i A1r

A
True Gentlewomans
Delight.

Wherein is contained
all manner of
Cookery:


Together with

  • Preſerving,
  • Conſerving
  • Drying
  • and
  • Candying.

Very neceſſary for all
Ladies and Gentlewomen.

Published by W. I. Gent.
London.
Printed by G.D. and are
to be ſold by William Shears,
at the Sign of the Bible in
St. Pauls Church-yard,1653.


ii A1v iii A2r

To the Vertuous and moſt Noble Lady, Latitia Popham, Wife of the Honorable and truely Valiant Colonel Alexander Popham. Thrice Noble and truely Vertuous Lady.

After mature deliberation, what to tender unto your acceptance worthy your Patronage, nothing occurred more probable, than this ſmall Manuall; which was once eſteemed a rich Cabinet of knowledge, by a perſon truely Honourable. May it auſpitiouſly procure but your Honours like friendly Eſtimation, and then I doubt not, but it will find a univerſal acceptance amongſt perſons of greateſt Eminency. Sure I am, it may be firſtly deemed as a rich magaz ine of experience having long ſince A2 taught iv A2v taught the world its approved excellency, yea, even in many dangerous exigencies. All I humbly crave for the preſent is my boldneſſe might be favorably excuſed, ſince ’twas my lawfull ambition, thereby to avoid ingratitude for the many ſingular favours I have already received from your endeared truely Honourable Husband, my always true noble friend, and moſt happy Countryman. God multiplie his bleſſings upon all your noble Family and make you no leſſe honourable here on Earth; than Eternally happy hereafter: which ſhall be the daily prayer of him, whoſe higheſt Emulation is

In all due ways abundantly to Honor: and Serve you,

W. I.

To v A3r

To the Virtuous and moſt Hopefull Gentlewoman, Ms. Anne Pile, Eldest Daughter of the Hounorable Sr. Francis Pile Baronet, deceaſed.

Moſt accompliſht Lady,

The many ſingular favours which I have received, not onely from your worthy ſelf, but alſo from your thrice noble progenitors, juſtly oblige me by all the due tyes of gratitude, to tender a juſt acknowledgement: I wiſh the ſame heart, that for many and juſt cauſes truely honours you, had any preſent worthy your acceptance. Now ſhall it be your ſingular goodneſſe to patronage this ſmall Treatiſe, which (if I miſtake not) carries with it two parts, Delight, A3 and vi A3v and Utility. I doubt not then, but that it will find a generall acceptance among all thoſe, who are any way the leaſt lovers of ſuch pleaſing and all delightfull ſtudies. I intend not to paraphraſe upon its worth, its uſe, and ſingular profit, which abundantly ſpeaks it ſecond unto none that hath been publiſhed of the like nature: ſo hoping you will accordingly eſteem of it, I beg pardon for my boldneſſe, and reſt ever,

A true and faithfull honourer of your tranſparent Virtues,

W.J.

vii A4r

To The Reader

Friendly Reader,

Heer thou haſt a ſmall Treatiſe entituled, A true Gentlewomans Delight, preſented to thy view: be ſo courteous as to read before thou cenſure it. If then the effect be anſwerable to its name, I ſhall be right glad: If there be any Errors, it will be no error, but a ſingular token of thy exemplar humanity to paſſe it by, and ſign it with thy pardon; for which I engage my ſelf,

Thine on the like occaſion,

W.I.

viii A4v ix B1r

A Table of the Contents.

  • A

    • To make Apple Cream. 3
    • To fry Apple Pies. 16
    • To make an Arterchoke Pie. 17
    • To make Angellets. 21
    • To preſerve Apricocks 43, 56
    • To make Apricock Cakes. 44
    • To candy Apricocks. 50
    • To make Cakes of Almonds. 60
    • To preſerve Angelica roots. 68
    • To make Almond Butter. 75
    • To make fleſh of Apricocks. 76
    • Lady of Arundels Manchet. 118
  • B

    • To bake Beef like red Dear. 19
    • To make ſtew’d Broth 30
    • To pickle Broom-buds. 35
    • To make bisket Bread 48
    • B To x B1v
    • To make paſte of Barberries or Engliſh Currans. 51
    • To make Papp of Barly. 58
    • A Broth to drink. 71, 73
    • A Broth to eat on faſting dayes. ibid.
    • To ſtew Beef. 75
    • To boil Brawn. 82
    • To boil a gammon of Bacon. ibid.
    • To bake a gammon of Bacon. 95
    • To bake fillets of Beef, &c. 94
    • To ſouce Brawn. 106
    • To make Bonny Clutter. 104
    • To draw Butter. 117
  • C

    • To make Chryſtall Jelly. 2
    • To make clouted Cream. 4
    • To make Quince Cream. 5
    • To make a freſh Cheeſe ibid
    • To make Codlin Cream. 6
    • To make Cheeſecakes. 6
    • To make a ſlipcoat Cheeſe. 11
    • To make Cheeſe-loaves. 12
    • To make Curd-cakes. 16
    • To make a Chicken Pie, 18
    • A good way to ſtew Chickens. 31
    • To xi B2r
    • To pickle Cowcumbers. 33
    • To doe Clove Gillyfloures up for ſalletting all the year 34
    • To preſerve Currans. 41
    • To make a Calfes-foot Pie. 66
    • To boyle a Capon with Brewis. 68
    • To make a Spice Cake. 69
    • To boyle a Chicken &c. 72
    • To make a Caudle. 74
    • To dry Cherries. 79
    • To boil a Capon in white Broth 81
    • To boil Chicken, and Sorrel Sops. 84
    • To ſtew Calves feet. 87
    • To ſtew cold Chickens. 90
    • To make Paſte for a Cuſtard. 91
    • To bake Calfes-feet. 94, 123
    • To bake a Chicken Pie. 96, 120
    • To fry Chickens. 104, 105
    • To make a Tart of Cherries. 112
    • To boyle Cream. 117
    • A Calfes Head Pie for Supper. 124
    • A Frigaſie of Chickens. 131
    • To make a Cake. 133
    • To ſouce a Calfes head. 137
  • B2 D To xii B2v
  • D

    • To make a made Diſh 15
    • To make a forc’d Diſh of any cold meat. 25
    • To make a forc’d Diſh of a Leg of Mutton or Lamb. 27
    • To boyle a Duck. 28, 139
    • To preſerve white Damſons. 45
    • To preſerve Damſons. 47, 57
    • To make fine Diet-Bread. 55
    • To boil a Duck with Turnips. 84
  • E

    • To make Eſſings. 65
    • To ſouce Eeles. 107
    • To ſouce an Eele. 136
  • F

    • To make a white Fool 7
    • To make a Fool. 8
    • To make Furmenty 16
    • To candy all kind of Fruitrages, Oranges, &c. 64
    • To candy all kind of Floures. ibid.
    • To boil Flounders, &c. 76
    • To boil divers kinds of Fiſhes. 86
    • To xiii B3r
    • To bake a Florentine. 98
    • To make Fritters. 106
    • To marble Fiſh. 110
  • G

    • To make a Goosberry Fool. 6
    • To make a Goosberry Cuſtard. 7
    • To make Grout. 36
    • To make Goosberry Tarts. 40
    • To preſerve Goosberries. 41
    • To make Goosberry Cakes. 42
    • To doe Goosberries like Hops. 43
    • To preſerve Grapes. 47
    • To preſerve Grapes to look clear and green. 50
    • To make Paſte of Goosberries. 51
    • To ſouce a Carp or Gurnet. 70
  • H

    • To bake a Hare. 95
    • To roaſt a Hare. 99
    • To make a Tart of Hips. 113
    • A Hartechoak Pie. 123
  • I

    • To make an excellent Jelly. 1
    • B3 To xiv B3v
    • To make a Jelly of Marmalet 37
    • To make a Junket. 114
  • K

    • A Florendine of Kidnies. 119
  • L

    • To make Leach. 11
    • To make yellow Leach. ibid.
    • To fry a Coaſt of Lamb. 28
    • To make Cakes of Lemons. 47
    • To candy Lemons and Oranges. 59
    • To make white Lemon Cakes 61
    • A Lamb Pie. 120, 121
    • A Lark Pie. 126
    • A Frigaſie of Lamb. 131
  • M

    • To make ſauce for a Shoulder of Mutton. 15, 120
    • To roaſt a Shoulder of Mutton with Thyme. 20
    • To roaſt a Shoulder of Mutton with Oyſters. ibid.
    • To boyle a Leg of Mutton. 32
    • To preſerve Medlers. 41
    • To xv B4r
    • To make Mackaroons. 44
    • To preſerve Mulberries. 45
    • To boil a Mallard, &c. 84
    • To ſtew a Mallard 88
    • To roaſt a Shoulder of Mutton. 10, 140
    • To roaſt a Leg of Mutton. 102
    • To roaſt a Neck of Mutton. ibid.
    • To roaſt a Chine of Mutton. 103
    • To roaſt a Giggit of Mutton. 104
    • To make a Tart of Medlers. 112
    • To ſcald Milk after the Weſtern faſhion. 114
    • To harſh a Shoulder of Mutton. 133
    • To make a Leg of Mutton three or four diſhes. 134
  • N

    • To make Broth for a Neats-tongue. 70
    • To roaſt a Neats-tongue. 100
    • A hot Neats tongue for Supper. 127
    • A cold Neats-tongue Pie. ibid.
  • O

    • To pickle Oyſters 36
    • B4 To xvi B4v
    • To make Paſte of Oranges and of Lemons. 52
    • To preſerve Oranges. 78
    • An Oyſter Pie. 122
  • P

    • To make a Sack Poſſet. 10
    • To make black Puddings. 21
    • To make white Puddings. 22
    • To make Almond Puddings. 23
    • To make a Pudding to bake. ibid.
    • To make a boyl’d Pudding. 24
    • To make a Cream Pudding to be boyled. 25
    • To pickle Purſlain. 34
    • To make a Jelly of Pippins. 38
    • To preſerve Pippins white. 46
    • To make Paſte Royall in Spice. 53
    • To candie Peares, Plums, &c. 54
    • To make Paſte Royall white, &c. ib.
    • To preſerve Pomecitron. 62
    • To make a very good Pie. 67
    • To make a fine Pudding. 71
    • To make a Ponado 74
    • To Souce a young Pig. 76
    • To dry Peaches. 79
    • To xvii B5r
    • To boil a Pike in white Broth. 85
    • To ſtew a Pullet or Capon. 90
    • To make a Paſte for a Paſsty of Veniſon. ibid
    • To make Paſte for a Pie to keep long 91
    • To make Paſte for buttered loaves 92
    • To make Paſte for buttered loaves 92
    • To make Paſte for Dumplins. ibid.
    • To make Puffe paſte 93, 129
    • To make an Italian Pudding. 98
    • To roaſt a Pig with a Pudding in the belly. 101
    • To ſouce a Pig. 107
    • To make a Tart of green Peaſe. 111
    • To make a Pippin Tart. 113
    • To make a Pudding in a baſte. 116
    • To make a Pudding in a diſh. ibid.
    • To boyle Pigcons. 118
    • A Pork Pie. 119
    • A Potato Pie for Supper. 128
    • Pigeon or Rabbet Pie. ibid.
    • To make a Pudding. 130
  • Q

    • To keep Quinces all the year. 32
    • To preſerve white Quinces. 40
    • To xviii B5v
    • To make Quince Cakes. 46
    • To preſerve Quinces red. 48
    • To make fleſh of Quinces. 77
    • To bake Quinces or Wardens &c. 95
  • R

    • To preſerve Resberries. 40
    • To candy Ringus Roots. 63
    • To boil a Rabbet. 82, 139
    • To ſtew a Rabbet. 89, 137
    • To make a Tart of Rice. 111
    • A Frigaſie of Rabbets. 134
  • S

    • To ſtew Sauceſedges. 28
    • To make Sugar Cakes. 66
    • To make Simbals. 67
    • To make Sallet of all manner of Hearbs. 87
    • To ſtew Steakes between two diſhes. ibid.
    • To ſtew Smelts or Flounders. 89
    • To bake a Steak Pie 97
    • To make a Tart of Strawberries. 112
    • A Skerret Pie. 124
  • T

      To xix B6r
    • To make a Tanſie. 13
    • To make black Tart ſtuffe. 14
    • To make yellow Tart ſtuffe. ibid.
    • To make gallendine ſauce for a Turkey. 31
    • To ſtew Trouts. 88
    • To bake a Turkie. 94
    • To fry Tongues 106
    • To ſouce a Tench or Barbell. 108
  • V

    • To make Cakes of Violets. 47
    • To make Oyle of Violets. 61
    • To boil Veal, 80
    • To bake Chunks of Veal. 96
    • To roaſt a Breaſt of Veal. 99
    • To roaſt a Haunch of Veniſon. 103
    • To roaſt a Shoulder or Fillet of Veal. ibid.
    • To ſouce a Breaſt of Veal. 108
    • To ſouce a Fillet of Veal. 109
    • To marble Beef, Mutton or Veniſon. ibid.
    • A Frigaſie of Veal. 131
  • W To xx B6v
  • W

    • To make a Whitepot. 26, 115
    • To make white broth with a Capon. 29
    • To preſerve green Walnuts. 39
    • To make a Tart of Wardens. 111
To 001 B1r 1

A True Gentlewomans Delight.

To make an Excellent Jelly.

take three gallons of fair water, boil in it a knuckle of Veal, and two Calves feet ſlit in two, with all the fat clear taken from between the clawes, ſo let them boil to a very tender Jelly, keeping it clean ſcummed, and the edges of the pot alwaies wiped with a clean cloth, that none of the ſcum may boil in, then ſtrain it from the meat, and let it ſtand all night, the next morning take away the top and the bottome, and take to every quart B of 002 B1v 2 of this Jelly, half a pint of Sherry Sack, half an ounce of Cinnamon, and as much Sugar as will ſeaſon it, ſix whites of Eggs very well beaten, mingle all theſe together, then boil it half an hour, and let it run through your Jelly Bag.

To make a Chriſtall Jelly.

Take two Calves feet, ſley them, and lay them in fair ſpring water with a knuckle of Veal, ſhift it in half a dozen waters, take out the fat betwixt the clawes, but do not break the bones, for if you do, the marrow of the bones will ſtain the Jelly, when they are ſoft and pickt very clean, boil them very tender in ſpring Water, when they be boiled tender, take them up, and uſe them at your pleaſure to eat, let the broth ſtand in an earthen pot or Pipkin till it be cold, then take away the bottome and the top, and put the clear into a fair Pipkin, put into it half a pound of fair Sugar-candy, or other Sugar, three drops of oil of 003 B2r 3 of Nutmeg, three drops of oil of Mace, and a grain of Musk, and ſo let it boil leaſurely a quarter of an hour, then let it run through a Jellie bag into a gallie pot, when it is cold you may ſerve it in little careleſſe lumps being taken out with a child’s ſpoon, and this is the beſt way to make your Chriſtal Jelly.

To make Apple Cream at any time.

Take twelve Pippins pare and ſlit them, then put them in a skillet, and ſome Claret Wine, and a race of Ginger ſhred thin, and a little Lemon pill cut ſmall, and a little Sugar, let all theſe ſtand together till they be ſoft, then take them off, and put them in a diſh till they be cold, then take a quart of Cream boiled with a little Nutmeg a while, then put in as much of the apple fluffe, to make it of what thickneſs you pleaſe, and ſo ſerve it up.

To make a Trifle Cream.

Take ſome Cream and boil it B2 with 004 B2v 4 with a cut Nutmeg, and Lemon pill a while, then take it off, cool it a little, and ſeaſon it with a little Roſe-water and Sugar to your taſte, let this be put in the thing you ſerve it in, then put it a little Runnet to make it come, then it is fit to eat.

To make clouted Cream.

Take three gallons of new Milk, ſet it on the fire till it boileth, make a hole in the middle of the Cream of the Milk, then take a pottle or three pints of very good cream, put it into the hole you made in the middle of the Milk, as it boileth, and let it boil together half an hour, then put it into three or four milkpans, ſo let it ſtand two daies, if the weather be not to hot, then take it up in clouts with a ſcummer or ſlice, and put it in that which you will ſerve it, if you like it ſeaſoned, you may put ſome Roſe-water between every clout as you lay one upon another, with your ſlice in the 005 B3r 5 the diſh you mean to ſerve it in.

To make a Quince Cream.

