R2r

A Day In Turkey.

or
The Russian Slaves.

A Comedy.
Interspersed with songs.

R2v

This play was brought out at Covent Garden in the
year 17921792. The Author’s object was to place in a state
of comparison the Manners of Europe and Asia, by
bringing them in contact in Turkey—where Asia intrudes
its Manners on Europe. Much of the florid
language of the East is introduced.—The omission of
Orloff’s song and of Ibrahim’s permitted those Characters
to be allotted to Performers who were never Singers.

A La Greque is the only portrait on the stage of the
giddy frenchman of the French Revolution, when the
term “Aristocrat” was the common word of disapprobation
for every thing that displeased, and the national naiveté
still maintained itself—amidst the dread events of the
day!

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Prologue.

But five bright moons have chased night’s shades from earth

Since the War ceased that gave our Drama birth.

’Twas whilst the Russians in ignoble chains

Were from their Country dragged to hostile plains,

In vision rapt, our Bard sweet females saw

In dread of Mahomet’s enslaving law,

And beauty’s flurried cheek in terror fade

As midst war’s horrors it was captive made.

The griefs of Russia thus themselves presented,

Our author drew them, and no fear prevented!

For scenes of grief tear not the Poet’s soul,

Who feels that all is quite within controul!

And, but to taste the sweet delight to save,

In danger places beauty and the brave,

With light scenes chequering those fraught with woe,

This pleasing anxious life’s true sketch to show.

Thus was her bold imagination fired,

Ere War had yet her deadly train retired.

She hopes the story that was then combined

Need not to drear Oblivion be consigned!

No, let it now your generous passions raise,

And to have touched them oft has been her praise!

Now once again she trusts to witness here,

Your smile of pleasure, and your pity’s tear,

For though the Time is passed, the Feelings true

She drew from Nature to convey to you.

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Characters.

Russians.

Orloff. Officer in the Russian Army. Mr. Farren.

A La Greque. His French Servant. Fawcett.

Petrowitz. Thompson.

Peter. His Son.— Cross.

Paulina. His Daughter.— Mrs. Esten.

Alexina. Orloff’s Wife.— Mrs. Pope.

Turks.

Ibrahim. The Bassa.— Mr. Holman.

Selim. Incledon.

Mustapha. Munden.

Azim Cubit.

Ismael. Farley.

Zilia. Mrs. Mattocks.

R4r

A Day In Turkey.

Act the First.


Scene I. a forest in Russia, near the frontiers
of Turkey.
in the back ground a Turkish camp.

Turkish Soldiers pass and repass, searching the Wood.
They retire through it.

Enter Paulina hastily at a distance.

Pau.

Whither—whither shall we fly?—Brother!
Father! come!—Driven from our little Estate, we
must forth into the wide World!


Enter Petrowitz and Peter.

Peter.

Come Father, lean on me, that you may get
on better, or we shall be picked up by some of the
turban’d freebooters. They are out on their Hunt,
and always consider us Russians but as animals of
Chase! Let us run.

Petrowitz.

Alas! with the load of Seventy years R4v 248
upon me, how hard a task! we shall never escape
them Child!

Pau.

Tenderly. Dear Father—come!—come!
chear up! and let us hurry on to the next village—
come—courage Father!—Peter take care of that bag,
you must bear the load of it, it contains all we have
in the world!

Peter.

Why, if it had not been for some of our own
provident Soldiers, I had had a greater weight to
carry! They were so considerate as to look into our
Cabin yesterday, and left no burthen—beyond my
strength!

Pau.

They took away my best fur dress, alas! And
he who took it, forsooth, said it was a laudable act,
to prevent its being worn by an Enemy’s wife.—So,
now I must into the chilly world without it!

Peter.

Yes, it was a peculiarly friendly action,
and performed in the regular stile of Gentlemen
Soldiers! Their very Looks were Oaths.—The black
eye-brows of one of them expressed fiercer threats
than I ever heard pass between fifty Siberian boarhunters.
Clashing of Swords without. There—
there! d’ye hear!—our enemies are at hand—and
our Friends are coming down upon us!—Come, let us
run!—from Friends and Enemies, holy Michael, defend
us!

Exeunt.
Clashing of swords, A la Greque runs in at top.

A La Gr.

There it goes—there it goes! Nothing
can save thee my gallant master! This comes of reconnoitering
idly. Had you not better have been in
your tent, prudently breaking fast, than here rashly
breaking heads! So—there—he’s disarmed! Well
—you acted without Orders—’tis all your own fault.
Now, how sentimental he looks! with his arms folded,
and his sword in the hands of that beetle brow’d
Turk!—But allons! on recollection I shall now be
not a less man than my Master!

R5r 249
Enter Orloff with Selim and other Turks.

Sel.

Courageous Russian thou art our’s! Could
Valour save thee against Numbers, captivity would
ne’er be thy lot. Your Empress, we trust, has not
many such Soldiers in the neighbouring Camp.
Come, droop not Sir! this is the fortune of War!

Orloff.

A Soldier can endure not only death, but
even Slavery, when a sense of Duty gives Dignity to
his chains! but, mine are those of Folly, for, I reconnoiter’d
but idly, and without Orders; and, attended
only by this fellow, have lost my Liberty without
Glory!

A La Gr.

Then I have lost mine too without Glory,
for I attended without command, and for punishment
—ah! quelle horreur! I am now Valet de chambre to
a Slave!

Turk.

Nay, let not that affect thee! The fate of
War, which has lowered your Master’s pride, may
elate your’s. You are now his equal—for you are
Slaves alike!

A La Gr.

Are we so? Oh, then I shall feel myself
quite at home!—And has he, by your rules, no further
right to command or threaten? Kind Sir, tell
me but that—tell me but that!

Turk.

None! none!

A La Gr.

H-r-r-mph! Puts his hat on, takes out
his snuff box, takes snuff, goes to his master, and offers
his box.
Take a pinch Sir, take a pinch!—pray make
yourself free to that extent!

Orloff.

Scoundrel!

Throws up the box with his
arm.

A La Gr.

Nay, no hard names—let us be obliging,
as brother-slaves ought to be. And, now I think of
it, hark ye Messieurs! I suppose Slaves with you
take Rank according to their Usefulness.

Turk.

Certainly.

A La Gr.

Well then, my ci devant Master there R5v 250
can do no earthly thing but fight; whilst I on the
contrary am expert at all points!

Sel.

Your qualifications?

A La Gr.

They are innumerable! I sing an Italian
Canzonetta, or a French Air—Helas! I fear you’ll
permit no air but Turkish now! No man in Paris Sir—
for I have the honour to be a frenchman—no man in
Paris Sir understands better than myself, the Science
of the delicate lodgement of the true Marechalle
in the hair. I can friz you in a Taste beyond—
Oh! what you’re all Crops I see—fore-fronts, and
back fronts—my Genius will be lost amongst you!
Why, you look as though you had all been scalped,
and had covered your heads with your pillows!

Turk.

Frenchman! our Turbans are too elevated
a subject for your sport!

A La Gr.

Dear Sir, let the subject of our dispute
pointing to the turban and the ground. drop—it will
be a proof of national taste!

Sel.

Thy speech is licentious and empty; but in a
Frank we can pardon it—that too is national taste!
However if your boasted qualifications end here, it
is probable you will be a slave as low in rank as your
Master.

A La Gr.

Pardonnez moi! I can do things he never
thought of!—You are great Story—tellers I hear in
Turkey! You have heard of the basket maker
amongst Savages. I do not despair of seeing my
master my Servant yet—chacun son tour!—Courage
Monsieur Le Comte
! I’ll treat you with great condescension
depend on it—and it shall be my endeavour
to make you forget in all things the distance
between us!

Sel.

He seems too deeply absorbed in melancholy
to be roused by thy impertinence!

A La Gr.

Melancholy?—poor young man he is
thinking of his Wife!

Orloff.

Hasten, hasten, to your chains and to your R6r 251
dungeons! The mental bitterness of this moment
cannot be encreased by corporeal suffering!

A La Gr.

Chains and Dungeons! why surely
there has not been a resurrection of our dead Bastille
here, eh Messieurs? Have you lantern posts and
hanging Marquisses too in this country?

Orloff.

Peace!

A La Gr.

Peace! that’s a bold demand. Your
Empress can’t command it at the head of a hundred
thousand men, and the most sublime Grand Seignior
is obliged to put on his night cap without it, though
he has half a million of these pretty Gentlemen to
assist him.

Orloff.

Come Sir, let us not loiter here—I would
have my fate determined—my misery at its worst!

Sel.

I shall conduct you but to the palace of the
Bassa Ibrahim, not many leagues within the Front—
iers beyond yonder camp, which he commands.
What your fate may afterwards be his Humour determines.

A La Gr.

Then I hope we shall catch him in a
good one, and then, what care I whether a Turk or
a Russian has the honour to be my master?—What
a misfortune to be born a Comte! Had he lost no
more than I have, he’d be as careless as I am.—
Come—brother slave—no ceremony, no ceremony
now!


Exeunt. A la Greque struts out before his Master.

Scene II.


Rocks.

Paulina runs across shrieking, followed by Peter.
Turks pursue and bring them back.

Turk.

Stay, stay, young ones! it is but mannerly
to wait for your Father. You see he is hobbling up,
with as much celerity as suits him.

R6v 252

Pau.

Aye, very true!—Oh, Peter, what made us
run! If Nature dont speak within us to take care of
our Father, what would she prompt us to take care
of!

Peter.

Number one, I believe, all the world over!
—verily I am afraid it is so! But, having recovered
our Hearts now—I’ll soon fetch him up I warrant
you.


Exit. Re-enter with Petrowitz guarded.

Petrowitz.

O my children! The wounds these
flints have made in my feet, are nothing to those inflicted
on my heart for you.

Pau.

Oh the miseries of war! I wonder it is ever
the pleasure of the great ones to set their hearts upon
it! What could be the reason why the King of the
Turks and our old Empress entered into an agreement
to go to war?

Turk.

To give brave soldiers an opportunity of
running away with such pretty girls as you, to be
sure.

Pau.

Oh, if they were now to see my Father, and
brother Peter, and I, in this condition, they wouldn’t
be happy until they had put an end to it!

Peter.

Dont thee show thy ignorance! Excuse
her Gentlemen! Dost think the great Grandees feel
and reason in the same simple natural way that we
do!

Turk.

To the Father. Come honesty chear up!
at the next village there is a waggon, into which you
and your family shall be put; you’ll very soon be at
the end of your short journey.

Petrowitz.

Ah, Paulina! thou little know’st how
my heart will tremble for thee, when we shall have
quitted dear Russia for the Turks domains!


Exeunt.
R7r 253

Scene III.


the gardens of the Bassa’s palace.

Decorated with Palms, Fountains, &c.
In the Eastern Stile.

Enter Mustapha.

Mus.

Where is she?—where is Alexina? I dont see
her here. She is generally leaning near that Fountain,
looking like the Nymph of the stream hallowing
it with her tears.

Azim.

Without. But I say no!—do you mark
me, I say no!

Enters with Slaves.

Mus.

Why, what a bawling you make. Wherefore
come ye hither—eh?

Azim.

To look for that insolent female Slave Alexina,
that I may curb her a little!

Mus.

Your ill humour towards her is never to be
curbed. Your malice always keeps pace with your
power! Thy turbulent disposition has made thee
hateful!—Dont I know how to keep an obstinate
female obedient to Authority as well as you?

Azim.

Ha! ha! ha!—Thee!—The greatest commanders
in the world have been foiled at it. But,
let me find her, and an experiment shall be made by
one more experienced than they.


Exit at the bottom of the Garden, looking for her.

Mus.

Observe the orders I gave ye. When our
Master arrives let no one be over busy to speak of
Alexina the Russian. If possible I would have him
forget that she is in his Palace.

Slave.

We will be careful!

Exeunt Slaves.
Enter Alexina from the bottom of the Garden, followed
by Azim.

Alex.

Pursue me not imperious Slave! You invade R7v 254
my retirement, you hunt me from the solitude which
can alone mitigate my sorrows!

Azim.

Stuff!—Solitude and retirement! they were
made for the birds of Night. They may delight in
them, Women should seek day-light.

Alex.

Day-light gives me no joy. Through added
weeks have I dragged on a torpid existence Going
to a tree.
—here is my sad register! On the tender
rind have I marked the return of each ungreeted
day.—The wounds, now but discernible, will deepen
as the tree advances to maturity, and speak, in another
Age, the miseries of Alexina!

Alexina.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Song.

Alexina.

Ye joyful hours now fled away,

How hasty was your blithesome course!

How short and fleeting was the day,

Of pure and lively joy the source!

In feathery lightsome pace ye pass’d,

And sweetly chearful hastened by,

Ah! happiness hath fled full fast!

Hath fled and left me but to sigh!

