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omitted

Divine
Songs
and
Meditacions


Composed
By
An Collins.

London,
Printed by R. Bishop.1653Anno Dom. 1653

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To the Reader

Christian Reader,

I inform you, that by divine Providence, I have been restrained from bodily employments, suting with my disposicion, which enforced me to a retired Course of life; Wherin it pleased God to give me such inlargednesse of mind, and activity of spirit, so that this seeming desolate condicion, proved to me most delightfull: To be breif, I became affected to Poetry, insomuch that I proceeded to practise the same; and though the helps I had therein were small, yet the thing it self appeared unto me so amiable, as that it enflamed my faculties, to put forth themselvs, in a practice so pleasing.

Now the furtherances I had herein, was what I could gather (by the benifit of hearing,) at first from prophane Histories; which gave not that satisfactory contentment, before mencioned; but it was the manifestacion of Divine Truth, or rather the Truth it self, that reduced my mind to a 4 A2v peacefull temper, and spirituall calmnesse, taking up my thoughts for Theologicall employments.

Witnesse here of, this Discourse, Songs and Meditacions, following; which I have set forth (as I trust) for the benefit, and comfort of others, Cheifly for those Christians who are of disconsolat Spirits, who may perceive herein, the Faithfullnesse, Love, & Tender Compassionatnesse of God to his people, in that according to his gracious Promise, He doth not leave nor forsake them. Heb. 13.5. But causeth all things to work for theyr good. Rom. 8.28. This I doubt not, but most Saints in som measure, do experimentally know, therefore I will not seek by argument, to prove a thing so perspicuous. And now (Courteous Reader) I have delivered unto you, what I intended, onely it remaines that I tell you, That with my Labours, you have my Prayers to God through Jesus Christ; whose I am, and in him,

Yours, in all Christian affection

An Collins.

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The Preface.

Being through weakness to the house confin’d,

My mentall powers seeming long to sleep,

were summond up, by want of wakeing mind

Their wanted course of exercise to keep,

And not to waste themselves in slumber deep;

Though no work can bee so from error kept

But some against it boldly will except:

Yet sith it was my morning exercise

The fruit of intellectuals to vent,

In Songs or counterfets of Poesies,

And haveing therein found no small content,

To keep that course my thoughts are therefore bent,

And rather former workes to vindicate

Than any new concepcion to relate.

Our glorious God his creatures weaknesse sees,

And therefore deales with them accordingly,

Giveing the meanes of knowledg by degrees,

Unfoulding more and more the Mystery,

Rev. 6. And opening the Seales successively,

So of his goodnesse gives forth demonstracions,

To his Elect in divers Dispensacions.

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In legall wise hee did himself expresse

To be the only Lord Omnipotent

A just avenger of all wickednesse,

A jelous God in power emminent,

Which terror workes, and pale astonishment;

Sith plagues for sin are holden forth thereby,

But with no strength to crush inniquity.

Now with the Law the Gospell oft appeares,

But under vailes, perspicuous unto few

Who were as those which of good tydings heares,

Rejoyceing much at the report or show

Of that the Saints now by possessing know;

Oft spake the Prophets Evangelicall,

Whose words like kindly drops of rain did fall.

But when the plenerie of time was come

The springs of grace their pleasant streams out deald

Felicitie did evidence on her same

Salvacion and the way thereto reveald,

Who wounded were in spirit, might be heald;

Here God declares the Beauties of his Face,

Great Love, rich Mercy, free Eternall Grace.

This time was when the Sonne of Righteousnesse

His Luster in the world began to spread,

Which more and more to his he doth expresse

In tearms so large that they run may read,

And to himselfe he doth the weaker lead;

He to his bosum will his Lambs collect,

Isa.40.II And gently those that feeble are direct.

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And so in them a life of grace instill

Whereby they shall be able to obay

All Gospell precepts suting with his will,

And that without regard of servill pay,

But with free hearts, where Christ alone doth sway

Causing the apprehensions of his love,

To gender love, which still doth active prove.

Where Christ thus ruleth, I suppose remaines

No heart that hankers after Novelties

Whose ground is but the Scum of frothy braines

Perhaps extracted from old Heresies,

New form’d with Glosses to deceive the eyes

Of those who like to Children, do incline

To every new device that seemes to shine.

I am perswaded they that relish right,

The Dainties of Religion, Food divine,

Have therby such a permanent delight,

And of best Treasures, such a lasting mine,

As that their hearts to change do not incline,

I therfore think theyr tastes of Truth is ill,

Who Truths profession, quickly alter will.

I speak not this to manifest despight

To tru Religions growth or augmentacion,

Nor do I take offence of greater Light

Which brings probatum est, or commendacion

From Truth it selfe, having therto relacion,

But rather with the Saints I doe rejoyce,

When God appeares to his in Gospel-voyce.

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Now touching that I hasten to expresse

Concerning these, the offspring of my mind,

Who though they here appeare in homly dresse

And as they are my works, I do not find

But ranked with others, they may go behind,

Yet for theyr matter, I suppose they bee

Not worthlesse quite, whilst they with Truth agree,

Indeed I grant that sounder judgments may

(Directed by a greater Light) declare

The ground of Truth more in a Gospel-way,

But who time past with present will compare

Shall find more mysteries unfolded are,

So that they may who have right informacion

More plainly shew the path-way to Salvacion.

Yet this cannot prevayl to hinder me

From publishing those Truths I do intend,

As strong perfumes will not concealed be,

And who esteemes the favours of a Freind,

So little, as in silence let them end,

Nor will I therfore only keep in thought,

But tell what God still for my Soule hath wrought.

When Clouds of Melancholy over-cast

My heart, sustaining heavinesse therby,

But long that sad condicion would not last

For soon the Spring of Light would blessedly

Send forth a beam, for helps discovery,

Then dark discomforts would give place to joy,

Which not the World could give or quite destroy.

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So sorrow serv’d but as springing raine

To ripen fruits, indowments of the minde,

Who thereby did abillitie attaine

To send forth flowers, of so rare a kinde,

Which wither not by force of Sun or Winde:

Retaining vertue in their operacions,

Which are the matter of those Meditacions.

From whence if evill matter be extracted

Tis only by a spider generacion,

Whose natures are of vennom so compacted,

As that their touch occasions depravacion

Though lighting in the fragrantest plantacion:

Let such conceale the evill hence they pluck

And not disgorg themselves of what they suck.

So shall they not the humble sort offend

Who like the Bee, by natures secret act

Convert to sweetnesse, fit for some good end

That which they from small things of worth extract,

Wisely supplying every place that lackt,

By helping to discover what was meant

Where they perceive there is a good intent.

So trusting that the only Sov’rain Power

Which in this work alwaies assisted mee,

Will still remain its firme defensive Tower,

From spite of enemies the same to free

And make it useful in some sort to bee,

That Rock I trust on whom I doe depend,

Will his and all their works for him defend.

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The Discourse.

You that indeared are to pietie,

And of a gracious disposicion are,

Delighting greatly in sinceritie

As your respects to godly ones declare;

For whose society you only care:

Dain to survay her works that worthlesse seem,

To such as honnest meanings dis-esteem.

But those that in my love I have preferd

Before all creaturs in this world beside,

Me works, I hope, will never dis-regard,

Though some defects here in may be espide;

Which those that have their judgments rectifide:

Can but discern, yet not with scornfull eye,

As their mild censures cheefly testifie.

Unto the publick view of every one

I did not purpose these my lines to send,

Which for my private use were made alone:

Or as I said, if any pious friend

Will once vouchsafe to read them to the end:

Let such conceive if error here they find,

Twas want of Art, not true intent of mind.

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Some may desirous bee to understand

What moved mee, who unskilfull am herein,

To meddle with, and thus to take in hand,

That which I cannot well, end or begin;

But such may first resolve themselves herein,

If they consider, tis not want of skill,

Thats more blame worthy, than want of good will

1

Then know, I cheefly aim that this should bee

Unto the praise of Gods most blessed name,

For by the mouths of sucking babes doth he,

Psal. 8. Reveal his power, and immortall fame;

Permitting Children to extall the same:

When those that were profound, and worldly wise

In ignominious sort did him dispise.

2

Next in respect of that I have receiv’d

Is nothing to that some have, I do confesse,

Yet he to whom one Tallent was bequeath’d,

Was cald to strict account, nevertheless;

Mat. 25. As well as he that many did possess,

From which I gather, they have no excuse,

Which of ability will make no use.

3

Moreover this is thirdly in respect

Of some neare Kindred, who survive mee may,

The which perhaps do better works neglect,

Yet this, they may be pleased to survay

Through willingnesse to heare what I could say,

Whereby they may bee haply drawn to look,

And read the Scriptures touched in this book.

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4

And lastly in regard of any one,

Who may by accident hereafter find,

This, though to them the Auther bee unknown,

Yet seeing here, the image of her mind;

They may conjecture how she was inclin’d:

And further note, that God doth Grace bestow,

Upon his servants, though hee keeps them low.

Even in my Cradle did my Crosses breed,

And so grew up with me, unto this day,

Whereof variety of Cares proceed,

Which of my selfe, I never could alay,

Nor yet their multiplying brood destray,

For one distemper could no sooner dy,

But many others would his roome supply,

Yea like the messengers of Job, they hast,

One comes before another can be gon,

All mocions of delight were soon defast,

Finding no matter for to feed upon,

They quickly were disperced every one,

Whereat my minde it self, would much torment,

Upon the rack of restless discontent.

The summers day, though chearfull in it selfe,

Was wearisom, and tedious, unto me,

As those that comfort lack content or health,

To credit this may soon’st perswaded be,

For by experience truth hereof they see,

Now if the summers day, cause no delight,

How irksome think you was the winters night.

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’Twere to no end, but altogether vain,

My several crosses namely to express,

To rub the scar would but encrease the pain,

And words of pitty would no griefe release,

But rather aggrevate my heaviness,

Who ever chose my crosses to conseale

Till to my griefe they would themselves reveale

So (to be briefe) I spent my infantcy,

And part of freshest yeares, as hath been sayd

Partaking then of nothing cheerfully

Being through frailty apt to be affraid,

And likely still distempered or dismaid,

Through present sence of some calamity,

Or preconceipt of future misery.

But as the longest winter hath an end

So did this fruitlesse discontent expire,

And God in mercy some refreshing send,

whereby I learn’d his goodnesse to admire,

And also larger blessings to desire;

For those that once, have tasted grace indeed,

Will thirst for more, and crave it till they speed.

But that I may proceed Method call,

When first the restlesse wanderings of my minde,

Began to settle, and resolve with all

No more to bee desturb’d with every winde

It such a pleasing exercise did finde,

Which was to ponder what Worth ech day,

The sence of Heareing should to it convay.

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But liveing where profanenesse did abound,

Where little goodnesse might be seen or heard;

Those consolacions, could be but unfound

Haveing to godlinesse no great regard:

Because that of the means I was debard,

Through ignorance of better exercise

I then delighted plesant histories

Whereof the most part were but fain’d I knew

Which not-with-standing I no whit dispised,

Imagining although they were not true,

They were convenient being moralized;

Such vanities I then too highly prized:

But when profane discourses pleasd mee best

Obscenities I allwaies did detest

But all this while, the fumes of vanities

Did interpose betwen my soules week fight,

And heavenly blisse, devine felicities;

Untill that morning starr so matchlesse bright

The Sun of righteousnesse reveald his light

Unto my soule, which sweet refreshings brings,

Ma] 4 2 Because he coms with healing in his wings.

Whose blessed beames my mind eradiates

And makes it sensible of pietie,

And so by consequence communicates

Celestiall health to ev’ry faculty:

Expeling palpable obscurity;

Which made my soule uncapable of grace,

Which now she much desires for to imbrace.

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Perceiving well that nothing can afford

Her either finall rest, or full content,

But saveing Graces, and Gods holy word,

Which is a means those Graces to augment;

With Praier, and the blessed Sacrament:

Which means with reverence my soul affects

And former pleasing vanities rejects.

