i A2r

Her majesties
moſt Princelie anſwere,

delivered by her ſelfe at the Court
at White-hall, on the 1601-11-30laſt day of November
1601
: When the Speaker of the Lower
Houſe of Parliament
(aſſiſted with the greateſt part
of the Knights, and Burgeſſes) had preſented their
humble thanks for her free and gracious favour,
in preventing and reforming of ſundry grievances,
by abuſe of many Grants,
commonly called
Monopolies.

The ſame being taken verbatim in writing
by A.B. as neere as he could poſsibly
ſet it downe.

¶Imprinted at London.
1601Anno 1601.

ii A2v 1 A3r

Her majesties moſt Princely anſwere delivered by her ſelfe at the Court at Whitehall, on 1601-11-30the laſt day of November 1601. When the Speaker of the Lower Houſe of Parliament (aſſiſted with the greateſt part of the Knights, and Burgeſſes) had preſented their humble thanks for her free and gracious favour, in preventing and reforming of ſundry grievances, abuſe of many grants, commonly called MONOPOLIES: The ſame being Verbatim in writing by A.B. as neere as he could poſſibly ſet it downe.

M. Speaker,

Weperceive by you, whome we did conſtitute the mouth of our Lower Houſe, howe with even conſent they are fallen into the due conſideration of theA3 precious 2A3v 2 precious gift of thankefulneſſe, most, uſually least esteemed, where it is best deſerved. And therefore we charge you tell them how acceptable ſuch ſacrifice is woorthily received of a loving KingQueene, who doubteth much whether the given thanks can be of more poiſe then the owed is to them: and ſuppoſe that they have done more for us, then they themſelves beleeve. And this is our reaſon: Who keepes their Sovereigne from the lapſe of error, in which, by ignorance, not by intent, they might have fallen; what thanke they deſerve, we know, though you may geſſe. And as nothing is more deere to us then the loving ōonſervation of our ſubjects hearts, What an undeſerved doubt might we have incurred, if the abuſers of our liberality, the thrallers of our people,the3A4r3 the wringers of the poore, had not bene tolde us! which, ere our heart or hand ſhould agree unto, we wiſh we had neither: and do thanke you the more, ſuppoſing that ſuch griefes touch not ſome amongst you in particular. We trust there reſides, in their conceits of us, no ſuch ſimple cares of their good, whome we ſo deerly priſe, that our hand ſhould paſse ought that might injure any, though they doubt not it is lawfull for our kingly ſtate to grant gifts of ſundry ſorts of who we make election, either for ſervice done, or merit to be deſerved, as being for a King to make choiſe on who to beſtow benefits, more to one then another. You muſt not beguile your ſelves, nor wrong us, to thinke that the gloſing lustre of a glistring glory of a Kings title may ſo extoll us, that we thinke allis4A4v4 is lawfull what we liſt, not caring what we doe: Lord, how farre ſhould you be off from our conceits! For our part we vow unto you, that we ſuppoſe Phyſicians aromaticall ſavours, which in the top of their potion they deceive the Patient with, or gilded drugges that they cover their bitter ſweet with, are not more beguilers of ſenſes, then the vanting boaſt of a kingly name may deceive the ignorant of ſuch an office. I grant, that ſuch a Prince as cares but for the dignity, nor paſſes not how the raines be guided, ſo he rule, to ſuch a one it may ſeeme an eaſie buſineſse. But you are cumbred (I dare aſſure) with no ſuch Prince, but ſuch a one, as lookes how to give account afore another Tribunal ſeat then this world affords, and that hopes, that if wee diſchargecharge5A5r5 charge with conſcience what he biddes, will not lay to our charge the fault that our Substitutes (not being our crime) fall in. We thinke our ſelves most fortunately borne under ſuch a ſtarre, as we have bene inabled by Gods power to have ſaved you under our reigne, from forreigne foes, from Tyrants rule, and from your owne ruine; and doe confeſse, that wee paſſe not ſo much to be a Queene, as to be a Queene of ſuch Subjects, for whom (God is witneſſe, without boaſt or vaunt) wee would willingly loſe our life, ere ſee ſuch to periſh. I bleſse God, he hath given me never this fault of feare; for he knowes best, whether ever feare poſseſt me, for all my dangers: I know it is his gift; and not to hide his glory, I ſay it. For were it not for conſcience, and foryour6A5v6 your ſake, I would willingly yeeld another my place, ſo great is my pride in reigning, as ſhe that wiſheth no longer to be, then Best and Most would have me ſo. You know our preſence can not aſsiſt each action, but muſt diſtribute in ſundrie ſorts to divers kindes our commands. If they (as the greateſt number bee commonly the woorſt) ſhoulde (as I doubt not but ſome doe) abuſe their charge, annoy whom they ſhould helpe, and diſhonour their king, whom they ſhould ſerve: yet we verely beleeve, that all you will (in your beſt judgement) diſcharge us from ſuch guilts. Thus we commend us to your constant faith, and your ſelves to your beſt fortunes.