I, a poor Captive, pine each day

That slowly creeps with lagging pace,

The sun of Freedom sheds no ray,

Its bright beams here we never trace!

The clouds that swim in air’s soft ocean,

Appear to scorn my prison towers!

Ah! Zephyr’s light unfetter’d motion

But heavier slower makes my hours.

Oh! now that wild on some high mountain,

I could inhale the wandering winds,

Or playful near some desart fountain,

Could emulate the bounding hinds!

R8r 255

Azim.

Such a wailing about Freedom! Come,
come, be gay and happy like the rest of the Slaves.
You are ordered to be so!—our Master is returning
from the Camp.

Alex.

Mustapha, let not that unfeeling Slave address
me—thou hast humanity!

Mus.

Would I could administer to the disease of
his mind—it is a terrible one! The love of talking
is in him an absolute frenzy! the love of ill-humoured
talk too. To silence him is impossible—but, as he
is subject to my Orders, I can oblige him to retire—
Away!

Azim.

What! shall an insolent Russian?—she shall
repent this deeply!

Exit.

Alex.

Doth your master indeed return to-day?

Mus.

Yes, and all here are in astonishment at your
tears!

Alex.

Oh Mustapha! I sink to be thy suppliant!
She is of no vulgar rank who thus sues to you for
shelter.

Mus.

For shelter!—I am myself a Slave!

Alex.

But thou hast power with thy master. Oh!
invent some excuse—contrive some means to save
me from the interview.

Mus.

I will consider. I—Music at a distance.
If it must be so, conceal yourself at once—for I hear
the Music that announces his approach!

Alex.

Mustapha! my very Life depends on thy
success.—Preserve me!

Sings, without music.

Alexina.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Thus, though a Slave, thy soul’s high state

Shall prove its origin divine,

Soar far above thy wretched fate,

And o’er thy chains sublimely shine.

Exit. R8v 256 Enter Zilia (hastily.)

Zilia.

Ah! Mustapha, the Bassa is arrived all triumph,
and, from what he has heard of her, full of
anxiety to behold Alexina. He comes in full State
—where is she?

Mus.

She just now ran off on that side, and I
shall run off on this. For I have not settled what to
say about her, and Bassas and Tygers are the two
animals least to be trifled with!

Exit. a march heard at a distance.
standard bearers advance.
female slaves dance down the stage.
chorus singers, and female slaves, follow,
strewing flowers.
The Bassa then enters with Selim and Azim,
and his Principal Officers.

Selim & Zilia[Speaker label not present in original source]

Song.

Selim, Zilia, and Chorus.

Hark! sound the Trumpet, breathe the Flute,

And touch the soft melodious Lute,

Return of Peace we gratefully applaud!

Ne’er more may know dispute,

Our Conqueror and our Lord.

Victorious Hero! blooming Sage!

The scourge and glory of the Age!

May blithesome mirth around thy footsteps shine,

Thy every hour engage,

And bless thy valiant Line.

S1r 257

In vain breathe Trumpets and the Flute,

And lost the soft melodious Lute,

When thy praise, Ibrahim, they would display!

Lost in the Theme they’re mute,

As twilight sinks in Day!

Ibr.

Enough of praise for our Triumph! a sweeter
awaits me. Where is the lovely Russian, who,
though my Captive more than two moons, I have
not yet beholden.

Azim.

We joy in our Lord’s return, that her Pride
may be humbled! Intolerable is the haughtiness of
her demeanour, insolent her melancholy and reserve.

Ibr.

Thou hast seen her Selim, does she justify
Azim’s description?

Sel.

She is reserved Sir, reserved and melancholy
—but too gentle to be insolent.

Azim.

Selim knows her not. After indulging her
melancholy more than two moons—I have ordered
her to be chearful and lively in vain! Canst thou believe
it, mighty Bassa, the idea of how glorious is
the fate of her—whose image lives in the heart of
Ibrahim worthy to live in the hearts of all! bows
with his hands to his forehead
has not once abated
her sorrow!

Ibr.

Indeed! angrily. Bid her to my presence,
to answer for this insult!

Zilia.

Insult!—ha! ha! Did any one ever hear
such Language! Remember, Sir, she is no Asiatic
slave, but an European, born beyond the boundaries
of Turkey and the region of our manners!

Ibr.

Well, Zilia, and what then?

Zilia.

She has not permitted my advances towards
intimacy with her. But, the chances of a varied life
have gifted me with some knowledge of the Manners
of the rest of Europe.—And let me impart a Secret
to you! if she should find you in love with her, and
should ever condescend to listen to a sentence from Vol. II. S S1v 258
you, she will deem herself intitled to treat you as
she pleases, and, instead of being herself a Slave,
will assume unbounded authority over you!

Ibr.

Nay she will not venture to forget that I
am—

Zilia.

A Bassa! and what then? You are thinking
now of your own power, when you should be
sensible only of her’s! You are powerful, and she is
pretty, your empire is less absolute than her’s—beware
of substituting Reproach for supplications!

Ibr.

Let her be summoned instantly! No—hold!
If management is necessary, I will receive her in
my Hall of Audience—dazzle her with my greatness
—and astonish her into love!

Zilia.

Ha! ha! ha!—ha! ha! ha!

Ibr.

Why that laugh Zilia?

Zilia.

Ha! ha! ha! at your new invention—of
astonishing people into Love! If you can contrive
to do that, you will be the most surprising Bassa in
all Turkey!

Ibr.

How then?

Zilia.

Ha! ha! you Mussulmen are a most extraordinary
people!—Grandeur and Dignity inspire
Love! They may inspire your Captive with Veneration
and Respect, but veneration and respect grow
in an atmosphere so chilly that Love starves in it.

Ibr.

Why, this adventure promises to be interesting!
I am not however sure that I yet comprehend
the Cupid we exiled hence, when our arms expelled
his Subjects from these realms. What are the Means
by which I may contrive to gain favour in this Foreigner’s
heart?

Zilia.

By humility Sir—not Grandeur!—Dominion
and Love are very different things.—

Zilia.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Apart to
the Female Slaves

—Hark ye! if I can tinge his
mind with such feelings, real Love will take possession
of it—he will determine on Marriage, and we
shall escape from Slavery!

S2r 259

Ibr.

Must I then become contemptible, before I
can be beloved!

Zilia.

No, but you must forget that you are a Governor.
In tender matters you had better be a Shepherd!

Ibr.

Does Love then know no distinctions?

Zilia.

At least it does not admit of any. The Peasant
he makes equal to the highest Monarch, or sinks
the Monarch to a level with the Peasant.

Ibr.

Why, under such a System, the Men must
be the Slaves, and the empire of Love be transferred
to the Women!—Away with every thing so exotic!
I’ll waste no time in mean conquest over female Caprice
—victory over the Enemy is alone worthy my
Ambition!

Zilia.

Ha! ha!—there, now you are Turkish again!
—Sagacious Sir! if you would really be heroic as a
Conqueror—you must begin by being romantic in
Love!

Zilia.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Song.

Zilia.

To Beauty’s empire Heroes yield,

What Triumph half so sweet?

What are the Laurels of the Field

Till laid at Beauty’s feet!

If they approve,

And bless with love,

The toil obtains its crown.

Should they disdain,

The labour’s vain,

E’en Fame herself will frown!

Ibr.

Well, my skilful Monitress, this is extraordinary
—but it is charming! Through conquest then
will I gain higher Glory, and thus shall I ensure her
love.

S2 S2v 260

Zilia.

You are still mistaken! Mere Loftiness, I
tell you, never attracts it. It holds in Contempt all
power but its own. You must be but a humble Suppliant
before you can become a Victor there, and
participate in the mutual love of such marriage as is
the source of felicity abroad.

Azim.

Mutual! Sir, she is your Slave—command
her affection! Such baseness may befit other countries,
a Mussulman is too sensible of his Dignity!

Zilia.

Aye, there are plenty of men, in the rest
of Europe, sensible enough of their Dignity, and as
much inclined to command and tyrannize as the
Sublime Sultan himself;—but, they are soon brought
under Rule!

Azim.

Aye, throughout Europe, except with us,
Women have too much sway and liberty. We shall
have infidelities introduced.

Zilia.

All a Mistake Mr. Glum-face! A tender
Husband has no where any thing to fear.

Ibr.

Well, the labours of war are for a time suspended!
and, during the interval, I will yield
me, in all humility, to the laws of this new love—it
cannot then withhold its promised blessings.

Zilia.

Why, I shall be going too far if I promise
that! It allows of no formal demands. To the claims
even of Merit the tender creature will sometimes
be a perfect Hyæna! To deserve seems too frequently
alas! every where the reason why the Lover
does not succeed.

Ibr.

No matter! I feel strangely inclined to take
my chance of participating in the chasten’d feelings
and refined love of the rest of Europe, and to forget
the toils of the Field—in the pleasing difficulties of
this new adventure!

Exit, with part of his Train.

Selim.

He is in delightful spirits. But how strange
it is that the Russian Slave should not have presented
herself to welcome her Master!

S3r 261

Zilia.

Stranger if she had, when nothing could excite
fiercer dread in her mind than the idea of inspiring
him with a Passion. I am interested for her,
and for that reason, as well as from a hope of obtaining
escape for myself and all who are here, I shall
endeavour to make Ibrahim pursue a conduct, not
usual from a mighty Mussulman to his Slave!

Exit.

Sel.

Hark ye Azim! what makes your lovely countenance
look so grim—where all is so gay? Your dark
face suits the day as little—as a black cloud amidst
surrounding sun-beams. Change it man, change it!
you will lose nothing—for you must look carefully
for a worse!

Azim.

Pshaw! I change not with every shifting
wind.

Sel.

Since I saw thee last, I have trod the paths
of Glory, slumbered amidst the frosts of the night,
and toil’d amidst the beams of burning day—but I
return and find thee the same! With me all things
are changed—thou art unalter’d. Thy temper, like
the deep shade of the forest, is chequer’d but by the
dart of the angry lightning, the serene chearfulness
of Morn dwells not with thee.

Selim.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Song.

Selim.

Thy breast perturbed let Mercy cheer,

And harmonize thy rugged mind,

Thy lids let reach soft Pity’s tear

The gem of sentiment refined.

Could’st thou the tender bliss once feel

The sympathising bosom knows,

As through it gentle sorrows steal,

And heave the heart with tender throes,

Thy frowning brows would not thus pry,

Thy glance no more so sternly dart,

Sweet mercy’s beams would deck your eye,

And peace spring calmly in your Heart!

S3v 262

Azim.

If you like me not, thwart me not! There’s
room enough in Turkey for thee and for me. Let
the Raven and the Vulture rest on the same tree;—
but, as far as are the streams of the Ilyssus from the
waters of the Bosphorus, may you and I be for ever
apart!

Exeunt.
S4r 263

Act the Second.


Scene I. an apartment in the bassa’s palace.
Ibrahim seated under a Canopy. Zilia and Officers attending.

Ibr.

You allow then Zilia that some of the Customs
of the rest of Europe are not less ridiculous
than our own!

Zilia.

Oh, I can assure you they have their full
share of the Absurd!—Priests they have, who are
but Beaus! Senators, who are but Pages of the
Court! and Soldiers, who study Finery more than
the art of War! Amongst their Women—they have
Grand-mothers who bedeck themselves like their
Grand-daughters, and Wives, who consume half
their lives at their Toilettes, and yet are shocked—if
accused of placing an ornament with a view to charm.

Ibr.

Mahomet be praised, from these follies we
are exempt.

Zilia.

Why perhaps yes—but then, your’s lean
terribly the other way! Your Men, in aping Dignity,
fix their features in a maukish Gravity, and seem but
Statues made to walk by mechanism! Ceremonious
and uncommunicative, their want of Ideas they conceal
in awful Silence. Never having known the advantages S4v 264
of elegant society, of Women they speak
but as Slave-merchants.—Their ideas of the World
they catch but from the Mariners who lie at anchor
in their Ports, and have no Criterion for the abilities
of a man—but the number of dupes he has made!

Ibr.

Nay, nay, Mercy to poor Man! or, at least,
let the loveliness of our Women find some favour
with you.

Zilia.

The women’s faces are pretty, but, they
are without Expression. Their Forms are regular,
but their Action conveys no Sentiment, and, ungifted
with Taste, they study Dress only to bedizen
themselves. Whilst, excluded from rational society
with men, and unrespected by them, their Minds
are uninformed, and their Manners ungraceful. In
short, in the follies abroad there is a play of Mind
that renders them interesting; your follies here—
create but listlessness and Disgust!

Exit. Enter Selim.

Sel.

Prisoners, Sir, await your leisure.

Ibr.

Why are they intruded on me? are they of
Rank?

Sel.

One of them seems to be so. The other is
his Servant.

Ibr.

Bring them before me.

Exit Selim, and re-enters with Orloff
and A la Greque

Ibr.

Who are you?

Orloff.