Together with unnecesary griefe,

Whose ill effects can hardly bee exprest,

For certainly it argues unbeleife

Which hinders many from eternall rest,

Heb. 3. 19 who do not seek in time to be redrest;

Therefore I would establish inward peace,

How-ever out-ward crosses doe increase.

If cross disgrace or dismall accident,

Indignity or loss, befalleth mee,

Immediately distempers to prevent,

I cald to mind how all things orderd bee,

Appointed, and disposed, as we see.

By Gods most gracious providence, which is,

I am perswaded, for the good of his.

Yet am I not so firm I must confess

But many times discomforts will intru’d,

Which oft prevailes to hinder quietness,

And by that means, some sorrows are teneu’d;

Which hope will help mee quickly to exclu’d:

Psal. 30. 5 So though distress continu for a night,

Yet joy returneth by the morning light.

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With confidence these favours will increase

My soule hath recolected all her powers,

To praise the auther of this blissfull peace,

Which no untimely crosse event devouers;

So permanent are the celestiall Flowers:

Those graces which are ever conversent,

Where holyness combinds with true content.

O! what transcendant ravishing delights

What bliss unspeakable they doe posesse,

Whose merth to holy praises them excites,

And cheers them to go on, in godlynesse,

The very quintisence of happinesse,

As is attainable, or may be had

In this life present, which were elce but bad.

There is a kind of counterfet content,

Wherwith some are deceivd, tis to be feard,

Who think they need not sorrow, or lament,

Being to sensuall pleasures so indeard;

Whose minds are stupid, & their concience ceard

Elce might they see all Earthly delectation,

Eccl. 2. To be but vanity, and hearts vexacion.

To lightniung, carnall merth we may compare,

For as a flash it hastes and soon is gon,

Foretelling of a Thunder-clap of care,

It also blastes the heart it lighteth on;

Makes it to goodnesse, senceless as a ston:

Disabling every part, and faculty,

Of soul and body unto piety.

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But sacred joy is like the Sunnes clear light,

Which may with clouds, be sometimes overcast,

Yet breaks it forth anon, and shines more bright,

Whose lively force continually doth last;

And shews most Orient, when a storm is past:

So true delight may bee eclips’d we see,

But quite extinguisht, can it never bee.

So now I will go on with my Discourse,

When knowledg, plesant to my soul became,

Unto Gods word, I often had recourse,

Being informed rightly that the same;

Would bee as fuell to encreace the flame

Of holy Zeal, which must with knowledg dwell,

Rom. 10 For without other, neither can do well,

Then sought I carefully to understand,

The grounds of true Religion, which impart

Divine Discreshion, which goes far beyand,

All civill policy or humane Art;

Which sacred principles I got by heart:

Which much enabled me to apprehend,

The sence of that whereto I shall attend.

First touching God, there is one God I know,

Rom. I. 20. who hath his being of himself alone,

I’a. I 17 The fountain whence al streams of goodnesse flow

But body, parts, or passions hath he none;

I Cor. 8. 4. And such a Diety, there is but one;

I Iohn. 5. 7. Eternall, Infinite, alone is hee,

One perfect Essence, distinct Persons Three.

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The first whereof for order, is the Father,

The Glorious Fountain of the Trinity,

Having his being, nor begining neither

Of no one but himselfe, undoubtedly;

Begets his Sonne, from all eternity,

And with his Sonne, the Holy-Ghost forth sends

From ever-lasting which for aye extends.

The Sonne, the second Glorious person is,

For Power, Substance, and Eternity,

Alone as is the Father, who it is,

Of whom he hath his being, too, only;

Yea the whole being of his Father, by

A Sacred and Eternall Genneracion,

Isaiah. 53. 8 A mistrey past all imaginacion.

In Trinity the Holy-Ghost is third,

Iohn I 5. 7. Proceeding and so sent forth equally,

Iohn I. I Both from the father & the son or word,

Being of their Power, Substance, Magisty;

And thus distinguished are the Trinity:

By whom were all things made, that ever were,

And by whose Providence preserved are.

What hath been sayd of God shall now suffice,

Of whom I frame no Image in my mind,

But I conceive him by his properties,

Hee is incomprehensible I find;

Filling all places, in no place confind;

I will therefore his wondrous works admire,

Not vainly after secret things inquire.

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Next unto God, my selfe I sought to know,

A thing not so facile, as some suppose,

But that I may the faster forward goe,

I leave to speak, what may bee said of those,

And haste to that I purpose to disclose:

Which being well considered may convert,

To lowest thoughts, the proudest haughty heart.

Touching my selfe and others I conceive,

Eph. 2. I. That all men are by nature dead in sin,

And Sathans slaves; not able to receive,

The things of God, which brings true comfort in:

Good accions still they faile in managing;

But apt they are to every vanity,

As vowed servants to inniquity.

Doe but observe the carnallist how he

Neglects all calings, fitt to be profest,

Waits all occasions, ill implyd to be,

Consumes his wealth, deprives himself of rest;

To please that darling sinn that likes him best:

Judg what a hellish bondage he is in,

That’s Sathans slave, and servant unto sin;

As all men in the state of nature be,

And have been ever since mans wofull fall,

Who was created first, from bondage free,

Untill by sinn he thrust himself in thrall;

By whose transgression we were stained all,

Not only all men, but all parts of man,

Corrupted was: since sin to reign began.

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The Soul who did her makers Image bear,

Which made her amiable fair and bright,

Right Orient and illustrious to appear,

To his omniscient eye and pure sight,

Who doth the inward Purity delight,

Lost all her beauty, once so excellent,

As soon as unto sinn she did consent.

The eye of understanding was so bleared,

That no spirituall thing it could behold,

The will corrupted, and the conscience ceared,

And all th’affections were to goodness cold,

But hot to evill, not to be contrould;

The members of the body then proceeds

As instruments to execute bad deeds.

But see what was the consequence of this,

The curse of God which did the fault ensue,

Thus man by sin deprived was of bliss,

The thought hereof might cause us to eschew

That bitter root whence all our sorrows grew:

Sickness of body, and distresse of mind,

With all afflictions layd upon mankind.

Whether in body goods or name it be,

And which is worce, the soules perplexity,

Whose conscience is awake, from deadnesse free

When she considers what felicity,

She hath exchang’d for endlesse misery;

Can but torment her selfe with bootlesse care,

Fore-see-ing that her pains eternall are.

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If this be so, the vilest liveing creature

Is in a better case then man; for why?

When this life ends with such by course of nature,

There with is ended all his misery;

But man tormented is eternally;

Twere so, but that our God we gracious find,

Who sent a Saviour to restore mankind.

Iohn. I. I. The second person of the Trinity,

The only Son of God omnipotent,

Who being God from all eternity,

Heb. 2.16. To take our nature freely did assent,

With all afflictions thereto insident:

In all things, like to othermen was he,

Save that from sins he still remained free.

So that two whole and perfect natures were,

In the same person joyned really.

And neither of them both confounded are,

Nor doth the Humane of it selfe rely;

But it subsisteth in the Deity,

Nor can these natures seperated be,

Both perfect God, and perfect man was he.

This much touching our Saviours person; Now,

His Offices we ought to know likewise,

And what he hath performd for us, and how

He freed us from the foresaid miseries,

And how Gods dreadfull wrath he satisfies;

His Offices shall briefly named be,

A Priest, a Prophet, and a King, is he.

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A Priest, for that he hath for mans transgression

Heb. 7.15. Full satisfaction made to God the father,

And likewise makes continuall intercession,

For those who to his fould he means to gather;

Or to eternall heavenly mancions, rather:

The means wherby Gods wrath he satisfies,

Was his obedience and his sacrifice.

The Law of God he perfectly fulfild,

With full obedience and integrity,

As God had pre-ordained, then did he yeild

A painfull ignominious death to dy,

The wrath of God appeased was thereby,

Which in full measure came upon him then,

Even what was due unto the sins of men.

A Prophet to instruct his Church he is,

Which doth him honour by sinceare profession,

His Spirit qualifies the hearts of his,

And makes them pliable to such profession,

His word doth take when grace shall have posses[sion,

For by the word no good efect is wrought

But where the heart is by Gods spirit taught.

Our Saviour is a King undoubtedly,

Although he seemes to have no Kingdoms here,

Yet in their hearts he means to Glorify,

A Kingdome he erects of grace, and there

Hee raignes, and by his spirit rule doth beare,

But here appears his machlesse dignity

Hee King of Glory is Eternally.

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For when he by his death had finished

The work of our redemcion, freed from paines,

He took his body that before was dead,

With all that to a perfect man pertaines;

With which he gloriously ascends and reignes:

At the right hand of God he doth remain

Untill to Judgment he returns again.

Christ sufferings are sufficient for to free,

2 Thes. 3.2 All men from wo and endlesse misery,

But all men have not faith, and therfore be,

Unlikely to have benefit thereby,

For it is Faith with which we must apply,

The merrits of our blessed Redeemer

And to our selves each in particuler.

Faith is a Grace which doth the sould refine,

Wrought by the Holy-Ghost in contrite hearts,

And grounded on Gods Promises divine,

Things superexcellent this same imparts,

To those that have it planted in their hearts:

But ere this faith is wrought, the heart must be,

Made capable of it, in some degree.

First God doth take the hammer of his Law,

And breaks the heart which he for Grace will fitt

Then the seduced soul is brought in aw,

And doth immediatly it selfe submitt,

When sight of sinne, and sorrowing for it,

Hath wrought humility, a vertu rare

Which truly doth the soul for Grace prepare.

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The Law of God is most exact and pure

Psal. 19.I. Requireing of us perfect holinesse,

To which is life eternall promis’d sure,

But curses unto them that it transgresse,

Whether by frailty or by wilfullnesse;

Though none but Christ, and Adam ere his fall

Could keep this Law, yet it may profit all.

For here we may perceive how much we fail,

With all what danger we incur thereby,

Then if we can our own defects bewail,

We may for sucour to our Saviour fly,

Whose Righteousnesse will all our wants supply:

Then here are Rules set down for Gods Elect

Whereby they will their course of life direct.

This Law by Gods most skillfull Hand was wrot,

And placed in two Tables orderly,

Shewing what’s to be done, and what is not;

Withall what good or evill coms thereby,

In Ten Commandements so distinctly,

Wherewith as with a Touch stone try we may,

How we offend our God, or him obay.

damaged

1

They sin against the first who think or say,

As doth the fool, there is no God at all,

So they that through profanenesse disobay,

And want of knowledg is a breach not small,

Who loves or fears a creature most of all,

And puts trust therein and seeks there-to

Makes that their God, and so break this they do.

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2

The second violated is by those

That Images erect, or them adore,

By such also who in devocion goes

To Saint or Angell, succor to implore,

Who set by superstitious Reliques store,

And worship God after mens fantasies,

And not as he commands, breaks this likewise

3

When those that seem religious prove profane,

Gods name is much dishonoured therby;

Even so likewise their error is the same,

Who use his word, or works, or Titles high,

For evill ends, or elce unreverently:

By witchcraft, cursing, swearing, blasphemy,

This violated is undoubtedly.

4

Whoso by preparation doth not fit

Himselfe to keep the Sabbath, breaks the same,

As those that holy exercise omit,

Or come thereto only for fear of blame,

Nor have delight or profit by the same;

So it is broke by carnall recreations,

By worldly works, by speech, or cogitacions.

5

When that inferiors disobedient are,

Ungratefull, stubborn, saucy, impudent,

Fayling in reverence, love, respective care,

To their superiors, hating Government,

Such grossly break this Fift Commandement:

As those superiors whose bad Disciplin

Or ill example, makes inferiors sin.