Take the Quinces and put them into boiling water unpared, and let them boil very faſt uncovered that they may not colour, and when they are very tender, take them off and peel them and beat the pap very ſmall with Sugar, and then take raw cream and mix with it, till it be of fit thicknes to eat like a cream, but if you boil the cream with a ſtick of Cinnamon, I think it the better, but it muſt ſtand till it be cold before you put it to the Quinces.

To make a freſh Cheeſe.

Take a pint of freſh Cream, ſet it on the fire, then take the white of ſix eggs, beat them very well, and wring in the juyce of a good Lemon into the whites, when the cream ſeeths up, put in the whites, and ſtir it about till it be turned, and then take it off, and put it into the cheeſecloth, and let the whay be drawn B3 from 006 B3v 6 from it, then take the curd and pound it in a Stone morter with a little Roſe-water and Sugar, and put it into an earthen Cullender, and ſo let it ſtand till you ſend it to the table, then put it into a diſh, put a little ſweet cream to it, and ſo ſerve it in.

To make a Codling Cream.

After your Codlings be throughly cooled and yeelded, put them into a ſilver diſh, and fill the diſh almoſt half full with Roſe-water, and half a pound of Sugar, boil all this liquor together, untill half be conſumed, and keep it ſtirring till it be well mingled, and when it hath boiled round about the diſh, take it up, ſweeten it with Sugar and ſerve it cold.

How to make a Goosberrie Fool.

Take your Goosberries and pick them, and put them into clean water, and boil them till they be all as thick 007 B4r 7 thick that you cannot diſcern what it is to the value of a quart, take ſix yolks of Eggs well beaten with Roſe-water, and before you put in your Eggs ſeaſon it well with Sugar, then ſtrain your Eggs, an d let them boil a little while, then take it up, put it in a broad diſh, ; let it ſtand till it be cold, thus it muſt be eaten.

How to make a white fool.

Take a quart of Cream and ſet it over the fire, and boil it with whole Cinnamon, and ſliced Nutmeg, and Sugar, then when it is almoſt ready take the whites of ſix Eggs well beaten with Roſe-water, and skum off the froth from them, and put it into the Cream, and boil it together a pretty while, then ſeaſon it, and take the whole ſpice out of it, and put it up in a broad diſh, and when it is cold then it must be eaten.

To make a Goosberry Cuſtard.

Take as many Goosberries as you pleaſe, boil them till they be B4 ſoft, 008 B4v 8 ſoft, then take them out, and let them ſtand ; cool, and drain them, draw them with your hand through a canvas Strainer, then put in a little Roſe-water, Sugar, and three Whites, and ſtir them altogether, put them in a Skillet, and ſtir them apace elſe they will burn, let them ſtand and cool a little while, and take them off, and put them in a glaſſe.

To make a Fool.

Take two quarts of Cream, ſet it over the fire, and let it boil, then take the yolks of twelve Eggs, and beat them very well with three or four ſpoonfuls of cold Cream, before you put the Eggs into the hot Cream, take three or four ſpoonfuls of the Cream out of the Skillet, and put it into the Eggs, and ſtir it together, and then ſtrain the Egges into the Skillet of hot Cream, ſtirring it all the time to keep it from turning, then ſet it on the fire, and let it boil a little while, but 009 C1r9 but keep it with ſtirring for fear of burning, then take it off, and let it ſtand and cool, then take two or three ſpoonfuls of Sack, and put it in the diſh, and ſome four or five Sippits and put them in the diſh, ſet the diſh and Sippits a drying, and when they be dry that they hang to the diſh, ſweeten the Cream, and pour it in the diſh ſoftly becauſe the Sippits ſhall not riſe up, thiſ will make three diſhes, when it is cold it is fit to be eaten.

To make Cheeſe-cakes.

For the cruſt take half a pint of flower, and four ſpoonfulls of cold water, and three parts of a quarter of a pound of butter, beat and knead theſe together, and put the paſt aſunder ſeveral times, then roul it ſquare and turn it over, then take a pint of Cream, and ſeven Eggs, and a quarter of a pound of Sugar, and a quarter of a pound of Currins plump before you put them in, and a whole Nutmeg grated on a Cknife, 010C1v10 knife, the Pepper muſt be beaten, but not too much, it muſt be gently boiled and ſtirred as you do buttered Eggs, the ſtuffe muſt be cold, and then put in the coffin, and ſo bake it.

To make a Sack Poſſet

Take two quarts of pure good Cream, a quarter of a pound of the beſt Almonds, ſtamp them in the Cream, and boil Amber and Musk therein, then take a pint of Sack in a Baſon, and ſet it on a chafingdiſh till it be bloud warm, then take the yolkes of twelve Eggs, with four whites, and beat them very well together, and ſo put the Eggs into the Sack, and make it good and hot, let the Cream cool a little before you put it into the Sack, then ſtir all together over the coales till it be as thick as you would have it, if you take ſome Amber and Musk, and grind it ſmall with Sugar, and ſtrew it on the top of the Poſſet, it will give it a moſt delicate and pleaſant taſte.

To 011 C2r 11

To make Leach.

Make your Jelly for your Leach with Calves feet, as you do your ordinary Jelly, but a little ſtiffer, and when it is cold, take off the top and bottome, and ſet it over the fire with ſome Cinnamon and Sugar, then take your Turnſele, being well ſteept in Sack, and cruſh it, and ſo ſtrain it into your Leach, and let it boil to ſuch a thickneſſe, that when it is cold you may ſlice it.

To make yellow Leach.

Your yellow Leach is juſt the ſame, but in ſteed off Turnſele you muſt colour it with Saffron, and when it is boiled enough, then put in your Saffron and not before, it muſt not boil in it.

To make a ſlipcoat Cheeſe.

Take five quarts of new Milk from the Cow, and one quart of Water, and one ſpoonful of Runnet, and ſtir it together, and let it ſtand till it doth come, then lay your Cheeſe-cloth into the Vate, and C2take 012C2v12 take up your Curd as faſt as you can without breaking, and put into your Vate, and let the Whay ſoak out of it ſelf; when you have taken it all up, lay a cloth on the top of it, and pound weight for one hour, then try two pound weight for one hour more, then turn him when he hath ſtood two hours lay three pound on him for an hour more, then take him out of the Vate, and let him lie two or three hours, and then ſalt him on both ſides, when he is ſalt enough, take a clean cloth and wipe him dry, then let him lie a day or a night, then put Nettles under and upon him, and change them once a day, the Cheeſe will come to his eating in eight or nine daies.

To make Cheeſe-loaves

Take the curds of a tender new milk Cheeſe, and let them be well preſſed from the Whay, and then break them as ſmall as you can poſſible, then take Crums of Manchet, and 013C3r13 and yolkes of Eggs, with half the whites, and ſome ſweet Cream, and a little fine flower, mingle all theſe together, and make a paſte of it, but not too ſtiffe, then make them into little loaves and bake them, when they be baked, cut off the tops and butter them, with Sugar, Nutmeg, and melted Butter, and put it in with a ſpoon, and ſtir it altogether, then lay on the tops, and ſeare them with ſcraped Sugar.

How to make a very good Tanſie.

Take fifteen Eggs, and ſix of the whites, beat them very well, then put in ſome Sugar, and a little Sack, beat them again, then put about a pint or a little more of Cream, then beat them again, then put in the juyce of Spinnage or of Primroſe leaves, to make it green, then put in ſome more Sugar if it be not ſweet enough, then beat it againe a little, and ſo let it ſtand till you fry it, when the firſt courſe is in, then fry it with a little ſweet Butter, it muſt C3be 014C3v14 be ſtirred and fried very tender, when it is fried enough, then put it in a diſh, and ſstrew ſome Sugar upon it, and ſerve it in.

To make black Tarte ſtuffe.

To a dozen pound of Prunes take half a dozen Maligo Raiſins, waſh and pick them clean, and put them into a pot of water, ſet them over the fire till all theſe are like pulpe, and ſtir them often leaſt they burn too, then take them off and let them be rubbed through a hair Sive hard with your hands, by little and little till all be through, then ſeaſon them to your taſte with ſearced Ginger.

To make yellow Tart ſtuffe.

Take four and twenty Eggs, and beat them with Salt together, and put it into a quart of ſeething Milk ſtirring it untill it caudles, then take it off, and put it into a napkin, hanging it up till all the Whay be run through, when it is cold, take it and grind it in a ſtone Morter with Sack 015C4r15 Sack and Sugar, to your taſte; and otherwiſe to make it look white, leave the yolks, and inſtead of Sack put in Roſewater.

To make a made Diſh.

Take a quarter of a pound of Almonds, beat them ſmall and in the beatin of them put in a little Rosewater to keep them from oyling, ſtrain them into Cream, then take Arterchoak bottomes and Marrow, and boil the redneſſe of the Marrow out, then take a quart of Cream, and boil it with Dates, Roſwe-water, and Sugar, and when it is boiled to a convenient thickneſſe, take it off, and take your Arterchoak and pare off the leaves, and lay them into the diſh, and ſome Marrow upon them, then pour ſome Cream upon them, then ſet it on coals til you ſerve it in.

To make Sauce for a ſhoulder of Mutton.

Take a few Oyſters, and ſome ſweet hearbs and an Onyon, and a pint of white Wine, and a little beaten Nutmeg, a little Salt, and C4a large 016C4v16 a large Mace, a little Lemon pild, and a little Sugar, a little leaker poſſ et if you have no Oyſters take Capers in the room of them, and ſome gravie of the Mutton.

To fry Apple pies.

Take Apples and pare them, and chop them very ſmall, beat in a little Cinnamon, a little Ginger, ſome Sugar, and a little Rose-water, take your paſte, roul it thin, and make them up as big Paſties as you pleaſe, to hold a ſpoonful or a little leſſe of your Apples, and ſo ſtir them with Butter not to haſtily leaſt they be burned.

To make Curd Cakes.

Take a pint of Curds, four Eggs, take out two of the whites put in ſome Sugar, a little Nutmeg, and a little flower, ſtir them well together and drop them in, and fry them with a little butter.

To make Furmentie.

Take a quart of ſweet Cream, two or three ſprigs of Mace, and a Nutmeg 017C5r17 Nutmeg cut in half, put into your Cream, ſo let it boil, then take your French Barley or Rice, being firſt waſhed clean in fair water three times, and picked clean, then boil it in ſweet milk till it be tender, then put it into your cream, and boil it well, and when it hath boiled a good while, take the yolks of ſix or ſeven eggs, beat them very well, and thicken on a ſoft fire, boil it, and ſtir it, for it will quickly burn, when you think it is boiled enough, ſweeten it to your taſte, and ſo ſerve it in with Roſe-water and Musk Sugar, in the ſame manner you may make it with wheat.

To make an Arterchoak Pie.

Take the bottome of ſix Arterchoaks, being boiled very tender, put them in a diſh, and put ſome vinegar over them, ſeaſon them with Ginger and Sugar, a little Mace whole, putting them into a Pie, and when you lay them in, lay ſome marrow, and Dates ſliced in, and C5a few 018C5v18 a few Raiſins of the Sun in the bottome, with good ſtore of Butter, to cloſe the Pie, when it is half baked, take a diſh of Sack, being boiled firſt with Sugar, and a pill of Orange, put it in your Pie, and ſet it in the Oven again, till you uſe it.

To make a Chicken Pie.

Make your paſte with good ſtore of Butter, and yolks of Eggs and Sugar, then take ſix chickens ſmall, taking out the breaſt-bone, and truſſing them round, take two Nutmegs; and a good quantity of Cinnamon, and put it in in little pieces, take two yolks of eggs, and beat them wirth ſix ſpoonfuls of verjuice, then take your juice and verjuyce, and a little ſalt, ſtir them well together, take a good deal of butter, and wet it in the verjuyce, and put it in the bellies of the Chikens, ſo lay them in the pie with butter under them, then take half a pound of Currans waſhed and dried,ed 019C6r19 ed, ſo lay them on the top of the Chickens, with a piece of Marrow, Barberries, Grapes, and good ſtore of Butter and Sugar, as will ſeaſon it, a little before you draw out your Pie, put in Verjuyce and Sugar boiled together.

To bake Beef like red Deer.

Take a pound of Beef, and ſlice it thin, and half a pint of good wine Vinegar, ſome three Cloves, and Mace above an ounce, three Nutmegs, pound them altogether, Pepper and Salt according to your diſcretion, and a little Sugar, mix theſe together, take a pound and half of Suet, ſhred and beat it ſmall in a Morter, then lay a row of ſuet, a row of Beef, ſtrow your ſpices between every lain, then your Vinegar, ſo do till you have laid in all, then make it up, but firſt beat it cloſe with a rowling pin, then preſs it a day before you put it in your paſte.

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To roaſt a Shoulder of Mutton with Thyme

Draw your ſhoulder of Mutton, and when it is half roaſted, ſave the gravy, and cut a good deal of the inſide of it and mince it groſſe, and boyle it in a diſh with the gravy, and thyme, Claret wine, and ſliced Nutmeg, and when your ſhoulder is roaſted, lay it in the diſh with ſliced Lemon, but remember to ſcorch your Mutton in roaſting, as you doe when you boyle it.

To roaſt a Shoulder of Mutton with Oyſters.

When you open the Oyſter ſave the liquor, then ſeaſon them with Pepper, and a little Cloves, and Mace, and Hearbs finely Chopped, and the yolk of two or three Eggs chopped ſmall, and ſome Currans parboyled a little, then ſtuffe your ſhoulder of Mutton thick with your Oysters, then ſeaſon it, and lay it to the fire, and roaſt it, then take the reſt of your Oyſters and boyle 021C7r21 boyle them with a little white Wine and ſome Butter, this is ſauce for your shoulder of Mutton, when your Oyſters are opened, you may parboyle them in their own liquor, then take them out, and ſeaſon them.

To make Angellets.

Take a quart of new Milk, and a pint of Cream, and put them together with a little Runnet, when it is come well, take it up with a ſpoon, and put it into the vate softly, and let it ſtand two dayes, till it is pretty fulle, then ſlip it out, and ſalt it a little at both ends, and when you think it is ſalt enough, ſet it a drying, and wipe them, and within a quarter of a year they will be ready to eat.

To make black Puddings,

Take your bloud when it is warm, put in ſome ſalt, and when it is throughly cold put in your groats well pickt, and let it ſtand ſoking a night, then put in Hearbs which 022C7v22 which muſt be Roſemary, large Savory, Pennyroyall, Thyme and Fennell, then make it ſoft, with putting of good Cream hot untill the bloud look pale, then beat four or five Eggs whites and all, and mingle it, then ſeaſon it with Cloves, Mace, Pepper, Fennell ſeeds, then put good ſtore of Beef ſuet in your ſtuffe, and mince your fat not too ſmall.

To make white Puddings.

After the humbles are very tender boyled, take ſome of the lights, with the hearts, and all the fleſh and fat about them, picking from them all the ſinewes and ſkin, then chop the meat ſmall as can be, then put to it a little of the Liver very finely ſearced, ſome grated bread ſearced, four or five yolks of Eggs, a pint of very good Cream, a ſpoonfull or two of Sack, a little Sugar, Cinnamon, Cloves, and Mace, a little Nutmeg, a few Canary ſeeds, a little Roſewater mingled with a good 023C8r23 good deal of Swines fat, a little Salt, roul it in roules two houres before you goe about it, let the fat ſide of the skin be turned and ſteeped in Roſewater till you fill them.

To make Almond Puddings.

Take a Pound of Almonds blanched, and beat them very ſmall with a little Roſewater, boyle good Milk with a ſtake of Mace, and a little ſliced Nutmeg, when it is boyled, take it clean from the Spice, then take the quantity of a penny loaf, grate it, and ſearce it through a Cullender, and then put it into the Milk, and let it ſtand till it be pretty cool, then put in Almonds, and five or ſix yolks of Eggs, and a little Salt and Sugar, what you think fit, and good ſtore of Beef ſuet, and Marrow very finely ſhred.

To make a Pudding to bake.

Take a penny loaf, pare it, ſlice it in a quart of Cream, with a little 024C8v24 little Roſewater, and break it very ſmall, take three ounces of Jordan Almonds blanched, and beaten ſmall with a little Sugar, put in ſome eight Eggs beaten, a Marrow bone, and two or three Pippins ſliced thin, or any way, mingle theſe together, and put in a little Ambergriece if you pleaſe.