A Russian.

Ibr.

The insatiate enemy then of every Turk.

Orloff.

The enemy of those who oppose the interests
of my Sovereign. To chastize them, I this
morning bore a sword which your servants won not
from me without much effort—the noblest acquisition
of the day!

S5r 265

Ibr.

This air of intrepidity might have suited thy
condition amidst the Russian camp. Thou art now
but a Captive, display then the humility that becomes
thy state.

Orloff.

I demand my Liberty! a truce has been
proclaimed and—

Ibr.

In the hour you err—not till after thou wert
captured;—thou art therefore by the laws of arms
fairly our prisoner.—Who art thou?

A La Gr.

Not a Russian, dear Sir, ’pon my honour,
nor the insatiate enemy of the Gentlemen of
Turkey.—I never saw a prettier dressed, prettier
behaved people in my life. They all show me as
much politeness and good breeding as though they
were my own Countrymen!

Ibr.

Of what country art thou!

A La Gr.

Oh, Paris Sir, Paris—a Frenchman! I
just travelled into Russia out of kindness, to polish
the Brutes a little, and to give them french Ideas.
But, finding I could not re-model their heads, I took
to their heels, and would have taught them dancing;
they were as incapable however of improving below
as above, so I betook myself to conducting the affairs
of this Gentleman. The result has been that I
have been led by him to dance in your chains, in
which if I can but caper myself into your favour, I
shall deem my last step the best I ever took!

Ibr.

The freedom of thy speech does not displease
me!

A La Gr.

Obliging Sir! I am the most humble
of your Slaves! ready to bow my head to your sandals,
and to lick the dust from your imperial feet!

Ibr.

Ha! ha! ha!

A La Gr.

Ah!—ça ira! ça ira!—ça ira!

Springing.

Ibr.

Go, take thy master into thy protection, and
see if thou canst inspire him with thy own good humour,
it will render his chains the lighter.

S5v 266

A La Gr.

Chains! they wont weigh a rush with
me!—ils sont toujours a la mode a Paris! I shall foot
it to their clink, and feel myself at home again!

Exit Orloff, A la Greque, Selim, &c.

Ibr.

Well Azim, where is the lovely Russian?

Enter Azim.

Azim.

Mighty Lord, thy Servant dares scarcely
pronounce her message! I delivered your commands,
and ordered her on pain of death to appear instantly
before you, she however refuses to come!—talks of
her sacred honour—and I know not what!

Ibr.

Cold, unimpassion’d, not to be awed—and
a sacred regard for her Honour! How swiftly she
gains an interest in my Heart—unfelt there before!

Azim.

What means my Lord!

Ibr.

Accustomed but to Eastern Slaves, you are
incapable of discerning the Soul that animates
Alexina.

Azim.

Thanks to our Prophet, for denying Women
the privilege of Souls. This is the first I have
met with that makes any pretensions to one, and it
seems given her only to plague every one about her!

Ibr.

I am disgusted with the abject submission of
our Eastern Captives, and rejoice that I have at
length found a being who will excite in me the
sensations of Hope and Despair.

Azim.

Supreme Lord! Bows, his hands to his
head
How is it possible that thou, for whom the
glorious Sun enlivens the Universe, and who should’st
give laws even to prostrate Kings—can’st think of
suffering thy repose to be disturbed by a woman!

Ibr.

If I am distinguished amongst men, that
which best distinguishes man—refined love—ought
in my breast to be more tender, more powerful, than
in the breast of others.

S6r 267

Azim.

Mighty Bassa, she will reject your Love;
some threatened Penalty must—

Ibr.

Go, go, thou talk’st of hearts, as though they
were as much under discipline as Janizaries! Beware
how thou endeavourest to weaken her haughty
Spirit. I will abate nothing of her inflexibility, will
be enamoured of her scorn, her cruelty shall be my
Triumph!

Azim.

My Lord! let thy Servant submit his fears!
—The laws of this mighty empire will pass away, if
Soul and Mind be granted thus to Woman!

Ibr.

Am I to be opposed—retire Slave!

Enter Zilia.

Zilia.

Why dont you go? have you not leave
to depart? Come, try the fresh air, Goodman
Whiskers!—Pulling him out by the sleeve. Exit Azim.
My Lord if you would follow my advice—

Ibr.

I’ll follow none! My Heart spurns at instruction
as needless, requires no more your lessons
than his!

Exit.

Zilia.

Upon my word, he’s advanced a great way
in a short time! I thought to have managed him like
a puppet; but presto! he leaves his instructor
groveling behind! I must contrive something more
than he exactly intends though!—Yes, I think that
may do—Mustapha and the others—Yes, yes, with
these I’ll weave a web which, whilst it fills these
gloomy regions with merriment, shall preserve Alexina
—and gain Liberty for us all!

Exit.
S6v 268

Scene II.


the garden. Enter Mustapha.

Mus.

So, my Lord Bassa, that hasty step, and that
eager look proclaim thy errand!

Enter Ibrahim (hastily.)

Ibr.

Where is the Russian Slave? ’tis said she
spends her hours in my garden, though I cannot see
her here. Yet I fancy her presence in the fragrant
breath of the Rose-trees! and her melodious voice,
in the strains that the beauteous songsters pour forth
from amidst the shrubs! Where is she Mustapha?

Mus.

I saw her awhile ago on the Right there
somewhere, but, may be, she’s on the left by this time
—there’s no guessing!

Ibr.

Azim persists still that she is all Insolence!

Mus.

(Aside. I’ll follow the lead, and destroy
every wish he may have to behold her!)—Yes, yes,
as to insolence, match me her fellow if you can. I
believe it would be as easy to march an army to St.
Petersburgh
, as to subdue her petulance.

Ibr.

Every word thou utterest gives new ardor to
my hopes—I already adore her in idea!

Mus.

Aside. Hey-dey! what’s all this?

Ibr.

Oh Mustapha, my imagination paints her
till my heart sinks—a slave to this new love. I see
the beauteous Scorner dart living lightnings from her
eye, her cheek glow with chaste disdain, I weep
in anguish at her feet, and implore her compassion;
melted by my prayers, yet still rigid and reserved, I
behold the bewitching Conflict in her soul—triumph S7r 269
in the discovery—yet conceal my delight—still implore,
still complain—

Mus.

What then—what then, my Lord, you are
not displeased at her haughtiness?

Ibr.

Displeased! Smiling.

Mus.

Aside. So, so, so! I have been driving on,
when I should have been pulling back, spurring instead
of using the check rein! If my description of
her Mind frighten not—I’ll try to deter him by a
description of her Person!

Ibr.

Nay proceed to paint her; pencil her in all
her fascinating Pride, and heighten the flames within
my heart—as you deck her in the coldness that reigns
in the chilly regions whence she came.

Mus.

To be sure, as to that, she’s as cold as all
their snow balls—she perfectly makes one’s teeth
chatter at her. But then—if truth must be spoken,
there is, after all, considering her attractions, a
Peculiarity about her.—Why now, my Lord, look at
me!

Ibr.

What means this?

Mus.

Why, they have a joke here, that there is a
considerable resemblance between this said beautiful
creature and me!

Ibr.

Ridiculous!

Mus.

Particularly about the Nose!—nay, there are
handsome likenesses, my Lord!

Ibr.

Thou must be mad!

Mus.

Not that I ever saw any myself—except in
the shape indeed; but there the advantage is with
me, for her right shoulder and her right ear are
rather too near neighbours—they are always together!
Then her hair, it may suit some eyes, but, according
to my fancy, the colour is execrable!

Ibr.

Wert thou not a Turk, I should believe thee
intoxicated with wine.—I’ll this instant seek the
charmer, and judge myself how far—Going off.

S7v 270 Enter Selim, on the other side.

Sel.

My Lord! a Messenger from the Divan—

Ibr.

Turns and stamps. What say’st thou!

Sel.

With weighty dispatches!

Ibr.

I wish they had been too heavy for his speed!
—Let him wait!

Still going.

Sel.

He is ordered to return without delay to the
Sublime Porte.

Ibr.

Impossible!—Would the Sublime Porte were
sunk beneath its own Lumber!

Exit.

Sel.

What is all this? what does the wind carry
now!

Mus.

Whims and oddities of all sorts! The
humours of Bassas it is as impossible to guess at as
the weight of moonshine!

Sel.

See! Alexina is weeping in that Arbour.

Mus.

Bless her! and her cheeks through the tears
look like the Carnations of the Garden—tinged with
the dew of the Morn!—For a moment retire.

Exit Selim. Enter Alexina, from an Alcove.

Alex.

Mustapha, trembling and grateful I have
witnessed thy kindness! But, what will it avail?
The dark prospect terrifies me! the rays of Hope
have departed from my mind.

Mus.

Nay, consider Hope, Lady, as a favorite
Lover—never to be lost sight of.

Alex.

Thou art light!

Mus.

Even so is Hope!—as light as one of your
own country Rein-deer. Never let her be detached
from your sledge, and she will skim with you o’er
all the frosty scenes of life!

Alex.

Oh, that I could seize her! but, how is it
possible within these walls—the abode of a Tyrant S8r 271
and his Slaves? Say Mustapha—canst thou—canst
thou not effect my escape!

Mus.

There indeed Hope will give you the slip!
for I could as easily spring into the air and pluck a
feather from the flying Eagle, as help you in that.
And, to tell you the truth, my Master cannot much
longer be defrauded of seeing you—he seeks you
now!

Alex.

Dreadful words! thou can’st little guess at
the horror with which they o’erpower me!—I do
swear to thee—thee to whom my Vows were made,
never to forget that I am thine! I have a Poniard
that is thy surety—to be used but when pure angels
shall nerve my arm to the blow, and sanctify an act
—where abstinence would be the truest self destruction!

Exit.

Mus.

By my Turban, I hardly know where I
stand. If our women have souls, those of women of
other countries must be of a different species I believe!
This is the first time this sort was ever in our
region!—Come hither, Selim, will you?— Enter Selim.
Be so good as to call on the Janissary Heli, he has
sent me notice, that he has captured some slaves and
other merchandize. Tell him that I shall be there
directly, to look at his Women and his Velvets, I
want to purchase some lively companion to cheer
this mourner.

Sel.

So then, Fate willing to plague us, we shall
have another female! Of all the merchandize our
traders deal in, Women give their purchasers the
most trouble.—And our wise and puissant Bassa is
as much out of his track in Courtship too as he would
be in the moon;—why, he is as melancholy as the
most moping lover on the wrong side of his Charmer’s
prison house!

S8v 272

Selim & Mustapha[Speaker label not present in original source]

Duet.

Selimand Mustapha.

Nonsense! whining,

Pouting, pining,

What Joke’s in all this pother!

If one’s a Prude,

And wont be woo’d,

I’d suit me with another.

If blue eyes frown,

I’d turn to brown,

Nor lose an hour in sighing.

Should half the sex

Combine to vex,

They’d never see me a dying.

Scene III.


a wide court, with several unfinished buildings.
Slaves at work at a distance. Some of them drive barrows across the Stage, and go off. Enter A la Greque in a Slave’s habit,
Wheeling a Barrow.

A La Gr.

Aye, wheel away Comrades—wheel
away!—hang me if I do though!—I’ll wheel no more
of their rubbish! let the Bassa dig dirt himself.
Oversetting his Barrow.—Why the Sun here in
Turkey seems to keep himself warm! Seating him—
self; on the ground
The former inhabitants of these
parts, I have heard, thought him a Coachman—but
hang me if I dont believe he’s a Baker, with a moveable
oven always hot!—I wish he’d make acquaint— T1r 273
ance with a Russian wind now for half an hour, or a
good strong South-easter!—Whu! how I do long for
a wind! if I was in Lapland, I’d buy all the witches
have bottled up for ten years to come.

Sings.

Blow, blow, blow, a gentle little breeze

Bustle bustle bustle all amongst the trees—

Enter Azim.

Azim.

How now, you lazy monkey! What seated,
tuning your pipes, in the middle of the day? To work
—to work, Sirrah!

A La Gr.

Why really I prefer tuning my pipes to
work, good Mr Mussulman, I do indeed!

Azim.

Then you shall smart, good Mr Frenchman,
you shall indeed! Shaking his Whip.

A La Gr.

Why, would you take the trouble to
beat me such a day as this? the fatigue would kill
you—I am not so entirely without Feeling as to suffer
it! Azim gives him a cut. Ah! rising. ’tis very
hard that I am to be cut up in this way!—Pray,
good Sir, can you tell me what are become of my own
cloaths? I dont like these! They may be the last
Paris cut for aught I know—I have not been there
exactly lately—but, of the two, I’d rather have the
old habits back again!

Azim.

Want your cloaths back again!—they are a
Perquisite of Office, Sirrah!

A La Gr.

Why you wont take them from me will
you?

Azim.

Aye fiercely.—or your head, were it a
perquisite of Office!