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6

This is transgrest by murther, or debate,

By being mindfull of revenge likewise,

By sinfull anger, envy, malice, hate;

By vexing words, and scornfull mockeries,

Which are occasions of extreamities,

Distresse of mind, heart-griefe, perplexity,

And life hath often prejudice thereby,

7

All thought impure this Cōommandment breaks,

So lewd pastimes, light gesture, wanton lookes,

Wearing apparell contrary to Sex,

Ill company, vain talk, lacivious books,

And all that may entice like baites or hooks,

To Fornication or Adultery,

Which breakes this Precept most apparently.

8

This is trangrest by any kind of stealing,

By coveting our nighbours goods also,

By fraud oppression, or deceitfull dealing,

By not disposing well of that we ow,

Refusing honest works to undergoe,

By being not content with our estate,

Not helping those we should commiserate.

9

This violated is by false witnesse bearing,

Likewise by any Lie we break the same,

By raiseing false reports, or gladly hearing

Ill of our nighbour, touching his good name,

By not maintaining his deserved fame,

By speaking truth of him maliciously

And not exhorting him in secresie.

10 This 19 C2r 19

10

This is trangrest by lusts, and mocions vain

Ro. 7.7 Though we thereto give no consent at all,

As the rebellion of the flesh, or stain

And blot, we have by sinne Originall,

Corrupsion of our nature we it call;

From which because that no one can be free,

Then all transgressors of the Law must be.

Who by the morall Law beholds his sin

And sees withall ther’s left him no defence,

To sorrow therefore now he doth begin,

His Conscience being toucht with lively sence

Of Gods displeasure for his great offence,

Dispairing of salvation, in respect

Of ought that by himselfe he can effect.

The curse contain’d in this exquiset Law,

Doth work this sorrow so effectually,

For truly he alone is brought in aw,

Whose Conscience is inform’d of this hereby;

Who breaks but one commandement only

In all his life, and that in coggitacion,

Is not-with-standing subject to damnacion.

Thus when the heart is fitted and prepard,

The seeds of Faith foth-with are cast therein,

Which in their orders briefly are declard:

The first is when one wearied under sinne,

To feel the wiaaight thereof doth now begin

And thereupon acknowledgeth with speed

That of a Saviour much he stands in need:

C2 damaged 20 C2v 20

The second is a vehement desire,

Or ardent longing to participate

Of Christ, and eke his benefits entire

And nothing else can this desire abate,

Consume or limit, quench or mittigate:

As doth the Hart the water brook desire,

So humble Souls a Saviour doth require.

The third is flying to the Throne of grace,

Even from the sentence of the Law so strict,

Which doth profane security deface,

Because that thereby the Conscience is prict,

Which doth the humble man for good afflict

By shewing such the danger of their case,

And for a cuer, sending them to grace.

Now this is done by fervent supplications,

By constant prayer, most prevailing known,

Exprest with hearty strong ejacculacions,

For Gods especiall grace in him alone,

In the forgivenesse of his sins each one;

And in his prayer, persevear will hee

Untill the thing peticion’d, granted bee.

Then God, as he hath promised, will prove

Propicious to the sinner penitent,

And let him feel th’assurance of his Love,

His Favour, Grace, and Mercy Excellent

The which in Christ, appears most emminent:

A lively Faith this full assurance is,

Wrought by Gods Spirit, in the hearts of his.

But 21 C3r 21

But there are divers measures or degrees

Of Saving Faith, the least whereof is this,

When he that hath a humble Spirit sees

He cannot feel, his Faith so little is,

As yet the full assurance, inward bliss,

Of the forgivenesse of his sinnes so free,

Yet pardonable findeth them to bee.

And therefore, prayeth they may be pardoned,

And with his heart the same of God requires,

Recals himself, as formerly misled,

Giveing no rest unto his large desires,

His Soul it faints not, nor his Spirit tires,

Although he be delayd yet still he praies,

On God he waites, and for an answer staies.

That such a man hath Faith it doth appeare

For these desires doe plainly testifie,

He hath the Spirit of his Saviour dear,

For tis his speciall work or property,

To stir up longings after purity:

Now where his Spirit is there Christ resides,

And where Christ dwels true Faith though weak abides

Of saveing Faith the largest quantity,

Is when a man comes on in Faith untill,

He finds the full assurance happily

Of Gods free mercy, favour, and good will,

To him in Christ, which doth his joy fulfill:

Finding he hath obtained free remission,

And that he’s safe in Gods divine tuision.

C3 This 22 C3v 22

This full assurance of his grace and love,

The Lord vouchsafes his servants true who he,

Doth for their inward sanctity approve,

Whose outward doeings also righteous be,

For such alone the evidence may see,

Of his inheritance, true happinesse,

Which for Christs merits sake they shall possesse.

A Christian in his infantcy in grace

Finds not this full assurance usually,

Untill he hath been practis’d for a space

By sound Repentance with Sincerity:

And finds Gods Love to him abundantly

Then shall his soul this full perswasion see,

Which is the strength of Faith or highest degree.

By Faith in Christ much profit we do gain,

For thereby only are we justifide,

At peace with God free from eternall pain,

And thereby only are we sanctifide,

Where faith is, by those fruits, it may be tride:

True faith being by fruits discovered

A barren faith must deeds be false and dead.

Now to be justifide, is to be freed,

From gilt and punishment of sin likewise,

To be accepted as for just indeed,

With God, whose grace it is that justifies;

And not our works, as vainly some surmise:

But that we may still orderly proceed,

It followeth next how we from sin are freed.

The 23 C4r 23

The sins of those that God will justifie,

Were by Christs sufferings so abolished,

As that they cannot hurt them finally,

Esay 16.16 Were they as Scarlet or the Crimson Red,

They shall be white as Snow and cleared,

Even by Christs Blood, the wch to free was spent

The faithfull, from deserved punishment.

Now comes to be considered how they may

With God, for Perfect-just, accepted be,

Who of them-selves by nature (truth to say)

Are in no part from sinnes corruption free,

How such are tane for just, here may we see,

Christs righteousnesse is theirs, by imputacion,

And so esteem’d by gracious acceptacion.

The true beleevers benifits are great,

Which they by being justifide possesse

For such shall stand before Gods judgment seat,

As worthy of Eternall Happinesse,

Even by the merits of Christs Righteousnesse,

For of themselves, they cannot merit ought,

Who are not able to think one good thought.

Then far from doing any work whereby

They might deserve Salvation on their part,

For God whose only perfect purity,

Will find in our best works no true disart,

But rather matter of our endlesse smart:

For in Christs Blood the Saints wch are most dear

Must wash their Robes before they can be clear.

C4 Though 24 C4v 24

Though by good works we do not gain Salvacion

Yet these good Duties that our God requires,

We must perform in this our conversacion,

With all our might, endevours, and desires,

Before this short uncertain time expires,

And at perfection must we allwaies aime,

Though in this life we reach not to the same.

For he that by his Faith is justifide,

It followeth also necessarily,

That such by Faith are likwise Sanctifide,

Corrupcion of our nature is thereby

Disabled so, as that inniquity

No longer rules, being by grace subdude,

Whereby the heart to goodnesse is renude.

Corrupcion of our nature purged is,

By vertue of Christ Precious Blood only

Which when by Saving Faith applyed is,

Serves as a corrasive to mortifie

And kill the power of inniquity,

Whence tis that those who Sanctified bee,

From sins dominion, happily are free.

The other part of true Sanctificacion,

Is life or quickenning to holinesse,

And may therefore be called renovacion,

Like a Restorative it doth redresse,

And him revive, that is dead in trespasse;

Tis by the power of Christs Resurrection,

That we are rais’d from sinne to such perfection.

Sanctificacion 25 C5r 25

Sanctificacion must be then entire,

Not for the present, perfect in degree,

Yet in respect of parts and true desire,

Each part and power Sanctified must bee,

Although no part from all Corruption’s free;

Yet every power must with goodnesse sute,

Though in this life no part be absolute,

Like as a Child new born without defect,

A perfect man he may be sayd to bee,

Because his body’s perfect, in respect

Of parts, though not in stature or degree

Of grouth, untill of perfect age he bee;

So have the faithfull imperfections some,

Till to a perfect age in Christ they come.

The graces of the Spirit will appeare,

And spring up in his heart thats Sanctifide,

And these the fruits of Righteousnesse will beare

Which in his conversacion are discride,

These graces hath he that is Sanctifide,

A detestacion of inniquity,

And love to goodnesse, Zeale and Purity,

Whereof Repentance blessedly proceeds,

Which is endeavour, purpose or intent

To leave all sin which causefull sorrows breeds

And not to give allowance or consent

To break Gods Law, or least Commandement:

But ever walk exactly there-unto,

Though to the flesh it seemes too much to doe.

So 26 C5v 26

So that continuall combates will arise,

Between Gods image, on the soul renewde,

And Sathans image, greatest contraries

Which ever seek each other to exclude,

Though in the end, the worst shall be subdude:

Yet in this life it will in no wise yeeld;

Against whose force, Faith is the only sheild.

Now when a man hath got the victory,

In such a conflict or extream temptacion

He sees Gods love to him abundantly,

By reason of his speciall conservacion,

Which of his favour is a demonstracion;

Now this increaseth peace of conscience most

Together with joy in the Holy-Ghost.

But if the wicked do so far prevaile,

By Gods permission by some provocacion

To over-come the faithfull being fraile,

And subject to be snar’d with temptacion

When not suspecting such abominacion;

But this their fall is through infirmity

Who shall not be forsaken utterly.

For soon a Godly sorrow will arise

And over-flow the heart of such a one,

Which blessedly the same so mollifies,

That it relents for haveing so mis-gone

Which godly griefe or sorrow is all one

For haveing so displeased God by sinne,

Who hath to him a loveing Father been.

Yea 27 C6r 27

Yea he for this abhors himselfe as vile

Acknowledging his execrable case,

Till he be reconcil’d to God, that while

Himselfe by lowest thoughts he doth abase,

As far unworthy to find any grace;

Yet cries to God in this humiliacion

For the return of wonted consolacion.

And when he hath attain’d recovery,

The breach without delay he fortifies

With stronger resolucion manfully,

And with a Watch impregnable likewise,

Against assaults of this his enimies,

And all assaies of their re-entery

Through which so many perish finally.

This much touching the ground of Truth I hold,

Which sith at first they rectified my mind,

I will not cast them off, as worn and old,

Nor will be so alone to them confind

As not admit of things of higher kind;

But will as God shall light dispence to mee,

(By ayd divine) walk up to each degree.

28 C6v 28

A Song expressing their happinesse who have Communion with Christ.

When scorched with distracting care,

My minde findes out a shade

Which fruitlesse Trees, false fear, dispair

And melancoly made,

Where neither bird did sing

Nor fragrant flowers spring,

Nor any plant of use:

No sound of happynesse.

Had there at all ingresse,

Such comforts to produce,

But Sorrow there frequents,

The Nurce of Discontents,

And Murmering her Mayd

Whose harsh unpleasant noise

All mentall fruits destroyes

Whereby delight’s convayd.

Whereof my judgment being certifide

My mind from thence did move,

For her concepcion so to provide,

That it might not abortive prove,

Which fruit to signifie

It was conceaved by

Most true intelligence

Of this sweet truth divine

Who 29 C7r 29

Esay. 54.5. Who formed thee is thine,

Whence sprang this inference;

He too, thats Lord of all,

Will thee beloved call,

Though all else prove unkind;

Then chearfull may I sing

Sith I enjoy the Sp ring,

Though Sesterns dry I find.

For in our Union with the Lord alone,

Consists our happinesse,

Certainly such who are with Christ at one

He leaves not comfortlesse,

But come to them he will

Their Souls with joy to fill,

And them to Fortifie

Their works to undergo

And beare their Crosse also,

With much alacrity:

Who his assisting grace

Do feelingly imbrace,

With confidence may say,

Through Christ that strengthens me

Phil 4.14 No thing so hard I see

But what perform I may.