To make a boyld Pudding

Take a pint of Cream or Milk, boyle it with a ſtick of Ciunnamon a little while, and take it off, and let it ſtand till it be cold, put in ſix Eggs, take out three whites, beat your Eggs a little before you put them into the Milk, then ſtirre them together, then take a penny roul, and ſlice it very thin, and let it lie and ſoke, and then braid it very ſmall, then put in ſome Sugar, and butter your cloth before you put it in, it will take but a little while ſeething, and when you take it up, melt a little freſh Butter, and a little Sac, and Sugar, beat all theſe 025C9r25 theſe together, and put it into the diſh with your Pudding to be ſerved in.

To make a Cream Pudding to be boyled.

Take a pint and a half of thick Cream, and boyle it with Mace, Ginger, and Nutmeg quartered, then put to it eight Eggs, with four whites beaten, and Almonds blancht a pound, and ſtrained in with the Cream, a little Roſewater and Sugar, and a ſpoonful of flower, ſearted very fine, then take a thick napkin, wet it, ; rub it with flower, and tie the pudding up in it, where Mutton is boyled, or in the Beefpot, remember to take out the whole Spice out of the Cream when it is boyled, the ſauce for this pudding is a little Sack, and Sugar, a pretty piece of Butter, you muſt blanch ſome Almonds, when they are blanched, cut every Almond in three or four pieces the long way, and ſtick them up an end upon the pudding very thick.

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To make a White-Pot

Take a pint and a half of Cream, a quarter of a pound of Sugar, a little Roſewater, a few Dates ſliced, a few Raiſins of the Sunne, ſix or ſeven Eggs, and a little large Mace a ſliced Pippin, or Lemon, cut ſippet faſhion for your diſhes you bake in, and dip them in Sack or Roſewater.

To make a forc’d diſh of any cold meat.

Take any cold meat and ſhred it ſmall, a little Cloves, and Mace, and Nutmeg, and two yolkes of Eggs, a ſpoonfull or two of Roſe- water, a little grated bread, a little Beef ſuet ſhred ſmall, make it up into balls or any faſhion you pleaſe, and boyle them in fried ſuet between two earthen diſhes, your ſuet muſt boyle before you put in your meat for ſauce, a little Butter, Verjuyce, and Sugar.

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To make a forc’d diſh of a Leg of Mutton, or Lamb.

Take a leg of Mutton, or Lamb, cut out the fleſh, and take heed you break not the skin of it, then parboyle it, and mince it with a little Beef ſuet, put into it a little ſweet hearbs ſhred, three or four Dates ſliced, a little beaten Nutmeg, Cloves and Mace, a few Currans, a little Sugar, a little Verjuyce, three or four Eggs, mix them together, and put them in the skin, and ſet it in a diſh, and bake it.

To boyle a Calves head with Oyſters.

Take the head, and boyle it with Water and Salt, and a little white Wine or Verjuyce and when it is almoſt enough then cut ſome Oyſters, and mingle them together, and blade or willegible2-letters of Mace, a little Pepper, and Salt, and a little liquor of the Oysters, then put it together, and put it to the Calves head, and the largeſt Oyſterr upon it, and a ſlit Lemon, and Barberries, ſo ſerve it in.

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To fry a Coaſt of Lamb.

Take a coaſt of Lamb, and parboyle it, take out all the bones as near as you can, and take ſome four or five yolkes of Eggs beaten, a little Thyme, and ſweet Majoram, and Parſly minced very ſmall, and beat it with the Eggs, and cut your Lamb into ſquare pieces, and dip them into the Eggs and Hearbs, and fry them with Butter, then take a little Butter, white Wine, and Sugar for ſauce.

To ſtew Sauceſedges.

Boyle them in fair Water and Salt a little, for ſauce boyle ſome Currans alone, when they be almoſt tender, then pour out the water, and put in a little white Wine, Butter, and Sugar.

To boyle Ducks.

When they be half boyled, take a quart of the liquour and ſtrain it, and put a quart of white Wine, and ſome whole Mace, Cloves, and Nutmegs ſliced, and Cinnamon, and 029C11r29 and a few Onions ſhred, a bundle of ſweet Hearbs, a few Capers, and a little Sampire, when it is boyled put ſome Sugar to ſeaſon it withall.

To make white Broth with a Capon.

Truſſe your Capons, and boyle them in fair water, and when they are half boyled, take out three pints of the liquor, and put it to a quart of Sack, and as much white Wine, and ſlice two ounces of Dates half or quarter wiſe as you pleaſe, a little whole Mace, Cloves, and Cinnamon, a Nutmeg ſhred, of each a little quantity, boyle the broth in a pipkin by it ſelf, untill the Dates begin to be tender, then put in the marrow of two bones, and let it boyle a little, not too much for fear, then when your Capons be near ready, break twenty Eggs, ſave the yolkes from the whites, and beat the yolkes untill you may take up a ſpoonfull and it will not run beſide the ſpoon, then you muſt put a little cold broth to them, 030C11v30 them, and ſo ſtrain them through a cloth, then take up ſome of the hot broth to heat your Eggs, becauſe elſe it will turn, let it have a walm or two after your Eggs be in, but not ſeeth too much for fear it turns, then diſh your Capons, and pour your broth on them, and garniſh your diſh as you pleaſe.

To make ſtewed Broth.

Take a neck of Mutton, or a rump of Beef, let it boil, and ſcum your pot clean, thicken your pot with grated bread, and put in ſome beaten Spice, as Mace, Nutmegs, Cinnamon, and a little Pepper, put in a pound of Currans, a pound and a half of Raiſins of the Sun, two pound of Prunes laſt of all, then when it is ſtewed, to ſeaſon it put in a quart of Claret, and a pint of Sack, and ſome Saunders to colour it, and a pound of Sugar to ſweeten it; or more if need be, you muſt ſeeth ſome whole Spice to garniſh your diſh withall, and a few whole 031C12r31 whole Prunes out of your pot.

To make gallendine Sauce for a Turkey.

Take ſome Claret Wine, and ſome grated bread, and a ſprig of Roſemary, a little beaten Cloves, a little beaten Cinnamon, and ſome Sugar.

An exceeding good way to ſtew Chickens.

Take Chickens, ſley them, and cut them in pieces croſſe way, then put them in a Pipkin or Skillet, and cover them almoſt with Pepper, and Mace, and Water, ſo let them ſtew ſoftly with a whole Onion in it till part of that Liquor be conſumed, then put in as much white Wine as will cover them againe, take Parſley, ſweet Majoram, Winter Savory, with a little Thyme, and ſhred them very ſmall, and put them in, and let them boil till they are almoſt enough, then put in a good piece of Butter.

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To boil a leg of Mutton

Take a leg of Mutton and ſtuffe it, for the ſtuffing take a little Bee ſuct, and a few ſweet hearbs, chop them ſmall, and ſtuffe it, and then boil it, and put in a handfull of ſweet hearbs, cut them ſmall, mingle a hard Egg amongſt the hearbs, and ſtrew it upon the Mutton, melt a little Butter and Vinegar, and pour it into the diſh, and ſend it in.

To keep Quinces all the year.

First you muſt core them, and take out the kernels clean, and keep the cores and kernels, then ſet over ſome water to boil them, then put them in when you ſet over the water then let them boil till they be a little ſoft, and then take them up, and ſet them down till they be cold, then take the kernels and ſtamp them and put them into the ſame water they were boiled in, and let them boil till they be thick ſee you have as much liquor as wil cover the Quinces, and if you have not 033D1r33 not enough, take of the ſmalleſt Quinces and ſtamp them to make more liquor, and when it is boiled good and thick, you muſt ſtrain it through a courſe cloth, and when the Quinces be cold, then put them into a pot, and the liquor alſo, and be ſure the liquor cover them, you muſt lay ſome weight upon them to keep them under, ſo cover them cloſe, let them ſtand fourteen daies, and they will work of their own accord, and they will have a thick rind upon them, and when they wax hoary or thick, then take it from the liquor, for it will have a skin on it within a moneth or ſix weeks.

To pickle Cowcumbers.

Take the Cowcumbers, and waſh them clean, and dry them clean in a cloth, then take ſome Water, Vinegar, Salt, Fennel tops, and ſome Dill tops, and a little Mace, make it faſt enough, and ſharp enough to the taſte, then boil it a while and then take it off, and let Dit 034D1v34 it ſtand and be cold, and then put in the Cowcumbers, and lay a board on the top to keep them down, and tye them cloſe, and within a week they will be fit to eat.

To pickle Purſlain.

Take the Purſlain, and pick it in little pieces, and put it into a pot or barrel, then take a little Water, Vinegar, and Salt to taſte, it muſt be pretty ſtrong of the Vinegar and Salt, and a little Mace, and boil all theſe together, and pour this liquor in ſomthing hot into the Purſlaine, and when it is cold tye it cloſe, but put a little board on the top to keep it down, and within a week or two it is fit to eat.

To do Clove-gillifloures up for Salleting all the year.

Take as many Clove-gillifloures as you pleaſe, and ſlip off the leaves, then ſtrow ſome Sugar in the bottome of the gallipot that you doe them in, and then a lane of Gillifloures, and then a lane of Sugar, and 035D2r35 and ſo do till all the Gillifloures be done, then pour ſome Claret Wine into them as much as will cover them, then cut a piece of a thin board, and lay it to them to keep them down, then tye them cloſe, and ſet them in the Sun, and let them ſtand a moneth or thereabouts, but keep them from any rain or wet.

To pickle Broom-buds

Take as many Broom-buds as you pleaſe, make linnen bags, and put them in, and tye them cloſe, then make ſome brine with Water and Salt, and boil it a little, let it be cold, then put ſome brine in a deep earthen pot, and put the bags in it, and lay ſome weight upon them, let it lie there till it look black, then ſhift it againe, ſo you muſt do as long as it looks black, you muſt boil them in a little caldron, and put them in vinegar a week or two, and then they be fit to eat.

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To pickle Oyſters.

Take your Oyſters and pick them out of the ſhells, and ſave the liquor that commeth from them, then take your Oyſters one by one, and waſh them clean out of griſt, then ſtrain the liquor, then take a quantity of white Wine, and a large Mace or two, and two or three ſlices of Nutmeg, and Pepper, groſly beaten, and ſalt them, boil it together, then put in your Oyſters and boil them, then take the yolk of an Egg, and beat it well with wine Vinegar, then take up your Oyſters, and let them cool, then put in your Egg and let it boil, take it off, and let it cool, and put it up together.

To make grout.

Take ſome Wheat and Beanes and when you have made it in a Malt, then rittle it, then take ſome Water, or ſome ſmall Wort, and heat it ſcalding hot, and put it into a pail, then ſtir in the Malt, then take 037D3r37 take a peice of ſower leaven, then ſtir it about and cover it, and let it ſtand till it will cream, then put in ſome Orange pills, then put it over the fire and boil it, keeping it ſtirring till all the white be gone.

To make jelly of Marmalet.

Take Quinces and pare them, cut them into water in little pieces, and when you have done all, then take them out of the water and weigh them, and to every pound of Quinces, take five quarters of a pound of Sugar, and half a quarter, then put it into the skillet, and put as much water as will make it pretty thin, then ſet it on the fire and clarifie it with the white of an Egg, and ſcum it off clear, then put in your Quinces and let it boil a pretty pace, and cover it cloſe, till it is pretty thick, then leave ſtirring it till it is thick enough for Marmalet, then take it off, and put it in your glaſſe, and doe it with your knife in little works, when you have D3done 038D3v38 done, let it ſtand, your coſtly muſt boil all the while, you muſt put in as much water as will make it pretty thin, when it is boiled to a pretty good colour, then ſtir it and weigh it, then take of loaf Sugar as much as it weighs, and boil it altogether to a Jellie, then pour it into your Marmalet glaſſe, then put it in a ſtove, and put ſome fire in every day.

To make jelly of Pippins.

Take Pippins and pare them and quarter them, and coar them, lay them in water, and when you set them on the fire, ſhift them in another water, and put them in a skillet, and put as much water as will cover them and a little more, ſet them over the fire, and make them boil as faſt as you can, when the Apples are ſoft, and the liquor taſte ſtrong of the Apples, then take them off, and ſtrain them through a piece of canvas gently; take to a pound of juice a pound of Sugar, then 039D4r39 then ſet it on the fire, when it is melted, strain it into a Baſon, and rince your skillet againe, ſet it on the fire, and when it is boiled up then ſcum it, and make it boil as faſt as you can, and when it is almoſt boiled, put in the juice of three Lemons ſtrained through a cloth, if you will have Orange pill pare it thin, that the white be not ſeen, and then lay it in the water all night, then boil them in the water till the pill be ſoft, then cut them in long pieces, then put it into the ſirrupe and ſhift it about and fill your glaſſes, and let it ſtand till it be cold, and then it is ready to eat.

To preſerve green Walnuts.

Take Walnuts, and boil them till the water do taſte bitter, then take them off and put them in cold water, and pill off the bark, and weigh as much Sugar as they weigh, and a little more water than will wet the D4Sugar 040D4v40 Sugar ſet them on the fire, and when they boil up, take them off, and let them ſtand two daies, and boil them againe once more.

To preſerve white Quinces.

Take a pound of Quinces, boil them with the skins on, but core them and pare them, take a quarter of a pound of Sugar, with water, no more than will wet the Sugar, put the Quinces into it preſently, boil them as faſt as may be, and skin them, when the Sirupe is thick take it up.

To make Gooſberry Tarts.

Take a partof Goosberries, and put them into a quarter of a pound of Sugar, and two ſpoonfuls of water, and put them on the fire, and ſtir them as you did the former.

To preſerve Resberries

Take as many as you pleaſe, a lay of Sugar, and a lay of Resberries, and ſo lay them into the Skillet, and as much Sugar as you think will make Sirrupe enough, and 041D5r41 and boil them, and put two ſpoonfuls of water in, boſcom it, take it off, and let it ſtand.

To preſerve Currans.

Part them in the tops, lay a lain of Currans, and a lain of Sugar, and ſo boil them as faſt as you do Resberries, do not put in the ſpoon, but ſcum them, boil them till the Sirrup be pretty thick, then take them off, and let them ſtand till they be cold, and then put them in a glaſſe.

To preſerve Medlers.

Take the juſt weight of Sugar as they weigh, to a pound of Sugar put a pint and a half of water, ſcald them as long as the skins will come off, ſtone them at the head, put the water to the Sugar, and boil it and ſtrain it, put in the Medlers, boil them apace, let them ſtand till they be thick, then take them off.

To preſerve Goosberries

Take the faireſt Goosberries you can get with the ſtalks on, prick D5three 042D5v42 three or four holes in every one of them, then take the weight of them in Sugar, lay the beſt part of the Sugar in the bottome of a ſilver or peuter diſh, then lay your Goosberries one by one upon it, ſtrew ſome of the reſt of the Sugar upon them, and put two ſpoonfuls of the water, into half a pound, then ſet the Goosberries on a chafing- diſh of coales, and let them ſtand uncovered, ſcalding upon the fire a pretty while before they boil, but not too long, for then they will grow red, and when they be boiled, let them not boil too ſoft when they be enough put them up, you muſt put the reſt of the Sugar on them as they boil, and that will harden them, and keep them from breaking.

To make Goosberry Cakes.

Prick as many Goosberries as you pleaſe, and put them into an earthen pitcher, and let it in a kettle of water till they be ſoft, and then 043D6r43 then put them into a ſive, and let them ſtand till all the juice be out, and weigh the juice, and as much Sugar, as ſirrup; firſt boil the ſugar to a Candy, and take it off, and put in the juyce, and ſet it on again till it be hot, and take it off, and ſet them in a preſſe till they be dry, then they are ready.

To do Goosberries like Hops.

Take pricks of black Thorn, then take Goosberries, and cut them a little a croſſe, take out the ſtones, put them upon the pricks, weigh as much ſugar, as they weigh ; take a quart or a pint of water and put into the ſugar and let it boil a while, then put in the hops, let them ſtand and ſcald two hours upon the coales till they be ſoft, then take out the Hops, and boil the ſirrupe a while, then take it off, and put in the Hops.

To preſerve Apricocks.

Firſt ſtone them and weigh them, and take as much ſugar as Apricocks,cocks, 044D6v44 cocks, put it in a Baſon, ſome in the bottome, and ſome on the top, let them ſtand all night, ſet them on the fire till they be ſcalding hot, then heat them twice more.

To make Apricock Cakes.

Take as many Apricocks as you pleaſe, and pare them, put as much Sugar as they weigh, take more water than will melt the Sugar, then boil the Sugar and it together, till they be pretty ſtiffe, then take them off, and put them in Saucers.