A La Gr.

Bows. Oh truly—I have all due dread
and respect for Office! Pray, Sir, what may your’s
in this place be?

Azim.

To keep you, and your fellow Slaves, to
your duty!

A La Gr.

And pray who keeps you to your duty?

Vol. II. T T1v 274

Azim.

Who? why myself, to be sure!

A La Gr.

Then I think yourself is a great selftyrant
—to oblige you to perform a duty so distressing
to your Politeness!

Azim.

You are an odd fish!

A La Gr.

No, I am one of a pair;—I have a twin
brother, just like me.

Azim.

The man who was taken with you?

A La Gr.

No, he has not such good fortune! He’s
—ha! ha! a Russian Count and was my Master!—
Parbleu! I could make you laugh about him!

Azim.

Well!

A La Gr.

About two months ago, Mr Slave-driver,
he married.

Azim.

Well!

A La Gr.

A pretty girl troth, and daughter of
one of the great Russian Boyards—a Boyard is a sort
of Lord over the Peasants—I love to elucidate!

Azim.

Well!

A La Gr.

So, gentle Sir, a few hours after the
ceremony, before the sun was gone down, and before
the moon had thought about getting up for the evening
—Whisp! his pretty bride was gone!

Azim.

Whither?

A La Gr.

That’s the very thing he would fain get
at! Ma’am and he were walking, gentle as two
Doves, admiring the glories of the setting sun in the
Boyard’s garden, which garden was bordered by trees,
which trees were bordered by a river—out sprang
from the Wood forty Turks, with forty Sabres, and
forty pair of great whiskers, which so frightened the
Bride, that, instead of running away, she fainted
away, and staid there!

Azim.

Ha! ha! ha! then my countrymen had a
Prize! Grins.

A La Gr.

Six of them hurried off with her to a
Felucca, which lay in the river at the edge of the
Wood, whilst all the rest employed my Master. I T2r 275
suppose they would have had him too, but the Boyard
with a large party of friends appearing suddenly, they
thought fit to make off with what they had. Well,
my Master staid all that night on the banks raving!

Azim.

Ha! ha! ha! thy Story is well—and the
Nightingales, I warrant, sung responses to his complaints,
and the melancholy wood-dove coo’d in
sympathetic sorrow!—It must have been very pleasant!

A La Gr.

Oh, as pleasant as could be! But, it cost
him a fortnight’s lying in bed. Resting his arm familiarly
on Azim’s Shoulder
For a hissing hot fever
laid hold of him, and the Doctors, with all their rank
and file of phials and bolusses kept it safe enough in
his veins—

Azim.

Why, you impudent french liberty-taker—
to your work! Twirling him round, with indignation.

A La Gr.

Oh, I’ve not finished yet! I want to tell
you how he joined the army, to have an opportunity
of learning whether she had come this way, and how,
in all the skirmishes we have had, he has drawn more
Turkish blood than—I; and how he was caught at
last reconnoitering—

Azim.

Go! you are an idle rascal, and would rather
talk an hour than work a minute. Go, or I will draw
some of your french blood, to balance accounts with
your Master!

A La Gr.

Sir, you are exceedingly attentive; the
most gentleman-like, civil, courtly, well-behaved
slave-driver that a man could well encounter—Takes
up the Barrow
—my service to you, Sir!

Azim lashes him off.

Azim.

The time he mentions, about two months,
is about the period when our Felucca landed Alexina,
and his account tallies exactly with the account of
the captors.—Aye, it must be so!—Now, will it add
to her misery, or diminish it, to know that her Husband
is so near?—I must consider, and she shall T2 T2v 276
either know it or not, according to the effect which
I think it will produce on her.—I know she deeply
hates me, let her look to it!

Enter Orloff in a Slave’s habit.

Azim.

Come, Sir, be so good as to take this spade
into your hand. Dig you must and shall; I have
had the honour to bring down as lofty spirits as your’s
before now.

Orloff.

Torture I may not be able to escape—but
I cannot submit to labour!

Azim.

And why not? Has Nature made any Distinction
between you and the rest of the Slaves?
Look at yourself Sir! Your Form, your Limbs, your
Habit! are they in aught different from the rest?

Orloff.

Birth and Fortune have made distinctions.

Azim.

But, Fortune has deserted you, and pray
recommend the recollection of your Birth to follow
her, that you may attend to business.—Here, take
the spade!

Orloff.

Snatches it, and throws it from him. Dare
again insult me, I’ll cast thee there, and tread on
thee!

Azim.

Aside.—Now, if the Bassa had not commanded
me to abstain, I would have lashed him till his
broken spirit brought him to my feet for Mercy!
But, if I cant bend—I’ll torture it!

Azim [Speaker label not present in original source]

—So, you think
you can master me, do ye?

Orloff.

I think not of thee.

Azim.

No, I suppose—ha! ha!—your pretty Wife
is in your thoughts!

Orloff.

My Wife!—Ah! art thou apprized that I
had a wife? Azim smiles contemptuously. Speak to
me! tell me if thou know’st where she is!—Nay,
turn not from me! every expression of thy countenance
becomes important!—if thou wilt not speak to T3r 277
me, let me but gaze on that, and there learn my
Fate.

Azim.

Well, gaze and gaze!—Read’st thou there
her Story? Dost thou know whether she breathes,
and where?

Orloff.

Villain!—by every star in Heaven, if she
lives, she’s chaste! Pauses. Had I gold and jewels,
I would lavish the treasure at thy feet, but now—in
Mercy—speak! tell me if Alexina lives!

Azim.

Ha! ha! ha!—if Alexina lives!

Laughs again, walking slowly off.

Orloff.

Nay thou shalt not avoid me! I will pursue
thee, kneel at thy feet, perform each menial office,
so thou wilt tell me of my Alexina!

Azim.

Turning. Now!—where are the Distinctions
of thy Birth! do they prevent your feeling yourself
—the common son of Nature!

Orloff.

They would prevent me from acting as
thou dost!—Yet, thou shalt chide long, if thou wilt
at length allay my Anguish—hear me, hear me!

Follows him out.
T3v 278

Act the Third.


Scene I. the garden.
Enter Mustapha.

Mus.

Come along I say! What do you stand there
for?—This is a stubborn one, I warrant her. Though
she saw me pay down the money for her, she has not
the least notion that she is sold! Nay, if you wont
come Madam, I’ll fetch you!

Goes out, and re-enters with Paulina new dressed.

Pau.

Law! how you haul one! I tell you I dont
like to walk here—let me alone!

Trying to disengage her hand.

Mus.

Come, come, Madam, none of your airs.
You must here be obedient and civil.—Come along!
The Janissary of whom I bought you told me you
was a good natured creature.

Pau.

Yes, but he was not so boisterous as you are
—and he gave me these fine cloaths. See, all spotted
with Silver! look at this beautiful Turban. He
gave me all.

Mus.

Why, that was only to set off your beauty,
and raise your price on sale. But, I bought you for
your good humour, that you might amuse here a
sweet woman, who pines until she has become, like
one of those myrtle blossoms, all paleness and fragrance.

T4r 279

Pau.

What’s all that to me. I shall be pale too,
if I am to be snubbed by you.

Mus.

Who wants to snub you? Behave yourself
prettily, and you may live as merrily here as a Sparrow
on a May-bush. The gentle creature, for whom I
bought ye, comes from the same country as yourself
I suspect, and I guessed you might divert her with
your prattle.

Pau.

Ah, did you so? Why you guessed as though
you was a Conjurer;—for I am the most merry
creature in our whole village, and, if I could but see
my Father and Brother Peter

Mus.

Well, if you behave yourself pleasantly, and
merit it, I’ll buy your Father and Brother Peter too.

Pau.

Buy! buy!—Why you talk of buying us, as
though we were eggs at so much per dozen.

Mus.

It is the mode here. We buy up Liberty,
as a Rarity!

Pau.

I wish you had not bought those frightful
fellows that I see at work yonder.

Mus.

Oh, they are now and then convenient. We
want them to take off a female head that is troublesome,
or to fit her neck with a Bow-string, when the
whim happens to seize a great man, of amusing himself
with such a pastime.

Pau.

What wicked wretches you must be then!
Get from my sight do! you frighten me so I cant
bear ye!

Mus.

Ah! you have a Spirit I see. Hark ye
Hussy!

Seizes her arm.

Pau.

Oh dear heart, dont look so ferocious! I suspect
you are a Tyger.

Mus.

Dread my claws then!—See, here is the
gentle creature for whom I bought ye. Had she
had thy impertinence, she might have pined in
sorrow, for me.

T4v 280 Enter Alexina.

Alex.

Nay, it is impossible!—And yet it is fact;
—art thou not Paulina, the daughter of my Father’s
Vassal Petrowitz?—Alas! thou art.—Unhappy Girl!

Pau.

Goodness! goodness! if it is not Lady
Alexina!

Alex.

Thou canst not be ignorant that I was torn
from my Husband, and dragged to Slavery!

Pau.

I did not know that you was in this part of
the World. But, I am monstrous glad to see you in
it—I have always been in luck!

Mus.

Yes, that Compliment was a Proof of it!
However I find I have been in tolerable luck in my
purchase. Try if you can amuse her child, I shall
enlarge your party immediately!

Exit.

Pau.

Though he is so pert, yet for all him I will
say, that I would not but have seen you here for the
best gown I have. Not even for this—so fine!

Alex.

Ah Paulina! I fear it will lead to dishonour
—that thou wilt sink to misery!

Pau.

It is misery enough, to be brought into such
an odd out of the way country as this! I have been
here but an hour—and it seems an hundred! In one
place a parcel of copper-coloured creatures without
tongues pop out, glaring with their saucer eyes;
and, if you want to talk, and be a little sociable—I
believe they learnt their alphabet from the sheep—
ba! ba! ba! is all you can get! Then in another
corner—

Alex.

Discontinue this strain. Speak to me of
Orloff, and of my Parents! Did they bear up in the
hour in which I was dragged from them?

Pau.

Truly as bad as you could wish! At last, it
was said that my Lord the Count went into the army.
And there he played about him valiantly! I warrant
he has paid the Turks for robbing him of you—in
coin they wont like!

T5r 281 Enter Mustapha and Zilia.

Mus.

Here, I have brought ye Zilia. She is a
girl of Enterprize, and has hatched a fancy, which her
powers of contrivance will bring to perfection.

Alex.

Alas! in what can she serve me? Can she
restore me to my Country, to my Husband!

Mus.

Doubt her not, she has as many Plots as
Dimples, so I leave you together. Pushes Paulina.
Stand on the other side!

Pau.

I hope you and I shall be always on contrary
sides Mr. Cross-patch!

Mus.

So hope I, Miss Nimble-tongue, or I should
soon be beside myself!

Exit.

Alex.

Are there then means, Zilia, of contriving
my escape! Oh, hasten to gratify the hope he has
raised.

Zilia.

Ah! you know not the dangers you would
incur.—Escape! a hundred lurking spies continually
surround these walls, they have received their Orders
—and here they only know to listen and to obey.

Alex.

Can I tremble at Danger—when Honour is
threatened!—’twere impious to doubt of Safety.

Zilia.

Safety I hope to procure for you—but not
through the medium of Danger! I was ignorant,
Lady, of your marriage, until you, this instant,
mentioned your Husband. This must cause some
variation in my scheme.—Let me see!—I must give
Ibrahim another object for the Passion (most extraordinary
in these regions) with which I mean to inspire
him. Hark ye, my dear, To Paulina. I must
learn whether you know how to rule a Lover. Was
you ever taught at home?

Pau.

I never had but one. He was a Soldier;
but as I neither liked to follow the Camp, nor to live
a Widow bewitched, I made him beat his march!

Zilia.

A regiment on its march, and your heart T5v 282
not shiver to pieces amidst a thousand Alexanders
and Cæsars!—However I shall teach you so to manage
your next Lover, that he shall quit his standards
and follow you!—To Alexina. Has the Bassa seen
you yet?

Alex.

He sent Azim to command me to his presence.
—I will first rush into the regions of Death.

Zilia.

Ha! ha!—Such a resolution in this country!
—the notion is exotic—it is an ice-plant of the North!

Alex.

With Scorn. Are you the Friend who was
to soothe my Sorrows!—But, what could I expect
from the contented inhabitant of such a place as this?

Zilia.

Not so contented as you imagine, Lady.
For, though I have taken a deep Interest in your
welfare, I am prompted also to my Scheme by a
hope—that it may procure escape also for myself
and all my fellow captives.

Alex.

Ah! hast thou a Heart capable of cherishing
such a Hope? Recollecting thy Birth, I should have
been less severe.

Zilia.

Be grateful, Lady, that your’s was under a
better System! and remember, in mercy, that it is
difficult not to be the mere creature of the institutions
of our Country. Mine was Georgia, and sold as a
Slave from thence, I am at least less guilty here than
a contented inhabitant from the rest of Europe would
be.

