tye a Coal to it and throw it in; but he would firſt try if he could fling in an Apple he had in his hand, he try’d, but the Apple fell down――;He ſaid there is ſomething in it, and Ran down in great haſt to fetch it――;But I ſuppoſe thoſe that ſet him on, had more fears I ſhould Convert him, than hopes he ſhould Pervert me, and would not let him appear any more at the Window, but preſently I heard a great Noiſe in the Goal, and it was pretended, the Jaylor had diſcovered our interview, and Sir John Nicholas came that Night to ſearch and examine me, I told him the Truth, but conceal’d that part which related to the Duke, the Earl of Peterborough, and Sir Allen Apſley, and would not own that I underſtood for what reaſon he ſhewed me Gold, as not thinking that a fitting time to tell ſuch Truths, I having too many Enemies already.

Then the Window ſhutters were nail’d up on that ſide of the Chamber, and the Caſement on the other ſide, and from that time I had not a breath of Air: I did but take out a Pain of Glaſs, and they put in another, and unfolded and ſearch’d all my Linnen, and cut my very Bread in pieces; and ſearch’d every thing with all imaginable ſtrictneſs; yet Captain Richardſon let me go when I would into a Room that look’d towards the Doctors Garden, where the Window was open, but there was ſuch a noyſom ſmell in the Room, that I rather choſe to be lock’d up in my own alone, than in that with a great deal of bold Company; for the Rats and Weezles plaid at Barly-break, and boldly Robb’d me before my face, and did not Dance without Muſick, ſqueeking as they ran up and down: And the worthy Gentleman Sir William Waller, came likewiſe to viſit me and ask’d if he could do me any Service, and fawning on me, with many flattering Experſſions, which I valued much like the Muſick of my other Viſitants: He pretended a great deal of pity that ſuch a Woman as I ſhould be engaged among ſuch a wicked and ungrateful people that Railed at me, ſaying, I was the worſt of Women, but if I would confeſs, as he would have me, and come to them, I ſhould be received according to my Merits.

Cellier.

I know nothing to confeſs,――

At which he ſhook his head. You know enough to ſave the whole Kingdom, if you would tell it.

Cellier.

So I do, and would be glad to tell it, if Truth could be believed, but I have been already told in Preſence of His Majeſty and His Councel, that nothing I ſaid ſhould be believ’d: And therefore I am reſolv’d to tell nothing.

Sir William.

Mrs. Cellier, if you will make any diſcovery to me, I’le ingage you ſhall be believ’d.――;

Then he began to ask me Queſtions.

Cellier.

Sir, Spair your pains in Pumping, for I am neither Slave nor Coward, and will not be Examined in Confinement, inlarge me, and two days after I will tell you what I know.

Sir William.

That I cannot do.

Cellier.

Then let me ſpeak with my Husband before a Keeper twice or thrice.

Sir 23 G1r 23

Sir W. Waller

I cannot do that.

Cel.

What do you come hither for then, troubling me with your proffer’d Service, if you be able to do nothing that I ask you?

Sir W. Waller

If you will make any Diſcoveries, then I will help you.

Cel.

Sir William, When I make Diſcoveries, I am ſure you will not like them, Yet it is very like I may make ſome in time, and new ones too, for my Heart is too high to be zany to a fellow that went on my Errands.

Much ſuch like dark diſcourſe we had, he ſtill flattering me, and telling me what high eſteem he had for my Wit and Courage. I told him I took his Ironical Speech as it was meant, and did as much admire him for another cauſe; and then pluckt Englands Bloody Tribunal out of my Pocket, and ſhewed him the Murtherers of his Majeſties Royal Father, and many of his Loyal Peers and Gentlemen; and told him, that was the Game he would fain be at; he denyed it after ſuch a manner, as made it viſible even to the meaneſt capacity, That he did not think it a Crime, and then went away.

We had only ſuch reflecting Speeches all the time of his ſtay, for Mr. Cooper, the Deputy Goaler came up with him, and I would not let him go away, for indeed I durſt not truſt my ſelf with ſuch a Doughty Knight as Sir William was, leſt he ſhould make Romances of me, as he had done of others; But I prayed him at parting to ſpeak to his Majeſty, I might be Tryed, for I was reſolv’d I would not lie there idle, but bring my ſelf upon my Tryal as faſt as I could.

The Friday after this, I was brought before the Council.

A Lord.

Turn up your Hoods Mrs. Cellier,――

I obeyed.

L. Chan.

Come Mrs. Cellier have you writ home, ſince you were ſent to Newgate?

Cel.

Pray my Lord, what Crime is it to write home?

L. Chan.

It is none.

Cel.

My Lord, ſelf-preſervation is natural to all Creatures.

L. Chan.

How often have you written home ſince your Confinement?

Cel.

Truly my Lord I know not whether it was 3 or 4 times.

L. Chan.

How did you ſend it?

Cel.

Once in a little Box, and other times in Bottoms of Thread.

L.C.

What made you ſo earneſt to have your Husband go into the Country?

Cel.

Becauſe he is a man in Trouble, and I thought That the beſt place for him.

L.C.

Was Margaret in trouble too, that you ſent to her to go out of Town?

Cel.

I did not, nor had any cauſe ſo to do.

L.C.

You did.

Cel.

I did not.

L. Chan.

You did, we have it under your hand.

Cellier.

If I did, I deſire to ſee my hand

――Then a Letter was produced, being a Copy of one of mine.――SirTho.Thomas Doleman read it, (and by Head and Shoulders thruſt in theſe Words, Send Margaret into the Country) I deſired to ſee the Letter, but they refus’d it. Then I own’d I G did 24 G1v 24 did write ſuch a Letter as that without thoſe words――but that I had neither ſeen, ſent to, nor heard from Margaret ſince Midſummer.

L. Chan.

This is very ſtrange you can remember every word of a Letter, but what you ſhould remember.

Cel.

My Lord, my Lord, I can remember any thing I did, but not what I never did.

Lord Preſident.

You writ it when you were aſleep.

Cel.

No, my Lord, I am no Noct-ambler.

L. Chan.

Did you write to no body elſe?

Cel.

Yes, to my Son and Daughter.

L. Chan.

To no body elſe?

Cel.

Yes, to Mr. Gadbury.

L. Chan.

What did you write to him?

Cel.

Am I obliged to remember every Word I write?

L. Chan.

No, but the ſenſe of it.

Cel.

I called him friend, and told him his laſt Viſit would make me always eſteem him ſo. I know I am the talk of the Town; but what do the Judicious ſay of me, for it is that I value, and not the prate of the Rabble? Are all my Summer friends flown? Is my Knight againſt me too? When will Jupiter come into Gemini?

L. Chan.

What do you expect from Jupiters coming into Gemini? do you think that the Catholick Religion ſhall be reſtored!

Cel.

No, my Lord, I have no reaſon to think ſo, But the Planets are no in Beſtial reptal Signs, and produce ſemblable effects, but when that benign Star comes into Gemini, which is a Humane Sign, I hope the Nation will return to their Wits, for I think they are all mad now.

A Lord.

Mris Cellier, how long has Mr. Gadbury

Cel.

He is not one I think, I’m ſure I never took him for one, nor ever heard he was.

L. Chan.

What Religion is he of, can you tell?

Cel.

My Lord, I always thought him to be a Church of England man.

L. Chan.

Come Mr. Gadbury, you ſaid you did not ſpeak in Aſtrological Terms to Women, But Mrs. Celier had told you all.

Gadbury.

My Lord, She can ſay no harm of me, if ſhe tell Truth.

Cel.

Mr. Gadbury, I neither ſaid, nor know any evil of you, I only ſaid you feared the Kingdom would never be quiet till Jupiter came into Gemini.

Then he was commanded to withdraw.

Gadbury kneeling down ſaid, I beſeech you let my cloſe Confinement be taken off.

A Lord.

No, you deny’d the Truth to us.

Gadbury.

I hope your Lordſhip will not call ſuch a thing as this is the denyal of the Truth.

Withdraw, withdraw Mr. Gadbury.

A Lord.

Are you with Child Mrs. Cellier?

Cel.

Truly, my Lord, I know not certainly.

Same Lord.

You ſay ſo in your Letter, and that it will keep you from any ſtricter examination.

Cel.

No my Lord, I have no reaſon to think ſo, this is a time which no Compaſſion is ſhewn to Sex, Age, or Condition.

Then 25 G2r 25

Then the Lord Chancellor wav’d the Diſcourſe.

Same Lord.

Do you know one Mr. Phillips, Mrs. Cellier, that you writ of, and deſir’d to go out of Town?