To make Mackeroons

Take half a pound of Almonds, put them in water, ſtamp them ſmall, put in ſome Roſe-water, a good ſpoonful of flower, four Eggs, half a pound of Sugar, in the beating of the Eggs, put in the Almonds, heat the oven hot enough to bake a Cuſtard, put them in, when you have taken them out, let them ſtand till they be cold, they muſt be baked in earthen pans round, and buttered very thin.

How 045 D7r 45

How to preſerve White Damſons green.

Take white Damſons, ſcald them in water till they be hard, then take them off, and pick as many as you pleaſe, take as much ſugar as they weigh, ſtrew a little in the bottome, put two or three ſpoonfuls of water, then put in the Damſons and the ſugar, and boil them, take them off, then let them ſtand a day or two, then boil them again, take them off, and let them ſtand till they be cold.

To preſerve Mulberries.

Take as many Mulberries as you pleaſe and as much ſugar as they weigh: Firſt wet the ſugar with ſome juice of Mulberries, ſtir your ſugar together, then put in your Mulberries, then boil them apace: till you think they are boiled enough, then take them off, and boil the ſirupe a while, and put it into the Mulberries, let them ſtand till they be cold.

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To preſerve Pippens white.

Take ſome Pippens and pare them, and cut them the croſſe way, and weigh them, and to a pound of ſugar, a pint of water, then put the ſugar to the water, and then let it boil a while, and then put in the Pippens, and let them boil till they be clear at the Core, take them off, and put them up.

To make white Quince Cakes.

Take Quinces and let them ſtand till they be cold, but not ſeethed till they be tender enough, then take them off, and pare them, then ſcrape off the ſofteſt, and doe it through a ſieve, and then weigh as much ſugar as it doth weigh, and beat it, and ſift it into the Quinces, and ſtir it altogether, and ſet it on the coales, and ſtir it about, but let it not boil at all, but let it ſtand and cool, till it be pretty thick, then take it off, and put it in glaſſe ſaucers.

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To preſerve Grapes.

Stamp and ſtrain them, let it ſettle awhile, before you wet a pound of ſugar, or grapes with the juice, ſtone the grapes, ſave the liquor, in the ſtoning take of the ſtalks, give them a boiling, take them off, and put them up.

To preſerve Damſons.

Take as many as you pleaſe, and weigh, as much Sugar as they weigh, and ſtrew ſome in the bottome and ſome on the top, and you may wet the ſugar with ſome ſirrup, of Damſons, or a little water, then ſet them upon the fire and let them ſtand and ſoke ſoftly about an hour, then take them off, and let them ſtand a day or two, then boil them up till you think they be enough, take them off, and put them up.

How to make Cakes of commonViolets.

Take of the beſt double refined ſugar, beaten very fine and ſearced through fine Tiffenie, and to half a ſilver porringer of Sugar, put 048D8v48 put to it two ſpoonfuls of water, and boil it till it be almoſt Sugar again, then grate of the hardeſt rinded Lemon, then ſtir it into your ſugar, put it into your Coffins of Paper, and when they be cold take them off.

To preſerve Quinces red.

Take your Quinces and weigh them, to a pound put a pound of ſugar, and half a pint of water, put your water to your Sugar, and let it ſtand, your Quinces muſt be ſcalded till they be tender, take them off, pare them, and core them, but not too much, then put them in the skillet where the ſugar is, then ſet them on fire, and let them boil two houres, if it be not enough, boil it a little more, pour it to the Quinces, and ſtop it cloſe.

To make Bisket Bread.

Take a pound and a half of white loaf ſugar, and ſo much flower, as much Anniſe ſeed, Coliander ſeed, and Carraway ſeed as you pleaſe, and 049D9r49 and twelve Eggs, three whites left out, take the ſugar and ſift it fine, and the flower alſo, and beat your eggs a little, then mingle them well together with four ſpoonfuls of damask Roſe-water, beat them well together, and put in two ſpoonfuls more, and beat it againe about an hour and a half in all, then butter plate trenchers, and fit them with ſtuffe, ſcrape ſome Sugar on them, and blow it off againe, heat your oven hot enough to bake a Pie, and let the lid ſtand up a little while, to draw down the heat from the top, then take the lid down againe and let it ſtand till it be cool, that you may ſuffer your hand in the bottom, then ſet in the Plates, and ſet up the lid againe untill, they riſe, then take them out and looſe them from the plates, and ſcrape the bottoms, and let them ſtand four hours, then they be fit to eat.

To 050 D9v 50

To preſerve Grapes to look clear and green.

Take a pound of Grapes with no ſtalks on them, when they do begin to be ripe, then weigh as much double refined ſugar beaten ſmall then take the grapes that were weighed, ſtone them at the place where the ſtalks are, pull off the ſkins, and ſtrain ſome Sugar in the bottome of the thing you do them in, and ſo lay them in the ſugar you did weigh till you have ſtoned and pilled the and ſo ſtrew the ſugar upon them then ſet them on the fire, and let them boil as faſt as can be, till the ſyrup be pretty thick, then take them off, and put them up till they be cold.

To Candie Apricocks.

Take your apricocks the faireſt and ſcald them, and pill them, between two clothes cruſh the water ſoftly out of them as dry as you can without too much flatting them then take of ſearced ſugar almoſt as 051D10r51 as much as they weigh, and boil it altogether to a Candie height, then take it off the fire, and lay the Apricocks in it one by one, with a feather annoint them over, then ſet them on a chafing-diſh of coales, and let them be through ſod but not boil, then take them off the fire, and ſet it in a ſtone or a bloud-warm oven, and twice a day ſet them on a fire, and turn them once at every heating, annointing them with a feather, and the ſame ſyrup every time you take them off the fire, this doe untill you ſee the ſyrrup begin to ſparkle, and full of eyes, then take them out of the ſyrup, and lay them on glaſſe plates, and dry them in a ſtove or oven, turning them a day or two till they be dry, white Pear plums may be done thus.

To make Paste of Goosberries, or Barberies, or Engliſh Currans.

Take any of theſe tender fruits, and boil them ſoftly on a chafing- diſh of coales, then ſtrain them with 052D10v52 with the pap of a rotten Apple, then take as much ſugar as it weighes, and boil it to a Candie height, with as much Roſe-water, as will melt the ſugar, then put in the pap of your fruit into the hot ſugar, and ſo let it boil leaſurely, till you ſee it reaſonable ſtiffe, almoſt as thick as for Marmalet, then faſhion it on a ſheet of glaſſe, and ſo put it into the Oven upon two Billets that the glaſſe may not touch the bottom of the Oven, for if it do, it will make the paſte tough, and ſo let it drie leaſurely, and when it is dry, you may box it, and keep it all the year.

To make Paſte of Oranges and Lemons.

Take your Oranges and Lemons, and ſet on the fire two veſſels of faire water at once, boil them, and then ſhift the water ſeven times, that the bitterneſſe may be taken from them, and they very tender, then cut them through the midſt, and take out the kernels, and wring 053D11r53 wring out all the water from them, then beat them in an Alabaſter morter, with the papps of three or four Pippens, then ſtrain it through a fine ſtrainer, then take as much ſugar as that pap doth weigh, being boiled to a Candie height; with as much Roſe-water as will melt the ſugar, then put the pap of your Oranges and Lemons into the hot ſugar, and ſo let it boil leaſurely with ſtirring, and when you ſee it ſtiffe as for Manchet, then faſhion it on a ſheet of glaſſe, and ſo ſet it in a Stove or Oven, and when it is throughly dry, box it for all the year.

To make Paſte Royall in Spice.

Take Sugar the quantity of four ounces, very finely beaten and ſeareed, and put into it an ounce of Cinnamon, and Ginger, and a grain of Musk, and ſo beat it into paſte, with a little Gum-Dragon ſteeped in Roſe-water, and when you have beaten it into paſte in a ſtone morter,ter, 054D11v54 ter, then roul it thin, and print it with your moulders, then dry it before the fire, and when it is dry, box and keep it all the year.

To candie Peares, Plums, or Apricocks, that ſhall look as clear as Amber.

Take your Apricocks and Plums, and give every one a cut to the ſtone in the notch, and then caſt Sugar on them, and bake them in an Oven as hot as for Manchet cloſe ſtopped, bake them in an earthen platter, let them ſtand half an hour, then take them out of the diſh, and lay them one by one upon glaſſe plates, and ſo dry them, if you can get glaſſes made like Marmalet boxes to lay over them they will be ſooner candi’d, this is the manner to candie any ſuch fruit.

To make paſte Royalle white, that you may make Court Bouls, or Caps, or Gloves, Shooes, or any pretty thing Printed in Moulds.

Take half a pound of double refinedfined 055D12r55 fined Sugar, and beat it well, and ſearce it through a fine lawn, then put it into a fine Alabaſter morter, with a little Gum-dragon ſteeped in a little Roſewater, and a grain of Musk, ſo beat them in a morter till it come to a pretty paſte, then roul it thin with a rouling pin, and print it with your moulders, like Gloves, Shooes, or any thing elſe, and ſome you may roul very thin with a rouling pin, and let dry in an Athen diſh, otherwiſe called a Court cap, and let it ſtand in the diſh till it be dry, and it will be like a ſaucer, you muſt dry them on a board farre from the fire, but you muſt not put them in an Oven, they will be dry in two or three houres; and be as white as ſnow, then you may guilt Box and Cap.

To make fine Diet Bread.

Take a pound of fine Flower twice or thrice dreſt, and one pound and a quarter of hard Sugar finely beaten, and take ſeven new laid Eggs, 056D12v56 Eggs, and put away the yolkes of one of them, then beat them very well, and put four or five ſpoonfuls of Roſewater amongſt them, and then put them into an Alabaſter or Marble morter, and then put in the Flower and Sugar by degrees, and beat it or pound it for the ſpace of two houres, untill it be perfectly white, and then put in an ounce of Canary ſeeds, then butter your Plates or Saucers, and put into every one, and ſo put them into the Oven; if you will have it gloſſe and Icie on the top, you muſt waſh it with a feather, and then ſtrew Sugar very finely beaten on the top before you put it into the Oven.

To preſerve Apricocks.

Take your Apricocks, and put them into a skillet of fair water, and put them over the fire untill they be ſomething tender, then take them up out of the water, and take a bodkin and thruſt out the ſtone at the 057E1r57 the top, and then peel off their skins, and when you have ſo done, put them into a ſilver diſh or Baſon, and lay Sugar very finely beaten over and under them, then put a ſpoonfull or two of water unto them, and ſet them over a very ſoft fire untill they be ready, then take them up, and lay them upon another diſh a cooling, and if you ſee good boyle the ſirrup a little more, when they are cold, and the ſirrup almoſt cold, put them up in a gallypot or glaſſe altogether.

To preſerve Damſons.

Take a pound of ſomething more of pure Sugar finely beaten, and then take a pound of Damſons, and cut one ſcotch in the ſide of each of them, then put a row of Sugar in a ſilver diſh or baſon, and then lay in a row of Plums, and then cover it with Sugar, and ſo lay it in till they be all in, and then take two ſpoonfuls of clean water, and make a hole in the middle of E them, 058E1v58 them, and ſet it over a very ſoft fire, and look to it carefully, for fear the Sugar ſhould burn, and when the Sugar is all diſſolved, ſhake them together, and ſtirre them gently, and then ſet them down, and cover them till they be cold, and when they are cold, ſet them upon the coales again, and then let them boyle gently till they be ready, and when they are ready take them down, and take them every one by its item, and cover them with the skins as well as you can, and then put them all one by one in a diſh, and if the ſirrup be not boyled enough, ſet it over, and let it boyle a little longer, and when the Plums be cold, put them in a gally pot or glaſſe, and pour the ſirrup to them while it is a little warm, you muſt not forget to take away the skin of the Plums as it riſeth.

To make Papp of Barly

Take Barly, and boyle it in fair water 059E2r59 water ſoftly untill it begin to break, then put that liquor out, then put as much hot water to it as you put forth, and ſo let it boyle till it be very ſoft, then put it into a Cullender and ſtrain it, then take a handfull of Almonds, and grind them very well with your Barly and ſome of the liquor, ſo ſeaſon it with Sugar, and a little Roſewater, a little whole Mace, and Cinnamon, and boyle them well together.

To candy Lemons and Oranges.

Take the peels of your Oranges and Lemons, the white cut away, then lay them in water five or ſix dayes, ſhifting them twice every day, then ſeeth them till they be very tender, then take them out of the water, and let them lie till they be cold, then cut them in ſmall pieces ſquare, the bigneſſe of a penny or leſſe, then take to every three two ounces of Sugar, put to it a quantity of fair Water, and a leſſe quantityE2tity 060E2v60 tity of Roſewater, and make a ſirrup thereof, then skum it very clean, and put in your peels, and let them boyle for the ſpace of an hour or longer, if you find your liquor wanting, you may put in more water at your pleaſure, then boyle them a little ſpace after with a little ſharp fire, ſtirring it alwayes for burning, then take it off the fire three or four times, ſtirring them all the while, and ſet them on again untill they be candied.

To make Cakes of Almonds.

Take one pound and a half of fine Flower, of Sugar twelve ounces beaten very fine, mingle them well together, then take half a pound of Almonds, blanch them, and grind them fine in a Morter, then ſtrain them with as much Sack as will mingle the Flower, Sugar, and Almonds together, make a paſte, bake them in an Oven not too hot.

To 061 B3r 61

To make white Lemon Cakes.

Take half a dozen of yellow Lemons the beſt you can get, then cut and pare them, leave none of the yellow behind, then take away the ſoure meat of it, and reſerve all the white, and lay it in water two dayes, then ſeeth it in fair water till it be ſoft, then take it out, and ſet it by till the water be gone from it, then weigh it, and take twice the weight in Sugar, mince the white ſtuffe very fine, then take an earthen pipkin, and pout therein ſome fair Water, and ſome Roſewater, if you have a pound of Sugar, you muſt have half a pint of Water, of both ſorts alike, let your Water and Sugar boyle together, then skum it, and put in the ſtuffe, and ſo let them boyle together, alwayes ſtirring it till it be thick, it will ſhew very thin, and when it is cold it will be thick enough.

To make Oyle of Violets.

Set the Violets in Sallade Oyle, E3 and 062E3v62 and ſtrain them, then put in other freſh Violets, and let them lye twenty dayes, then ſtrain them again, and put in other fresh Violets, and let them ſtand all the year.

To preſerve Pomecitron.

Take Pomecitron and grate off the upper skin, then ſlightly cut them in pieces as you think good, lay them in water four and twenty houres, and when it boyles put them in, and ſo ſhift till you find the water be not bitter, then take them up and weigh them, and to every pound of Pomecitron put a pound and quarter of Sugar, then take of your laſt water a pint and quarter, ſet your water and Sugar over the fire, then take two whites of Eggs and beat them with a little fair water, and when your ſirrup begins to boyle, caſt in the ſame that riſeth from the Eggs, and ſo let it boyle, then let it run through a clean fine cloth, then put it in a clean 063E4r63 clean Poſnet, and when your ſirrup begins to boyle, put in your Pomecitron, and let it boyle ſoftly three or four houres, untill you find your ſirrup thick enough; be ſure you keep them alwayes under ſirrup, and never turn them, take them up, and put them into your glaſſe, and when they be cold cover them.

To candy Ringus Roots.

Take your Ringus Roots and boyle them reaſonable tender, then peel them, and pith them, then lay them together, then take ſo much Sugar as they weigh, and put it into a poſnet with as much Roſewater as will melt it, then put in your Roots, and ſo let it boyle very ſoftly, until the Sugar be conſumed into the Roots, then take them and turn them, and ſhake them till the Sugar be dryed up, and then lay them a drying upon a lattice of wyer untill they be cold, in the ſort you may candy any other Roots, which you pleaſe.

E4 To 064 E4v 64

To candie all kind of Fruitrages as Oranges, Lemons, Citrons, Lettice ſtockes, the Sugar-candy, ſuch as the Comfet-makers doe candy the Fruits with.

Take one pound of refined Sugar, and put it into a poſnet with as much water as will wet it, and ſo boyle it untill it come to a candy height, then take all your fruit being preſerved and dryed, then draw them through your hot Sugar, and then lay them on your hardle, and in one quarter of an hour they will be finely candied.

To candie all kind of Floures in wayes of the Spaniſh Candie.