Alex.

All allowance made for the force of Custom,
in those who are ignorant of better, still you have
elsewhere witnessed a happier System.

Zilia.

True I have, where the qualities of a Woman’s
mind render her the object of Affection, where
she is beloved as the participator in all the Interests
of her husband’s life, and is respected whilst she is
beloved.

Alex.

Connubial love, Zilia, is the affection of a
heart—all Virtue. Its foundation is nobleness of
mind; and, opening to a woman a more extended T6r 283
field for exercising all the charities of her nature, instead
of degrading her in her society with man, it
gifts her with loftiest Dignity, and throws a Grace
around all her actions in life.

Zilia.

Hence my determination to change all
here.—I ought to have known what you would feel
at my Levity; in gratitude for your reproof, I will
but the more sedulously contrive escape for us all—
to my joy no less than your’s!

Zilia.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Song.

Zilia.

To spring from sleep with jocund day,

To hasten o’er the dewy plain,

To lead the dance, to mix in play,

Or list, betrothed, my suitor swain,

To watch at noon my fleecy lambs

Within a shady grove’s recess,

To deck with Flowers their sportive dams,

Or my white crook with garlands dress,

This was my envied chearful lot,

For which I would all else resign;

Fate grant again my rural cot!

Be peace and merry freedom mine!

Alex.

Zilia! relieve my Suspense! impart the
means of my escape.

Zilia.

If my scheme succeed by the aid of this
young creature, the Bassa shall never see you, or at
least not until he has become attached elsewhere,
with a fidelity that will exclude every other object.
But, Madam, we must at present confer in private.
I intreat you to retire with me.—Ah! To Paulina
who is following
not so quick! Stay here until I return.
—Stir not I charge you!

Exit with Alexina.

Pau.

Stay here, indeed! There is pretty good
care taken that one shan’t run away! The walls are
as high as their Mosques, and such piercing eyes T6v 284
prowling about, that a mouse could not run from one
shrub to another without observation.—How they
all stare at me! So! here’s another of them, he looks
rather better than the rest, but I wont speak to him.

Enter Ibrahim, followed by Slaves. He turns and speaks to them with impatience.

Ibr.

No more, no more of Business! Let not a
thought of Duty here intrude itself—I have already
sacrificed too much to it! They retire.—And now
for converse with Alexina!—She must be here—
I have found her—I have found her!

Pau.

Heigho! what shall I do with myself? I’ll
gather Flowers for Lady Alexina.

Gathers.

Ibr.

My heart is already enslaved—she has a thousand
charms! How dared Mustapha impute deformity
to a figure—Symmetry itself! The hair he
decried should form the Bow-strings of the God of
Love they describe to me.

Pau.

I guessed as much! another of the Bowstringers!
—Hang this sharp thorn, it has made my
finger bleed!

Ibr.

Advancing. Hail bright daughter of the
Northern World!—Thou art born to make Hearts
bleed! Thy beauty sprang where the sun gives but
chilly beams, but thy charms are more glowing than
those where he darts his fiercest rays!

Pau.

Looks at him, then tosses her head scornfully
away
—Nonsense!

Ibr.

How exact were they in their description of
her scorn!—Will you not speak to me?

Pau.

I wonder at some people!

Ibr.

What dost thou say? That mouth is too lovely
to be closed so soon!

Pau.

Talking to her flowers. You are very pretty,
and you are very sweet, but you are not complete T7r 285
yet—Good Mr. What-d’ye-call reach me that flower
that grows so high.

Ibr.

How new! and how bewitching is this! Presents
the flower
—Shall I arrange them for you?—
Distinguished amongst Women, let me crown thee
with the Myrtle of Love!

Pau.

Get along do!

Ibr.

Teach me not to displease you.

Pau.

Get out of my way then!

Ibr.

How she talks!—Do you know me?

Pau.

Not I!—I wish I was out of this Prison, I
know that.

Ibr.

You are unacquainted with my Rank! Your
haughtiness I was prepared to bow to, but I know
not how to meet your Contempt.

Pau.

Dont begin to redden at me! I mind you
no more than I do this sallow leaf. There see! I
blow it, and away it flies! Go after it with your fine
speeches about this and that, there lies your Way!

Paulina.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Song.

Paulina.

You think to talk of this and that,

And keep me here in silly chat,

But I know, I know better.

There clearly lies, kind Sir, your way!

Pursue it then I humbly pray,

And me you’ll make your debtor.

Why, bless my stars, ’tis very odd

That here upon this verdant sod

I cannot stay alone.

But, now you know so clear my mind,

Mayhap you’ll leave me here behind,

I prithee, Sir, begone!

Goes to a distance.

Ibr.

Charming Songstress! you bid me go, whilst T7v 286
I am rivetted by eyes, wild and full of fire as those
of the Antelope—when first in the Morn he darts his
glance across the plain!

Pau.

If my eyes keep you here, I’ll shut them.
There—how do you like me now?

Ibr.

In vain you close them, unless you could
likewise hide that rosy mouth, those teeth, those
features—that Form!—I could love you though you
were blind.

Pau.

What! a hard-hearted Turk, who cuts heads
off, love!

Ibr.

Pshaw! I love to distraction! could exist
for ever around you, as the humming-bird lives on
the vapour of the Rose!

Pau.

Aside. Now what can he mean by all this?
I believe a Boyard could not talk finer!

Paulina.[Speaker label not present in original source]

—Aye, all
of ye talk in a very flaming way in this part of the
world—but I dont understand you! All I know is,
that I dont love you, and I wont marry you. Do
you understand that!

Ibrahim.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Song.

Ibrahim.

Charming Nymph! Oh, learn your Duty,

Vain is Wit, and vain is Beauty,

If, insensible to Love,

Sighs nor tears your heart can move!

Behold the Bird on yonder spray,

Sweet sonnets chaunting through the day,

Her mate sports round on playful wings,

Whilst she with joy more sweetly sings.

When blithe Beauty’s flown away,

Auburn tresses changed to grey,

Then in cold neglect you’ll mourn,

Vainly sigh for Youth’s return!

Pau.

I dont like your advice at all! There is more
wisdom in an old song in my country, Russia.

T8r 287

Paulina.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Song.

Paulina.

Let Girl of Wit and Charms possess’d,

By all admired, by all caress’d,

Who needs, with fascinating eyes,

But mark her victim, and he dies!

Dominion keep while ’tis her own,

Her hand bestowed, the Suitor’s flown,

The inchantment’s broke! the Lamb will
rouze,

A surly Bear she’ll find her spouse!

Withdraws to the back of the Stage.

Ibr.

The Enchantress! how well she knows the
power of Love—I dare not pursue her! Oh no, she
shall have a million of unreasonable wishes, that I
may have the pleasure of humouring them!

Exit.

Pau.

Coming down. So! he’s gone— Enter Alexina, Mustapha, and Zilia.
ah! see what sweet Flowers I have gathered for you!
Why did you stay so long!

Alex.

Oh, my sweet girl, I owe every thing to
you!

Pau.

What, all this for the Flowers!

Alex.

No, for Hope—for sweet returning Hope!
Paulina, the powerful Bassa is thy Slave—he truly
loves you! I have witnessed your interview, and
greet that fortune which has done for me in an instant,
what, by a train of contrivances, we meant to
have procured.

Mus.

Ah! but you little rogues, ’tis I that have
done it, ’tis I that have brought about all this.
Though in this, as in some other great actions, more
is owing to chance than skill.

Pau.

Why, what makes you so full of your brags?

T8v 288

Zilia.

Why are you not sensible of your happiness
in subduing the Heart of one of the greatest personages
in the Empire?

Pau.

What—he is not then one of those cruel men
who bow-string us?—How could I treat the Gentleman
so? I’ll run after him, and make it up!

Running off.

Alex.

Following, and holding her. Stay! or you
undo me! my fate is in your hands!

Mus.

Hark ye, my pretty maid! our Bassa happens
to have an odd fancy—he doesn’t like too much
honey.

Zilia.

Do you wish to retain his Heart? hearken
to me—plague it! you’ll lose him, you fool, if you
are tender! remember this for ever.

Pau.

Why, that’s just the way in my country too;
as our Ladies grow fond, their Lovers grow careless;
for all the world like the little wooden man and woman
in the weather box—when one pops into the
house, pop the other walks out.

Mus.

Keep the lesson you have heard in your
mind, and you may be a very great Lady. Take
care not to begin your pops too soon!

Zilia.

Come, my good girl, you shall go with me,
and I will give you the prettiest lesson you ever
learnt. In half an hour, you shall be able to play on
a husband’s mind, as though it were a musical instrument
—every note shall be obedient to your
wish.

Alex.

Be attentive to her lessons, my dear Paulina;
my Felicity depends on your Success. Preserve your
own innocence, and be the guardian of mine.

Pau.

Preserve my own innocence! Aye, to be
sure I will! for my Father has read to me, out of a
good book, that a woman who has lost her innocence,
has lost her Charms, and, like a faded rose that
has fallen, the foot of every passenger will tread on U1r 289
her!—My dear Lady, why, your eyes look as bright
again as they did!

Alex.

Hope hath awaken’d his Lustre in them!
My Heart is full—the brightest visions glide before
me!

Zilia.

Come hither away, Paulina, to School!

Exeunt, all but Mustapha. Enter Selim.

Sel.

Why, Mustapha, the Russian Slave passed me
with a look all pleasure! whence can it spring?

Mus.

From a hope of getting rid of a Lover, because
the Bassa has fallen in love with Contempt!
My Turban to a Jew’s tobacco box, we shall have
strange revolutions here!

Sel.

What a Whim!—grow fond of Mind! and of
mind in an ill-humour too! Who ever heard of it here
as an object of Love at all!

Mus.

Well, every country hath its fancy!—the
doctrine however is certainly not orthodox amongst
Mussulmen!

Selim & Mustapha[Speaker label not present in original source]

Duet.

Mustapha. Selim.

Give us a female soft and kind

Whose joy ’twould be to love us,

The beauties of her precious Mind,

Attract not, they’re above us!

But dimpled cheeks, and sparkling eyes,

Are here deemed Wit and sound sense,

And better worth a Lover’s sighs

Than stores of mental nonsense!

Here but a beauteous rose-leaf lip

Speaks Reason and bright Science,

Mind Soul and Love in Fellowship!

Impossible Alliance!

Vol. II. U U1v U2r 291

Act the Fourth.


Scene I. a quadrangle.
On one side a lofty Garden Wall. A la Greque trying to peep through. From behind are heard bursts of Laughter.

A La Gr.

I hope the workmen are bowstringed
that built this Wall! Not a chink or cranny can I
find, through which to catch the thousandth part of
a Sun-beam. Laughs within. There again! Enter
a Turk who crosses.
Hark ye, Mr. Gravity! is there
no getting a peep into these pretty gardens?

Turk.

No!

A La Gr.

What, are they never to be seen?

Turk.

No!

A La Gr.

If a body was to venture its neck over
the wall to look at them—do you think it would be
safe?

Turk.

No!

A La Gr.

Do you believe the Bassa would forgive
such an innocent piece of Curiosity?

Turk.

No!

A La Gr.

Why, Master Mahomet, you manage
your stock of words discreetly! Are you afraid they U2 U2v 292
wont last till winter if you let them fly off in
couples?

Turk.

No!

A La Gr.

Well done, Steady!

A La Greque.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Aside.

I’ll see if
I cant coax him though!

A La Greque.[Speaker label not present in original source]

—Come, friend, I’ll give
you a Song on the word you are so fond of.

A La Greque.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Song.

Mustapha.

A sapient Gemman once I saw,

The neighbours said he studied law.

When, full of grief,

In hand a Brief,

A poor man came,

Kind Sir, he cried,

Plead on my side!

The Lawyer careless answered—No!

One of the preachers would you ask,

To do a charitable task,

For Tom and Sue,

A Couple true

Who’d fain be tied,

With eye elate,

And strut of State,

The surly preacher answers—No!

Should labouring honest low-fed Dick,

Through constant starving very sick,

To Doctor send,

By some kind friend,

To beg Advice,

He strait will see

No hope of Fee,

And, two to one, he answers—No!

U3r 293

To a young beauty should you kneel,

And talk of all the pangs you feel,

With eye askance,

She’ll steal a glance,

And blushing sigh;

But Marriage press,

And urge to bless,

She’ll whisper forth a trembling—No!

A Politician ask to vote,

Who lists of Places knows by rote.

Though the State’s good

He understood

You had in view,

Yet should he find,

No Place designed,

His bow polite, you know, means—No!

Turk.

I like your Song.

A La Gr.

And I like your praise!

Turk.

To reward you I’ll show you a place where,
by the help of good climbing, I sometimes get a
squint over the wall—though if it were known, my
next squint would be in t’other world.

A La Gr.

Come along then!