Cel.

I know one Mrs. Phillips an Upholsterer, but I know no reaſon I have to deſire her to go out of Town.

Ld.

But you did write to her to go out of Town.

Cel.

Did I not write for every one to go out of Town, I refer my ſelf to the Letter, and deſire it may be read?

L. Chan.

No, no.

And ſo put off the Diſcourſe.

Same Lord.

Do you know my Lord Shaftsbury, Mrs. Cellier? Or have you ſeen him lately?

Cel.

My Lord, I have been with him lately; and (if you pleaſe) I will tell you the occaſion. In April laſt Sir W.William Waller was very buſie about my Houſe, inſomuch as I was forc’d to leave it, and I (having a deſire to be quiet at home) writ the ſtate of my Caſe to my Lord Shaftsbury, and prayed his Favour; He bid the perſon who carried the Letter, ſend Sir W.William Waller to him; and from that time I had no further trouble, till about ten or twelve days before Dangerfield was taken. He told me that my Name was enter’d into Sir W.William Waller’s Black Bill, and he would ſearch my Houſe that Week, and therefore he advis’d me to write again to the Earl of Shaftsbury, I told him I durſt not preſume to do that, but I would go to his Lordſhip, and thank him for the favour, and pray a continuance of it, and deſired him to go with me, becauſe being known in the Houſe, as he ſaid, and might the eaſier bring me to ſpeak with his Lordſhip.

Dangerfield.

Madam, I cannot at all advantage your Cauſe, but injure it, for I have told my Lord Lies, and have been catch’d in them; but if you pleaſe to let the Coach drive cloſe to the Gate, and ask for Mr. Shepherd, and deſire him to bring you to the Figure of one, he will bring you to his Lordſhip.

I did ſo that very night, and after I had thank’d his Lordſhip for his former Favour, and intreated him that I might not be troubled with Sir W.William Waller, he anſwered me,

Madam, I am for the propagation of the Proteſtant Faith; yet, becauſe I think you an excellent Woman, though of another Religion, I promiſe you I will do you all the good I can.

I thanked his Lordſhip, and took my leave.

Upon this I was commanded to withdraw.

Three or four days later I was brought before their Lordſhips again.

L――

Turn up your Hoods Mrs. Cellier.

L. Chan.

Come Mrs. Cellier, we have found Margaret, and ſhe has told us all, the Truth comes out for all your cunning.

Cel.

She can ſay no Evil of me, unleſs ſhe bely me: Beſides, ſhe is no lawful Witneſs, for ſhe was my Servant, and turned away in Diſgrace, and if ſhe accuſe me of any thing, it is the effect of her Malice.

G2 a 26 G2v 26

Then Margaret was call’d in.

L. Chan.

Come Margaret, this is ſtrange, that whilſt you liv’d with Mrs. Cellier you could ſee nothing but Vertue and Goodneſs by her, and ſhe can tell ſo much Thieving, and other ill things of you.

Margaret.

She may ſay what ſhe pleaſes of me, but I will not wrong her.

Cellier.

Margaret you know we did loſe a Spoon, and ſome other things.

Margaret.

Yes, but then you thought another had them.

Cel.

Yes, and I think ſo ſtill, but being told you accuſe me, I muſt defend my ſelf as well as I can.

L. Chan.

Nay Margaret, we like you never the worſe for her ſpeaking againſt you, and if you will tell us any thing of her, we will believe you.

Margaret.

I know nothing but what I have told you.

L. Chan.

Go Margaret, conſider of it, and remember what you can againſt you come again.

Cellier.

Margaret have a care what you do, leſt you foul your hands with innocent Blood.

L. Chan.

Hark, She tutors her before us.

Cellier.

Truth may be ſpoken at all times and places.

Soon after this, Sir W. Waller came to the Priſon again, wheedling, and proffered his Service to help me to made a Diſcovery; I anſwered him after the former rate.

Sir. Will.

I wonder how you, that have ſuch a fine curious Houſe to Live in, can endure to ſtay here, and may ſo eaſily go out, and be repaired all your Loſſes with advantage.

Cellier.

Sir Wil.William I value not my Loſſes nor my Life, I’ll ſtay here this twenty Years, rather than Lie my ſelf to Liberty. I am Priſoner for Truth ſake, and that Cauſe, and the joy I have to ſuffer for it, makes this Dirty, Smoaky Hole to me a Pallace, adorned with all the Ornaments Imagination can think upon; and I aſſure you, This is the moſt pleaſant Time of my whole Life, for I have thrown off all care of Earthly things, and have nothing to do but ſerve God.

Sir Will.

But for all your obſtinance, you will be weary of ſtaying here e’er long, and perhaps put into a more rigorous Confinement.

Cel.

Have you ever a place to put me in, where God is not?

Sir Will.

No, he is every where.

Cel.

Is he ſo, then do your worſt, I defie you all, and him that ſets you on.

Sir Will.

Why are you ſo angry Mrs. Cellier? I came hither to ſerve you.

Cel.

I deſire none of your Service, and I cannot be angry with ſuch a Man as you are.

Sir Will.

I proteſt I have as much reſpect for you, as if you were my Siſter, and had rather take your counſel, than any Woman’s I know.

Cel.

I’ll aſſure you Sir William I will never take yours. Pray ſpeak to His Majeſty I may be tryed.

Sir Will.

You had better ſtay, for if you be tryed, you’ll certainly be put to death.

Cel. 27 H1r 27

Cel.

Thanks be to God, you muſt neither be Judge nor Jury-man, but I’ll venture that, and bring my ſelf to the Bar the firſt day of the next Term.

Sir Will.

You muſt not be tryed there, you muſt be tryed at the Old Bayly.

Cel.

If his Majeſty bring me upon my Tryal, He may try me where He pleaſes; but if I bring my ſelf to it, it muſt be at the Kings-Bench Bar.

Sir Will.

You are deceived, you cannot.

Cel.

But I can, and will to.

Sir Will.

I’ll tell his Majeſty what you ſay.

Cel.

Pray do, for I deſire it.

Sir Will.

Well, I ſee you are an obſtinate woman, and do not underſtand your own good, I’ll come no more to you.

Cel.

I care not for your Company, therefore pray ſtay away; and tell Truth Once in your Life.

As he was upon the Stairs going down, I call’d to the Maid to bring me ſome Beer, and he was willing to believe I called him, and ran up in great haſte, aſking though the Door if I had bethought my ſelf of any thing he could do to ſerve me.

Cel.

No Sir Will.William I am not ſuch a diſtreſſed Damoſel to uſe your Service. For as the Devil can do harm, but not good; ſo, though you have put me in, yet it is not in your power to fetch me out of this inchanted Caſtle, but I ſhall come out e’er long to a Glorious Death, or an Honourable Life, both which are indifferent to me, bleſſed be God.

After this I was no more troubled with him.

That night the Duke of Monmouth came to town from Holland I was fetched before the Council in great haſte, having now learn’d to turn up my Hoods without bidding.

L. Chan.

Come Mrs. Cellier, we hear of your zeal.

Cel.

It is a Virtue to be zealous my Lord.

L. Chan.

The Truth comes out by little and little, we ſhall know all.

Cel.

My Lord I wiſh all the truth were known, and then I ſhould go home to my own Houſe.

L. Chan.

When were you in Flanders?

Cel.

Never.

L. Chan.

You were.

Cel.

I never was out of England.

L. Chan.

Do you know one Mr. Adams?

Cel.

What Mr. Adams does your Lordſhip mean?

L. Chan.

Mr. Adams, a Commiſſioner of the Statute of Bankrupt.

Cel.

Yes, I know him well, he ſent John-a-Nokes to Priſon, and thereupon was put out of Commiſſion.

L. Chan.

Has he done you any perſonal injury?

Cel.

Only helpt to cheat me of five Hundred Pounds.

L. Chan.

Nothing elſe?

Cel.

No my Lord, but I’ll aſſure you he did that.

L. Chan.

You were at the Devil-Tavern with him and Dangerfield the 24th of September, and ſaid there was no Plot but a Presbyterian H Plot 28 H1v 28 Plot and that it would appear ſo in a Month, you tim’d it well, for juſt then your Intrigue was found out.

Cel.

My Lord I was at the Devil-Tavern, but not within three weeks of the time you mention.

L. Chan.

You were there at that time, and ſaid you were juſt come from Flanders and drank the Duke of York’s Health in a Beer-glaſs of Claret, and would not let Mr. Adams drink, unleſs he nam’d the Health.

Cel.

Indeed my Lord that was ill done, for there was not a drop of Claret.