Take double refined Sugar, put it into a poſnet with as much Roſewater as will melt it, and put into it the papp of half a roaſted Apple, and a grain of Musk, then let it boyl till it come to a candie height, then put in your Floures being pick’d, and ſo let it boyle, then caſt them on a fine plate, and cut it in waves 065E5r65 waves with your knife, then you may ſpot it with Gold and keep it.

To make Eſſings.

Take one peck of Oatmeal grots, the greateſt you can get and the whiteſt, pick it clean from the black, and ſearce out all the ſmalleſt, then take as much evening Milk as will cover it and ſomething more, boyle it, and cool it again till it be bloud-warm, then put it to the Oatmeal and let it ſoak all night, the next morning ſtrain it from your Milk as dry as you can through a cloth, then take three pints of good Cream, boyle it with a Mace and the yolkes of eight Eggs, when it is boyled put it into your ſtuffe, then put in ſix Eggs more whites and yolkes, ſeaſon it with a good quantity of Cinnamon, Nutmeg, and Ginger, and a leſſe quantity of Cloves and Mace, put in as much Sugar as you think will ſweeten it, have a good E5 ſtore 066 E5v 66 ſtore of Suet ſhred ſmall, and forget not Salt, ſo boyle them.

To make Sugar Cakes.

Take one pound of fine Flower, one pound of Sugar finely beaten, and mingle them well together, then take ſeven or eight yolkes of Eggs, and if your Flower be good, take one white or two as you ſhall think good, take two Cloves and a pretty piece of Cinnamon, and lay it in a ſpoonfull of Roſewater all night, and heat it almoſt bloudwarm, temper it with the reſt of your ſtuffe, when the paſte is made, make it up with as much haſte as you can, bake them in a ſoft Oven.

To make a Calfes-foot Pie.

Take your Calfes-feet, boyle them, and blanch them, then boyle them again till they be tender, then take out all the bones, ſeaſon it with Cloves, Mace, Ginger, and Cinnamon, as much as you ſhall think good, then put in a good quantity of 067E6r67 orf Currans and Butter, bake your Pie in a ſoft oven, and when it is baked, take half a pint of white Wine Vinegar, beat three yolkes of Eggs, and put to the coales, ſeaſon it with Sugar and a little Roſewater, alwayes ſtirring it, then put it into your Pie, and let it ſtand half a quarter of an hour.

To make a very good Pie.

Take the backs of four white Herrings watred, the bones and skin taken away, then take ſo much Wardens in quantity pared and cored, half a pound of Raiſins of the Sun ſtoned, mince all theſe together, and ſeaſon it with Cinnamon and Ginger, and when the Pie is baked put in a little Roſewater and ſcrape Sugar on it, if you put in Butter, then put in a handfull of grated bread.

To make Simbals.

Take fine Flower dryed, and as much Sugar as Flower, then take as much whites of Eggs as will make 068E6v68 make it a paſte, and put in a little Roſewater, then put in a quantity of Coriander ſeed, and Anniſe ſeed, then mould it up in that faſhion you will bake it in.

To preſerve Angelica roots.

Take the roots and waſh them, then ſlice them very thin, and lay them in water three or four dayes, change the water every day, then put the roots in a pot of water, and ſet them in the embers all night, in the morning put away the water, then take to a pound of roots four pints of water, and two pound of Sugar, let it boyle, and skum it clean, then put in the roots, they will be boyled before the ſirrup, then take them up, and boyle the ſirrup after, they will ask you a whole dayes work, for they muſt boyle very ſoftly, at St. Andrewes time is the beſt time to doe them in all the year.

To boyle a Capon with Brewis.

Take a Capon; and truſſe him to 069E7r69 to boyle, ſet him on the fire in a good quantity of water, skum it very clean, before you ſet on your Capon put a little winter Savory and Thyme into the belly of it, and a little Salt and groſſe Pepper, when you have skummed it clean, cover it cloſe to boyle, then take a hood handfull of Hearbs, as Marigolds, Violet leaves, or any ſuch green Hearbs as you ſhall think fit, waſh them, and ſet them on the fire with ſome of the uppermoſt of the broth that boyles the Capon, then put into it good ſtore of Mace, and boyle it with the Capon, when the hearbs be boyled, and the broth very green, and almoſt conſumed away, take the uppermoſt of your Capon and ſtrain it together, and ſcald your Brewis, and put it into a diſh, and lay the Capon on them.

To make a Spice Cake.

Take one buſhel of Flower, ſix pound of Butter, eight pound of Currans, 070E7v70 Currans, two pints of Cream, a pottle of Milk, half a pint of good Sack, two pound of Sugar, two ounces of Mace, one ounce of Nutmegs, one ounce of Ginger, twelve yolkes, two whites, take the Milk and Cream, and ſtirre it all the time that it boyles, put your Butter into a baſon, and put your hot ſeething Milk to it, and melt all the Butter in it, and when it is bloudwarm temper the Cake, put not your Currans in till you have made the paſte, you muſt have ſome Ale yeſt, and forget not Salt.

To make Broth for a Neats-tongue.

Take Claret Wine, grated Bread, Currans, ſweet Butter, Sugar, Cinnamon, Ginger, boyle them altogether, then take the Neats-tongue, and ſlice it, and lay it in a diſh upon ſippets, and ſo ſerve it.

To ſouce a Carp or Gurnet.

Take fair Water and Vinegar, ſo that it may be ſharp, then take Parſly, 071E8r71 Parsly, Thyme, Fennell, and boyle them in the broth a good while, then put in a good quantity of Salt, and then put in your Fiſh, and when it is well boyled put the broth into a veſſell, and let it ſtand.

To make a fine Pudding

Take Crums of white Bread, and ſo much fine Flower, then take the yolkes of four Eggs, and one white, a good quantity of Sugar, take ſo much good Cream as will temper it as thick as you would make Pancake batter, then butter your pan, and bake it, ſo ſerve it, caſting ſome Sugar upon it, you muſt ſhred ſuet very ſmall, and put into it.

To make a Broth to drink,

Take a Chicken, and a little of the neck of Mutton, and ſet them on, and ſcum it well, then put in a large Mace, and ſo let it boyle while the Chicken be tender, then take theChicken out, and beat it all to pieces 072E8v72 pieces in a ſtone morter, and put it in again, and ſo let it boyle from four pints to a little more than half a pint, then call it through a ſtrainer, and ſeaſon it.

To boyle a Chicken, Partridge, or Pyton.

Take your Chicken, and ſet it a boyling with a little of the neck of Mutton, and ſcum it well, then put in a Mace, and ſo let it boyle down, and when it its almoſt boyled, have ſome few hearbs parboyled, as Lettice, Endive, Spinage, Marigold leaves, for note theſe hearbs are uſually uſed to be boyled, which by courſe will hold their colour in boyling, and put ſome of theſe aforeſaid hearbs to the Chicken and Mutton, if you think your broth ſtrong enough, take out your Mutton, then you may put a little piece of ſweet Butter, and a little Verjuyce, and a very little Sugar, and Salt, ſo ſerve it in with ſippets.

A 073 E9r 73

A Broth to drink.

Take a Chicken and ſet it on, and when it boyles ſcum it, then put in a Mace, and a very little Oatmeal, and ſuch hearbs as the patty requires, and boyle it well down, and bruiſe the Chicken, and put it in again, and it is a pretty broth, and to alter it you may put in half a dozen Prunes, and leave out the hearbs or put them in, ſo when it is well boyled, ſtrain it and ſeaſon it.

A Broth to eat on faſting dayes.

Take fair Water, and ſet it a boyling, and when it boyleth, put to it ſo much ſtrained Oatmeal as you think will thicken it, and a large Mace, a handfull of Raiſins of the sun, as many Prunes, and as many Currans if your quantity require it, ſo boyle it, and when it is boyled, ſeaſon it with Salt and Sugar, and a piece of ſweet Butter if the time will allow it, and for an alteration, when this broth is boyled,ed, 074E9v74 ed, put in a quantity of Cream, and it will doe well.

To make Ponado.

The quantity you will make ſet on in a poſnet of fair water, and when it boyles put a Mace in, and a little piece of Cinnamon, and a handfull of Currans, and ſo much Bread as you think meet, ſo boyle it, and ſeaſon it with Salt and Sugar, and Roſewater, and ſo ſerve it.

To make a Caudle.

Take Ale, the quantity that you mean to make, and ſet it on the fire, and when it is ready to boyle, ſcum it very well, then caſt in a large Mace, and take the yolkes of two Eggs for one meſſe, or one draught, and beat them well, and take away the skin of the yolks, and, then put them into the Ale, when it ſeethes, be ſure to ſtir them well till it ſeeth again for a youngling, then let it boyle a while, and put in your Sugar, and if it be to eat, cut three 075E10r75 three or four coſts of bread thin, and ſofte them dry, but not brown, and put them to the caudle, if to drink, put none.

To make Almond Butter.

Blanch your Almonds, and beat them as fine as you can with fair water two or three houres, then ſtrain them through a linnen cloth, boil them with Roſe-water, whole Mace and Anniſe ſeeds till the ſubſtance be thick, ſpread it upon a fair cloth draining the whey from it, after let it hang in the ſame cloth ſome few houres, then ſtrain it, and ſeaſon it with Roſe-water and Sugar.

To ſtew Beef

Take a good Rump of Beef cut from the bones, ſhred Turnips and Carroots ſmall, and Spinnage and Lettice, put all in a pan, and let it ſtew four houres with ſo much water, and a quart of white Wine, as will cover it, when it is ſtewed enough, then put in a wine glaſſe full of 076 E10v76 of Elder vinegar, and ſerve it in with ſippets.

To Souce a young Pig.

Take a young Pig being ſcalded, boil it in faire water, and white Wine, put thereto Bay leaves, whole Ginger, and Nutmegs quartered, a few whole Cloves, boil it throughly, and leave it in the ſame broth in an earthen pot.

To boil Flounders or Pickrels after the French Faſhioun.

Take a pint of white Wine, the tops of young Thyme and Roſemary, a little whole Mace, a little whole Pepper, ſeaſoned with Verjuice, Salt, and a piece of ſweet Butter, and ſo ſerve it; this broth will ſerve to boil ſith twice or thrice in, or four times.

To make fleſh of Apricocks.

Take Apricocks when they are green, and pare them and ſlice them, and take half their weight in Sugar, put it to them, ſo put them in a skillet, and as much water as you think 077E11r77 think will melt the Sugar, ſo let them boil and keep them ſtirring till they be tender, and ſo take them off, and ſcum them very clean, ſo put them forth of the skillet and let them ſtand, take as much Sugar as you had before, and boil them to a Candie height, and then put in your Apricoks, and ſet them over a ſoft fire, but let them not boil, ſo keep them with oft ſtirring, till the Sirupe begin to jell, then put them in glaſſes, and keep them for your uſe.

To make fleſh of Quinces.

Take Quinces, pare them, and core them, and cut them in halfs, boil them in a thin ſirupe till they be tender, then take them off, and let them lie in ſirrupe, then take Quinces, pare them, and quarter them, take out the cores, put as much water to them as will cover them, then boil them till they be very tender, and then ſtrain out the liquor clean from them, and take unto a pint of that 078E11v78 that liquor a pound of Sugar put as much water to the Sugar as will melt it, then boil it to a Candie height, then ſtir the Quinces that are in the ſirupe as thin as you can: when your ſugar is at a full Candy height, put in a pint of the liquor, then ſet it over a ſoft fire ſtirring it leaſurely till the Sugar be diſſolved, then put in half a pound of your ſlices, keeping it ſtill ſtirring but not to boil, you muſt take the jelly of Quince kernels, that have lain in water two or three hours, take two good ſpoonfuls of it and put it to the fleſh, ſo keep it ſtirring leaſurely till it begin to jelly upon the ſpoon, then put it into thin glaſſes, and keep it in a ſtove.

To preſerve Oranges.

Take a pound of Oranges, and a pound of Sugar, pill the outward rind, and inward white skin off, take juice of Oranges, put them into the juice, boil them half an hour, and take them off.

To 079 E12r 79

To dry Cherries.

Take the faireſt Cherries, ſtone them, take to ſix pound of Cherries a pound of Sugar, put them into a skillet, ſtraining the Sugar amongſt them as you put them in, then put as much water to them as will boil them, then ſet them upon a quick fire, let them boil up, then take them off, and ſtrain them very clean, put them into an earthen pan or pot, let them ſtand in the liquor four daies, then take them up and lay them ſeverally one by one upon ſilver diſhes, or earthen diſhes, ſet them into an oven after the bread being taken out, and ſo ſhift them every day upon dry diſhes, and ſo till they be dry.

To dry Peaches.

Take Peaches and coddle them, take off the skins, ſtone them, take to four pound of Peaches, a pound of Sugar, then take a gallie pot and lay a laier of Peaches, and a laier of Sugar, till all be laid out, then, put 080E12v80 put in half a pint of water, ſo cover them cloſe and ſet them in embers to keep warm, ſo let them ſtand a night and a day, put them in a skillet, and ſet them on the fire to be ſcalding hot, then put them into your pot again, and let them ſtand four and twenty houres, then ſcald them againe, then take them out of your ſirupe, and lay them on filter diſhes to dry, you may dry them in an Oven when the bread is taken out, but to dry them in the Sun is better, you muſt turn them every day into clear Diſhes.

To boil Veal,

Take Veal and cut in thin ſlices, and put it into a Pipkin with as much water as will cover it, then waſh a handful of Currans, and as much Pruins, then take a Court roul, and cut it in long ſlices, like a Butchers skiver, then put in a little Mace, Pepper, and Salt, a piece of Butter, a little Vinegar, ſome crums of Bread, and when it hath ſtewed 081F1r81 ſtewed two hours, take it up and ſerve it.

To boil a Capon in white Broth.

Truſſe a Capon to boil, and put it into a Pipkin of water, and let it boil two hours, and when it is boiled, take up a little of the broth, then take the yolks of Eggs, and beat them very fair with your broth that you take up, then ſet it by the fire to keep warm, ſeaſon it with grated Nutmeg, Sugar and Salt, then take up your Capon, and pour this broth on it with a little Sack, if you have it, garniſh it with ſippets, and ſerve it, remember to boil whole Mace with your Capon, and Marrow, if you have it.

To boil a Capon or Chicken in white Broth with Almonds.

Boil your Capons as in the other, then take Almonds, and blanch them, and beat them very ſmall, putting in ſometimes ſome of your broth to keep them from oyling, when they are beaten ſmall enough Fput 082F1v82 put as much of the uppermoſt broth to them as will ſerve to cover the Capon, then ſtrain it, and wring out the ſubſtance clear, then ſeaſon it as before, and ſerve it with marrow on it.

To boil Brawn.

Water your Brawn four and twenty hours, and waſh and ſcrape it four or five times, then take it out of the water, and lay it on a fair table, then throw a handful of Salt on every coller, then bind them up as faſt as you can, with Hemp, Baſs, or Incle, then put them into your kettle when the water boileth, and when it boileth, ſcum it clean, let it boil untill it be ſo tender that you may thruſt a ſtraw though it, then let it cool untill the next morning, by the ſouced meats you may know how to ſouce it.

To boil a gammon of Bacon.

Water your Gammon of Bacon twenty four hours, then put it into a deep kettle with ſome ſweet hay let 083F2r83 let it boil ſoftly ſix or ſeven hours, then take it up with a ſcummer and a plate, and take off the skin whole, then ſtick your Gammon full of Cloves, ſtrewn on ſome groſſe Pepper, then cut your skin like ſippets, and garniſh your Gammon, and when you ſerve it, ſtick it with Bayes.

To boil a Rabbet.

Fley and waſh a Rabbet, and ſlit the hinder legs on both ſides of the back-bone, from the forward, and truſſe them to the body, ſet the head right up with a skiver, right down in the neck, then put it to boiling with as much water as will cover it, when it boils, ſcum it, ſeaſon it with Mace, Ginger, Salt, and Butter, then take a handful of Parſley, and a little Thyme, boil it by it ſelf, then take a handful of Parſley, and a little Thyme, boil it by it ſelf, then take it up, beat it with a back of a knife, then take your Rabbet, and put it in a diſh, then put your hearbs to your broth, and ſcrape in a Carret root, let your broth boil a F2little 084F2v84 little while, put in ſalt, pour it on your Rabbet and ſerve it.

To boil a Mallard with a Cabbage.