But when the Soul no help can see

Through sins interposicion,

Then quite forlorn that while is she,

Bewailling her condicion;

In which deplored case

damaged 30 C7v 30

Now such a Soul hath space,

To think how she delayd

Her Saviour to admit

Who shu’d to her for it,

And to this purpose sayd,

Open to me my Love,

Can. 5. My Sister, and my Dove,

My Locks with dew wet are

Yet she remissive grew,

Till he himselfe with-drew

Before she was aware.

But tasting once how sweet he is,

And smelling his perfumes,

Long can she not his presence misse,

But griefe her strainth consumes:

For when he visits one

He cometh not alone,

But brings abundant grace

True Light, and Holynesse

And Spirit to expresse

Ones wants in every case;

For as he wisedome is,

So is he unto his

I Cor. I.30 Wisedome and Purity,

Which when he seemes to hide,

The soul missing her guide,

Must needs confused lie.

Then let them know, that would enjoy

The firme fruition,

damaged 31 C8r 31

Of his Sweet presence, he will stay

With single hearts alone,

Who[butt] their former mate,

Doe quite exterminate:

With all things that defile

They that are Christs, truly,

The Flesh do Crucifie

Gal. 5. With its affections vile

Then grounds of truth are fought

New Principles are wrought

Of grace and holinesse,

Which plantings of the heart

Will spring in every part,

And so it selfe expresse.

Then shall the Soul like morning bright

Can.6. 10 Unto her Lord appeare,

And as the Moone when full of Light

So fayr is she and cleare,

With that inherent grace

Thats darted from the Face

Of Christ, that Sunne divine,

Which hath a purging power

Corruption to devour,

And Conscience to refine;

Per fection thu s begun

As pure as the Sunne,

The Soul shall be likewise

With that great Blessednesse,

Imputed Righteoussenesse

Which freely Justifies.

damaged 32 C8v 32

They that are thus compleat with Grace

And know that they are so,

For Glory must set Sayle apace

Whilst wind doth fitly blow,

Now is the tide of Love,

Now doth the Angell move;

If that there be defect

That Soul which sin doth wound,

Here now is healing found,

If she no time neglect;

To whom shall be reveald

What erst hath been conceald,

When brought unto that Light,

Which in the Soul doth shine

When he thats most divine,

Declares his presence bright.

Then he will his beloved shew

The reason wherefore she

Is seated in a place so low,

Not from all troubles free;

And wherefore they do thrive

That wicked works contrive;

Christ telleth his also

For who as friends he takes

He of his Councell makes,

Iohn 15.15 And they shall secrets know:

Such need not pine with cares

Seeing all things are theirs,

Cor. 3.21. If they are Christs indeed;

Therefore let such confesse

damaged 33 D1r 33

They are not comfortlesse,

Nor left in time of Need.

A Song shewing the Mercies of God to his people, by interlacing cordiall Comforts with fatherly Chastisments.

As in the time of Winter

The Earth doth fruitlesse and barren lie,

Till the Sun his course doth run

Through Aries, Taurus, Gemini;

Then he repayres what Cold did decay,

Drawing superfluous moistures away,

And by his luster, together with showers,

The Earth becoms fruitful & plesant with flowers

That what in winter seemed dead

Thereby the Sun is life discovered.

So though that in the Winter

Of sharp Afflictions, fruits seem to dy,

And for that space, the life of Grace

Remayneth in the Root only;

Yet when the Son of Righteousnesse clear

Shall make Summer with us, our spirits to chear,

Warming our hearts with the sense of his favour,

Then must our flowers of piety savour,

And then the fruits of righteousuesse

We to the glory of God must expresse.

D And 34 D1v 34

And as when Night is passed,

The Sun ascending our Hemisphear,

Ill fumes devouers, and opes the powers

Which in our bodies are, and there

He drawes out the spirits of moving and sence

As from the center, to the circumference;

Sothat the exterior parts are delighted,

And unto mocion and action excited,

And hence it is that with more delight

We undergo labor by day then by night.

So though a Night of Sorrows

May stay proceedings in piety

Yet shall our light like morning bright

Arise out of obscurity,

Then when the Sun that never declines

Shall open the faculties of our mindes,

Stirring up in them that spirituall mocion

Whereby we make towards God with devocion

When kindled by his influence

Our Sacrifice is as pleasing incense.

Now when we feel Gods favour

And the communion with him we have,

Alone we may admit of joy

As having found what we most crave

Store must we gathor while such gleams do last

Against our tryalls sharp winterly blasts

So dispairacion shall swallow us never,

Who know where God once loves, there he loves [ever

Though sence of it oft wanting is

Yet still Gods mercies continue with his.

So 35 D2r 35

So soon as we discover

Our souls benummed in such a case,

We may not stay, without delay

W e must approach the Throne of Grace,

First taking words to our selves to declare

How dead to goodnesse by nature we are,

Then seeking by him who for us did merit

To be enliv’d by his quickening Spirit,

Whose flame doth light our Spark of Grace,

Whereby we may behold his pleased face.

From whence come beams of comfort,

The chiefest matter of tru Content,

Who tast and see, how sweet they be,

Perceive they are most excellent,

Being a glimce of his presence so bright,

Who dwelleth in unapproachable light:

Whoso hath happily this mercy attayned,

Earnest of blessednesse endlesse hath gayned,

Where happinesse doth not decay

There Spring is eternall, and endlesse is day.

A Song declaring that a Christian may finde tru Love only where tru Grace is.

No Knot of Friendship long can hold

Save that which Grace hath ty’d,

For other causes prove but cold

When their effects are try’d;

D2 For 36 D2v 36

For God who loveth unity

Doth cause the onely union,

Which makes them of one Family

Of one mind and communion.

Commocions will be in that place,

Where are such contraries,

As is inniquity and grace,

The greatest enimies,

Whom sin doth rule shee doth command

To hold stiff opposicion

Gainst grace and all the faithfull band

Which are in her tuision.

This is the cause of home debates,

And much domestick woes,

That one may find his household mates

To be his greatest foes,

That with the Wolfe the Lamb may bide

As free from molestacion,

As Saints with sinners, who reside

In the same habitacion.

By reason of the Enmity

Between the womans Seed

And mans infernall enimy,

The Serpent and his breed,

The link of consanguinity

Could hold true freindship never,

Neither hath neare affinity

United friends for ever.

For 37 D3r 37

For scoffing Ishmael will scorn

His onely true born brother:

Rebeckahs sonns together born

Contend with one another,

No bond of nature is so strong

To cause their hearts to tarry

In unity, who do belong

To masters so contrary.

The wicked ordinarily

Gods dearest children hate,

And therfore seek (though groundlesly)

Their credits to abate,

And though their words and works do show

No colour of offences

Yet are their hearts most (they trow)

For all their good pretences.

And those that strongest grace attain,

Whereby sin is vanquished,

By Sathan and his cursed train

Are most contraried;

Because by such the Serpent feeles,

His head to be most bruised,

He turnes and catches at their heeles,

By whom he is so used.

His agents he doth instigate,

To vex, oppose, and fret,

To slander and calumniate,

Those that have scap’t his net,

D3 Who 38 D3v 38

Who servants are so diligent,

That like to Kain their father

They whose works are most excellent

They mischiefe will the rather.

Yet there are of the gracelesse crew

Who for some private ends

Have sided with prefessors tru

As truly pious friends,

But to the times of worldly peace

Their friendship was confined.

Which when some crosses caus’d to cease

The thred of league untwined.

Such friends unto the Swallow may

Be fitly likened,

Who all the plesant Summer stay

But are in Winter fled:

They cannot ’bide their freind to see,

In any kind of trouble,

So pittyfull (forsooth) they bee

That have the art to double.

Such will be any thing for one

Who hath of nothing need,

Their freindship stands in word alone,

And none at all in deed,

How open mouth’d so e’re they are,

They bee as closely handed,

Who will (they know) their service spare,

They’re his to be commanded.

Therefore 39 D4r 39

Therefore let no true hearted one

Releife at need expect,

From opposits to vertue known,

Who can him not afect:

For his internall ornaments,

Will ever lovely make him

Though all things pleasing outward sence

Should utterly forsake him.

In choise of Freinds let such therefore

Prefer the godly wife,

To whom he may impart the store

That in his bosome lies:

And let him not perniciously

Communicate his favours,

To all alike indifferently,

Which shewes a mind that wavers.

Gods children to each other should

Most open hearted bee;

Who by the same precepts are rul’d,

And in one Faith agree,

Who shall in true felicity,

Where nothing shall offend them

Together dwell eternally,

To which I do commend them.

D4 A 40 D4v 40

A Song demonstrating The vanities of Earthly things.

Shall Sadnesse perswade me never to sing

But leave unto Syrens that excellent thing,

No that may not be, for truely I find,

The sanguin complexion to mirth is enclin’d.

Moreover, they may who righteousnesse love,

Be soberly merry, and sorrows remove,

They only have right to rejoycing allwaies

Whose joy may be mixed with prayer and praise.

Wherefore rejoyceth the epicure?

As though his fadeing delights would endure,

Whereas they are ended, as soon as begun,

For all things are vanity under the Sun.

Riches and Honour, Fame and Promocion,

Idols, to whom the most do their devocion;

How fadeing they are, I need not to show,

For this by experience, too many doe know.

They that delight in costly attire,

If they can compasse the things they desire,

Have onely obtained, what sin first procured,

And many to folly are therby alured.

Learning 41 D5r 41

Learning is sure an excellent thing,

From whence all Arts and Sciences spring,

Yet is it not from vanity free,

For many great Scholars prophane often be.

Whoso hath studied Geometry,

Or gained experience in Geography,

By tedious labour much knowledge may gain,

Yet in the conclusion, hee’l find all is vain.

He that hath studied Astronomy,

Though his meditacion ascend to the Sky

He may mis of heaven and heavenly blis,

If that he can practise no studdy but this,

But they that delight in Divinity,

And to be exquisit in Theology,

Much heavenly comfort in this life may gain,

And when it is ended their joyes shall remain.

What should I speak more of vanities,

To use many words when few may suffice,

It argueth folly, therfore I have don,

Concluding, all’s vanity under the Sun.

42 D5v 42

A Song manifesting The Saints eternall Happinesse

Sound is the Minde

Which doth that Hope possesse

Whose object is Eternall joy

Or Heavens Happinesse;

Such healthfull hearts

Their spirits doe sustain,

In thinking on the Rest which for

Gods peeple doth remain,

A Treasure inaccessible,

Or Everlasting Life,

A blessed State which never shall

Heb. 4.6 be cumbered with strife

Salvacion

2 Tim. 2.10 With endlesse glory cleare,

And each good thing to be desir’d

Are in their Fountain there;

Flowers are here,

Together with the weeds

Exposed to all kinde of stormes,

Which much confusion breeds:

Some for weaknesse are dismaid,

And some are comfortlesse,

Because of some defect of sence,

Or want of comlinesse.

Grant 43 D6r 43

Grant some may have

Proporcion so compleat,

That correspondency of parts

Declares Perfections seat

Yet doubtles such

Their burthen have also

By reason of their travell which

They must needs undergo,

For in every calling is

A tedious wearinesse

Which whoso followes carefully

Is driven to confesse

Further suppose

One might be freed from all

Afflictions which externall are,

Or crosses corporall

Yet if the soule

Be sencible of sin

It cannot be but such will have

Enough to do within:

For to Preserve the heart and waies

From being over grown

With fruits of that contagious seed

That’s in our nature sown.

Doubting some times

The Soul with anguish tires,

Who must anon encounter with

inordinate desires:

Luſt 44 D6v 44

Lust oft prevailes,

And then the consequence,

Will be a great ecclips of grace,

And losse of comfort sence,

In striving to recover peace,

The soule is oft opprest.

As he that’s conscious of his sin,

Hath here but little rest.