L.C.

But you drank the Duke’s Health.

Cel.

Pray my Lord what crime is it?

L.C.

It is none.

Cel.

Then I hope there’s no Puniſhment.

L.C.

Here is nothing to be done with her, call Mr. Adams.

He was called in, and his Wiſe Depoſitions read.

Cel.

My Lord, of all this fine Story there is nothing true, but that I was at the Tavern, but it was three weeks before the time mentioned, and I did Pledge the DDuke’s Health, and ſay, I believed there was a Plot among the Preſbyterians, to play their old Game over again, but I hoped God would bleſs the King and his Royal Brother, and that their Affairs would go well, and God would deſtroy their Enemies, and ſend quiet Times.

Adams.

She did ſay ſhe had been beyond Sea, and Mr. Petly will ſwear ſhe ſaid ſhe had been in Flanders.

Cel.

If I did ſay ſo, I lyed.

L. Preſid.

If you Lyed then, how ſhall we know you tell Truth now?

Cel.

My Lord, there is a great deal of difference between what I ſay at a Tavern, to a Man of his Underſtanding, and what I ſay here, where every Word ought to be equal to an Oath.

Adams.

Your bawdy Story I left out of the Depoſitions, I was aſham’d to ſpeak it.

The King.

What, can ſhe ſpeak Bawdy too?

Adams.

Yes, indeed ſhe did.

L.C.

I, ſhe’s fit for any thing.

Cel.

My Lord, I never ſpoke an immodeſt word in my Life. Mr. Adams though you ſtrive to take away my Life, do not take away my Honour; What did I ſay?

King.

What did ſhe ſay? come tell us the Story.

Adams.

She ſaid――She ſaid――that――She ſaid――That if ſhe did not loſe her Hands, ſhe could get Mony as long as――

King.

As long as what? out with it.

Adams made as if he were aſham’d, and could not ſpeak ſuch a word.

Cel.

I ſaid, if I did not loſe my Hands, I ſhould get Mony as long as Men kiſſed their Wives.

Adams.

By the Oath I have taken ſhe ſaid their Miſtreſſes too.

Cel.

Did I ſo, pray what elſe do they keep them for?

L. Chan.

That was but witty.

King.

’Twas but natural to her Practice.

Cel.

Mr. Adams I am ſorry for your Ignorance,――;I beſeech your Majeſty let me be inlarged.

L. Chan.

You are an obſtinate Woman, and will tell us nothing we ask you.

Cel.

My Lord, I tell Truth to all you ask.

L. Chan. 29 H2r 29

L.C.

Here’s no body believes you, you will trifle away your Life.

Cel.

My Lord, I will not belye my ſelf nor others to ſave it, but I will aſſure your Lordſhips, never man that came before you, feared Death, nor valued Life leſs than I do.

L.C.

I, ſhe’s fit for them, Withdraw, Withdraw.

After that I was fetcht up once or twice again, but do not remember for what;――;Then they let me alone till the 9th of January, and then Captain Richardſon went up with me, and by the way told me, That if now I would make an ingenious Confeſſion I might be inlarged, and the Truth found out: I anſwered, I knew nothing of all they asked me, nor ever anwered any thing but the Truth, they do not look for Treaſon in the right place, but when they do, they may find enough.

Capt. Richardſon.

But if you know any thing you are bound to tell it.

Cel.

I am only obliged to anſwer Truth to ſuch queſtions as I am asked, and the Lord Chancellor told me he would not believe a word I ſaid, and I do not believe a word of the whole Plot further than that the Preſbyterians are playing over their old Game again.

Capt. Richardſon.

Well I ſee it is impoſſible to perſwade you to Reaſon.

Cel.

I never yet could ſee a Reaſon for lying.

When I came before the Council they ſpoke not a word of the old matter, but queſtioned me concerning Sir Robert Peyton then preſent; I told the Truth, as I would have done long before if they asked it; and deſired Pen, Ink and Paper to recollect my Memory, and to ſee my Husband before a Keeper, which the King ſaid was but reaſonable, and bid make an Order for it, which was done, yet the Keeper would never let me ſee him in 11 or 12 weeks that I was confined after that, but one quarter of an hour; Yet to give him his due, he was as civil (to me, as the ſtrictneſs of my confinement would admit of,) and his Wife alſo, all the time I was in their own Houſe.

January 11th. I ſent in my Depoſitions, being all I then could remember, but they would not let me have Paper to take a Copy of them, but Truth can never be forgotten.

January 15, 16, or 17th. I was brought before a Committee of Lords, and they asked me many Trepanning Queſtions to inſnare me.

Then Mr. Gadbury was called in, and his Depoſtions read, to which I only anſwered.

Cel.

Mr. Gadbury I remember nothing of all this, but I confeſs I am the unfortunate cauſe of your Trouble, and if by ruining me you can eaſe your ſelf, I give you free leave.

Then a Lord told me there was Treaſon ſworn againſt me, but I might yet ſave my ſelf if I would, for they did not Thirſt for my Blood.

Cel.

I am glad to hear your Lordſhip ſay ſo, for I am ſo ſimple I judge by appearances, which are quite otherwiſe.

Then Dangerfield was called in, and asked if I did not ſet him on to make a Mutiny at the Rainbow Coffee-Houſe.

Dangerfield.

My Lord, I cannot ſay ſhe ſet me on.

Cel.

Was not I angry with you for it, and bid you be gone out of my Houſe? and cauſed you to be removed up into the Garret.

Dang. 30 H2v 30

Dangerfield.

No, that was afterwards.

Cel.

But it was for that Cauſe.

A Lord.

Do you know any thing of a walk that was upon TowerWharf? tell us the Truth for you are upon your Oath.

Cel.

I have often walked upon it, for I lived thereby.

A Lord.

We mean a walk with the Lord Chief Juſtice, and offering Ten Thouſand Pounds concerning Sir George Wakeman, tell us the Truth, for the Counteſs of Powis has told us all.

Cel.

Yes, my Lord, I read it in a Pamphlet.

Dangerfield.

I do believe it was in a Pamphlet.

Cel.

There was two, and you brought them both to me.

A Lord.

Do you remember any more concerning Sir Robert Peyton?

Cel.

Nothing that is fit to tell at this time.

A Lord.

She will not tell the Kings Privy Council what ſhe knows.

Cel.

Not at this time,――;

at which Anſwer they were very angry, and asked me ſome ſnaring Queſtions concerning my ſelf, but I have forgot what it was; yet remember that I anſwered thus.

Cel.

My Lord, I am not obliged to Anſwer that Queſtion; your Lordſhips are none of my Judges, I appeal to my equal Judges, Twelve Commons of England in a Court of Judicature, let them that deſire my life, aſſault it there, and though I cannot defend it like a man, yet I will not part with it in complement to your Lordſhips, and I deſire to be tryed as ſoon as may be.

A Lord.

Your Tryal will come ſoon enough, you will be put to death.

Cel.

Bleſſed be God, then I hope the Play is near an end, for Tragedies whether real or fictious, ſeldom end before the Women die.

A Lord.

What do you make a Play of it?

Cel.

If there be no more Truth in the whole Story, then there is in what relates to me, every Play that is Acted has more Truth in it.

A Lord.

You talk very peremptorily.

Cel.

My Lord, I thank God Death is no terror to me, and ſhe that fears not to die, cannot fear to ſpeak Truth.

A Lord.

Withdraw, withdraw, Mrs. Cellier.

Cel.

Before I go, I will tell you ſomething of Sir Robert Peyton; he told me, that though the Earl of Shaftsbury was out of the Council, yet his power was as great as ever, for he had a ſtrong Party there, and he knew all Tranſactions as ſoon as the Council roſe, for he had a Nephew there, and there was a perſon always ready at his Houſe, to run away with Intelligence of what paſſed at Council to the Earl of Shaftsbury.

A Lord ſaid that was very like, how elſe ſhould the Examinations taken there come to the Preſs ſo ſoon? ſome of Mr. Gadburies that were taken but a day or two before, lying there in Print upon the Table.

Then one of the Lords ſeeming to wonder his Lordſhips Nephew was not there, commanded me to withdraw.

Both in January and February, I ſent in the following Petition, but could not poſſibly get it read, though I ſent 5 or 6, and in the whole time of my Confinement, my Husband carried near 20, but they were ſtill ſuppreſt.