Half roſt your fowl, then take it off, and caſe it down, then put it into a Pipkin with the gravie, then pick and waſh ſome Cabbage, and put to your Mallard with as much fair water as will cover it, then put in a good piece of Butter, and let it boil an hour, ſeaſon it with Pepper and Salt, and ſerve it upon ſops,

To boil a Duck with Turnips.

Half roſt her, then cover it with liquor, boil your Turnip, by themſelves half an hour, then cut them in cakes ; put them to your Duck, with butter and parſley chopt ſmall, and when it hath boiled half an hour ſeaſon it with Pepper and Salt, and ſerve them upon ſops.

To boil Chicken, and Sorrel Sops.

Truſſe your Chickens, and boil them in water and ſalt very tender, then 085F3r85 then take a good handfull of Sorell, and beat it ſtalks and all then ſtrain it, and take a Manchet, and cut it in ſippets and dry them before the fire, then put your green broth upon the coales, ſeaſon it with Sugar, and grated Nutmeg, and let it ſtand untill it be hot, then put your ſippets into a diſh, put your Chickens, upon them, and pour ſauce upon it, and ſerve it.

To boil a Pike in white Broth.

Cut your Pike in three Pieces, and boil it with water and ſalt, and ſweet hearbs, let it boil untill it ſtain, then take the yolks of half a dozen Eggs, and beat them with a little Sack, Sugar, melted Butter, and ſome of the Pikes broth, then put it on the fire to keep warm, but ſtir it often leaſt in curdle, then take up your Pike, and put the head and tail together, then cleave the other pieces in two, take out the back bone, and put the one piece on the one ſide, and the other piece F3on 086F3v86 on the other ſide, but blanch all, then pour on your white broth, garniſh your diſh with ſippets and boiled Parſley, and ſtrew on pouder of Ginger, and wipe the edge of the diſh round, and ſerve it.

To boil divers kinds of Fiſhes.

Bat, Conger, Thornback, Plaice, Salmon, Trout, or Mullet, boil any of theſe with Water, Salt, and ſweet hearbs, when they boil skum it very clean, then put in Vinegar and let it boil till you think it is enough, your liquor muſt be very hot of the Salt, then take it off, you may let it ſtand five or ſix days in the liquor, then if you would keep it longer, pour that liquor away, and put Water and Salt to it, or ſoucing drink, you muſt remember to let your Mullets boil ſoftly, and your Thornback and other fiſh very faſt, you muſt blanch your Thornback while it is warm, and when you ſerve any of theſe fiſhes, ſtrew on ſome green hearbs.

To 087 F4r 87

To make Sallet of all manner of Hearbs.

Take your hearbs and pick them clean, and the floures, waſh them clean, and ſwing them into a diſh, and mingle them with Cowcumbers, and Lemons, ſliced very thin, then ſscrape on Sugar, and put in Vinegar and Oil, then ſpread the floures on the top, garniſh your diſh with hard Eggs, and all ſorts of your floures, ſcrape on Sugar and ſerve it.

To ſtew Steakes between two diſhes.

You muſt put Parſley, Currans, Butter, Verjuyce, and two or three yolks of Eggs, Pepper, Cloves, and Mace, and ſo let them boil together, and ſerve them upon ſops, likewiſe you may do ſteakes of Mutton or Beef.

To ſtew Calves feet.

Boil them and blanch them, cut them in two, and put them into a Pipkin with ſtrong broth, then put F4in 088F4v88 in a little pouder of Saffron, and ſweet Butter, Pepper, Sugar, and ſome ſweet hearbs finely minced, let them ſtew an hour, put in ſalt and ſerve them.

To ſtew a Mallard.

Roſt your Mallard half enough then take it up, and cut it in little pieces, then put it into a diſh with the gravie, and a piece of freſh Butter, and a handful of Parſley chopt ſmall, with two or three Onions, and a Cabbage-lettice, let them ſtew one hour, then ſeaſon it with Pepper and Salt, and a little Verjuyce, then ſerve it.

To ſtew Trouts.

Draw your Trouts, and waſh them, and then put them into a diſh with white Wine and water and a piece of freſh Butter, then take a handfull of Parſley, a little Thyme and a little Savorie, mince theſe ſmall, and put to your Trouts with a little Sugar, let them ſtew half an hour, then mingle the yolks of two 089F5r89 two or three hard Eggs, and ſtrew them on your Trouts with Pepper and Salt, then let them ſtew a quarter of an hour, and ſerve them.

To ſtew Smelts or Flounders.

Put your Smelts or Flounders into a deep diſh with white Wine and Water, a little Roſemary and Thyme, a piece of freſh Butter and ſome large Mace, and ſalt, let them ſtew half an hour, then take a handfull of Parſley, and boil it, then beat it with the back of a knife, then take the yolks of three or four Eggs, and beat them with ſome of your fiſh broth, then diſh up your fiſh upon ſippets, pour on your ſauce, ſcrape on Sugar and ſerve it.

To ſtew a Rabbet.

Half roſt it, then take it off the ſpit, and cut it in little pieces, and put it into a diſh with the gravie, and as much liquor as will cover it, then put in a piece of freſh butter, and ſome pouder of Ginger, ſome Pepper and Salt, two or three PippinsF5pins 090F5v90 pins minced ſmall, let theſe ſtew an hour, then diſh them upon ſippets.

To ſtew a Pullet or Capon.

Half roſt it, then cut it into pieces, and put it into a diſh with the gravie, and put in a little Cloves and Mace, with a few Barberberries or Grapes, put theſe to your Pullet with a pint of Claret, and a piece of Butter, let theſe ſtew an hour, diſh them upon ſippets, and ſerve it.

To ſtew cold Chickens.

Cut them up in pieces, put them into a Pipkin of ſtrong broath, and a piece of Butter, then grate ſome bread, and a Nutmeg, thicken your broth with it, ſeaſon your meat with groſſe Pepper, and Salt, diſh it upon ſippets, and ſerve it.

To make Paſte for a Paſtry or Veniſon.

Take almoſt a peck flower, wet it with two pound of butter, and as much ſuet, then wet your Paſte, put 091F6r91 put in the yolks of eight or ten Eggs, make it reaſonable lithe paſte, then roul it out, and lay on ſuet; Firſt lay a paper under your paſte, then lay on your Veniſon, cloſe it, pinke it, baſte it with butter, and bake it, when you draw it out, baſte it with butter again.

To make Paſte for a Pie to keep long.

Your flower muſt be of Rye, and your liquor nothing but boiling water, make your paſte as ſtiffe as you can, raiſe your Coffin very high, let your bottome and ſides be very thick, and your lid alſo.

To make Paſte for a Cuſtard.

Your liquor muſt be boiling water, make your paſte very ſtiffe, then roul out your paſte, and if you would make a great Tart, then raiſe it, and when you have done, cut out the bottome a little from the ſide, then roul out a thin ſheet of paſte, lay a paper under it, ſtrew flower that it may not ſtick to it, then 092F6v92 then ſet your coffin on it of what faſhion you will, then dry it, and fill it, and bake it.

To make Paſte for buttered Loaves.

Take a pottle of flower, put there to Ginger, and Nutmegs, then wet it with Milk, yolks of Eggs Yeſt, and Salt, then make it up into little loaves, then butter a paper, and put the loaves on it, then bake them, and when they are baked draw them forth, and cut them in cakes, butter them, then ſet them as they were, ſcrape on Sugar and ſerve them.

To make Paſte for Dumplins.

Seaſon your flower with Pepper, Salt, and Yest, let your water be more than warm, then make them up like Manchets, but let them be ſomewhat little,, then put them into your water when it boileth, and let them boil an hour, then butter them.

To 093 F7r 93

To make Puffe paſte.

Take a quart of flower, and a pound and a half of butter, and work the half pound of butter dry into the flower, then put three or four Eggs to it, and as much cold water as will make it lithe paſte, then work it in a piece of a foot long then ſtrew a little flower on the table, and take it by the end, beat it untill it ſtretch long, then put the two ends together, and beat it againe and ſo do five or ſix times, then work it up round, and roul it up broad, then beat your pound of butter with a rouling pin, that it may be lithe, then take little bits of your butter, and ſtick it all over the paſte, then fold up your paſte cloſe, and coaſt it down with your rowling pin, and roul it out again, and ſo do five or ſix times, then uſe it as you will.

To bake a gammen of Bacon.

You muſt firſt boil it two hours, before you ſtuffe it, ſtuffe it with ſweet 094F7v94 ſweet hearbs, and hard Eggs chopt together with Parſley.

To bake fillets of Beef, or clods, in ſtead of red Deer.

Firſt take your Beef, and lard it very thick, then ſeaſon it with Pepper and Salt, Ginger, Cloves and Mace good ſtore, with a great deal more Pepper and Salt than you would do to a piece of Veniſon, then cloſe it, and when it is baked put in ſome Vinegar, Sugar, Cinnamon and Ginger, and ſhake it well, then ſtop the vent hole, and let it ſtand three weeks before you ſpend it.

To bake Calves Feet.

Seaſon them with Pepper, Salt and Currans, when they be baked, take the yolks of three or four Eggs, and beat them with Verjuyce or Vinegar, Sugar and grated Nutmeg, put it into your pie, ſcrape on ſugar and ſerve it.

To bake a Turkie.

Take out his bones and guts, then 095F8r95 then waſh him, then prick his back together againe, then perboil him, ſeaſon him with Pepper and Salt, ſtick ſome Cloves in the breſt of him, then lard him and put him into your Coffin with butter, in this ſort you may bake a Goose, Pheaſant, or Capon.

To bake a Hare.

Take out his bones, and beat the fleſh in a morter with the Liver, then ſeaſon it with all ſorts of ſpices, then work it up with three or four yolks of Eggs, then lay ſome of it all over the bottome of your pie, then lay on ſome Lard, and ſo doe untill you have laid on all, then bake it well with good ſtore of ſweet Butter.

To bake Quinces or Wardens, ſo as the fruit look red, and the cruſt white.

Your Wardens muſt be ſtewed in a Pipkin with Claret Wine, Sugar, Cinnamon, and Cloves, then cover your Pipkin with a ſheet of 096F8v96 of paſte, and let it ſtand in the oven five or ſix hours, then raiſe a Coffin of ſhort paſte, put in your Wardens with ſugar, and put it into the Oven, when it hath ſtood an hour, take it out and waſh it with Roſe-water and Butter, then ſcrape on ſugar, and put it in a quarter of an hour more, and it will be red upon the top, then ſcrape on ſugar and ſerve it.

To bake Chucks of Veal.

Perboil two pound of the lean fleſh of a leg of Veal, ſo it may be eaten, mince it as ſmall as grated bread, with four pound of Beef Suet, then ſeaſon it with Biskay Dates, and Carraways, Roſe-water, Sugar, Raiſins of the Sun and Currans, Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, and Cinnamon, then mingle them all together, fill your pies, and bake them.

To bake a Chicken Pie.

Seaſon your Chicken with Nutmeg,meg, 097F9r97 meg, Salt and Pepper, and Sugar, then put him into your coffin, then take ſome Marrow and ſeaſon with the ſame Spice, then roul it in yolkes of Eggs, and lay it on your Chicken with minced Dates, and good ſtore of Butter, then bake it, and put in a little Sack or Muſcadine, or white Wine and Sugar, then ſhake it, ſcrape on Sugar, and ſerve it.

To bake a Steak Pie.

Cut a neck of Mutton in ſteaks, beat them with a cleaver, ſeaſon them with Pepper, and Salt, and Nutmeg, then lay them on your Coffin with Butter and large Mace, then bake it, then take a good quantity of Parſly, and boyle it, that it as ſoft as the pulp of an Apple, put in a quarter of a pint of Vinegar, and as much white Wine with a little Sugar, warm it well, and pour it over your ſteaks, then ſhake it, that the gravy and the liuqor may mingle together, ſcrape 098F9v98 ſcrape on Sugar, and ſerve it.

To make an Italian Pudding.

Take a manchet, and cut it in ſquare pieces like a Die, then put to it half a pound of Beef ſuet minced ſmall, Raiſins of the Sun the ſtones picked out, Cloves, Mace, minced, Dates, Sugar, Marrow, Roſewater, Eggs, and Cream, mingle all theſe together, and put it into a diſh fit for your ſtuffe, in leſſe than an hour it will be baked, then ſcrape on Sugar, and ſerve it.

To bake a Florentine

Take the kidney of a loin of Veal, or the wing of a Capon, or the leg of a Rabbet, mince any of theſe ſmall with the Kidney of a loin of Mutton, if it be not fat enough, then ſeaſon it with Cloves, Mace, Nutmegs, and Sugar, Cream, Currans, Eggs, and Roſe- water, mingle theſe four together, and put them into a diſh between two ſheets of paſte, then cloſe it and cut the paſte round by the brim 099F10r99 brim of the diſh, then cut round about like Virginall keyes, then turn up one, and let the other lie, then pink it, cake it, ſcrape on Sugar and ſerve it.

To roaſt a Breaſt of Veal.

Take Parſly, and Thyme, waſh them, and chop them ſmall, then take the yolkes of five or ſix Eggs, grated Bread, and Cream, mingle them together with Cloves, Mace, Nutmeg, Currans, and Sugar, then raiſe up the skin of the Breaſt of Veal, and put in your ſtuffe, prick it up cloſe with a skiver, then roaſt it, and baſt it with Butter, when it is roaſted, wring on the juyce of Lemon, and ſerve it.

To roaſt a Hare.

Caſe your Hare, but cut not off her eares, nor her legs, then waſh her, and dry her with a cloth, then make a pudding and put into her belly, then ſow it up cloſe, then truſſe her as if ſhe were running, then ſpit her, then take ſome Claret Wine, 100F10v100 Wine, and grated Bread, Sugar, and Ginger, Barberries, and Butter, boyle theſe together for your ſauce.

To roaſt a Shoulder of Mutton.

Roaſt it with a quick fire, that the fat may drop away and when you think it is half roaſted ſet a diſh under it, and ſlaſh it with a knife acroſſe as you doe Pork, but you muſt cut it down to the bone on both the ſides, till the gravy run into the diſh, baſte it no more after you have cut it, put unto the gravy half a pint of white Wine Vinegar, a handfull of Capers and Olives, five or ſix blades of Mace, and a handfull of Sugar, and ſtew all theſe together, and pour it on your meat.

To roaſt a Neats-tongue.

Boyle him, and blanch him, cut out the meat at the butt end, and mingle it with Beef ſuet as much as an Egg, then ſeaſon it with Nutmeg, and Sugar, Dates, Currans, and 101F11r101 and yolkes of raw Eggs, then put your meat to your Tongue, and bind it with a Caul of Veal or Mutton, then roaſt it, baſte it with Butter, ſave the gravy, and put thereto a little Sack of Muſcadine, let it ſtew a litle while, then pour it on your Tongue, and ſerve it.

To roaſt a Pig with Pudding in his belly.

Fley a fat Pig, truſſe his head looking over his back, then temper as much ſtuffe as you think will fill his belly, then put it into your Pig, and prick it up cloſe, when it is almoſt roaſted wring on the juyce of a Lemon, when you are ready to take it up, take four or five yokes of Eggs, and waſh your Pig all over, mingle your bread with a little Nutmeg and Ginger, then dry it, an take it up as faſt as you can, let your ſauce be Vinegar, Butter, and Sugar, the yolk of a hard Egg minced, and ſerve it hot.

To 102 F11v 102

To roaſt a Leg of Mutton.

Cut holes in a Leg of Mutton with a knife, then thruſt in ſlices of Kidney ſuet, and ſtick it with Cloves, roaſt it with a quick fire, when it is half roaſted cut off a piece underneath, and cut it into thin ſlices, then take a pint of great Oyſters with the liquor, three or four blades of Mace, a little Vinegar and Sugar, ſtew theſe till the liquor be half conſumed, then diſh up your Mutton, pour on the ſauce and ſerve it.

To roaſt a Neck of Mutton.

Cut away the ſwag, and roaſt it with a quick fire, but ſcorch it not, baſte it with Butter a quarter of an hour, after wring on the juyce of half a Lemon, ſave the gravy then baſte it with Butter again wring on the other half of Lemon, when it is roaſted, dry it with Manchet and grated Nutmeg then diſh it, and pour on your ſauce

To 103 F12r 103

To roaſt a Shoulder of Haunch of Veniſon, or a Chino of Mutton.