Exeunt.
U3v 294

Scene II.


the garden.
Enter Zilia and Female Slaves, calling to their
companions
Who enter from opposite sides all the way
up the Garden.
During the Song others enter, dancing to the Music.

Slaves[Speaker label not present in original source]

Chorus.

Come away! come away!

Companions so gay!

Come away! Come away!

Let no idler stay!

Song.

This is Freedom’s precious hour,

Welcome airy sportive Mirth!

We’ll enjoy thee whilst we’ve power,

Give to all thy whimsies birth!

Let our Masters burst with spite,

We’ll ne’er heed their shrugs or frowns,

Vary every blithe delight,

Whilst brisk joy our freedom crowns.

This is Freedom’s precious hour,

Welcome airy sportive Mirth!

We’ll enjoy thee whilst we’ve power,

Give to all thy whimsies birth!

U4r 295

Chorus.

Come away! come away!

Companions so gay!

Come away! come away!

Let no idler stay!

First Slave.

Thank our stars, we have again escaped
from restraint, and, for one hour, our actions and
our minds are free.

All going off.

A La Gr.

Appearing over the wall. Ha! ha!
ha! You little merry rogues, you’re there are you?
Give ye mirth and phantasy, whu! you’re in an extacy!

(The Women all run off shrieking, except Zilia.

Zilia.

Presuming Slave! do you know the consequence
of your temerity in mounting so loftily?

A La Gr.

Yes, that you deem it the higher compliment!

Zilia.

Pshaw! your Vanity has raised you quite as
much as the wall—escape! escape!

Exit.

A La Gr.

You little saucy jade, come back under
the wall and blow me a kiss—You wont! Why get
along then, you ill-humoured Baggage—ah! what
you look back do you? you’d better turn!—This is
a fine place for the Gypsies hang me if it is not.—
Ah! here comes another— Enter Paulina.
hark ye pretty maid—come this way.

Pau.

Gracious! where can that voice come from?
I see nobody!

Running about.

A La Gr.

I say, you little rogue, if—why can this
be? If my eyes are my own eyes, and if her eyes are
her’s, it is Paulina, the daughter of old Petrowitz!

Pau.

Clapping her hands. Why that impudent U4v 296
head was once on the shoulders of A La Greque!
who ever thought to see it on the top of a Turkish
wall?—What, have they bought you too?

A La Gr.

Oh no, I was taken fighting, after disarming
a dozen Turks, and killing one of their
Bassas. The cowardly rogues have shut me up here,
for fear I should do them further mischief. I believe
they thought I had a design on the Crown!

Pau.

Pshaw! nonsense.

A La Gr.

What, did you not hear that the Grand
Turk offered a reward for my Head?

Pau.

Your head!—why what could he do with it?

A La Gr.

As I had no inclination to learn, I took
to my heels to carry it off.

Pau.

Why then—how came it there! Pointing.

A La Gr.

Oh, that was because a whole army set
upon me and my Master, Count Orloff, and at last
took us.

Pau.

Mercy! is your Master Count Orloff here?

A La Gr.

Is he? aye, lock’d up within these Gates.

Pau.

If ever I heard the like! Why his Lady
Alexina, who was stolen from him, is lock’d up here
too!

A La Gr.

She here too! Why this place is like the
sick Lion’s den, where all the beasts of the Forest
assembled together!

Voices.

Without. Help! help! here’s somebody
talking to one of the female slaves!

A La Gr.

I’ll prove you Liar in your teeth!

Goes down. Enter several Slaves.

First Slave.

Where is the stranger to whom you
were talking? I heard his voice.—Let us drag her
before the Bassa!—Go you and search the Gardens.

Second Slave.

Apart. We must take care what
we do here! This is the new Slave whom we were U5r 297
commanded to respect.—As long as she is in favour,
her word will go further than our’s.

First.

I understand you!—Turning. I thought
I heard a voice, but sounds deceive, or it might be a
Bullfinch perhaps. We beg pardon for the mistake
Lady!

Exeunt Slaves.

Pau.

Ha! ha! ha!—But, how oddly things turn
out. Little does Lady Alexina think her Husband
is so near.—Hist! A la Greque! A la Greque!
Pshaw! he’s gone down now. Well I’ll run to bless
her with the News, and to take another lesson for
my behaviour to the Bassa. I shall be able then to
behave as proudly as though my Father were a Noble
of the Land!—Let me see, how was it I was to be a
fine Lady?—First, I must disguise all the feelings of
my Heart! but, how can I do so, without telling
Fibs? Well but, as a fine lady, I find I mustn’t mind
that! Secondly; when he kneels, I must turn from
him, or hum a tune thus—hums.—Did you speak to
me Sir? and, if he attempts a salute, I must complain
of his insolence, and walk away thus!

Walks away scornfully.

Scene III.


the buildings.
Enter Azim, with Ismael and Slaves.

Azim.

We must stand by each other Brothers! As
the case stands, Alexina is wonderfully in favour; it
seems as though the Bassa’s passion encreases in proportion
as he hears of her perverseness! She will, no
doubt, be revenged on us all, for the severities she
endured previous to our Lord’s arrival. The Bassa
has just now threatened vengeance to all who displeased
her!

U5v 298

Ismael.

Will not Imprisonment displease her then?

Azim.

’Tis likely it may, but there is no danger
in that to us; for we can, if necessary, connive at her
escape. And, if we allow her to leave the Palace,
she, whose mind is so discordant with all that passes
here, will readily pardon the Prison!

Ism.

Well, well, let her be locked up, as you say,
and then we may persuade him that she has escaped.
We can dig down part of an old wall, and drop a
Ladder, and who can doubt that that’s proof of it?

Azim.

Yes, and that old tower will be a proper
place to confine her in; for drily. I dont entirely
approve of poisoning her, and then, if need be, she
can hereafter be produced.

Ism.

Why, aye we need not destroy her at present.
It may you know be done, if it should happen to
seem necessary, hereafter. Where shall we seize
her?

Azim.

She is generally in the Garden, and alone.
—We must watch for a moment when Mustapha is
absent.

Slave.

Somebody comes!

Azim.

Disperse several ways! Those who have a
Plot in hand should never be seen together—a flight
of crows proclaims prey!

Exeunt severally. Enter Orloff and A la Greque.

Orloff.

Pursue me not, contemptible wretch! My
sorrows are too sacred to be interrupted by resentment
at thy folly.—Most torturous fate! to know
that my Alexina lives, and not to know where.—My
chains grow heavy indeed!

A La Gr.

I rather think, Sir, I can make them
jingle lighter!

Orloff.

Begone, I say!

A La Gr.

Aye, people often drive good fortune U6r 299
from them! I shall only say, as I was saying before,
that this place has a Garden, and that that garden
has a Wall!

Orloff.

My beloved Bride! could I but cheer thee
by my voice, could I but lessen thy anguish by
speaking to thee of my own!

A La Gr.

Well—a wall!—What is a Wall to me?

Orloff.

Could I each morning, as I greet its rays,
but behold thee, I could bear to live even in this
wretched state, and should creep each night to my
straw pallet with less despondency, having first received
from thy sweet eyes farewell!

A La Gr.

To be sure the Wall is a high wall, and
a strong wall; but, it is but a Wall!

Orloff.

If thou darest mention the wall again—

A La Gr.

Well, I won’t then; but, was I to tell
you what that Wall contains, I really believe you
would forgive all my sauciness for ten years to come!

Orloff.

Ah! there lurks some meaning—What
wouldst thou say?

A La Gr.

Aye, such a meaning!

Orloff.

Oh, trifle not!

A La Gr.

Why then, in two words, I have climbed
the Garden Wall, and who do you think I saw in the
Garden—Who do you think?

Orloff.

Speak! grasping his hand. Speak!—life
depends upon thy words!

A La Gr.

Then, my Lord, there, as sure as you
lost your Bride on the day of Marriage, there I saw
the fair—Paulina daughter of old Petrowitz!

Orloff.

Torture!

A La Gr.

Aside. C’est bien drole! too much
for him? how would he then have borne it had I seen
his Wife!)—Goes to him. My Lord! my Lord! Why
he’s as pale as Death—I dare not tell him now that
Alexina is within a hundred yards of him—the extasy
of that would compleat the business!

Orloff.

Bitter, bitter disappointment! it has rived U6v 300
my Heart!—Wretch! to raise my hopes with artful
cruelty, and then—but why do I talk to thee!

Exit.

A La Gr.

Why, if he would but have had Patience,
and let me talk a little longer, I was just
going to tell him that his Wife—but hang Patience!
it is a humble Virtue, and not fit, it seems, for a
Gentleman. Before I next see him, I’ll scale the
wall again—for news for him about his Wife!

Scene IV.


a prison.
Voices are heard without, Alexina shrieks.

Azim.

Entering. Stop her mouth, and drag her
in!

Alexina dragged in, her hair dishevelled.

Alex.

Monsters—desist!—Drag me not from day,
and from my husband!

Azim.

This is your habitation, Madam, make the
best of it.

Alex.

At whose command is it my habitation?
What is my Crime?—You act without the knowledge
of your Lord, and, if you do, doubt not his Vengeance!
he cannot authorize such Cruelty!

Azim.

Come, come, Madam, a few weeks spent
here will quiet you a little. Your sorrows wont be
half so violent a fortnight hence—let that comfort
you!

Alex.

A Fortnight! Oh, it is an Eternity! Death
is nothing to this!—Dragged, at such a moment,
from Light and Health and Hope!—Running about
wildly
My husband is in the Palace!

Azim.

Then let him get you out, if he can!

Alex.

Hear me! kneeling. Tell him only that his U7r 301
Alexina is here, that I may but hear his steps as he
walks around my prison!

Azim.

Aye, you’re mighty humble now; you know
what insolence I have borne from you.

Alex.

Oh, forgive me! Here, take this ring. Rising
It is rich, but not half so rich as shall be thy
reward, if thou wilt be my friend—if thou wilt pity
me!

Azim.

Well! I am so far softened that I permit
thee to use the apartment next this! It has more air
and light—I’ll unlock it—its last Inhabitant had it
fourteen years. There! you shall each added day
have your allowance of food. Whether you are ever
released or not depends on yourself. Be patient!
that only can serve you.

Alex.

Patient! Oh, it shall be my Prayer! though
still—I fear my brain will be disturbed!

Azim.

Well, you’ll find no other disturbance here!
Come Madam Forces her in, and shuts the door.
There, she’s safe, and that makes us safe!—Now, let
us go and fix the rope-ladder, to be able to swear,
if necessary, that she has escaped!—Comrades!
they talk of countries where what we have done
might be punished by the Sufferer!—but, we fear no
punishment from any quarter but our Masters—and
them we deceive!

Exeunt, laughing.
U7v 302

Act the Fifth.


Scene I. a spacious apartment.
Enter Paulina, running from the top.

Pau.

Looking back. He follows me still.—Ah!
Zilia little thinks of the difficulty I have, to behave to
him as though I hated him. How hard it is when
one sees a great gentleman, who I am sure will marry
me, ready to die at one’s feet—and to be forced to
be snappish!—He is coming here! which way shall
I run next?

Looking about. Enter Ibrahim.

Ibr.

Oh fly me not—yet fly! Even the distance
you throw me at, heightens your charms, and, whilst
it tortures, bewitches me!

Pau.

Aside. I do like to hear him talk!

Ibr.

You smile! Ah, know you the value of such
smiles? each merits a Throne.

Pau.

I suppose you hope, by all this, to make me
forget I am a Captive!

Ibr.

It is I who am your Captive!

Pau.

I tell you once again, I can never be happy
here. All is dismal, not a window to the Street!
Nothing to look at but trees, and fountains, and
great whiskers, and black slaves.

Ibr.

Could I but have the transport to interest U8r 303
your Heart—this hated place would seem transformed
to an Enchanted Palace!

Pau.

But, I tell you I never will suffer my Heart
to be interested!

Paulina.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Aside.

It is very hard that I
must belie my Conscience so—it makes my Heart
jump every time!

Ibr.

Who knows what persevering constant Love
may do? You may at length—rapture! confess an
enchanting Pity for me.

Pau.

Aside..—I could confess it now perhaps, if I
might speak out!

Ibr.

Charming creature—say only that I am not
hateful to you!

Pau.

Aside..—It would be the truest word I ever
spoke!

Paulina.[Speaker label not present in original source]

—But I will say that you are hateful to me
—never speak to me about Love again!—In that
room yonder they are singing and playing; but,
dont you come I charge you—I will not let you come
—or if you do, not a word—Looking back. No, not
one word about Love!

Exit.

Ibr.

If there be Language in Looks, her words
are false; ’tis but by her lip, not her eye, that love
is forbidden!—Charming sex! who can make refusal
bliss, and give delight even in denying! Going—
Noise behind
Ah! what Noise is that?

Puts his hand to his Scymetar.