The 31 I1r 31

To the Kings moſt Excellent Majeſty, and the Right Honourable the Lords of his Majeſties Privy Counſel. The Humble Petition of Elizabeth Cellier cloſe Priſoner in Newgate, Sheweth, That Your Petitioner hath been thirteen Weeks cloſe confin’d, and ſhe having had the management of her Husband’s Eſtate, with that of two Fatherleſs Children; The moſt conſiderable Eſtate of which depends upon Proceſs of Law, and is to be try’d this next Term, and they are wholly Ignorant of their Affairs. Wherefore your Petitioner doth moſt humbly Pray and Beſeech your Majeſty and the Honourable the Lords of the Counſel, that ſhe may be Inlarged, or permitted to ſpeak to her Husband and Children before a Keeper, to adviſe them how to proceed in their Suit, and thereby prevent their ruine. And your Petitioner ſhall pray.

My Husband put in ſeveral Petitions to the ſame effect, but could get no Anſwer, inſomuch that he was forc’d to releaſe Seven Hundred and odd Pounds for Sixty one; A good Part of which Mony lay in Court of Chancery, and the Maſter of the Rolls had made A decretal Order for us, but the Defendant petitioning for another hearing, my Husband and Children not being permitted to ſpeak with me, knew not which way to defend themſelves.

There I lay cloſe confin’d, till the firſt of April, though my Husband daily ſollicited for my enlargement. But about that time, (being dangerouſly ſick) I was allow’d the Liberty of the Preſs-Yard.

Sometime in February, I was brought again before a Committee of Councel.

A Lord.

Mrs. Cellier, do you know one Mr. Pen, a Quaker?

Cel.

I never ſee him but once.

Lord.

Did you not write to him, and give him thanks for making ſo good uſe of the Paper you ſent him?

Cel.

Yes, My Lord, I did ſo.

Lord.

Do you uſe to write to Men you know not?

Cel.

If your Lordſhips pleaſe to have Patience, I will tell you the occaſion of it.

About the beginning of May laſt, 6 Copies of a Paper call’d the Danby Reflections were left at my Houſe, by an unknown Perſon, with a Note, deſiring me to put them into underſtanding mens hands.

I went to Fox Hall, and made a ſtrict Inquiſtition into the matter, and found by the affirmation of many Perſons, that that part of the Story was very true, and I thought I had no other reaſon to doubt the Truth of the reſt, and having heard Mr. Pen plead in the Cauſe of New Jerſey, at Sir John Churchil’s chamber, before the Duke’s Commiſſioners, and obſerv’d that he was a man of a great deal of Reaſon, I thought I could not better comply with the deſire of the Author, than to ſend him one.

Lord.

What made you ſo earneſt to ſpeak with him?

Cel.

I heard it abroad by the name of Pen’s Paper, and found it ſpread much.

Lord.

What had you to ſay to him?

Cel.

Something relating to the ſame matter, I ſuppoſe, but I have forgot what, for it is 9 or 10 months ago.

Lord.

What did you with the reſt?

Cel.

I gave one to my Lady Powis, another to Mr. Henry Nevil. I ſent one I into 32 I1v 32 into France, another into Flanders, and got the other coppied, and ſent as many as I could get to my Friends and Acquaintance.

Lord.

You have been very zealous for the Cauſe.

Cel.

My Lord, It is good to be diligent in all that one undertakes.

Which anſwer was the laſt I had opportunity to make to any in Authority until my Arraignment, which (in confidence of my own Innocence) I continually preſt for.

Not but that I knew the danger, as to this Life, of encountring the Devil in the worſt of his Inſtruments, which are Perjvrers Incovraged to that degree as that profligated Wretch was, and has been ſince his being expoſed to the World in his true colours both at mine, and at anothers Tryal.

But the Sence that all I had done, or endeavoured to do, was prompted by a Diſintereſted Loyalty to the King, and Charity to Innocence oppreſt, without the leaſt mixture of Mallice to any Creature breathing, Made me with hopes expect the worst thoſe Devils incarnate could do unto me.

And if any thing in the World could give a probable Light where the true Plot is manag’d, mine, and my accuſers Caſes would do it.

For Singly and Alone, without the Advice or Aſſiſtance of any Catholick breathing Man or Woman, I was left to ſtudy, manage, and ſupport my self in all my troubles to my Expence and Loſs much above a thouſand Pounds, never receiving one penny towards it, directly or indirectly, but ten pounds given me by the hands of a condemn’d Prieſt, five days before my Tryal: nor have I ſince received any thing towards my Loſſes, or the leaſt civility from any of them.

Whilſt Dangerfield (when made a Priſoner for apparent Recorded Rogueries) was viſted by and from Perſons of conſiderable Quality, with great Sums of Gold and Silver, to encourage him in the new Villanies he had undertaken, not againſt Me alone, but Perſons in whoſe Safety all good Men (as well Proteſtants as others) in the three Kingdoms are concern’d.

For I hope no reaſonable man can believe me ſo vain, as to think my Life or Fame worth the conſideration of an Induſtrious Faction.

Thus have I laid open the Truth of my Caſe, to be believed or not believed, as Reaſon, Sence, and Probability ſhall guide Men.

And as to my own Sex, I hope they will pardon the Errors of my Story, as well as those bold Attempts of mine that occaſion’d it, ſince in what I meddled with, as to Sir Robert Peyton and others (that are yet among them undiſcovered like Huſbai, and I hope will have as good succeſs to confound the crafty Contrivances of all the old Achitophels, and the Headſtrong Ambitious Practices of young Abſalom) though it may be thought too Maſculine, yet was it the effects of my Loyal (more than Religious) Zeal to gain Proſelites to his Service.

And in all my defence, none can truly ſay but that I preſerv’d the Modeſty, though not the Timorouſneſs common to my Sex. And I believe there is none, but had they been in my Station, would, to their power, have acted like me; for it is more our buſineſs than mens to fear, and conſequently to prevent the Tumults and Troubles Factions tend to, ſince we by nature are hindered from ſharing any part but the Frights and Diſturbances of them. Which that God will long preſerve theſe three Kingdoms from, is the daily Prayers of

Elizabeth Cellier.

AN
33 I2r 33

An Abſtract of the Tryal of Elizabeth Cellier.

Upon the 1680-04-3030th of April (80.) I was Arraigned at the Kings-Bench Bar, before the Lord Chief Juſtice Scroggs, for High-Treaſon.

Cl. of the Crown.

What ſayſt thou Eliz.Elizabeth Cellier, art thou Guilty, or not Guilty?

Cel.

Not Guilty.

C.C.

Culprit. how wilt Thou be Tryed?

Cel.

By God and my Country.

C.C.

God ſend thee a good Deliverance.

Cel.

My Lord, I am ſafe in my own Innocence, (as far as Innocency can make any perſon ſafe,) but ſince the moſt Innocent may be ſworn out of their lives, I deſire time to ſend for my Witneſſes, ſome of which live very far off.

L.C. Juſt.

How long time will you have? till next Term?

Cel.

No my Lord, I deſire but a fortnight;

which was Granted, and I remanded back to Priſon, that day I ſent the following Petition to the Attorney General.

To the Honourable Sir Creſwell Levins, his Majeſties Attorney General The Humble Petition of Elizabeth Cellier. Sheweth, That your Petitioner is to have her Tryal at the Bar of His Majeſties Court of Kings-Bench, for High Treaſon, the 14 of this Inſtant May. Your Petitioner Humbly beſeeches, that you will pleaſe to let her know, or otherwiſe to order the Clerk of the Crown to give her to underſtand, whether ſhe is Indicted at Common Law, or upon any Statute, and what Statute, and that ſhe may likewiſe have a Copy of Mr. Dangerfields laſt Pardon from his Majeſty; as alſo Subpœna’s for her Witneſſes, That ſhe may be ſome wayes enabled to make her Defence. And your Petitioner ſhall Pray, Eliz.Elizabeth Cellier.

34 I2v 3234

Mr. Attorney anſwered, that I was Indicted upon the Statute of the 25 of Edward III. and might have as many Subpœna’s as I would at the Crown-Office; But he knew nothing of Dangerfield’s Pardon.

Then I petitioned the Lord Chancellor for a Copy of the Pardon, and his Lordſhip was pleaſed to Grant it.

May the 14. I was again brought to the Bar in Order to my Tryal, but Mr. Gadbury being Sick, (of which Oath was made by a learned Phyſitian that had Viſited him) the Kings Council deſired to put off the Tryal, but I prayed to be Tryed then, or ſome day that Term; And ſaid, That I would bring my ſelf thither, the laſt day of the Term, and hoped that according to the Law, I ſhould be Tryed or Diſcharged.

L.C.J.

That will do you little good, for there is a Proviſo in the Act, if the Kings Witneſſes be not ſick.