Take any of the meats and lard them, prick them with Roſemary, baſte them with Butter, then take half a pint of Claret Wine, Cinnamon, Ginger, Sugar, and grated Bread, Roſemary, and Butter, let all boyle together untill it be as thick as Watergruel, then put in a little Roſewater and Musk, it will make your Gallintine taſte very pleaſantly, put it on a ſitting diſh, draw off your meat, and lay it into that diſh, ſtrew it with Salt.

To roaſt a Shoulder or Fillet of Veal

Take Parſly, winter Savory, and Thyme, mince theſe ſmall with hard Eggs, ſeaſon it with Nutmeg, Pepper, Currans, work theſe together with raw yolks of Eggs, then ſtuffe your meat with this, roaſt it with a quick fire, baſte it with Butter, when it is roaſted, take 104F12v104 take the gravy and put thereto Vinegar, Sugar, and Butter, let it boyle, when your meat is roaſted pour this ſauce on it, and ſerve it.

To roaſt a Giggit of Mutton.

Take your Giggit, with Cloves and Roſemary, and lard it, roaſt it, baſte it with Butter, and ſave the gravy, put thereto ſome Claret Wine, with a handfull of Capers, ſeaſon it with Ginger and Sugar when it is boyled well, diſh up your Giggit, and pour on your ſauce.

To fry Chickens.

Boyle your Chickens in Water and Salt, then quarter them into a pan with ſweet Butter, and let them fry leiſurely, then put thereto a little Verjuyce, and Nutmeg, Cinnamon and Ginger, the yolks of two or three raw Eggs, ſtirre theſe well together, and diſh up your Chickens, pour the ſauce upon them.

To 105 G1r 105

To fry Calfes-feet

Boyle them, and blanch them, then cut them in two, then take good ſtore of Parſly, put thereto ſome yolkes of Eggs, ſeaſon it with Nutmeg, Sugar, Pepper, and Salt, and then roul your Calfes-feet in them, and fry them with ſweet Butter, then boyle ſome Parſly and beat it very tender, put to it Vinegar, Butter, and Sugar, heat it hot, then diſh up your Feet upon ſippits, pour on your ſauce, ſcrape on ſome, Sugar, and ſerve it hot.

To fry Tongues

Boyle them, and blanch them, cut them in thin ſlices, ſeaſon them with Nutmeg, Sugar, Cinnamon, and Salt, then put thereto the yolkes of raw Eggs, the core of a Lemon cut in ſquare pieces like a Die, then fry them in ſpoonfuls with ſweet Butter, let your ſauce be white Wine, Sugar, and Butter, heat it hot, and pour it on your Tongues, ſcrape on Sugar and ſerve it.

G To
106 G1v 106

To make Fritters.

Make your Batter with Ale, and Eggs, and Yeſt, ſeaſon it with Milk, Cloves, Mace, Cinnamon, Nutmeg, and Salt, cut your Apples like Beanes, then put your Apples and Butter together, fry them in boyling Lard, ſtrew on Sugar, and ſerve them.

To ſouce Brawn.

Take up your Brawn while it be hot out of your boyler, then cover it with Salt, when it hath ſtood an hour, turn the end that was under upward, then ſtrew on Salt upon that, then boyle your ſoucing drink, and put thereto a good deal of Salt, when it is cold, put in your Brawn with the Salt that is about it, and let it ſtand ten dayes, then change your ſoucing drink, and as you change ſoucing drink put in Salt, when you ſpend it, if it be too faſt, change it in freſh drink.

To ſouce a Pig.

Cut off the head, and cut your Pig 107G2r107 Pig into two ſleikes, and take out the bones, then take a handfull of ſweet Hearbs, and mince them ſmall, then ſeaſon your Pig and Hearbs with Nutmeg, Ginger, Cloves, Mace, and Salt, then ſtrew your Hearbs in the inſide of your Pig, then roul them up like two Collers of Brawn, then bind them in a cloth faſt, then put them a boyling in the boyling pot, put in ſome Vinegar and Salt, when they are boyled very tender, take them off, let them ſtand in the ſame liquor two or three dayes, then put them into ſoucing drink and ſerve it with Muſtard and Sugar.

To ſouce Eeles.

Take two fair Eeles and ſley them, cut them down the back, and take out the bones, and take good ſtoor of Parſly, Thyme, and ſweet Marjoram, mince them ſmall, ſea ſon them with Nutmeg, Ginger, Pepper, and Salt, ſtrew your Hearbs in the inſide of your Eeles G2then 108G2v108 then roul them up like a Coller of Brawn, put them into a cloth, and boyle them tender with Salt and Vinegar, when they are boyled, then take them up, let it be in the pickle two or three dayes, and then ſpend them.

To ſouce a Breaſt of Veal.

Take out the bones of a Breaſt of Veal, and lay it in water ten or twelve houres, then take all manner of ſweet Hearbs and mince them ſmall, then take a Lemon and cut it in thin ſlices, then lay it with your Hearbs in the inſide of your Breaſt of Veal, then roul it up like a Coller, and bind it in a cloth and boyle it very tender, then put it into ſoucing drink and ſpend it.

To ſouce a Tench or Barbell.

First cut them down the back, then waſh them, then put them a flawed-reproductionone-two wordswith no more water then will cover them, when they boyle, throwin ſome Salt and Vinegar, ſcum 109G3r109 ſcum it very clean, when it is boyled enough take it up, and put it into a diſh fit for the Fiſh, then take out the bones, pour on as much liquour as will cover it, with grated Nutmeg, and pouder of Cinnamon, when it is cold ſerve it.

To ſouce a Fillet of Veal.

Take a fair Fillet of Veal, and lard it very thick, but take out the bones, ſeaſon it with Nutmeg, Ginger, Pepper, and Salt, then roul it up hard, let your liquor be the one half white Wine, the other half water, when your liquor boyleth put in your meat, with Salt, and Vinegar, and the peel of a Lemon, then ſcum it very clean, let it boyle untill it be tender, then take it not up untill it be cold, and ſauce it in the ſame liquour.

To marble Beef, Mutton, or Veniſo u.n

Stick any of theſe with Roſemary and Cloves, then roaſt it, being firſt joynted very well, then baſte G3it 110G3v110 it often with Water and Salt, and when it is throughly roaſted, take it up and let it cool, then take Claret Wine, and Vinegar, and as much Water, boyle it with Roſemary, Bayes, good ſtore of Pepper, Cloves, Salt, when it hath boyled an hour take it off, and let it cool, then put your meat into a Veſſell, and cover it with this liquor and Hearbs, then ſtop it up cloſe, the cloſer you ſtop it, the longer it will keep.

To marble Fiſh.

Take Flounders, Trouts, Smelts, or Salmons, Mullets, Makrels, or any kind of ſhell Fiſh, waſh them, and dry them with a cloth, then fry them with Sallade Oyle, or clarified Butter, fry them very criſpe, then make your pickle with Claret Wine, and fair Water, ſome Roſemary, and Thyme, with Nutmegs cut in ſlices, and Pepper, and Salt, when it hath boyled half an hour take it off, and let it cool, then put your 111G4r111 your Fiſh into a veſſell, cover it with liquor and Spice, and ſtop it cloſe.

To make a Tart of Wardens.

You muſt firſt bake your Wardens in a pot, then cut them in quarters and core them, then put them into your Tart, with Sugar, Cinnamon, and Ginger, then cloſe up your Tart, and when it is almoſt baked doe it as your Warden Pie, ſcrape on Sugar and ſerve it.

To make a Tart of green Peaſe.

Take green Peaſe and ſeeth them tender, then pour them out into a Cullender, ſeaſon them with Saffron, Salt, and ſweet Butter, and Sugar, then cloſe it, then bake it almoſt an hour, then draw it forth and ice it, put in a little Verjuyce, and ſhake it well, then ſcrape on Sugar, and ſerve it.

To make a Tart of Rice.

Boyle your Rice, and pour it into a Cullender, then ſeaſon it with Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Ginger,G4ger 112G4v112 ger, and Pepper, and Sugar, the yolkes of three or four Eggs, then put it into your Tart with the juyce of an Orange, then cloſe it, bake it, and ice it, ſcrape on Sugar, and ſerve it.

To make a Tart of Medlers.

Take Medlers that are rotten, then ſcrape them, then ſet them upon a Chafingdiſh of coales, ſeaſon them with the yolkes of Eggs, Sugar, Cinnamon, and Ginger, let it boyle well, and lay it on paſte, ſcrape on Sugar, and ſerve it.

To make a Tart of Cherries.

Take out the ſtones, and lay the Cherries into your Tart, with Sugar, Ginger, and Cinnamon, then cloſe your Tart, bake it, and ice it, then make a ſirrup of Muskadine and Damask-water, and pour this into your Tart, ſcrape on Sugar, and ſerve it.

To make a Tart of Strawberries.

Waſh your Strawberries, and put them into your Tart, ſeaſon them 113G5r113 them with Sugar, Cinnamon, Ginger, and a little red Wine, then cloſe it, and bake it half an hour, ice it, ſcrape on ſugar, and ſerve it.

To make a Tart of Hips.

Take Hips, and cut them, and take out the ſeeds very clean, then waſh them, ſeaſon them with Sugar, Cinnamon, and Ginger, then cloſe your Tart, bake it, ice it, ſcrape on Sugar, and ſerve it.

To make a Pippin Tart.

Take fair Pippins and pare them, then cut them in quarters and core them, then ſtew them with Claret Wine, Cinnamon, and Ginger, let them ſtew half an hour, then pour them out into a Cullender, but break them not, when they are cold, lay them one by one into the Tart, then lay on Sugar, bake it, ice it, ſcrape on ſugar, and ſerve it.

G5 To 114 G5v 114

To ſcald Milk after the Weſtern faſhion.

When you bring your Milk from the Cow ſtrain it into an earthen pan, and let it ſtand two houres, then ſet it over the fire untill it begin to heave in the middle, then take it off, but jog it as little as you can, then put it in a room where it may cool, and no duſt fall into it, this Milk or Cream you may keep two or three dayes.

To make a Junket.

Take Ewes or Goats Milk, if you have neither of theſe then take Cowes Milk, and put it over the fire to warm, then put in a little Runnet to it, then pour it out into a diſh, and let it cool, then ſtrew on Cinnamon and Sugar, then take ſome of your aforeſaid Cream and lay on it, ſcrape on Sugar, and ſerve it.

To make Bonny Clutter.

Take Milk, and put it into a clean earthen pot, and put thereto Run- 115G6r115 Runnet, let it ſtand two dayes, it will be all in a curd, then ſeaſon it with ſome Sugar, Cinnamon, and Cream, then ſerve it, this is beſt Iin the hotteſt of the ſummer.

To make a Whitepot.

Take a quart of Cream, and put it over the fire to boyle, ſeaſon it with Sugar, Nutmeg, and Cinnamon, Sack, and Roſe-water, the yolkes of ſeven or eight Eggs, beat your Eggs with Sack and Roſe- water, then put it into your Cream, ſtirre it that it curdle not, then pare two or three Pippins, core and quarter them, and boyle them with a handfull of Raiſins of the Sun, boyle them tender, and pour them into a Cullender, then cut ſome ſippets very thin, and lay ſome of them in the bottome of the diſh, and lay on half your Apples and Currans, then pour in half your Milk, then lay on more ſippits, and the reſt of your Apples and Raiſins, then pour on the reſt of your 116G6v116 your Milk, bake it, ſcrape on Sugar, and ſerve it.

To make a Pudding in haſte.

Take a pint of Milk, and put thereto a handfull of Raiſins of the Sun, and as much Currans, and a piece of Butter, then grate a Manchet, and a Nutmeg alſo, and put thereto a little Flower, when your Milk boyleth put in your bread, let it boyle a quarter of an hour, and put in a piece of Butter in the boyling of it, and ſtirre it alwayes, then diſh it up, pour on Butter, and ſerve it.

To make a Pudding in a diſh.

Take a quart of Cream, put thereto a pound of Beef ſuet minced ſmall, put it to your Milk, ſeason it with Nutmeg, Sugar, and Roſewater, and Cinnamon, then take ſome ſeven or eight Eggs, and beat them very well, then take a coſt of Manchets, and grate them, and put unto it, then mingle theſe together well, then put it into a diſh, 117G7r117 diſh, and bake it, when it is baked, ſcrape on ſugar, and ſerve it.

To boyle Cream.

Take a quart of Cream, and ſet it a boyling with Mace, whileſt your cream is boyling, cut ſome thin ſippets, then take ſeven or eight yolks of Eggs, beat them with Roſewater, and Sugar, and a little of your cream, when your cream boyleth, take it off the fire, and put in your Eggs, and ſtirre it very faſt that it curdle not, then put your ſippets into the diſh, pour in your cream and let it coole when it is cold, ſcrape on Sugar, and ſerve it.

To draw Butter.

Take your Butter and cut it into thin ſlices, put it into a diſh, then put it upon the coals where it may melt leiſurely, ſtir it often, and when it is melted put in two or three ſpoonfuls of Water, or Vinegar, which you will, then ſtir and beat it until it be thick.

Lady 118 G7v 118

Lady of Arundels Manchet.

Take a buſhel of fine Wheat flower, twenty Eggs, three pound of freſh Butter, then take as much Salt and Barme as to the ordinary Manchet, temper it together with new Milk pretty hot, then let it lie the ſpace of half an hour to riſe, ſo you may work it up into bread and bake it, let not your Oven be too hot.

To boyle Pigeons.

Boyle them in water and ſalt, take a handfull of Parſly, as much Thyme ſtript, two ſpoonfuls of Capers minced altogether, and boyle it in a pint of the ſame liquour a quarter of an hour, then put in two or three ſpoonfuls of Verjuyce, two Eggs beaten, let it boyle a little, and put too a little Butter, when you have taken it off the fire, ſtir this altogether, and pour it upon the Pigeons, with ſippets round the diſh.

A 119 G8r 119

A Florendine of Sweet-breads or Kidnies.

Parboyle three or four Kidnies, and mince them ſmall, ſeaſon them with Nutmeg, one ſtick of Cinnamon, beat as much Sugar as will ſweeten it, and a penny loaf grated, and the Marrow of three bones in good pieces, and a quarter of a pound of Almond paſte, a glaſſe of Mallego Sack, two ſpoonfuls of Roſewater, a grain of Musk, and one grain of Ambergriece, and a quarter of a pint of Cream, three or four Eggs, and mix it altogether, and make it up in puffe paſte, and bake it three quarters of an hour.

A Pork Pie.

Boyle your leg of Pork, ſeaſon it with Nutmeg, and Pepper, and Salt, bake it five houres in a high round Pie.

A Chicken Pie.

Scald and ſeaſon your Chickens with Nutmegs, as much Sugar as 120G8v120 as Cinnamon, Pepper, and Salt, then put them into your Pie, then put three quarters of quartered Lettice, and fix Dates quartered and a handfull of Goosberries, and half a ſliced Lemon, and three or four branches of Barberries, and a little Butter, you may uſe to four Chickens three Marrow bones rould in yolkes of Eggs, and Ringo roots, and ſome preſerved Lettice; make a caudle and put in when the Pie comes out of the oven, an hour and a half is enough to ſtand in the oven.

A Lamb Pie.

Take the ſame Ingredients you did for the Chicken pie, onely leave out the Marrow, the Ringo roots, and the preſerved Lettice, make your caudle of white Wine, Verjuyce, and Butter, put it in when your Pie comes out of the oven.

Sauce for a Shoulder of Mutton

Take a ſpoonfull of Hearbs, and as many Capers, half a pint of white Wine, 121G9r121 Wine, half a Nutmeg, and two Eggs, when it is boyled put a piece of butter to the gravy, when it is boyled, take it off, and put the butter in.

A Lumber Pie.

Take three or four ſweet-breads of Veal, parboyle and mince them very ſmall, then take the curd of a quart of Milk, turned with three Eggs, and a half a pound of Almond paſte, and a penny loaf grated, mingle theſe together, then take a ſpoonfull of ſweet Hearbs minced very ſmall, alſo ſix ounces of Oringado and mince it, then ſeaſon all this with a quartern of Sugar, and three Nutmegs, then take five Dates, and a quarter of a pint of cream, four yolks of Eggs, three ſpoonfuls of Roſewater, three or four Marrow bones, mingle all this together, except the Marrow, then make it up in long boles about the bigneſſe of an Egg, and in every bole put a good piece of Marrow, put theſe into 122G9v122 into the Pie, then put a quarter of a pound of butter, and half a ſliced Lemon, then make a caudle of white Wine, Sugar, and Verjuyce, put it in when you take your Pie out of the Oven, you may uſe a grain of Musk and Ambergriece.