From all those woes

And many more that bee,

The Saint that finisht hath his course

Shall be for ever free,

And likewise have

For ever to posesse

A most exquisit Diadem,

2. Tim. 4.8. The Crown of righteousnesse,

Of that divine inheritance

I.Pet. I.5. Which fadeth not away,

They shall be really posest,

And ever it enj oy.

Bodies which here

Are matter thick and grosse,

Attaining to this happinesse,

Are freed from their drosse:

And as the Sunn

Mat. 13.43. Appeares in brightest Sky,

So every body glorifi’d

Shall be for clarity,

And 45 D7r 45

And likewise be impassible,

Uncapable of pain

Having agility to move.

Whose vigour shall remain.

Glorified Soules,

Are fild with all delight,

Because the spring of Beuty is

The object of their sight:

Also they have,

(Their joy to amplify)

Immediat sweet c ommunion with

The blessed Trinity.

Which satisfies appetite,

Which else were empty still,

Because no finite c omfort can

Content the mind and will.

Briefly a word

Of place and company

Which Saints in G lo ry shall enjoy,

Heb. 12. The place is heavenly

Jerusalem,

The citty of the Lord:

Rev. 21. Discover’d by such precious things

As pleasure most affo rd,

The consorts, Angells numberlesse,

Heb. 12. The whole Assembly

Of Saints, who shall for ever dwell

With Christ Eternally.

Why 46 D7v 46

Why hath the Lord

For his, such Joyes prepar’d

Because their pacient sufferings

He richly will reward,

2 Cor. 4.17. This light distresse

Which for a moment dures

An excellent eternall waight

Of Glory his procures,

Rom. 8.18. But our afflictions merit not

This Glory that exceeds

But it, as Gods all other gifts,

Rom. 6.23. Of his free-Love proceeds.

Now they that have

This Hope of Heaven sure,

Shew it by striving to be cleane

I Iohn :3.3. As Christ our Lord is pure,

Also they take

Their croses chearfully

Because a substance they expect,

Heb. 10.34. Eternall heavenly,

To which my Soule aspired still

And cannot setled be,

Till shee returns againe to him

Ecl. 12.7. That gave her unto me.

47 D8r 47

A Song exciting to spirituall Alacrity.

Discomforts will the heart contract

And joy will cause it to dilate;

That every part its part may act,

A heart enlarg’d must animate.

Unfruitfull ones therfore they are

That planted be in sorrows shade,

Sith by the blasts of cloudy care

They are unfit for action made.

The ill effects of fruitlesse greife

Are in this place no further shown,

Because the meanes of true releife

Is more convenient to be known.

Col. I.9. Now he in whom all fullnesse dwels

All good and meanes of good must bee,

His presence Sathans rule expells

Gal. 3.13. And doth from Legall terror free.

So that their Soules which are so blessed

His sacred presence to enjoy,

Can never be so much distressed

But consolacion find they may.

damaged 48 D8v 48

Isay. 32.I.2 Having a hiding place so secure,

And covert from the stormy wind,

And streames of water perfect pure

To vivify and cheare the mind.

If scorched with afflictions heat

They to their shady rock may fly,

And be in safties bosome seat

And lap of true felicity.

Where are delights Angelicall,

The quintisence of all good things,

Reifned wine to cheare withall

And food which life eternall brings.

Which though the Saints by faith posesse,

Doe not suppose it solace give,

But truly reall happinesse,

As they that feele alone beleeve.

Who thence abundant strength collect,

In all condicions to support,

No troubles can them much deject,

Who have this soules defensive Fort.

Suppose temptacion sist them sore,

2 Cor. 12.9. Sufficient grace will them releive,

And make their Faith appeare the more,

Which will to them the Conquest give.

Or 49 E1r 49

Or be their Scourge some outward Crosse,

As causelesse hate, or poverty,

Decay of parts, disease, or losse

Of Credit, Freinds, or Liberty.

Nay were their state compos’d of woes,

In whom the Morning Star doth shine,

Whose lively luster will disclose,

To his a heritage divine,

Which he of Love did them procure,

With freedom, not to Adam dain’d

To tast the Tree of Life most pure,

Whereby the soule alone’s sustain’d

The sence of Love-Eternall, doth

with Love, Obedience still produce,

Which active is, and passive both,

So sufferings are of speciall use.

Bearing the soule with joy and peace,

Through true beleeving, evermore,

Whose sweet contentments take encrease,

From heavens never-fayling store.

E 50 E1v 50

Another Song exciting to spirituall Mirth.

The Winter being over

In order comes the Spring,

Which doth green Hearbe discover

And cause the Birds to sing;

The Night also expired,

Then comes the Morning bright,

Which is so much desired

By all that love the Light;

This may learn

Them that mourn

To put their Griefe to flight.

The Spring succeedeth Winter,

And Day must follow Night.

He therefore that sustaineth

Affliction of Distresse,

Which ev’ry member paineth,

And findeth no relesse;

Yet such therefore despaire not,

But on firm Hope depend

Whose Griefes immortall are not,

And therefore must have end:

They that faint

With complaint

Therefore 51 E2r 51

Therefore are too blame,

They ad to their afflictions,

And amplify the same.

For if they could with patience

A while posesse the minde,

By inward Consolacions

They might refreshing finde,

To sweeten all their Crosses

That little time they ’dure;

So might they gain by losses,

And harp would sweet procure;

But if the minde

Be inclinde

To Unquietnesse

That only may be called

The worst of all Distresse.

He that is melancolly

Detesting all Delight,

His Wits by sottish Folly

Are ruinated quite:

Sad Discontent and Murmors

To him are insident,

Were he posest of Honors

He could not be content:

Sparks of joy

Fly away,

Floods of Cares arise,

And all delightfull Mocions

In the consention dies.

E2 But 52 E2v 52

But those that are contented

However things doe fall,

Much Anguish is prevented,

And they soon freed from all:

They finish all their Labours

With much felicity,

Theyr joy in Troubles savours

Of perfect Piety,

Chearfulnesse

Doth expresse

A setled pious minde

Which is not prone to grudging

From murmoring refinde.

Lascivious joy I prayse not,

Neither do it allow,

For where the same decayes not

No branch of peace can grow;

For why, it is sinister

As is excessive Griefe,

And doth the Heart sequester

From all good: to be briefe,

Vain Delight

Passeth quite

The bounds of modesty,

And makes one apt to nothing

But sensuality.

53 E3r 53

This Song showeth that God is the strength of his People, whence they have support and comfort.

MGy straying thoughts, reduced stay,

And so a while retired,

Such observacions to survay

Which memory hath registred,

That were not in oblivion dead.

In which reveiw of mentall store,

One note affordeth comforts best,

Cheifly to be preferd therfore,

As in a Cabinet or Chest

One jewell may exceed the rest.

God is the Rock of his Elect

In whom his grace is incoate,

This note, my soule did most affect,

It doth such power intimate

To comfort and corroberate.

God is a Rock first in respect

He shadows his from hurtfull heat,

Then in regard he doth protect

His servants still from dangers great

And so their enimies defeat.

E3 damaged 54 E3v 54

In some dry desart Lands (they say)

Are mighty Rocks, which shadow make,

Where passengers that go that way,

May rest, and so refreshing take,

Their sweltish Wearinesse to slake.

So in this world such violent

Occasions, find we still to mourn,

That scorching heat of Discontent

Would all into combustion turn

And soon our soules with anguish burn,

Did not our Rock preserve us still,

Whose Spirit, ours animates,

Iohn. 3.8 That wind that bloweth where it will

Sweetly our soules refrigerates,

And so distructive heat abates.

From this our Rock proceeds likewise,

Those streames, which graciously

Releives the soule which scorched lies,

Through sence of Gods displeasure high,

Due to her for inniquity.

So this our Rock refreshing yeelds,

To those that unto him adhere,

Whom likewise mightily he sheilds,

So that they need not faint nor fear

Though all the world against them were.

Becauſe 55 E4r 55

Because he is their strength and tower,

Whose power none can equalize,

Which onely gives the use of power

Which justly he to them denies,

Who would against his servants rise.

Not by selfe power nor by might,

Zach. 4. But by Gods spirit certainly,

Men compasse amd attain their right,

For what art thou, O mountain high!

Thou shalt with valleys, evenly.

Happy was Israell, and why,

Deu. 33.29 Jehovah was his Rock alone,

The Sword of his Excellency,

His sheild of Glory mighty known,

In saving those that are his own.

Experience of all ages shewes,

That such could never be dismayd

Who did by Faith on God repose,

Confessing him their onely ayd,

Such were alone in safty stayd.

One may have freinds, who have a will

To further his felicity,

And yet be wanting to him still,

Because of imbecility,

In power and ability.

E4 But 56 E4v 56

But whom the Lord is pleasd to save,

Such he is able to defend,

His grace and might no limmits have,

And therefore can to all extend

Who doe or shall on him depend.

Nor stands he therefore surely,

Whose Freinds most powerfull appeare,

Because of mutabillity

To which all mortalls subject are,

Whose favours run now here, now there.

But in our Rock and mighty Fort,

Of change no shadow doth remain,

His favours he doth not Transport

As trifles movable and vain,

His Love alone is lasting gain.

Therfore my soule do thou depend,

Upon that Rock which will not move,

When all created help shall end

Any Rock impregnable will prove,

Whom still embrace with ardent Love.

Another Song.

The Winter of my infancy being over-past

Then supposed, suddenly the Spring would hast

Which useth every thing to cheare

With invitacion to recreacion

This time of yeare.

The 57 E5r 57

The Sun sends forth his radient beames to warm- the ground

The drops distil, between the gleams delights abound,

Ver brings her mate the flowery Queen,

The Groves shee dresses, her Art expresses

On every Green.

But in my Spring it was not so, but contrary,

For no delightfull flowers grew to please the eye,

No hopefull bud, nor fruitfull bough,

No moderat showers which causeth flowers

To spring and grow.

My Aprill was exceeding dry, therfore unkind;

Whence tis that small utility I look to find,

For when that Aprill is so dry,

(As hath been spoken) it doth betoken

Much scarcity.

Thus is my Spring now almost past in heavinesse

The Sky of pleasure’s over-cast with sad distresse

For by a comfortlesse Eclips,

Disconsolacion and sore vexacion,

My blossom nips.

Yet as a garden is my mind enclosed fast

Being to safety so confind from storm and blast

Apt to produce a fruit most rare,

That is not common with every woman

That fruitfull are.

A Love of goodnesse is the cheifest plant therin

The second is,(for to be briefe) Dislike to sin.

damaged 58 E5v 58

These grow in spight of misery,

Which Grace doth nourish and cause to flourish

Continually.

But evill mocions, currupt seeds, fall here also

wWhenc springs prophanesse as do weeds where flowers grow

Which must supplanted be with speed

These weeds of Error, Distrust and Terror,

Lest woe succeed

So shall they not molest, the plants before exprest

Which countervails these outward wants, & purchase rest

Which more commodious is for me

Then outward pleasures or earthly treasures

Enjoyd would be.

My little Hopes of worldly Gain I fret not at,

As yet I do this Hope retain; though Spring be lat

Perhaps my Sommer-age may be,

Not prejudiciall, but beneficiall

Enough for me.

Admit the worst it be not so, but stormy too,

Ile learn my selfe to undergo more then I doe

And still content my self with this

Sweet Meditacion and Contemplacion

Of heavenly blis,

Which for the Saints reserved is, who persevere

In Piety and Holynesse, and godly Feare,

The pleasures of which blis divine

Neither Logician nor Rhetorician

damaged
59 E6r 59

Another Song.

Having restrained Discontent,

The onely Foe to Health and Witt,

I sought by all meanes to prevent

The causes which did nourish it,

Knowing that they who are judicious

Have alwaies held it most pernicious.