Cel.

My Lord what if they will never be well?

L.C.J.

You ſhall be Tryed the next Term, it is but a little while to it.

Cel.

My Lord, my Husband will think it a great while;

at which the Court laugh’d.

Cel.

My Lord, he hath a great cauſe to think it long for he is already a Thouſand pounds the worſe for my Impriſonment; I have lain two and twenty weeks cloſe confin’d, During which time my Husband put in near 20 Petitions before the Lords of the Council, to ſpeak with me before a Keeper; but they were all rejected: and he had then a ſuit in Chancery to a conſiderable value, which had been heard before the Maſter of the Rolls, and he had made a Decretal Order for us, and a good part of the Money lay in the Court of Chancery, but my Adverſary taking Advantage of my confinement, Petitioned for another Hearing; and my Husband not knowing how to defend the Cauſe, was forced to diſcharge ſeven hundred and odd pounds, for ſixty one, becauſe he could not be permitted to ſpeak with me.

L.C.J.

You arraign the Councel.

Cel.

No, my Lord it is not to Arraign them, but to make it known how I have been uſed, and pray redreſs.

Serj Maynard.

Why could not your Husband follow his Law-Suit without you?

Cel.

Becauſe he is a Stranger, and does not underſtand the Law.

Serj. Maynard.

Then you do Gentlewoman.

Cel.

No Sir, but I have got enough to make a Country Juſtice, and pray that I may be tryed, And if I be Guilty, puniſhed; and if Innocent, acquitted. And that my Husband and Children may not ſuffer as they do by my Impriſonment.

L.C.J.

You ſhall be tryed the firſt day of the next Term, and it is in compaſſion to you that we appoint that day.

Cel.

My Lord ſhall I be diſcharged, if I be not Tryed then?

L.C.J.

You ſhall.

Cel.

My Lord the Laws I am to be Tryed by, have ſufficiently compenſated their denying me other Councel, by allowing me you my Lords that are my Judges, for Councellors, and I will depend upon your Faithful advice with confidence, and humbly pray fair play for my life.

Judges.

You ſhall have fair play.

Cel.

I thank your Lordſhips.

L.C.J.

Keeper of Newgate, take her back, and uſe her with reſpect.

1680-06-11June the 11th. (80) I was again brought to the Bar, and the Indictment read 35 K1r 35 read, and the effect of it was for conſulting, and expending Money for carrying on the Plot to kill the King, raiſe War in the Realm, and introduce Popery, and for endeavouring to caſt the Plot upon others, and for imploying Dangerfield to kill the King, and upbraiding him for loſing an Opportunity, &c.

Cel.

My Lord, for ſaving the time of the Court, I pray that no Gentleman that has been on any of the former Juries, and found the Indictment againſt any of them that lately had the like accuſation, may be ſworn againſt me (And in regard a great part of my Charge is for endeavouring to throw the Popiſh Plot upon the Preſbyterians) therefore I except againſt all thoſe that had not lately taken the Sacrament, as Perſons that cannot be indifferent.

L.C.J.

Mrs. Cellier, this cannot be allow’d, you muſt make your exceptions.

Cel.

My Lord, the Jury ought to be choſe out of the unconcern’d Neighbourhood, and every Diſſenter from the Church of England is a party againſt whom the Fact is ſaid to be committed, therefore none but Church of England men ought to be of my Jury.

L.C.J.

Mrs. Cellier, make your exceptions.

Which I did, and excepted againſt ſeveral that had been on the former Juries, yet admitted of Sir Philip Matthews, and others, telling them they looked like honeſt men, and I believ’d they would do me no wrong.

The Jury are as follows.

  • Sir Philip Matthews, Baronet.
  • Sir John Munſter.
  • Thomas Harriot, Eſq.
  • John Foſter, Eſq.
  • Richard Cheney, Eſq.
  • Edward Draper, Eſq.
  • Edward Wilford, Eſq.
  • John Roberts, Eſq.
  • Hugh Squire, Eſq.
  • Thomas Eaglefield, Eſq.
  • George Read, Eſq.
  • Richard Parrot, Eſq.

The Jury being ſworn, the Kings Councel called the Witneſſes, and firſt Mr. Gadbury, who atteſted he knew not a tittle of the Plot one way or other, except what he heard by Common Report, and read in the Prints, nor of any deſign I had againſt the Life of the King; but acknowledges that he was Privy to, and active in bringing over Sir Robert Peyton to the Kings intereſt, (at the ſaid Sir Robert’s requeſt) and to bring Sir Robert to kiſs his Royal-Highneſs’s hand by my means; and ſaid, That I did always expreſs my ſelf with all Duty and Loyalty; and that I told him I had carried the names of four Gentlemen. Sir Roberts Friends to the Duke, in hopes that if they were put into Commiſſion of the Peace, it might conduce much to the breaking the meaſures of the Factious. And Mr. Gadbury further Declared that one Smith formerly a School-maſter at Iſlington, and another Gentleman with him came to him, and deſired his Advice about going to the Lords in the Tower, pretending he could declare ſtrange things againſt Mr. Oats, which might prove advantagious to them.

In order to Indicting him for Perjury, which he ſaid I was forward to promote, and ſaid, that I did not care if I were at Ten Pounds Charge to have it effected, but he ſaid he refus’d to adviſe Mr. Smith to concern himſelf either with Mr. Oats, or the Lords.

He further aver’d, that I told him I heard Dangerfield talk of a Non-conformiſtK miſt 36K1v 36 miſt Plot, and how he frequented their Clubs; and had ſo far inſinuated into the favour of ſome of them, that he was promiſed a Commiſſion among them, and that ſeveral Commiſſions were given out already. After that, Mr. Gadbury being interrogated by the Attorny General, to ſeveral paſſages ſignified in an Atteſtation which he himſelf had drawn up for the Privy Council, which ſeemed more to affect me than any thing he had hitherto ſaid, ſhewing the ſame unto him, which when he had perus’d, he did own to be his hand-writing; and ſaid, That what was contained therein was true, but when he wrote the ſame, he confeſſed that he raked up all that ever he could againſt me, aggravating every Circumſtance to the utmoſt, and that by that reaſon when he was in Priſon, ſome perſon or perſons whom he did not name to avoid reflections, Threatned him with Hanging, &c. And that they told him two Witneſſes had ſworn Treaſon poſitively againſt him, and that I now accus’d him, and made a third; and he knowing I muſt ſwear falſe, as the reſt had done, and being Menac’d as before, Drew up the ſaid Accuſation againſt me, aggravating the ſeveral expreſſions therein, in hopes thereby to leſſen my Evidence againſt him, and thereby to ſave himſelf.

Then he was again interrogated, whether I did not tell him I hoped to ſee Weſtminſter Abby full of Benedictine Monks, and the Temple with Fryers; he anſwered, That his ſufferings had very much weakned his Memory, but as far as he remembred, I did not ſpeak of any hope, but believes it was thus, What if you ſhould ſee Weſtminſter Abby filled with Monks again? and that this was in ordinary Diſcourſe as they paſs’d through the Abby together; And that he looked upon thoſe Words to be no way maliciouſly ſpoken, nor regarded it further than common Diſcourſe.

Serjeant Maynard.

What religion are you of?

Gadbury.

A Proteſtant according to the Church of England.

Serj. Maynard.

Such Proteſtants do more harm than Papiſts.

Gad.

Sir, I am neither Papiſt nor Presbyterian, nor was I any of the Tribe of Forty One.

Then he went on with his Evidence, ſaying, That when the King was Sick at Windſor, I aſked him whether he thought his Majeſty would live or dye, ſuppoſing as he thought that he might have taken ſome notice of the effect by obſerving the beginning of the Diſtemper; but ſays, That I did not deſire him to erect a Scheme for that purpoſe, nor to Calculate the Kings Nativity, and that he believes I had talked at this rate five or ſix times, always expreſſing great fears of his Majeſties Death, and the Troubles that may thereupon ariſe through the reſtleſs Malice of the turbulent Factious Party, and that he with as great Trouble told me, he durſt not preſume to Judge of ſuch and ſo weighty an Affair as that was.

But that he remembers he Calculated a perſons Nativity for me, to know whether he would be juſt to me in gathering in ſuch Debts as were due to my Husband who was a French Merchant; And that from thence he caution’d me to beware of him, but that he knew not the ſaid perſon was Dangerfield, till he came before the Counſel, bringing onely the time and Place of his Birth, without making any mention of his Name, but that the ſaid Dangerfield thence took occaſion to ſwear him into the acquaintance of the Counteſs of Powis, and ſeveral Honourable Lords, whoſe Faces he never ſaw.