Orloff.

Without. Base Slaves, in vain you oppose
me! were your master surrounded by all his ministers
of Vengeance, I would force my way.

Orloff bursts in. Ismael and Slaves endeavouring to withhold him. After them Selim enters.

Ibr.

Your way! Did not I pay some regard to
your fame as a Soldier, by Mahomet your life’s swift
stream should pay me for this insult!

U8v 304

Orloff.

Talk not of Life! Restore to me my Bride!
restore—but canst thou? can’st thou restore to me
the spotless angel, whom Heaven’s most sacred
ordinance made mine?

Ibr.

Wretches! allow a Madman to assail me thus!

Orloff.

Thy Life, base Turk! shall be assailed.
No Madman, but an injured Husband stands before
thee!—Restore her! give her back to me, pure as
the light of that morn on which I led her from the
Altar.

Ibr.

Slaves speak! declare who it is he means—or
dread my vengeance!

Ibrahim.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Aside.

—Fear thrills my blood
—it must be her!

Sel.

Sir! it is the lovely Russian that he claims!

Ibr.

Ah! and doth he dare to this extent!—away
with him to the torturous death he merits!

Slaves seize him.

Pau.

Rushing in, and catching hold of Orloff.
Astonishment! Horror! stop base wretches!—Ibrahim!
I cannot speak—have you a Heart!

Ibr.

Aside.—Ah! she is then his Wife!) Speak
Russian! art thou the Husband of the beauteous
Slave I love?

Orloff.

Love!—may I yet avenge me that thou
hast given utterance to the word!

Ibr.

And art thou—but my Heart feels ’tis true!
—Let both be forced from my presence!—They
lead out Paulina
I distrust my power of self restraint!
Tear him away, lest I stain my honour with
the blood of her husband whom I adore.

Orloff.

Stir I will not—give full sway to your
vengeance—it would be Mercy now!

Ibr.

Amidst the agonies in which I see thee, thou
art still my Envy!—She is thy wife—she surely loves
thee! By what tortures would I not purchase your
felicity! Bear him off I command—hurt him not—
but force him hence!

Orloff.

Unhand me Slaves!

They drag him off.

Ibr.

And now, O Ibrahim, what remains for thee X1r 305
—within whose eager reach the utmost happiness, a
moment since, seemed placed!

Ism.

Mighty Lord! is not the beauteous slave
within your power?

Ibr.

No! removed from it for ever—for her Heart
is unattainable.

Sel.

Is it your pleasure Sir that we remove her
altogether, and discard her with her Husband?

Ibr.

Never!—Virtue, in exacting that, thy commands
are too rigorous!—I will go this instant, and
at her feet—I dare not—if I see her I am lost! If I
see her, with a dread of losing her, barriers human
and divine would fall before me!

Hastens off.

Ism.

Run from the woman he loves!

Sel.

His generous spirit refrains from the exercise
of tyrannic power.

Selim.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Song.

Selim.

Love, disdaining to controul,

Nobly great, and pure as flame,

Captive holds th’ obedient soul,

Shudders at assumptive claim!

Modest Beauty care beguiles,

What delight can Power impart?

Comes joy of extorted smiles?

Void of Friendship in the Heart!

Ism.

Aye, these are all strange foreign feelings,
that will pass away, or the Bassa must change his
nature!

Sel.

Oh! though his passions are headstrong as the
winds of the north that stir the Forest, yet will Reflection,
in its holy ministry, their boisterous sway
allay.

Exeunt. Vol. II. X X1v 306 Enter Zilia and Female Slaves.

Zilia.

Ah! this room is luckily empty! Bring in
the Bassa’s Seat. We’ll set it up here, to see how it
looks before it goes to the pavilion. Come, make
haste! They bring in a long narrow seat. Set it
just here. Now on with its beautiful covering. They put it on, it reaches to the Ground.
Now bring the Canopy. They bring in a decorated Canopy, fixed on
a small Pilaster, and place it behind the Seat.

Fix it just here. There, that will do. Walks round
it
Mercy! what’s that noise?—Why, here comes
that impudent Slave that was hanging over the wall!

Female Slaves run in, followed by A la Greque.

A La Gr.

Fie! fie! pretty creatures, never spoil
sweet features, with such spiteful angry looks! Grant
me one salute, to save my life, for I am famished.

Zilia.

It would cost thee thy life, should it be
known.

A La Gr.

Known!—Going to a distance Madam!
Do you think I am a man to betray Secrets? I am
only come here to learn one.

Zilia.

Why, you are quite at your ease!

A La Gr.

Why yes. And in order that I may be
thoroughly so, I’ll sit down and be comfortable on
this pretty seat.

Zilia.

You must not sit there! it is a little Throne
made on purpose for the Bassa.

They endeavour to prevent him.

A La Gr.

Haughtily Oh then, it is just the Seat
for a Frenchman to seize! Besides, I am here upon
an important enquiry, and the Seat of State becomes
it! Pray, have you one Alexina here, in her way
from Russia? I came to enquire for a Friend of mine.
—You lively little rogue Laying hold of Zilia’s hand X2r 307
come here and sit down by me, you shall be my
Bassa-ess, and tell me all about her.

Zilia.

Stranger! this is no place for Jesting! Fly
swifter than light—unless you like Death!

A La Gr.

Like him! Not I.—Death is an Aristocrat!
and I am bound as a frenchman to hate him.

Azim.

Without Search every where! He must
be hereabout—I saw him descend. Come on this
way!

Zilia.

There! Now, carelessness or discretion will
be equally ineffectual—you are on the threshold of
destruction!

Slaves.

We too are lost!

A La Gr.

Not unless I am found!—A dozen women
without a scheme to save one man! Throws himself
upon his knees, turning to one, then to another
Save
me! save me!

Zilia.

What use is there in kneeling?—yet there
is use!—Lower! lower still! rest on your hands.—
Reach the seat—quick! quick!

They put the Seat, and its covering, upon
him, and place the Canopy behind him.

Azim.

Without Come this way I say!—here he
must have passed. Enters with others Fly all of ye
—hide yourselves. The new french Slave is somewhere
here. Frenchmen there is no being guarded
against—at other’s cost they make themselves free
every where. You, Ismael and Hafez, go and search
the inner apartments, I’ll wait here with the rest, to
intercept him should he escape you.

Exeunt Ismael and Hafez.

Zilia.

Oh, we’ll take care he shall remain snug
where he is!—You had better follow the rest.

Pushing him.

Azim.

I chuse to watch here.—This hurry and
exertion is somewhat too much for a Turk! so I’ll
sit down.

Zilia.

Pardon me, we have made this seat for the X2 X2v 308
Bassa alone! It is not your turn to be throned yet
Master Azim.

Places herself before the Seat

Azim.

I say I’ll sit there Madam—so away! I have
been walking since sun-rise.

Zilia.

Then walk till it sets. Motion is healthful!

Azim.

Away from the seat! I say I will have a sit
down.

Zilia.

And you shall have one, if I can procure it
for you, some day or other, and such a one as you
shall never forget!—but, this seat none shall have
but the Bassa.

Azim.

Patience is worn out!—I’ll convince you in
a moment—

Goes to Zilia, and seizes her hand to pull
her away

Ism.

Without We have found him!—we have
found him!—A door is fastened on the inside—he
must be there!

Azim.

Follow! follow!—Now, we’ll show a Frenchman
what Liberty is in Turkey!

Exeunt all but the female slaves.

A La Gr.

Getting up with the Seat upon him
That fellow is certainly Cerberus turned Turk!

They disengage him.—Voices without.

Zilia.

They return! Waste not an instant—Begone!

A La Gr.

Well, farewell to all of ye! and may all
some day or other, have the luck to escape from hence
like me!

Exit.

Zilia.

Let us run and appease Azim. You hear
he is loud! his vengeance, losing another object, may
fall on us—Haste! haste!

Exeunt.
X3r 309

Scene II.


the garden. moonlight.
Enter Ibrahim, at a distance, thoughtfully.
Followed by Selim.

Sel.

My Lord, dare I offer consolation!

Ibr.

I can receive none!—I have resolved she
shall never know an Insult. I may—hereafter—perhaps
restore her to her Husband.

Sel.

That will be a moment of Triumph to yourself!
Affliction is a Blessing, when it produces
Magnanimity.

Ibr.

When I can do that, Virtue thou may’st boast
a Victory indeed! When I can resolve no more to
view the sweet radiance of her eyes, to behold no
more the unartificial Graces that adorn her, when I
shall search these groves in vain for that dear Form,
and listen and hear her voice no more—then Virtue
thou may’st indeed boast a Triumph! A Pause
Leave me! night and Solitude best harmonize with
my mind.

Exeunt, different sides. Orloff appears at the top of the Wall
And calls to A la Greque behind.

Orloff.

Quick, prithee! mount and give me the
Rope. Thou art as slow, as if this moment were not
the most precious of my life!

A La Gr.

Appearing Consider, I have but just
had one escape, my Lord, and another escape may
escape me. Here’s the Rope for you, however, if
you will be so venturesome. You’ll find it long
enough—I wish you may never be at the end of
it.

X3v 310

Orloff.

Takes the Rope, and is let down Environ’d
with Dangers as I am! this moment is the first that,
for succeeding months, has given me one gleam of
comfort.

A La Gr.

Well, my Lord, I leave you to enjoy it
all, I’m off! The very Moon over my head seems to
say—Sweet Monsieur A La Greque, your Master is
under my influence, so take care of yourself!

Withdraws.

Orloff.

Ye walks, which the feet of my Alexina
have so often passed, ye trees whose pendent boughs
have given to her beauties your softening shade, ye
Fountains, whose murmurs may have lulled her
sorrows to repose, my full Soul greets ye! Soft vocal and instrumental music, at a distance.
Ah! surely her voice floated on the passing breeze!
—It cannot be. No; though charged with many a
sweet note, it bore not her’s! Thou pale Moon, dart
more seducive rays, and tempt my Angel from her
retirement!—Ah! again the Music! near that spot
then may she be found—whose Soul is Harmony.
Music still heard for a short time Perchance, whilst
music floats the air each way around, my voice, unnoted
by any ear but that of Love, may draw her
thence.

Orloff.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Song.

Orloff.

Cupid spread thy rapid wings!

Haste from Cytherean groves,

Where the beauteous Psyche sings,

Guarded by a band of Loves.

Throw around a spicey cloud,

Shade me from Suspicion’s eyes!

Lead me through the watchful crowd,

Or thy guiltless Votary dies!

Exit up the Garden. X4r 311 Enter Paulina, opposite side.
Music continues a few bars.

Pau.

Where, where can the Bassa conceal himself?
I am tired of seeking him. Can he be offended
that he flies me thus! Alas! I feel that I could not
bear to pain him!— Enter Mustapha.
Ah! Mustapha! hast thou seen the Bassa?

Mus.

Not I. I have been taken up in watching
the motions of Azim, who, I am sure, has some contrivance
in hand, though I cannot divine what.—
Where is the gentle Alexina?

Pau.

I dont know—I have not seen her for a very
long time!

Mus.

Nor I—I’ll seek her out.—Should the Bassa
have seen her, I would not give an old Turban for
our scheme for you!—But, what’s the matter? You
look as dismal as a Widow at the funeral of her second
husband!

Pau.

I cant find the Bassa—I have been looking
for him till my eyes are dizzy. He actually flies me
now, he does indeed!

Mus.

Aye, aye, you would be smirking, though I
put ye on your Guard! You have learnt now, child,
that fondness is cloying. Dash sweet sauce with
acid, or it palls on the palate.

Pau.

So I did then. I was as cross as I could be.
—To be sure I must say, that at leaving him, I told
him—I told him he might follow; if he did not talk
about Love though!

Mus.

Aye, now ’tis out! You gave leave to follow
—and, of course, he runs away! Angrily X4v 312
This is the way you should treat him—“Keep your
distance Sir—how can you be so confident!—I hate
you—I do indeed!”
—This you see would be graceful
and captivating!

Pau.

That captivating?—ha! ha!

Mus.

I tell ye, Women are all Fools! If the sweet
rogues knew what they lose when they cease to blush,
and resign timidity for a confident air, we should
soon see all their affectations resigned for one—better
affected than not seen at all—an air of modesty.

Exit.

Pau.

For all he thinks he knows so much, the next
time I’ll follow my own way, I am determined!

Mus.

Appearing at the side Remember the hint
I gave you. If our Master should see your Countrywoman,
all your hopes will be wisked off in a hurricane!
You may as well attempt to catch a husband
with bird-lime, as to catch him after that; so—prevent
it!—prevent it!

Exit.

Pau.

How can I prevent it? Alack-a-day! what
he fears has happened. As sure as harvest is yellow
Lady Alexina must certainly have seen the Bassa—
and he’ll now be her Adorer as he calls it. May be
he’s at her feet sighing as he was to day at mine—I
cannot bear it! the sight would break my heart!—
Mercy, he is here! he is here!