Looking to outward things, I found

Not that which Sorrow might abate,

But rather cause them to abound

Then any Greife to mittigate

Which made me seek by supplicacion

Internall Peace and Consolacion

Calling to mind their wretchednesse

That seem to be in happy case

Having externall happinesse

But therewithall no inward grace;

Nor are their minds with knowledg pollisht

In such all vertues are abollisht

For where the mind’s obscure and dark

There is no vertu resident,

Of goodnesse there remaines no spark;

Distrustfullnesse doth there frequent

For Ignorance the cause of error

May also be the cause of terror

damaged 60 E6v 60

As doth the Sun-beames beutify

The Sky, which else doth dim appeare

So Knowledg doth exquisitly

The Mind adorn, delight and cleare

Which otherwise is most obscure,

Full of enormities impure.

So that their Soules polluted are

That live in blockish Ignorance,

Which doth their miseries declare

And argues plainly that their wants

More hurtfull are then outward Crosses

Infirmities, Reproach, or Losses.

Where saving Knowledg doth abide,

The peace of Conscience also dwels

And many Vertues more beside

Which all obsurdities expels,

And fils the Soule with joy Celestiall

That shee regards not thing Terrestiall.

Sith then the Graces of the Mind

Exceeds all outward Happinesse,

What sweet Contentment do they find

Who are admitted to possesse

Such matchlesse Pearles, so may we call them:

For Precious is the least of all them.

Which when I well considered

My greife for outward crosses ceast,

Being not much discouraged

Although 61 E7r 61

Although afflictions still encreast,

Knowing right well that Tribulacion

No token is of Reprobacion.

Another Song.

Excessive worldy Greife the Soule devouers

And spoyles the activnesse of all the Powers,

Through indisposing them to exercise

What should demonstrate their abilities,

By practicall improvment of the same

Unto the Glory of the givers name.

Though Envy wait to blast the Blossoms green

Of any Vertu soon as they are seen,

Yet none may therfore just occasion take

To shun what Vertu manifest should make,

For like the Sun shall Vertu be beheld

When Clouds of Envy shall be quite dispeld;

Though there be some of no disart at all

Who no degree in worth can lower fall,

Prefer’d before the Verteous whom they taunt

Onely because of some apparent want,

Which is as if a Weed without defect

Before the Damask Rose whould have respect,

Becauſe 62 E7v 62

Because the Rose a leafe or two hath lost,

And this the Weed of all his parts can boast;

Or elce as if a monstrous Clout should be

Prefer’d before the purest Lawn to see,

Because the Lawn hath spots and this the Clout

Is equally polluted thoroughout

Therefore let such whose vertu favours merit,,

Shew their divinly magnanimious spirits

By disregarding such their approbacion

Who have the worthlesse most in estimacion,

For who loves God above all things, not one

Who understands not that in him alone

All causes that may move affection are,

Glimpses wherof his creatures doe declare,

This being so, who can be troubled

When as his gifts are undervalued,

Seeing the giver of all things likewise

For want of knowledg many underprise.

63 E8r 63

A Song composed in time of the Civill Warr, when the wicked did much insult over the godly.

With Sibells I cannot Devine

Of future things to treat,

Nor with Parnassus Virgins Nine

Compose in Poems neat

Such mentall mocions which are free

Concepcions of the mind,

Which notwithstanding will not be

To thoughts alone confind

With Deborah twere joy to sing

When that the Land hath Rest,

And when that Truth shall freshly spring,

Which seemeth now deceast,

But some may waiting for the same

Go on in expectacion

Till quick conceipt be out of frame,

Or till Lifes expiracion.

Therefore who can, and will not speak

Betimes in Truths defence,

Seeing her Foes their malice wreak,

And some with smooth pretence

And 64 E8v 64

And colours which although they glose

Yet being not ingraind,

In time they shall their luster lose

As cloth most foully staind.

See how the Foes of Truth devise

Her followers to defame.

First by Aspersions false and Lies

To kill them in good Name;

Yet here they will in no wise cease

But Sathans course they take

To spoyl their Goods and Wealths increase,

And so at Life they make.

Such with the Devill further go

The Soule to circumvent

In that they seeds of Error sow

And to false Worships tempt,

And Scriptures falsly they apply

Their Errors to maintain,

Opposing Truth implicitly

The greater side to gain.

And to bind Soul and Body both

To Sathans service sure

Therto they many ty by Oath,

Or cause them to endure

The Losse of lightsom Liberty

And suffer Confiscacion,

A multitude they force therby

To hazard their Salvacion.

Another 65 F1r 65

Another sort of Enimies

To Lady Verity,

Are such who no Religion prise,

But Carnall Liberty

Is that for which they doe contest

And venture Life and State,

Spurning at all good meanes exprest,

The force of Vice to bate.

Yet these are they, as some conceit,

Who must again reduce,

And all things set in order strait

Disjoynted by abuse,

And wakeing witts may think no lesse

If Fiends and Furies fell,

May be suppos’d to have successe

Disorders to expell.

How-ever Truth to fade appeare,

Yet can shee never fall,

Her Freinds have no abiding here,

And may seem wasted all;

Yet shall a holy Seed remain

The Truth to vindicate,

Who will the wrongeds Right regain

And Order elevate.

What time Promocion, Wealth, and Peace,

The Owners shall enjoy,

Whose Light shall as the Sun encrease

Unto the perfect Day

F Then 66 F1v 66

Then shall the Earth with blessings flow,

And Knowledge shall abound,

The Cause that’s now derided so,

Shall then most just be found.

Prophanenesse must be fully grown,

And such as it defend

Must be ruind or overthrown,

And to their place desend,

The Sonns of strife their force must cease,

Having fulfild their crime,

And then the Son of wished peace

Our Horizon will clime.

That there are such auspicious dayes

To come, we may not doubt,

Because the Gospels splendant rayes

Must shine the World throughout:

By Jewes the Faith shall be embrac’t

The Man of Sin must fall,

New Babell shall be quite defac’t

With her devices all.

The Truth will spread and high appeare,

As grain when weeds are gon,

Which may the Saints afflicted cheare

Oft thinking hereupon;

Sith they have union with that sort

To whom all good is ty’d

They can in no wise want support

Though most severely try’d.

damaged 67 F2r 67

Another Song

Time past we understood by story

The strength of Sin a Land to waste,

Now God to manifest his Glory.

The truth hereof did let us taste,

For many years, this Land appears

Of usefull things the Nursery,

Refresht and fenc’d with unity.

But that which crown’d each other Blessing

Was evidence of Truth Divine,

The Word of Grace such Light expressing,

Which in some prudent Hearts did shine,

Whose Flame inclines those noble minds

To stop the Course of Prophanacion

And so make way for Reformacion.

But He that watcheth to devour,

This their intent did soon discry,

For which he strait improves his power

This worthy work to nullify

With Sophistry and Tiranny,

His agents he forthwith did fill

Who gladly execute his will.

And first they prove by Elocution

And Hellish Logick to traduce

Those that would put in execucion,

Restraint of every known abuse;

F2 damaged 68 F2v 68

They seperate and ’sturb the State,

And would all Order overthrow,

The better sort were charged so.

Such false Reports did fill all places,

Corrupting some of each degree,

He whom the highest Title graces

From hearing slanders was not free,

Which Scruple bred, and put the Head

With primest members so at bate

Which did the Body dislocate.

A Lying Spirit mis-informed

The common people, who suppose

If things went on to be reformed

They should their ancient Customs lose,

And be beside to courses ty’d

Which they nor yet their Fathers knew,

And so be wrapt in fangles new.

Great multitudes therefore were joyned

ToSathans plyant instruments,

With mallice, ignorance combined,

And both at Truth their fury vents;

Test Piety as Enimy

They persecute, oppose, revile,

When Freind as well as Foe they spoyle.

The beuty of the Land’s abollisht,

Such Fabericks by Art contriv’d,

The many of them quite demollisht,

And many of their homes depriv’d

Some 69 F3r 69

Some mourn for freinds untimely ends,

And some for necessaries faint,

With which they parted by constraint.

But from those storms hath God preserved

A people to record his praise,

Who sith they were therefore reserved

Must to the heigth their Spirits raise

To magnify his lenity,

Who safely brought them through the fire

To let them see their hearts desire

Which many faithfull ones deceased

With teares desired to behold,

Which is the Light of Truth professed

Without obscuring shaddowes old,

When spirits free, not tyed shall be

To frozen Forms long since compos’d,

When lesser knowledg was disclos’d.

Who are preserv’d from foes outragious,

Noteing the Lords unfound-out wayes,

Should strive to leave to after-ages

Some memorandums of his praise,

That others may admiring say

Unsearchable his judgments are,

As do his works alwayes declare.

F3 70 F3v 70

Meditacions

The first Meditacion.

The Morning is at hand, my Soule awake,

Rise fron the sleep of dull security;

Now is the time, anon ’twill be to late,

Now hast thou golden opportunity

For to behold thy naturall estate

And to repent and be regenerate.

Delay no longer though the Flesh thee tell,

Tis time enough hereafter to repent,

Strive earnestly such mocions to expell,

Remember this thy courage to augment

The first fruits God requir’d for sacrifice,

The later he esteemed of no price

First let’s behold our natural estate

How dangerous and damnable it is,

And thereupon grow to exceeding hate

With that which is the onely cause of this;

The which is Sin, yea Disobedience

Even that which was our first parents offence.

damaged 71 F4r 71

The reasonable Soule undoubtedly

Created was at first free from offence,

In Wisdom, Holinesse, and Purity,

It did resembleth the Divine Essence,

Which being lost, the Soule of man became

Like to the Serpent, causer of the same.

The Understanding, Will, Affections cleare,

Each part of Soule and Body instantly

Losing their purity, corrupted were

Throughout as by a loathsom Leprocy

The rayes of Vertu were extinguisht quite

And Vice usurpeth rule with force and might.

This sudden change from sanctitude to sin

Could but prognosticat a fearfull end,

Immediatly the dollour did begin,

The Curse that was pronounc’d, none might defend,

Which Curse is in this life a part or some,

The fulnesse thereof in the life to come.

The Curse that to the Body common is

The sence of Hunger, Thirst, of Sicknes, Pain:

The Soules Callamities exceedeth this,

A Tast of Hell shee often doth sustain,

Rebukes of Conscience, threatening plagues for sin,

A world of Torments oft shee hath within.

F4 Unlesse 72 F4v 72

Unlesse the Conscience dead and seared be,

Then runs the soule in errors manifold,

Her danger deep she can in no wise see,

And therefore unto every sin is bold,

The Conscience sleeps, the Soule is dead in sin,

Nere thinks of Hell untill shee comes therein.

Thus is the Conscience of the Reprobate,

Either accusing unto desperacion,

Or else benummed, cannot instigate

Nor put the Soule in mind of reformacion;

Both work for ill unto the castaway,

Though here they spent their time in mirth and play.

Yet can they have no sound contentment here,

In midst of laughter oft the heart is sad:

This world is full of woe & hellish feare

And yeelds forth nothing long to make us glad

As they that in the state of nature dy

Passe but from misery to misery.

Consider this my soule, yet not despaire,

To comfort thee again let this suffice,

There is a Well of grace, whereto repaire,

First wash away thy foul enormities

With teares proceeding from a contrite heart,

With thy beloved sins thou must depart.

Inordinate 73 F5r 73

Inordinate affections, and thy Will,

And carnall wisdom, must thou mortify,

For why, they are corrupt, prophane and ill,

And prone to nothing but impiety,

Yet shalt thou not their nature quite deface,

Their ruines must renewed be by grace.

If that thou canst unfainedly repent,

With hatred therunto thy sins confesse,

And not because thou fearest punishment

But that therby thou didst Gods Laws transgress

Resolving henceforth to be circumspect,

Desiring God to frame thy wayes direct.