This was the ſubſtance of Mr. Gadbury’s Evidence.

L.C.J.

Brother you are miſtaken in your Evidence.

Att. 37 K2r 37

Att. Gen.

We are in this, but I hope we ſhall not be miſtaken in others.

Then Dangerfield was call’d in.

Cel.

My Lord, I except againſt his Evidence, as a perſon that has not the Qualifications the Law requires in Witneſſes of Treaſon, and I pray that I may be heard to prove it, and that the Court will protect my Witneſſes from his Inſolence, for the laſt time I ſtood here in order to my Tryal, he ſtruck one of them here in preſence of his Majeſty, in the Face of the Court, and threatned to kill others; if they appear’d again.

L.C.J.

Have you Witneſſes of this?

Cel.

Yes my Lord, I will offer nothing to the Court, but what I will prove by Witneſſes and Records. And to do this, I have taken of a few of the Records of his many Crimes, and but a few, becauſe I would not be chargeable to my Husband, or troubleſome to the Court. I have but Thirteen.

Judge.

A pretty Company.

L.C.J.

Go on then.

Cel.

Call Mr. Pearſon.

He appear’d. I pray’d he might be ſworn.

L.C.J.

That may not be againſt the King.

Cel.

My Lord it is not againſt the King, for the King is as much concern’d to preſerve me if I be Innocent, as to puniſh me if I am Guilty.

And by the Statute of the Fourth of King James, it is ordered that perſons accuſ’d ſhall have Witneſſes produc’d upon Oath, for his better Clearing and Juſtification. And the Lord Cook ſays, That he never read in any Act of Parliament, Author, Book, Caſe, nor Ancient Record, that in criminal Caſes, the Party accus’d ſhould not have ſworn Witneſſes: And therefore there is not a ſpark of Law againſt it. And the Lord Cook dyed but lately; and if there was no Law againſt it then, I deſire to know by what Law it is now denyed me; for the common Law cannot be altered. And, I pray your Lordſhips, being of Counſel for me, that you will not ſuffer any thing to be urged againſt me contrary to Law, but that my Witneſſes may be ſworn, or Counſel aſſign’d me; to that Point of Law.

A Judge.

What would you have Counſel for? This does not affect you yet. Go on.

Cel.

Mr. Pearſon, pray tell the Court how Dangerfield us’d you the laſt time I was here.

Pearſon.

I ſtood in the Hall, and he came and asked me how I durſt Subpœna any man and not tell him for what, and ſtruck me on the Arm.

Judge.

Did he ſo?

Cel.

Call Mr. Barrard:

He appear’d, and teſtified the ſame.

Cel.

My Lord, Witneſſes for Treaſon ought to be Honeſt, Sufficient, Lawful, and Credible; and I will prove he hath been Burnt in the Hand, Whip’d, Tranſported, Pillorie’d, Out-law’d for Felony, Fin’d for Cheating, and ſuffer’d publick Infamy for many other notorious Crimes.

Mr.Clements, bring the London Record.

He produc’d it.

Judge.

Can you ſwear this is a true Copy.

Clem.

Yes my Lord, I examin’d it.

Then he was ſworn, and the Clark read the Record, which ſhew’d, That in the 25th. Year of his Majeſtie’s Reign he was Convict of Felony at the Old Baily, for ſtealing a Tortoice-ſhell Cabinet, and ten pieces of old Gold, out of the Houſe of Robert Blagrave, and being asked what he had to ſay for himſelf, that Judgment ſhould not paſs upon him, according to Law? He ſaid he was a Clark, and deſir’d the benefitfit 38 K2v 38 fit of the Book, which was granted; and he read, and was (according to Law) Burnt in the Hand.

A Judge.

Can you prove he is the man?

Cel.

CallMr. Ralph Briſcow.

He appeared, and teſtified that he was the Man, and he ſaw him Burnt in the Hand.

Cel.

CallCaptain Richarſon.

He appeared, and teſtified the ſame. Then Dangerfield offer’d to go away. One of the Judges call’d to him, and ask’d him whither he went? a Lawyer anſwer’d, to fetch his Pardon, for he was come without it.

LCJ.

Make haſt then.

Then there aroſe a Queſtion among the Judges, whether Felony was ſufficient to take away his Evidence, his Clergy having reſtor’d him? And an excellent Diſcourſe paſſ’d amongſt them upon that Subject, but I cannot remember the particulars ſo well as to inſert it here. One of the King’s Counſel alledged that he was made a good Witneſs by his Pardon.

Cel.

My Lord, He is not Pardon’d Fellonies, Burglaries, nor Forgeries; And I will prove him convict of all theſe; and the King cannot give An Act of Grace to one Subject, to the prejudice of another, as this Pardon will be to me, if this prodigious Villain be thereby made a good Witneſs to take away my Life; Nor doth his Pardon include his Crimes.

Then I produc’d a Copy of his Pardon, but remembering I was not oblig’d to believe that he had a Pardon, till he himſelf had produc’d it, I call’d for it back again, then the Court went off the Cauſe, and heard motions, but Dangerfield ſtaying long, they began to examine Witneſſes on his behalf.

Firſt, Thomas Williamſon was call’d. Who ſaid he knew nothing of my treating with Dangerfield, nor ever ſaw us together, but that he was imploy’d in buſineſſes of Charity by me, to get Priſoners out, and Dangerfield among the reſt.

Mr. Scarlet was call’d, and ſaid he turn’d him over to the Bench, and I paid for his Habeas Corpus.

Bennet Duddle was call’d.

He atteſted, that he had often ſeen Dangerfield and I together in the Gallery at Powis-Houſe, and had ſeen us write, but he knew not what.

William Woodman was call’d.

And ſaid, he had carried Letters for me to the Tower and elſe-where, but none for Dangerfield.

An Blake was call’d.

Who atteſted, that I ſent her to Dangerfield in New-gate, and that he cry’d and pray’d her to ſpeak to me to ſend him ſix Pounds, and that ſhe return’d to him and told him I would ſend him none. Then Dangerfield told her he had been rack’d and expected worſe uſage that night, and that ſhe ſhould be forc’d to turn Rogue, and ruin us all.

And that if he did not turn Rogue he ſhould be hang’d, And that I bid her hide the Papers, ſaying they were Dangerfields, and might do him good, and ſhe put them into the Meal-Tub.

Then Margaret Jenkins was call’d.

And ſaid, ſhe ſaw Dangerfield in New-gate, in Irons, very poor, that he told her he had eaten nothing in two dayes, that ſhe carried him half a Crown, and another time five Shillings; and after that, Mony to pay his Fees; and that ſhe ſaw him in the Bench.

Att. 39 L1r 39

Att. Gen.

Did you not carry Letters between them?

Margaret.

Yes, but knew not what was in them.

Att. Gen.

Did you not carry two Vials of Opium to him?

Mar.

I carri’d 2 Vials which he ſent for, but I know not what was in them.

L.C.J.

Who ſent for them?

Mar.

Dangerfield ſent a Note for them to Mr. Blaſedal, and when I brought them to him he taſted of them, and ſet them up in his room.

Judge.

Who taſted of them?

Mar.

Dangerfield did.

Att. Gen.

Did you ever ſee Mrs. Cellier in the Bench with him?

Mar.

No, I never did.

Att. Gen.

Did you ever ſee them together at Powis-Houſe?

Mar.

Yes, once at Dinner, and once at Supper.

L.C.J.

Was any body with them?

Mar.

Yes, once her Husband, and the other time three Gentlewomen.

Att. Gen.

What do you know concerning Stroud?

Mar.

She bid me tell Dangerfield that he muſt get acquainted with Stroud; I tould him ſo, and he reply’d, that was done already, for he had been acquainted with Stroud a long time, and they us’d to go a robbing together. And he told me that he fear’d neither Fire, Sword, nor Hell, and he car’d not what he ſaid, nor ſwore, for he had ſtudied to be a Rogue ever ſince he was Ten Years old.

L.C.J.

You will make a ſpecial Witneſs of him by and by.

Then the Attorney General would not let her ſpeak any more, but call’d Suſan Edwards.

Att. Gen.

What do you know againſt the Priſoner at the Bar?

Edwards.

I carried two Notes from her to Mr. Dangerfield in New-gate, and two Books of Accompts, and a Guiney, and 20 s.shilling in Silver, and ſhe bid me tell him, now was the time that her Life lay in his hands.

Serj. Maynard.

Did you not carry her a Letter from him?

Suſan.

Yes.

Att. Gen.

What was in it?