An Oyſter Pie.

Seaſon your Oyſters with Nutmegs, Pepper, and Salt, and ſweet Hearbs, your Oyſters being firſt thrown into ſcalding water and parboyled, ſeaſon them, and put them into the Pie, put two or three blades of Mace, and half a ſliced Lemon, and the marrow of two bones rouled in the yolkes of Eggs, and ſome butter, then let your Pie ſtand almoſt an hour in the Oven, then make a caudle of verjuyce, butter, and ſugar, put it into your Pie when you take it out of the oven; you may uſe two Nutmegs to one quart of Oyſters, and as much Pepper as the quantity of three Nutmegs, but leſſe ſalt, and 123G10r123 and one ſpoonfull of ſweet Hearbs.

A Hartechoak Pie.

Take the bottomes of boyled Hartechoaks, and quarter them, and take the meat from the leaves, ſeaſon it with half an ounce of Cinnamon, and half an ounce of beaten Nutmegs, and two ounces of Sugar, and put them into your Pie, and boild marrow rould in yolkes of Eggs, and ſix blades of large Mace, Lemon ſliced, ſix quartered Dates, and a quarter of a pound of Ringo roots, half a pound of freſh butter, then let it ſtand in the Oven one hour, and when you take it out put a caudle into your pie, made of white Wine, Sugar, and Verjuyce.

A Calfes-foot Pie.

Mince your calves-feet very ſmall, then ſeaſon them with two Nutmegs, and three quarters of an ounce of Cinnamon, one quarter of a pound of Sugar, half a pound of Currans, two Lemon peels minced, ten 124G10v124 ten Dates minced, three ſpoonfuls of Roſewater, and half a pound of freſh butter, bake it an hour, and put a caudle into it, made of white Wine, Sugar, and Verjuyce.

A Skerret Pie.

Take a quarter of a peck of Skerrets blanched, and ſliced, ſeaſon them with three Nurtmegs, and an ounce of Cinnamon, and three ounces of Sugar, and ten quartered Dates, and the marrow of three bones rouled in yolkes of Eggs, and one quarter of a pound of Ringo roots, and preſerved Lettice, a ſliced Lemon, four blades of preſerved Barberries, and a half a pound of Butter, then let it ſtand one hour in the oven, then put a caudle made of white Wine, Verjuyce, Butter, and Sugar, put it into the pie when it comes out of the oven.

A Calfes Head Pie for Supper

Boyle your Calfes-head almoſt enough cut it in thin ſlices all from the 125G11r125 the bone, ſeaſon it with three beaten Nutmegs, a quarter of an ounce of Pepper, and as much Salt as there is ſeaſoning, then take a ſpoonfull of ſweet Hearbs minced ſmall, and two ſpoonfuls of Sugar, and two of three Hartechoak bottomes boyled, and cut them in thin ſlices, and the Marrow of two bones rouled in yolkes of Eggs, a quarter of a pound of Ringo roots, and a quarter of a pound of Currans, then put it into your pie, and put a quarter of a pound of Currans, then put it into your pie, and put a quarter of a pound of butter, and a ſliced Lemon, three or four blades of Mace, three or four quartered Dates, let it ſtand an hour or more in the oven, then when you take it out, put into it a caudle, made of Sugar, white Wine, Verjuyce, and Butter.

A Lark Pie.

Take three dozen of Larks, ſeaſon them with four Nutmegs, and half an ounce of Pepper, a quarter of an ounce of Mace beaten, then take 126G11v126 take the Lumber pie meat, and fill their bellies if you will, if not, take half a pound of Salt, and one pound of Mutton minced, half a pound of Raiſins of the Sun, and ſix Apples minced altogether very ſmall, then ſeaſon it with a Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt, and one ſpoonfull of ſweet Hearbs, and a Lemon peel minced, one penny leaf grated, a quarter of a pint of Cream, two or three ſpoonfuls of Roſewater, three ſpoonfuls of Verjuyce, then make this in boles, and put it into their bellies, and put your Larks in your pie, then put your marrow rouled in yolkes of Eggs upon the Larks, and large mace, and ſliced Lemon, and freſh Butter, let it ſtand in the oven an hour, when you take it out, make your caudle of Butter, Sugar, and white Wine Vinegar, put them into the pie.

A 127 G12r 127

A hot Neats tongue for Supper.

Boil your tongue till it be tender, blanch it, and cut it in thin pieces ſeaſon it with a Nutmeg, and a quarter of an ounce of Pepper, and as much Salt as ſeaſoning, then take ſix ounces of Currans, ſeaſon all together, and put it into the pie, then put a Lemon ſliced and Dates, and butter, then bake it, and let it ſtand one hour and a half, then make a Caudle of white wine, and verjuice, ſugar, and eggs, and put it in when you take it out of the Oven.

A cold Neats-tongue Pie.

Your tongue being boild, blanched, and larded with Pork or Bacon, ſeaſon it with the ſame ingredients the Deer hath, that is three Nutmegs, three races of Ginger, half an ounce of Cloves and Mace together, and half an ounce of pepper, heat your ſpices altogether, more ſalt than ſeaſoning, and likewiſe lay in 128G12v128 in the liquor, bake it two hours, but put one pound of butter in your pie before you lid it.

A Potato Pie for Supper.

Take three pound of boyled and blanched Potatoes, and three Nutmegs, and half an ounce of Cinnamon beaten together, and three ouunces of Sugar, ſeaſon your Potatoes, and put them in your pie, then take the marrow of three bones, rouled in yolks of Eggs, and ſliced Lemon, and large Mace and half a pound of butter, ſix Dates quartered, put this into your pie, and let it ſtand an hour in the Oven, then make a ſharp Caudle of Butter, Sugar, Verjuice, and white Wine, put it in when you take your pie out of the oven.

Pigeon or Rabbet Pie.

Take one ounce of Pepper and more Salt, then ſeaſon your Pigeons or Rabbets, and take two Nutmegs grated with your ſeaſoning, then lay your Rabbet in the Pie, and one pound 129H1r129 pound of butter, if you heat the pie hot, then put in two or three ſlices of Lemon, and two or three blacks of Mace, and as many branches of Barberies, and a good piece of freſh butter melted, then take it, and let it ſtand an hour and half, but put not in the freſh butter till it comes out of the oven.

To make a puffe- paste.

Break two Eggs in three pints of flower, make it with cold water, then roul it out pretty thick and ſquare, then take ſo much Butter as paſte, and lay it in rank, and divide your butter in five pieces, that you may lay it on at five ſeverall times, roul your paſte very broad, and take one part of the ſame Butter in little pieces all over your paſte then throw a handful of flower ſlightly on, then fold up your paſte and beat it with a rouling pin, ſo roul it out againe, thus do five times and make it up.

H A Pud- 130 H1v 130

A Pudding

Take a quart of Cream, and two Eggs, beat them, and ſtrain them thereinto the Cream, and grate in a Nutmeg and half, take ſix ſpoonfuls of flower, beat half a pound of Almonds with ſome cream, and put it into the cream, and mix this together, boil your pudding an hour and no more, firſt flower the bag you put it in, then melt freſh butter and take Sugar and Roſe-water, beat it thick, and pour it on the pudding, you may put to a little Milk, and ſtick blanched Almonds, and Wafers in it; add to the ſame pudding, if you will, a pennie loaf grated, a quartern of Sugar, two Marrow bones, one glaſſe of Mallago Sack, ſix dates minced, a grain of Amber-greice, a grain of Musk, two or three ſpoonfuls of Roſe-water, bake this pudding in little wood diſhes, but firſt butter them, your Marrow muſt be ſtuck to and again, then bake it half an hour, five or ſeven 131H2r131 ſeven at a time, and ſo ſet them in order in the diſh, and garniſh them with a ſprig in the middle, and wafers about it, ſtrew Sugar about the branch, and ſliced Lemon, ſet four round, and one in the top.

Frigaſie of Veal.

Cut your meat in thin ſlices, beat it well with a rouling pin, ſeaſon it with Nutmeg, Lemon and Thyme, fry it ſlightly in the pan, beat two eggs, and one ſpoonful of Verjuice, and put it into the pan, and ſtir it together and diſh it.

Frigaſie of Lamb.

Cut your Lamb in thin ſlices, ſeaſon it with Nutmeg, Pepper, and ſalt, mince ſome Thyme, and Lemon, and throw it upon your meat, then frie it ſlightly in a pan, then throw in two Eggs beaten in Verjuyce and Sugar into the pan alſo a handful of Goosberries, ſhake it together and diſh it.

Frigaſie of Chickens.

Kill your Chickens, pull skin H2and 132H2v132 and feathers off together, cut them in thin ſlices, ſeaſon them with Thyme ; Lemon minced, Nutmeg and Salt, and a handful of Sorrel minced, and then fry it well with ſix ſpoonfuls of water, and ſome freſh butter, when its tender, take three ſpoonfuls of Verjuice, one ſpoonful of Sugar, beat it together, ſo diſh it with ſippets about.

Another Frigaſie of Chickens.

Take the former ingredience, and adde to it boiled Hartechoak bottomes, with the meat of the leaves, and a handful of ſcalded Goosberies, and boiled Skerrets and Lettice toſ’d in Butter when they are boiled, add two ſpoonfuls of ſugar, two Eggs and Verjuice beaten together, and lay your Lettuce upon your Chickens, as before, and ſliced Lemon upon it, and ſippets upon the diſh.

A Frigaſie of Rabbets.

Cut your Rabbets in ſmall pieces and mince a handful of Thyme and 133H3r133 and Parſley together, and a Nutmeg, Pepper and ſalt, ſeaſon your Rabbets, then take two Eggs, and verjuice beaten together, and throw it in the pan, ſlick it, and diſh it up in ſippets.

To harſh a ſhoulder of Mutton.

Half roaſt your Muttton at a quick fire, cut it in thin ſlices, ſtew it with Gravie, ſweet Majoram, and Capers, and Onyons, three Anchovies, two Oyſters, half a Nutmeg, half a ſliced Lemon, ſtir this altogether with the meat let it flow till it be tender in a diſh, then break 3 or 4 yolks of Eggs, and throw it in the diſh with ſome butter, toſs it well together, and diſh it with ſippets.

To make a Cake.

Take half a peck of flower, two pound and a half of Currans, three or four Nutmegs, one pound of Almond paſte, two pound of Butter, and one pint of Cream, three ſpoonfuls of Roſe-water, three quarters of a pound of Sugar, half H3a pint 134H3v134 a pint of Sack, a quarter of a pint of Yeſt, and ſix Eggs, ſo make it, and bake it.

To make a Leg of Mutton three or four diſhes.

Take a Leg of Mutton, cut out the fleſh and the bone, but ſave the skin whole, divide the meat in three pieces, and take the tendereſt, and cut it in thin ſlices, and beat it with a rouling pin, ſeaſon it with Nutmeg, Pepper and ſalt, and mince Thyme and Lemon pill, fry it till it be tender, then beat two Eggs with a ſpoonful of Verjuice, throw two Anchoveis into the pan, ſhake it altogether, and put it into the diſh with ſuppets round the diſh, being dreſt with Barberries ſcalded, Parſly and hard Eggs minced.

Another part of the ſame meat ſtew in a diſh, with a little white Wine, a little Butter, and ſliced Lemon, one Anchovy, two Oyſters, two blades of Mace, a little Thyme in a branch, and one whole Onion, take 135H4r135 take out the Thyme and the Onion, when it is ſtewed, doe it altogether on a chafingdiſh of coales till it be tender, then diſh it, garniſh your diſh with hard Eggs, and Barberries, and ſliced Lemon, and ſippets round the diſh.

Take another part of the ſame meat, mince it ſmall with Beef ſuet, and a handfull of Sage, to three quarters of a pound of ſuet adde one pound of meat, you may uſe a ſpoonfull of Pepper and Salt, mix this altogether, and ſtuffe the skin of the Leg of Mutton, hard skiver it cloſe, and ſpit it at a quick fire, and well roaſt it in an hour.

Take another part of the ſame meat, then put in the Pepper and Salt, with a grated Nutmeg, ſome ſweet Hearbs, and a Lemon peel minced, a penny loaf grated, one ſpoonfull of Sugar, a quarter of a pound of Raiſins, and a quartern of Currans, mince altogether with the meat, and the ſuet, and the reſt H4of 136H4v136 of the ingredients, put to two ſpoonfuls of Roſewater, and as much salt as ſpice, then make it up in little long boles or roules, and butter your diſh, and lay them in with a round bole in the middeſt, ſet them in an oven half an hour, then pour out the liquour which will be in the diſh, and melt a little Butter, Verjuyce, and Sugar, and pour upon it, garniſh your diſh ſtick in every long roule a floure of paſte, and a branch in the middle.

To ſouce an Eele.

Scoure your Eel with a handfull of Salt, ſplit it down the back, take out the chine bone, ſeaſon the Eele with Nutmeg, Pepper, and Salt, and ſweet Hearbs minced, then lay a packthread at each end, and the middle roul up like a Coller of Brawn, then boyle it in Water, and Salt, and Vinegar, and a blade or two of Mace, and half a ſliced Lemon, boil it half an hour, keep it in the 137H5r137 the ſame liquor two or three daies, then cut it out in round pieces, and lay ſix or ſeven in a diſh, with parfly and barberries, and ſerve it with Vinegar in ſaucers.

To ſouce a Calfes head.

Boil your Calfes head in Water and Salt ſo much as will cover it, then put in half a pint of Vinegar, a branch of ſweet Hearbs, a ſliced Lemon, and half a pint of white Wine, two or three blades of Mace. and one ounce or two of Ginger ſliced, boil it altogether till it be tender, keep it in the liquor two or three daies, ſerve it, the diſh upright, and ſtick a branch in the mouth, and in both the eyes, garniſh the diſh with Jelly or pickled Cowcumbers with ſaucers of Vinegar, and Jelly, and Lemon minced

A ſtewed Rabbet.

Cut your Rabbet in pieces, and ſeaſon it with Pepper, and Salt, Thyme, Parſly winter Saveury, and ſweet Majoram, three Apples, and three 138H5v138 three Onions minced altogether, ſtew it till it be tender with vinegar and water, put a good piece of butter in, ſtir it together in your Diſh, put ſippets in the bottom, then ſerve it up with the head in the middle of the Diſh with ſippets in the mouth.

Lay your Pig in the ſame Ingredients you did for your Calfes head. uUse the ſame for a Capon, and the ſame for a Leg of Mutton.

To boil Chickens

Boyl your Chickens in Water, and Salt, and Wine Vinegar, a blade of Mace, a good handfull of Endive, and as much Succory, two handfulls of Skerrets boyled and blanched, when the Chickens and theſe things are ſtewed, take a pint of liquor up, and put to a quarter of white Wine, and one ounce and half of Sugar, and three Eggs to thicken it, a piece of butter, and lay them in the diſh, and pour it on.

To 139 H6r 139

To boil a Rabbet.

Boil them in Water and Salt, mince Thyme and Parſly together, a handfull of each, but with ſome of the ſame liquor, then take three or four ſpoonfuls of Verjuice, a piece of Iriſh butter, two or three Eggs, ſtir the Eggs together in the liquor, ſet it upon the fire till it be thick, then pour it upon the Rabbet, ſo ſerve it in.

To boil a Duck.

Half roaſt your Duck with a quick fire, take as much Wine and Water as will cover them, take ſome Thyme and Parſly, and one handful of ſweet Majoram, two blades of Mace, half a Lemon ſliced, ſtew theſe together half an hour without Onions, take ſome of your liquor and thicken it with three or four Eggs, two or three ſpoonfuls of Verjuice, a piece of Butter, and as much Sugar as will lye upon it, diſh your Duck, and boil three or four ſlices of Lemon by 140H6v140 by it ſelf, and hard Eggs minced, put this upon your Duck, then pour your liquor upon it with Barberries, ſo you may boil Pigeons with the ſame Ingredients, or Plover, or Teale.

A roaſted ſhoulder of Muttoun.

When it is roaſted, ſlath it, and carbonado it, take two ſpoonfuls of Capers, and a little Thyme, and Lemon minced, half a Nutmeg, two Anchovies, a quarter of a peck of Oyſters, mixed altogether, boil them one hour in ſtrong broth and white wirne, then pour it upon the meat, with hard Eggs minced, and ſippets round the diſh, throw firſt Salt on the meat, then the hard Eggs, and ſliced Lemon, and Barberries.

Finis.