Each member of thy body thou dost guide,

Then exercise them in Gods service most

Let every part be thoroughly sanctifide

As a meet Temple for the Holy Ghost;

Sin must not in our mortall bodies raign

It must expelled be although with pain

Thou must not willingly one sin detain,

For so thou mayst debarred be of blis,

Grace with inniquity will not remain,

Twixt Christ and Belial no communion is,

Therefore be carefull every sin to fly,

And see thou persevere in piety.

So 74 F5v 74

So mayst thou be perswaded certainly,

The Curse shall in no wise endanger thee,

Although the body suffer misery

Yet from the second death thou shalt be free;

They that are called here to Holinesse

Are sure elected to eternall blisse.

A Taste of blessednesse here shalt thou say,

Thy Conscience shall be at Tranquility,

And in the Life to com thou shalt enjoy

The sweet fruicion of the Trinity,

Society with Saints then shalt thou have,

Which in this life thou didst so often crave.

Let this then stir thee up to purity,

Newnesse of life, and speedy Conversion,

To Holinesse and to integrity,

Make conscience of impure thought unknown

Pray in the Spirit with sweet Contemplacion

Be vigilant for to avoid Temptacion.

75 F6r 75

The Preamble.

Amid the Oceon of Adversity,

Neare whelmed in the Waves of sore Vexacion,

Tormented with the Floods of Misery,

And almost in the Guise of Despairacion,

Neare destitute of Comfort, full of Woes,

This was her Case that did the same compose:

At length Jehovah by his power divine,

This great tempestious Storm did mittigate.

And cause the Son of Righteousnesse to shine

Upon his Child that seemed desolate,

Who was refreshed, and that immediatly,

And Sings as follows with alacrity.

The Second Meditacion.

The storm on Anguish being over-blown,

To praise Gods mercies now I may have [space

For that I was not finally orethrown,

But was supported by his speciall grace;

Psal. 19.I The Firmament his glory doth declare,

Psal, 145.9 Yet over all his works, his mercies are.

The Contemplacion of his mercies sweet,

Hath ravished my Soule with such delight

Who to lament erst while was onely meet,

Doth now determine to put griefe to flight,

Being perswaded, hereupon doth rest,

Shee shall not be forsaken though distrest.

damaged 76 F6v 76

Gods Favour toward me is hereby proved,

For that he hath not quite dejected me;

Why then, though crosses be not yet removed

Yet so seasoned with pacience they be,

As they excite me unto godlinesse,

The onely way to endlesse happinesse.

Wch earthly muckworms can in no wise know

Being of the Holy Spirit destitute,

They savour onely earthly things below;

Who shall with them of saving Grace dispute,

Shall find them capable of nothing lesse

Though Christianity they do professe.

Let Esaus porcion fall unto these men,

The Fatnesse of the Earth let them possesse

No other thing they can desire then,

Having no taste of Heavens happinesse,

They care not for Gods Countenance so bright,

Their Corn and Wine and Oyle is their delight.

To compasse this and such like is their care,

But having past the period of their dayes,

Bereft of all but miseries they are,

Their sweet delights with mortall life decayes,

Tim. 6.6 But godlinesse is certainly great gain,

Immortall blisse they have, who it retain.

They that are godly and regenerate,

Endu’d with saving Knowledg, Faith, and Love,

When they a future blisse premeditate,

It 77 F7r 77

It doth all bitter passion quite remove;

Though oft they feel the wane of outward things

Their heavenly meditacions, comfort brings.

They never can be quite disconsolate,

Because they have the onely Comforter

Which doth their minds alway illuminate,

And make them fleshly pleasures much abhorr,

For by their inward light they plainly see

How vain all transitory pleasures bee.

Moreover, if they be not only voyd

Of earthly pleasures and commodities,

But oftentimes be greivously annoyd

With sundry kinds of great Calammities,

Whether it be in Body, Goods, or Name,

With pacience they undergo the same.

And why? because they know and be aware

That all things work together for the best,

Ro. 8 28. To them that love the Lord and called are,

According to his purpose, therefore blest

Doubtlesse they be, his knowledg that obtain,

No Losse may countervail their blessed Gain.

Which makes them neither murmor nor repine

When God is pleas’d with Crosses them to try,

2 Cor 4.6. who out of darknesse caused light to shine,

Can raise them Comfort out of Misery

They know right well and therefore are content

To beare with patience any Chastisment.

This 78 F7v 78

This difference is betwixt the good and bad;

When as for sin the godly scourged are,

And godly Sorrow moves them to be sad,

These speeches or the like they will declare:

O will the Lord absent himselfe for ever?

Will he vouchsafe his mercy to me never?

What is the cause I am afflicted so?

The cause is evident I do perceive.

My Sins have drawn upon me all this woe,

The which I must confesse and also leave,

Pro. 28.13 Then shall I mercy find undoubtedly,

And otherwise no true prosperity.

Whilst sin hath rule in me, in vain I pray,

Or if my Soule inniquity affects,

If this be true, as tis, I boldly say,

8 Pro. 15, The prayer of the wicked, God rejects;

If in my heart I wickednesse regard

Psal. 66 How can I hope my prayer shall be heard.

If I repent, here may I Comfort gather,

Though in my prayers there be weaknesse much

Christ siteth at the right hand of his Father

Rom. 8. 33 To intercede and make request for such,

Who have attained to sincerity,

Though somthing hindered by infirmity.

I will forthwith abandon and repent,

Not onely palpable inniquities,

But also all alowance or consent

To 79 F8r 79

To sinfull mocions or infirmities;

And when my heart and wayes reformed be,

God will with-hold nothing that’s good from me

Psal. 84.

So may I with the Psalmist truly say,

Tis good for me that I have been afflicted,

Psal 119 Before I troubled was, I went astray,

But now to godlinesse I am adicted;

If in Gods Lawes I had not took delight,

I in my troubles should have perisht quite.

Such gracious speeches usually proceed

From such a Spirit that is Sanctifide,

Who strives to know his own defects and need

And also seekes to have his wants supplide;

But certainly the wicked do not so

As do their speeches and distempers show.

At every crosse they murmor, vex and fret,

And in their passion often will they say,

How am I with Calamities beset!

I think they will mee utterly destray,

The cause hereof I can in no wise know

But that the Destinies will have it so

Unfortunate am I and quite forlorn,

Oh what disastrous Chance befalleth me!

Under some hurtfull Plannet I was born

That will (I think) my Confusion be,

And there are many wickeder then I

Who never knew the like adversity.

damaged 80 F8v 80

These words do breifly show a carnall mind

Polluted and corrupt with Ignorance,

Where godly Wisdom never yet hath shin’d

For that they talk of Destiny or Chance;

For if Gods Power never can abate,

He can dispose of that he did create

If God alone the True Almighty be

As we beleive, acknowledge, and confesse,

Then supream Governor likewise is he

Disposing all things, be they more or lesse;

The eyes of God in every place do see

The good and bad, and what their actions bee.

The thought hereof sufficeth to abate

My heavinesse in great’st extremity,

When Grace unto my Soul did intimate

That nothing comes by Chance or Destiny,

But that my God and Saviour knowes of all

That either hath or shall to me befall

Who can his servants from all troubles free

And would I know my Crosses all prevent,

But that he knowes them to be good for me

Therefore I am resolv’d to be content,

For though I meet with many Contradictions

Yet Grace doth alwayes sweeten my Afflictions.

81 G1r 81

The third Meditacion.

Faint not my Soule, but wait thou on the- Lord

Though he a while his answer may suspend,

Yet know (according to his blessed word)

He will vouchsafe refreshing in the end,

Yea though he seen for to withdraw his grace,

And doth not alwaies show his pleasing face.

As by the Sun, though not still shining bright,

We do enjoy no small Commodity,

Whilst that the day is govern’d by his Light,

And other works of Nature testify

His wonderfull and rare Effects alwayes,

Though often vayled be his shinging rayes.

So it is no small mercy, though we see

Gods Countenance not alwaies shinging bright,

That be the same our minds enlightned be,

And our affections guided by that Light,

And whilst the winter-fruits as it were we find

In Pacience, Sufferings, and Peace of mind.

Then let it not be told in Ashkelon,

Neither in Gath let it be published,

That thos that seek the Lord and him alone

In any case should be discouraged,

Lest it rejoyce the wicked this to see,

Who think the wayes of grace unpleasant be.

G Where-as 82 G1v 82

Where-as they are most pleasant, sweet, and fair

Yeilding delights which onely satisfy

Our minds, which else transported are with care

And restlesse wandrings continually,

But those that do no taste hereof attain

Seek rather for content in pleasures vain.

When Kain had lost the happy harmony,

He by a peace full Concience might enjoy

His nephew Juball then most skillfully

Invented Musick, thereby to convey

Unto the outward eare some melody,

But no true joy comes to the heart thereby.

For it is onely a Certificate

Brought by Gods Spirit from the Throne of Grace.

That may delight the Soule Regenerate,

Which certifies her of her happy case,

That shee’s already in a gracious state,

Which will in endlesse glory consummate.

Again, the blessed Soule may take delight,

To think on Sions great prosperity,

In that the Gospell long hath shined bright,

Sustaining no Eclips by Heresy,

So that the meanes of knowledg is so free,

Gods Worship rightly may performed be.

If then my Soule, the Lord thy Porcion be

Delight’st his Word and sacred Covenants

Wherby his Graces are conveyed to thee,

As Earnests of divine inheritance,

And 83 G2r 83

And which may cause tru comfort to abound

Thy Lot is fallen in a pleasant ground,

Then let not any trouble thee dismay

Seeing the Light of Grace to thee hath shone

The sable Weed of Sadnesse lay away,

And put the Garment of Salvacion on,

With chearfullnesse, Gods blessings entertain

Let not the object of thy mirth be vain,

Which as a true Cloud would stop the influence

Of that true Light that doth the Soule refine

And predisposeth it through lively sence

To that eternall brightnesse most divine;

Then cheifly to admit that joy, accord,

Which commeth by the Favour of the Lord.

God’s Favour ever highly estimate,

As the prime motive of tru happinesse,

Whereof, since that thou didst participate,

In Life or Death, feare no kind of distresse;

When humane help shall fayl thee utterly

Then is Gods saving opportunity.

Deadnesse of spirit that thou mayst avoyd,

The lively means of godlynesse embrace,

And cease not seeking though thou be delayd,

But wait till God do manifest his grace,

For thy deliverance, prefix no day,

But paciently the Lords due leisure stay.

G2 84 G2v 84

The fourth Meditacion.