Suſan.

I know not, for I cannot read written-hand; but he told me he muſt turn Rogue and ruine all the Sect.

Judge.

What Sect?

Suſan.

I know not what Sect, but he ſaid, if he did not turn Rogue, he ſhould be Hang’d.

Ser. Main.

But ſhe bid you tell him her Life lay in his hands.

Cel.

And yours too Sir, if he turn Rogue, and be believ’d as others have been of late. But ſhe’s no Witneſs, for ſhe robb’d me, and the very Heathens would not allow falſe Servants to ſwear againſt their Maſters.

Cel.

By the Oath you have taken, Where had you the Cloaths you wear?

Suſan.

Of my Father, they are none of yours, I never ſee you have but two Suits at at time.

Cel.

Did you ever ſee any thing Diſhonourable by me?

Suſan.

Yes, He went into your Chamber one Sunday Morning.

L.C.J.

Was her Husband there?

Suſ.

No, He was gone to Church.

L.C.J.

He were beſt take care how he goes to Church.

Cel.

My Lord, I appeal to your Conſcience, as you ſit there, whether you think any thing but Innocence durſt ask that Queſtion; And to prove it is ſo, there is a Women has ſerved me 26 Years, be pleaſed to examine her.

A Lawyer within the Bar, ſaid, To me it is a plain proof of her Innocence as to that point. Serj.Serjeant Maynard then made ſome malicious reflections thereupon.

Cel.

Pray Sir, is that Treaſon by the Statute of the 25. of Edward III. It is not in this Innocent Age.

L Suſan. 40 L1v 40

Suſan,

She ſaid ſhe doubted not, but the Plot would turn to a Presbyterian one; and I heard Dangerfield ſay ſo too; and that he would make it his Intereſt to find it out; and ſhe ſaid, if he did, ſhe ſhould ſee him keep his Coach and Six Horſes, and then he ſhould marry her Daughter.

L.C.J.

What would he have Mother and Daughter too?

Suſan then prated very impertinently.

Judge.

Will that Impudent Wench never have done prating? Turn her out.

Then ſhe went and ſtood among the Clerks, Prating, and behaving her ſelf impudently, till they ſcoft at her, and thruſt her out of Court.

Then the Lord Chief Juſtice made an excellent Speech, of what ſad Conſequence it would be to admit ſuch profligated Wretches to give Evidence; and that the three Kingdoms might have cauſe to rue ſuch a days work, and that it would be an in-let to the greateſt Villanies, to deſtroy our Lives, Liberties and Eſtates, with much more to the like purpoſe.

Judge.

This Fellow will come no more.

L.C.J.

Call him, ſhall we ſtay all day?

Cryer.

Dangerfield, Dangerfield, Dangerfield, &c.

After he had been called five or ſix times, the Lord Chief Juſtice commanded a Tip-ſtaff to go into the Hall and look for him: Which he did, and after a long time Dangerfield came with a Black-Box, at which the Court laughed, ſaying here comes the Black-Box, here comes the Black-Box.

L.C.J.

You have been long in going to the Temple.

Dang.

I went to the Exchange; Here is my Pardon.

It was obſerv’d that his Hands did ſo ſhake and tremble, that he could not open the Box.

Cel.

My Lord, he is not Pardon’d Fellony, Burglay, Perjury, nor Forgery: And I will prove him notoriouſly Guilty of all theſe.

The Clerk read his Pardon, and all theſe Crimes were omitted.

Cel.

My Lord, he is Convict of Fellony, and Out-lawed thereupon; Mr. Lane bring the Chelmsford Record: he produc’d and prov’d it.

The Clerk read it, which ſaid he was Convict of Fellony and Burglary, for breaking the Houſe of Robert Tetterſon, Shoe-maker of Windſmore Hill, and taking thence a linnen bag worth a Penny, and Four Pounds Ten Shillings in Mony; he broke Priſon, and was Out-law’d thereupon.

Kings Counſel.

How do you know this is the Man?

Cel.

He is the Man, and I will prove it by the party that was Rob’d, and the Conſtable out of whoſe hands he broke.

Call Robert Tetterſon, and James Eaton.

The Cryer called, but they came not.

Cel.

My Lord, I fear he has Murther’d them, for Tetterſon was here yeſterday, and told me, that Dangerfield threatned to kill him, if he appeared any more, and ſaid, That he went in danger of his Life.

L.C.J.

Call them again, look about the Hall for them, which they did.

Clements.

My Lord, I ſee Tetterſon in Court this day.

Then the Cryer called them again, and a perſon was ſent to the Houſes adjacent, to call them, but in vain.

Then the Kings Councel would not admit him to be the Man mentioned in the Indictment, becauſe it was there Tho.Thomas Dangerfield, Labourer, and the Pardon was Tho.Thomas Dangerfield Gentleman.

Cel.

My Lord, if he be the perſon’d Pardoned, he is the perſon Out-law’d, for both are Thomas Dangerfield of Waltham Abby.

Judge.

Is there any more Thomas Dangerfields there?

Dang. 41 L2r 41

Dangerf.

Yes, my Father and a Couſin of mine, which uſes to come there ſometimes.

Kings Councel. Said I muſt prove him the man.

Lawyer within the Bar.

Brother trouble not the Court, for he is the Man.

L.C.J.

Come, I will not admit it could be your Father. Mrs. Celliers, have you a Record of Perjury.

Cel.

My Lord, I have of Forgery.

Judge.

Have you one of his being Pillory’d?

Cel.

I have four, bring the Salisbury Records.

They were produced and proved, and one of them read, which ſaid that in the Thirtieth year of the King, he was Indicted at Sarum, for putting off a Gild Shilling for a Guinney, to which Indictment he Pleaded Guilty, and was Condemned to ſtand in the Pillory three hours next Market day, with a Paper on his forehead, ſignifying his Crime, and after that to pay five Pounds to the King, and that he ſtood in the Pillory according to Sentence.

Cel.

My Lord, I have 3 Records more to the ſame effect, to all which he Pleaded Guilty.

Judge.

No, it is enough.

After all this, Serj. Maynard and the Att.Attorney General would had him allowed a good witneſs, ſaying all theſe Crimes are Pardoned under the Title of Offences and Transgreſſions.

Cel.

A Pardon cannot make him an honeſt Man, as all ought to be that are Witneſſes in Treaſon. Nor can the King give him an Act of Grace to my prejudice, as this Pardon will be, if it make him a good Witneſs to take away my Life.

Mr. Langhorn deſired that Mr. Reading might be examined, and the Lord Chief Juſtice North denyed it, ſaying he had been in the Pillory, and had his Teſtimony been allowed, I doubt not but Mr. Langhorn had beed alive. And ſhall this prodigous Wretch that has been burn’d in the Hand, Whipt, Pillory’d, Convict of all manner of Crimes, and ſtands out-law’d for Fellony, be allow’d a good Witneſs to take away my Life, and ſuch a Gentleman as Mr. Reading be denyed to give Evidence to ſave, becauſe he had been on the Pillory for endeavering to do that which if he had done, it had not amounted to one of thoſe many Crimes this Villain Pleaded Guilty to. And I beſeech the Court to conſider, That if ſuch Witneſſes be allowed, Liberty and Property are deſtroyed.

Attor. General.

Mr. Reading was not Pardoned.

Cel.

He is not Pardoned neither, for he is Out-lawed for Fellony, which is not incerted in his Pardon, and is otherwiſe notoriouſly infamous.

K. Council.

None but Villains are fit to be employed in ſuch Deſigns.

L.C.J.

They are fit to be employed, but not fit to be believed, and we ought not to hood-wink Juſtice for ſuch a Stigmatiz’d, Whipt, Pillory’d, Burnt in the hand Fellow as he notoriouſly appears to be.

Then Dangerfield ſubmiſſively bowing; ſaid My Lord, this is enough to diſcourage any one hereafter, from entring into good and honeſt Principles.

L.C.J.

It will diſcourage Rogues from daring to appear before a Court of Juſtice.

Then his Lordſhip told him his own in very apt words, with a recapitulation of his Crimes; ſaying, he did not, nor would not, fear nor ſpare ſuch as he was.

Then Judge Dolben ſtood up, and ſaid, That no man that had any ſpark of Grace or Civility, would dare to appear before a Court of Juſtice, being guilty of ſuch Crimes, and that no man of common ſence, would take away the life of a Worm upon ſuch Evidence.

Then the Lord Chief Juſtice gave ſhort directions to the Jury, telling them he knew nothing they had to do, for that nothing material appeared againſt me.

And they unanimouſly cryed out, Not Guilty.