Enter Ibrahim musing; seeing Paulina starts.

Ibr.

Oh Paulina, hide thee! hide thee! At sight
of thee every resolution fails,—the pure flame of Virtue
scarcely can exist! Gazing on her Cruel
Stranger—why did’st thou not at first tell me thou
wert, in right and heart, another’s! Why suffer mine
to nurture torturous love, in ignorance that thine
could beat only for another!

X5r 313

Pau.

What other?—Sings. Without Music.

Oh! ne’er till now this breast Love knew,

’Tis you alone e’er stole my heart,

It now can beat alone for you!

’Tis only now it feels Love’s dart.

Ibr.

Oh thou Enchantress!—Thou Wife of envied
Orloff—thou hast my Soul in thraldom!

Pau.

Wife of Orloff!—wherefore call me thus!—
Oh, spare me if I speak too plain—make me but
your wife, my heart—my whole heart—will be
your’s! You have awakened its first tender thought,
will retain it to the last!

Ibr.

Art thou not his Wife!—whence then the
anxiety which this day made thee save him?

Pau.

I heard thee but pronounce his dreadful
Fate! And, let me tell you—that thou didst forget
the Turk in thee and spare him (though you used
me roughly) has ever since, in my eyes, given
your features a more interesting air—bestowed on
your eyes a more becoming expression!

Ibr.

Nay then, farewell to every dread!—Love!
reign through every faculty and thought—for now
for ever I am thine!

Clasps her.

Orloff.

Rushing in Adulterous Villain!

Presents a Dagger to Ibrahim’s breast.
Paulina shrieks and runs off.

Ibr.

Ah! wrests the Dagger my life attacked!—
Slaves! They hurry in on all sides twice to day!
Seize him! Death now must expiate thy double
crime!—

Ibrahim.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Aside

—Whence this?—he claims her
still!

Orloff.

Dost think to degrade me to a state of terror?
Death I welcome—welcome it midst tortures!

Ibr.

Russian! thou know’st me not! whilst left
to myself, I could command myself! my ardent
passions I could curb—and suppress the love that
honour could not sanction!—But thou shalt know, X5v 314
when thus opposed, I own no law but Will—Drag
him away!

Exit.

Orloff.

Tyrant! I know my Fate! But, the bitterness
of Death is past. To live after having seen my
wife thus in thy arms is Madness—Death is refuge
to me now!

Exeunt.

Scene III.


the prison. Dark Enter Alexina from a distance.

Alex.

This must be the darkest hour of Night.
The dim light my solitary window afforded has long
passed away, and gloom and silence every where
prevail. Footstep nor sound, nor voice of Love or
Friendship, reach me! Can I be her whose gloomy
prospect, not a short hour since, felicity and freedom
began to cheer!—the reverse is dreadful!

Voices without.

—This way! make safe the outer
Gate!

Alex.

Slaves with lights! They come perhaps to
end this wretched being! Ah!—that Nature shrinks
from! and though each prospect of Life causes
but dread, I fly from Death—by impulse irresistible!

Goes off in the distance.
Orloff guarded in by Slaves.

1st Slave.

There Sir, here you must stay, till our
Master pronounces the sort of Death you are to endure.
We have great Variety here! The Bow-string X6r 315
is the easiest you can hope for.—Apart to his Comrade
—Wasn’t she who withdrew, the Russian Slave
Alexina, concerning whom Mustapha has been so
anxious in his enquiries?—how is this!

2d Slave.

’Tis strange she should be here, without
his knowledge!—we’ll to him!

1st Slave.

We’ll leave you a lamp, Sir, to show the
Apartment, and enliven your last hour!

Exeunt Slaves.

Orloff.

May that hour of bitterness be short! Here
on the flinty earth I’ll pass it, and resign to Despair
the fleeting moments that remain!

Throws himself on the ground. Enter Alexina, fearfully.

Alex.

What new Wretch hath Tyranny sent hither! Advancing, and viewing him.
By every hope and dread it is my Husband!—
Orloff! seizing his hand my Orloff!— He starts up, throws her off, and
hurries to the other side.

Dost thou distrust thy Senses! It is Alexina, thy
wretched—thy happy Alexina!

Orloff.

Abandoned Woman! Dost thou e’en follow
to insult my last moments?—Or art thou even the
messenger to administer the draught of Death!

Alex.

My Orloff! what mean you!

Advancing towards him.

Orloff.

Nay, rather than be enfolded in thy adulterous
embrace I’ll—Draws a Dagger—my thoughts
are desperate! Avoid me if thou wouldst live!

Alex.

Ah!—affliction hath confused his mind!— He throws away the Dagger.
To threaten Death is needless! Be witness for me
Celestial Spirits! that I’ll not an instant survive a X6v 316
Husband’s hate!—All other miseries I have borne—
this subdues me! Snatches up the dagger Thou
accusest me of crimes I shudder at!—Orloff!—an
Adultress would not dare this blow!

He springs forward, and seizes her arm.

Orloff.

Die!—yes, it should be so!—but, let Fate
first reach me.—It lingers not, its Ministers are at
hand!—Oh! had I not seen thee in his arms, ne’er
had belief—

Alex.

My Orloff!—a beam of radiance once more
breaks in upon me! The Bassa I have never seen!
Nay, look not thus incredulous—this Dungeon
proves it! I am here a Prisoner no less than you!

Orloff.

Fate! spare me yet a moment!—Scarcely
dare I give way to the o’erpowering thought!—It
must be thus!—it was not thee whom I beheld! it
was another—Alexina is pure!

Alex.

As pure as at that sacred hour, when at the
Altar you received my vows!

Orloff.

Clasping her Then, thou art dearer in
these Prison walls, dearer in this thy faded beauty,
than when, in full blaze of charms, you overpower’d
my Senses beneath the haughty dome where first I
woo’d thee.

Alex.

Boundless is the power of virtuous Love!
Thus seeing thee—thus once again pressed to thy
bosom—I am prepared for Death.

Orloff.

Its ministers now enter! they must mean
that we should die together.—The arm that guided
thee to the Altar, must support thee to this aweful
scene! After a few painful moments we shall be
united in eternal bands!

Mustapha.

Without Make fast the outer gate,
and bring him along!

X7r 317 Enter Mustapha and Slaves, with Azim in chains,
Followed by Zilia, and Attendants bearing Torches.

Mus.

I thought we should nick you at last! the
net you fraudently spread for another, has now caught
thee!

Zilia.

I promised you a set down, Azim, and now
you have it!—Joy, joy to Alexina!

Mus.

To Alexina—and her Lord!

Orloff.

Ah! what means this!—to a hope of Bliss
I dare not yield me yet!

Zilia.

Fear not to greet it! our master hath heard
from Paulina your touching story, and sends us to
conduct you to his presence.

Mus.

You must make haste, Madam, for we want
room for Azim your persecutor!

Alex.

Farewell—farewell—ye dreary walls! We
fly to light, to liberty—

Orloff.

—And love!

Exit, leading Alexina, followed by
part of the Slaves.

Mus.

To Azim. You look a little strange—pray
make free Sir; you are, you know, in a place of
your own choice!

Zilia.

Hold up your head, man! and look round
your new apartments! Examine the furniture—it is
in your own taste! View the spacious windows—are
you not charmed with your Prospect?—Monster! to
this dreary abode thou didst consign Innocence and
Virtue!

Azim.

Oh, that these galling chains were off! I
to be thus imprisoned!

Mus.

Come, come—“A few weeks spent here
will quiet you a little!”
—I have heard every thing
from your accomplices.—“Your sorrows wont be X7v 318
half so violent a fortnight hence as they are now!
—let that comfort ye!”

Azim.

I shall find none, but in nursing my hate
for thee!

Mus.

For this ring Snatches Alexina’s ring from
Azim’s finger
“I am so softened that I will permit
thee to use the apartment next this—I’ll unlock it”

—its new tenant stands a chance to have it Fourteen
years!—Nay, it is in vain to struggle, force him in!

Exit. Slaves force Azim in, the door is
locked.

Zilia.

Compleatly trapp’d at last! Runs up to the
door
Good night, pretty Azim! He rattles his
chains.
Good night! I’ll give ye such a friendly call
as this once a month or so during your Term. In
the mean time, dream of Ease and Liberty!

Exeunt. Azim rattling his chains.

Scene IV.


an apartment.
Enter Ibrahim at top, leading Paulina.

Ibr.

Beauteous Paulina! what wonderful events
are these! It is no crime to love thee! I was struggling
against a passion which it was determined
should be a blessing to me!

Alex.

Without Hasten, my Orloff, let us hasten
to his presence— Enter Orloff, Alexina, and A la Greque.
Generous Ibrahim, I no longer tremble to appear
before thee. In the presence of my Husband, I
dare ask thy mercy!

Ibr.

Is it Mercy you ask?—how poor the word! I
give you instant Liberty—and, in that, grant your X8r 319
every Hope—for ye love! Valiant Russian, I embrace
thee! The poniard you aim’d at my breast
might have pierced a Heart, which, amidst the turbulence
of war, and the blandishments of Peace, has
yet preserved its own Respect—and offers you its
Friendship!

Orloff.

Which I accept with the frankness and fervour
that becomes a Soldier and a Husband.

Ibr.

To Alexina To such Charms I could not
have been insensible, had I view’d them before Paulina
had engrossed my Heart, and exalted me into
the purer Lover of the realms around.—To-morrow
you shall be escorted to your Camp. My Paulina’s
Family too shall be discovered, and restored to their
country with the means of future happiness. Whilst,
to give that Dignity to love, without which it sinks
into a degrading passion, I will restore the female
captives to Liberty, and by solemn rites make this
charmer mine.

Orloff.

Such a moment, Sir, is the Seal of Heaven
on the purified Heart! Love has taught you to revere
Marriage, and marriage will secure to you, in
a unison of sentiment and mind, the pure felicity of
which you have so long felt a want!

A La Gr.

What ups and downs there are in this
world! My Lord, to Orloff I am once again your
most duteous Servant! Fellow Slaves we shall be no
more—so here ends the Tyranny of Equality!

Ibr.

Pronounce, Madam, the Fate of the profligate
slave whose villainy had nearly brought about
events so disastrous.—Shall he cease to exist?

Alex.

In this hour of felicity—let nothing cease to
exist but Misfortune! Be the benevolent Mustapha
rewarded, and Azim’s office and means of oppression
being at an end, let Mercy be extended even to him.

Ibr.

Charming Magnanimity! which, flowing from
the benevolent doctrines you are taught, shall make
their unselfish principles my Study, whilst I, having X8v 320
gratefully learnt that to reign in the heart of one virtuous
woman is alone the felicity of love, enjoy
every happiness with my Paulina.

Pau.

It is most grateful to my heart to see you
thus happy! It shall be the study of my life to cause
you continually to rejoice in the noble sentiments of
this hour!

Ibr.

Orloff and Alexina! in your happiness too I
participate—from the delightful sense of having been
its cause! May the dangers risked but heighten the
pleasure felt at escape, and none regret the time
devoted to—A Day in Turkey.

Y1r

Epilogue.

Spoken by Alexina.

Alexina.[Speaker label not present in original source]

Escaped from Turkey, and from Prison free,

Yet still a Slave you shall behold in me,

A free-born english slave to mental pleasure,

Your plaudits seeking as her richest treasure!

Whilst you thus feast with cheering praise my ear

Still for the Author I endure some fear!

Perhaps you’ll say—“Two Marriages for Love!”

Thus foolish female pens for ever rove;

But give us, Madam, give us English life,

For who, in foreign realms, would seek a wife!

Critic! a short time since I would allow

Your comment just, but not, Sir Surly, now!

For now we know a Prince can cross the Seas

A Wife t’obtain a Nation’s heart to please.

Tell the rapt Orator, whose magic pen,

So lately scrutinized The Rights of Men,

Who fear’d that Honour, Courage, Love, were lost,

And Europe’s glories in a whirlwind tost,

“The Age of Chivalry” again returns!

And Love, in all its ancient splendor burns.

“Heroic Enterprize” doth still survive,

And “Loyalty to Sex” remain alive;

“The unbought Grace of Life” again we find,

And “Proud Submission” fill the public mind,

To her now borne to Britain’s happy coast,

’Tis fondly hoped to be a Nation’s boast!

Vol. II. Y Y1v 322

“Just lighted on this orb” The Duchess of York had then but just reached the english
shores. It will be recognized that Burke’s celebrated description
of The Queen of France is quoted to compliment the
arriving Stranger.
the Vision shines,

“Scarce seems to touch” and all around refines,

May she hereafter through this chosen Isle

Be greeted ever with applauding smile.

When “Like the Morning Star” at wondrous height

She soars at length beyond this world and night,

Still may your blessings to her name be given

Whilst gently fading to her native Heaven!