Alas my Soule, oft have I sought thy Peace,

But still I find the contrary encrease,

Thou being of a froward disposicion,

Perceivest not thy mercyfull Physician

Doth give thee for thy health these strong purgacions

So may we call our daily molestacions,

Which how to beare, that thou mayst understand

Take heed of two extreams under Gods hand,

The one is, too light takeing thy Distresse,

The other’s, hopelesse Greife or Pensivenesse;

Between these two, observe with heedfull eye

A middle course or mediocrity;

Consider for the first, if one correct

His Child, who seemeth it to disrespect,

Warding the blow or setting light therby,

How is he beat again deservedly;

So if that thou should’st seem to disregard,

The Chastisments of God, or seek to ward

The same by wayes or meanes impenitent,

How just shall God renew thy punishment:

If Physick for our Bodies health be tane,

We hinder not the working of the same,

Strong Physick if it purge not, putrifies,

And more augments then heales our malladies,

And as is sayd, our manifold Temptacions,

Are nothing but thy scouring Purgacions,

Wherein 85 G3r 85

Wherin a dram too much, hath not admission,

Confected by so Skilfull a Physician

Who will not have their bitternesse abated,

Till thy ill humors be evacuated;

Then loose it down for thy Humilliacion,

And hinder not its kindly Opperacion,

As thou mayst by untimely voyding it

By vain contentments, which thou mayst admit,

Which makes us drive repentant thought away,

And so put far from us the Evill day;

But that content which is by such meanes got

Is like cold water, tane in fevers hot,

Which for the present, though it seem to ease,

Yet after it encreaseth the disease;

But thou dost rather unto Grief incline,

At Crosses therfore, subject to repine,

Supposing oft, thy present troubles are

Intolerable, and thy bane declare;

Whilst thou for this, thy selfe dost miserate

Dispair unto thee doth intimate,

That none hath been afflicted like to thee,

Unparaleld thy visitacions bee;

The by-waies being thus discovered,

Endeavour in the right way to be led,

With tru Repentance, hope of pardon joine,

Deny thy selfe, and trust for help divine,

Seek first with God in Christ to be at peace,

Who onely can thy Tribulacion cease,

For he that laid the Rod (affliction) on,

The power hath to pull it off alone;

G3 Twere 86 G3v 86

Twere but in vain for one that were in debt,

To see the Officers a discharg to get,

Till with his Creditor he doth agree

He cannot walk out of his danger free;

So vain are they, which think their course is sure,

When in the use of meanes they rest secure,

Whereas if God his blessing doth restrain

We by the creature can no help attain:

Though it hath pleased God out of his grace,

Naturall causes over things to place,

Yet keeps he to himselfe, (blest be his name)

The staffe and operacion of the same;

Then do not think my Soule to find redresse

By meanes of Freinds, or by self Skilfullnesse,

But rather all created helps deny,

Save as they serve for God to work thereby:

Now forasmuch as God is just alone,

Know, without cause he hath afflicted none,

Sith without doubt, his wayes so equall be,

For som great fault he thus correcteth thee,

Therfore to lowest thoughts thy self retire,

To seek the cause that moved God to ire,

Which when thou findest, whatsoere it be

As thy right hand or eye so dear to thee,

Resolve for ever to abandon it,

Be watchfull lest the same thou recommit,

Renew thy Covenant with God, and vow

In the remainder of thy dayes, that thou

Wilt walk before him with an upright heart

If for that end his grace be on thy part,

If 87 G4r 87

If when hereto thou dost thy forces try,

In them thou find a disability,

Then look to Christ, who doth thy weaknesse veiw

And of compassion will thy strength renew,

From him alone thou mayst that grace derive

Which like a Cordiall or Restorative,

Will strengthen and repair thy faculties,

Which else are dead to holy exercise,

Twill make thy Understanding apprehend

God as a Father, who in Love doth send

Correction to his Children when they stray,

When without check the wicked take their sway;

This grace once tasted, so affects the will,

As it forsaketh that which cannot fill;

The well of living waters, to frequent,

Can onely fill the Soule with tru content;

The memory it doth corroberate,

To keep a store, the Soule to animate,

Gods precious promises the treasures be,

Which memory reserves to comfort thee;

The over-flowings of this grace divine

To goodnesse the affections will encline,

Turning the hasty current of thy love

From things below, unto those things above,

Seeing it is the grace of Christ alone,

Which makes the Soule to be with God at one,

Endeavour for it give thy selfe no rest,

Till feelingly thereof thou be possest.

G4 88 G4v 88

The fifth Meditacion.

Such is the force of each created thing,

That it no solid happinesse can bring,

Which to our minds may give contentments sound

For like as Noahs Dove no succour found,

Till shee return’d to him that sent her out,

Just so the Soule in vain may seek about,

For rest or satisfaction any where,

Save in his presence, who hath sent her here.

Gods omnipresence I do not deny,

Yet to the Faithfull he doth spec’ally,

Alone his gracious presence evidence,

Who seeing all true blessings flow from thence,

Are troubled onely when he hides his Face,

Desiring still to apprehend his Grace,

This Grace of God is taken diversly

And first it doth his Favour signify,

That independent Love of his so free,

Which mov’d him to his mercyfull Decree,

His Merum beneplacitum it is

That’s motive of all good conferd on his:

The fruits of this his Love or Favour deare,

Are likewise called Graces everywhere,

Election and Redempcion, graces are,

And these his Favour cheifly do declare.

Faith, 89 G5r 89

Faith, Hope, Repentance, Knowledge, and the rest,

Which do the new Creac’on manifest,

Now these are counted Grace habituall.

And lastly, this the Grace of God we call,

His actuall Assistance on our side,

Wherby we overcome when we are tride;

How ever then the word is understood

Grace is the cheif desirable good.

Tis Summum bonum; is it so? for why?

Because without it no Prosperity,

Or earthly Honours, in the high’st degree,

Can make one truly happy sayd to be,

For as we might their miseries condole

Who should inhabit neare the Northern-Pole,

Though Moon & Stars may there apear most bright

Yet while the Sun is absent, still tis night,

And therfore barren, cold, and comfortlesse,

Unfit for humane creatures to possesse:

More fruitlesse, empty comfort is the Mind,

Who finds the Sun of Righteousnesse declind.

Yea, though all earthly glories should unite

Their pomp and splendor, to give such delight,

Yet could they no more sound contentment bring

Then Star-light can make grasse or flowers spring;

But in that happy Soule that apprehends

His Loving kindnesse, (which the Life transcends)

There is no lack of any thing that may

Felicity or tru delight convey;

As whilst the Sun is in our Hemisphere,

We find no want of Moon nor Star-light cleare,

So 90 G5v 90

So where the Fountain of tru Light displayes

His beames, there is no need of borrow’d joyes,

For where he is who made all things of nought,

There by his presence still fresh joyes are wrought

Nor need he help to make a happy one,

Sith all perfection is in him alone,

Grant then his Grace is most to be desir’d

And nothing else to be so much requir’d;

But here a carnall crew are to be blam’d,

By whom the Grace of God so much is nam’d

Who are experienc’d in nothing lesse

As do their course and practises expresse,

For though they say the Grace of God’s worth all

Yet will they hazzard it for Trifles small,

Hereof they’ll put you out of all suspicion

When Gods Grace coms with mens in competicion

For holy duties lightly such neglects,

Whereby Gods Love is felt with its effects,

The favour of a mortall man to gain

Though but a shew thereof he do attain,

And that perhaps for some employment base

Which one cannot perform and keep tru Grace,

Therefore tis probable, how ere they prate,

Gods Grace they value at too low a rate

For to be purchast by them, sith they leave

Their hold of it, a shaddow to receave;

But they that do in truth of heart professe

That they have found this Pearle of Blessednesse

Will not adventure it for any thing,

Whatever good it promiseth to bring.

Becauſe 91 G6r 91

Because they know the choisest quintesence

Of earthly pleasures greatest confluence,

Cannot procure that sweet blissefull peace

Which from Gods Favour ever takes encrease;

Yet many times it comes to passe we see,

That those who have tru grace so senselesse be

Of it, that they in seasons if distresse,

Abundance of impacience do expresse,

But tis their sin, and brings an ill report

Upon their cheifest Comfort, Strength, and Fort;

Such therefore should endeavour paciently,

To beare whatever crosse upon them ly,

And that by strength of this consideracion

I Pet. I.6. That they have need of this theyr tribulacion

It may be to mind them of some offence

Which they committed have (perhaps) long since

Yet they remaine unhumbled for it,

Or elce (may be) some Duty they omit,

In which remissive course they will remain,

Till with a Rod they be brought home again;

Or if they would consider how they prove

The Lords great Pacience towards them, and Love

In wayting for theyr turning to his wayes,

They would not think so greivous of delayes,

Of restitucion to that solace sound,

Which in the sence of Grace is ever found,

Which whoso will in Heart and Life preserve,

These following directions must observe;

The first is, to purge out inniquities

With all that might offend Gods puer eyes,

The 92 G6v 92

The next is, to have Faith in Christ, and Love

Of God, and that which he doth best approve;

Humility must likewise have a place

Iam. 4.6 In them that will be sure of tru Grace,

Then there must be sincear Obedience

To all Jehovah’s just Commandements,

For God will manifest himself to those,

Ioh. 14 Who by Obedience, Love to him disclose.

Now lastly, that which fits one to embrace

The sence of God’s exceeding Love and Grace

Is skilfulnesse in that most blessed Art

Of walking with the Lord with upright heart,

That is to manage all things heedfully,

As in the veiw of Gods omniscient eye,

And so, by consequence, by Faith to joyne

In union with the Trinity divine;

This is the very life of happynesse,

Which may feel far better then expresse:

But lest whilst being wrapt above my sphere,

With sweetnesse of the Theame, I should appeare

Quite to forget the nature of a Song,

And to some this might seem over-long,

My thoughts theyr workings, speedily suspends,

And at this time my Meditacion ends.

Finis.

93 G7r 93

Verses on the twelvth Chapter of Ecclesiastes.

All Earthly Glories to theyr periods post,

As those that do possesse them may behold,

Who therfore should not be at too much cost,

With that which fades so soon, dies & growes old

But rather minde him in their youthfull dayes,

Who can give glory which shall last alwayes.

Ere Light of Sun or Moon or Stars expire,

Before the outward sence eclipsed be,

Which doth direct the heart for to admire

These works of God which obvious are to see,

The Fabrick of the Earth, the Heavens high,

Are to the mind discoverd by the eye.

Again, before the strong men, low shall bow,

And they that keep the house shall tremble sore,

Ere natures force be spent, or quite out-flow;

And wonted courage shall be found no more,

When weaknesse shall each part emasculate

And make the stoutest heart effeminate.

Moreover 94 G7v 94

Moreover, ere the grinders shall be few

Which for concoction doth the food prepare,

And Dames of musick shall be brought so low

That for their melody none much shall care;

Harsh and unpleasant, then the voyce shall bee

The breast being not from obstructions free.

Also before that, causlesse feares arise,

By reason of much imbecility,

Conceit of harmes will in the way surprise

Such feeble ones, which would from shadowes fly

When chilling Frost of sad decrepid age,

The force of vitall vigour shall aswage.

The Almond Tree shall blossoms then declare,

Gray hairs presage to them the end is nigh,

Naturall heat having no more repaire,

Desires fayle, as flames wanting fuell, dy,

Nothing remayning, wherby strengths suppli’d

The marrow wasted, and the moysture dri’d.

And ere the silver cord be loose and weak,

Before the veins be stopt, and sinews shrink

And ere the golden Bowl or Pitcher break,

Before the heart for want of spirit shrink

The head whereas the animals reside,

Now full of maladies, and stupyfide.

The 95 G8r 95

The Body thus out-worn and quite decayd,

The dust returneth to the Earth again;

To God who gave it, is the Soul convayd

Who doth with it as he did preordain,

However som to vent their falacy

Conclude the Soul doth with the Body dy.

Which if were truth why did our Saviour say?

Mat.10 28. Feare him not which the Body kils alone,

And hath no might the Soul for to destray,

If with the one the other must be gone;

But that they may declare impostors skill

Twixt Soul and Spirit they distinguish will.

The Soul (say they) doth with the Body dy,

Then there’s a thrid part which they Spirit call,

Who doth return to God immediatly

Leaving the Dead till judgment-generall,

And then returning, breathing doth infuse

In Soul and Body, wherby life ensues.

For which they have no Scripture (I suppose)

Save what they wrest unto theyr own Perdicion,

As this, where ’tis said, the word with power goes

Heb. 4. 12. Twixt Soul & Spirit by divine commission

Twixt joynts and marow it doth penetrate,

Seeing all secrets, heart can meditate.

96 G8v 96

The joynts and marrow of the Body be

Not sev’rall species, but of kind the same,

The Body to support, each part agree,

And ev’ry member hath its sev’rall name;

So Soul and Spirit is one entire thing,

Immortall by the vertue of its Spring.

More texts of Scripture these Deceivers wrest,

Which should be answered, Truth for to defend;

But seeing here I have so long digrest,

What I begun, I hasten now to end,

Which is to stir up youth their God to mind,

Before effects of evill dayes they find

All here is vanity the Preacher sayes,

Yea use of many books are wearisome,

If cheifly don for self-respect or prayse

It doubtlesse will to such a snare become:

Of all the matter, then the End let’s hear,

Keep Gods commandements with son-like fear.

Finis.

omitted