Clerk Crown.

Kneel down.

Cel.Cellier Kneeling, ſaid God preſerve the King and his Royal Highneſs, and bleſs this Hounourable Court.

L.C.J.

Dang.Dangerfield have you any ſecurity for your Good behaviour to anſwer the Fellony.

But Dangerfield having none, the Lord Chief Juſtice ſaid, Take him away, take him away, and ſecure him. Then was Dangerfield preſently diſarmed, who trembling, and looking as if he had been juſt going to be Hang’d, Cryed out, Whither muſt I go? whither will you carry me? Then he ſhed Tears in the Court, and was by the Officers preſently conveyed to the Kings-Bench Priſon with a numerous Train of Attendance, where the Gentlemen Priſoners received him according to his Merit. But he not liking his entertainment, deſired to be locked up till the Marſhal came home: and then for his better ſecurity was ſent to the Common-Side, where the Priſoners had like to have Pump’d him.

But 42 L2v 42

But his Phanatick friends bringing him good ſtore of Mony, both Gold and Silver, he ſpent it very freely among them, ſo by that means eſcap’d that Storm, and there remained in the cuſtody of the Marſhal, till he was brought to the Bar by order of Court, and pleaded a general New-gate Pardon, in which his name was inſerted, and ſo was diſcharged, with good advice to leave off his former wicked courſes, and take up ſome imployment to live honeſtly, for his thread of Life was ſo fine ſpun, that he could expect no more favour from any Court.

The tryal being over, the Gentlemen of the Jury ſent for me up into the Room where they Din’d, and told me, there was a Guiny a Man due to them, I Anſwer’d, I had coſt my Husband a great deal of Mony arlaleady, much more than my Perſon was worth, and was not willing to put him to any Charge I could avoid; And I hop’d they would conſider my condition, and not expect Mony from me. They reply’d if I had been caſt, the King muſt have paid them a Guiny a Man, upon which I promis’d if it were a due Debt I would ſend it to Sir Philip Matthews on Munday, but finding it was not, I ſent him this following Letter.

Honoured Sir. I have conſidered your demand of a Guiny apeice to each Gentleman of the Jury, and find that it is in no ſort due. How great ſoever the ruin is I lie under by the villany of my accuſer, I would have made hard ſhift but I would have paid what was juſtly due. But upon your ſecond thoughts, I am aſſur’d you will not forfeit your Spurs by oppreſſing the Diſtreſſed ſhe, Your ſelves and the Laws have preſerv’d from a raging Dragon. Pray Sir accept of, and give my moſt humble Service to your ſelf, and all the Worthy Gentlemen of your Pannel, and Yours and their ſeveral Ladies. And if you and They pleaſe, I will with no leſs fidelity ſerve them in their Deliveries, then You have done me with Juſtice in mine, and thereby preſerv’d Liberty and Property, as much as, Honoured. Sir. Your moſt Humble Servant, Elizabeth Cellier.

Monday the 14th of June the Jury ſent one Mr. Squire, a very civil and underſtanding Gentleman, to demand the Guinies of me, we argued the Caſe a while, and he went away very well ſatisfied.

On Tueſday morning another came, that was rough and inconſiderable; and among other things he told me, that the D.Dutchess of B. gave them two Guinies a Man. I replyed, If I had been a Dutcheſs, I would have given them five; But I was a poor Woman, and had been much wrong’d, and to prevent further inconvenience, I would not injure my Innocence, notr their Juſtice, ſo much as to give them any thing but my humble Thanks, which I pray’d him to accept of, and give to them all. He went away in a great heat, expreſſing his reſentment in ſuch Language as I will not ſpoil Paper with.

This is all I can call to mind, of what paſt at my ſeveeral Examinations, and Tryal, and I hope the judicious Reader will pardon what is either forgot, or not well expreſs’d in conſideration that I was forc’d to defend my Life, both againſt the Knights and the Dragon, for in this unequal Combate there was no St. George to defend me againſt him, but Sir C―― Sir J―― Sir R―― and Sir George alſo ſtood by my accuſer, to manage his Malice againſt me.

Yet I could not but pity thoſe learned Gentlemen, (one of which would have been infinitely too hard for all theſe together,) which have been accuſed in this accurſed Plot, that ſo many of them ſhould come arm’d and arrayed againſt me, and be forc’d to bluſh at the weakneſs of their Combatant.

But God, the Protector of Innocence, hath for this time delivered me from the rage of that wicked Enemy, and his Fellow-plotters.

But how long either my ſelf, or any other Loyal Subjects, ſhall be ſecure from the like Conſpiracy, God only knows.

He ſent from above, he drew me out of many Waters. He delivered me from my ſtrong Enemy, and from them which hated me, for they were too ſtrong for me. They prevented me in the day of my Calamity, but the Lord is my ſtay. Pſ. 18. 16,17,18.

Finiſhed, 1680-07-02Fryday, July the 2d.ByElizabeth Cellier.

43 M1r 43

A Poſtſcript to the Impartial Readers.

On Monday the 16th. of this Inſtant, the Sheet F was taken in the Preſs, and my Self and the Printer brought by Meſſengers before Mr. Secretary Jenkins, and he caus’d us to give Bonds and Security to appear before the Lords of the Council, and in the mean time not to print any further.

On Wedneſday the 18th. I appear’d before their Lordſhips, and teſtified the truth of what I had written, ſaying, I publiſh’d it becauſe I would come again before their Lordſhips; and then did accuſe Sir William Waller, Manſel, Dangerfield, and their Confederates, of High Treaſon, for endeavouring to raiſe a Rebellion, and for conſpiring againſt the life of his Royal Highneſs. And proffered to make good my Charge, by the Teſtimony of perſons of Honours, Perſons of middle Quality, and unſpotted Reputation, and by ſome of their own Companions. And their Lordſhips were pleaſed to promiſe that we ſhould be heard.

Thurſday the 19th. According to their Lordſhips order, I came to Mr. Guin, the Clerk then in waiting, to give ſecurity for my good Behaviour, and to appear at the Kings-Bench Bar the firſt day of the next Term, and though ſeveral good Houſ-keepers proffer’d themſelves, he would accept of none but ſuch as he himſelf knew; which, though it was very difficult for me to obtain, I was forc’d to do it. After Security given, he would not let me depart, till I had paid 3l.pound 2s.shilling 6.d.pence And though I told him that two Juſtices of the Peace expected me at that hour, to go with them to take the Examination of a Perſon that then lay ſick, and deſired him to let me go, and I would ſend the Mony to him, as ſoon as I came home. Yet he commanded Otterbury the Meſſenger to take me into cuſtody till I paid it; and I was forced to ſtay till I ſent home for Mony, and by theſe delays loſt the Opportunity of meeting the Gentlemen, and could not examine the party that day; and the next he was taken Speechleſs, as he ſtill continues. By this means I loſt a moſt material Witneſs; Yet doubt not to make good my Charge, if the reſt may be heard.

I hope the Readers have not forgotten, that after it had been proved before the Lords of the Council, that Dangerfield ſtood in the Pillory at Salisbury, Yet, upon his ſingle Evidence, the Counteſs of Powis, the Earl of Caſtlemain, and other perſons of conſiderable Quality, were Committed, and I was cloſe Con finedM fined 44 M1v44 fined two and twenty weeks, and after that, Tryed for my Life, June the 11th.

But though Treaſonable Practices have been ſworn againſt Dangerfield, by Juſtice Foſter, Juſtice Harvey, Mr. Thomas Hill, and my ſelf; Yet the Gentleman walks abroad undiſturbed, and daily conſults with his Confederates, how to act new Villanies.

Theſe things make me very ſenſible of the great Difficulties and Diſcouragements I am like to meet with; But I hope the God of Truth and Juſtice will protect me, and bring me through them all, and pluck off the vails, and diſcover both Truth and Frauds barefaced.

And whenſoever his Majeſty pleaſes, to make it as Safe and Honourable to ſpeak Truth, as it is apparent it hath been Gainful and Meritorious to do the contrary, there will not want Witneſſes to teſtifie the truth of more than I have written, and Perſons that are above being made The Hangman’s Hounds for weekly Pentions, or any other Conſiderations whatſoever.

And though I have been two and twenty Weeks confined, and two and thirty Weeks a Priſoner, and my Charge and Loſſes much exceed a Thouſand Pounds, I do not yet ſo much fear the ſmell of Newgate, as to be frighted for telling the Truth; nor is Death ſo great a Terror to me, but that I am ſtill ready to ſeal the ſame with my Blood.

Elizabeth Cellier